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Skylab (McDonnell-Douglas) Collection

Creator:
McDonnell Douglas Corp. McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Co.  Search this
Names:
McDonnell Douglas Corp. McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Co.  Search this
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Skylab Program  Search this
Extent:
1.53 Cubic feet ((1 records center box) (1 flatbox))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Drawings
Reports
Date:
1970-1974
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of McDonnell-Douglas Astronautics Co. documents relating to the construction of NASA's Skylab Orbital Workshop in 1970-1972. It contains still photographs covering the construction of the vehicle and its transportation to Kennedy Space Center, Florida, which were submitted to NASA every month during the project. Also included are daily status reports during the operating life of Skylab (29 May 1973 - 8 February 1974), as well as engineering drawings of the vehicle prepared by McDonnell-Douglas for the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum.
Biographical / Historical:
Skylab was a manned space station launched into Earth orbit by the United States in May 1973. It was made from the third stage of a Saturn V launch vehicle. A crew of three astronauts occupied Skylab during each of three missions. The longest mission, which ended in February 1974, lasted almost three months. The Skylab missions obtained vast amounts of scientific data, and they demonstrated to the American public that people could live and work productively in space for months at a time. The Orbital workshop (OWS) was a modified Saturn 4B stage that served as crew quarters. It could hold provisions for a three-man crew for up to 84 days each. Skylab crews lived and did most of their scientific research in the workshop.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
No donor information, Gift, unknown, XXXX-0090, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Manned space flight  Search this
Space vehicles  Search this
Skylab Orbital Workshop  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Drawings
Reports
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0090
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0090

Skylab 4 Pilot's Flight Data File (William R. Pogue Collection)

Creator:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Names:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Skylab Program  Search this
Carr, Gerald Paul, 1932-  Search this
Gibson, Edward George, 1936-  Search this
Pogue, William Reid, 1930-  Search this
Extent:
9.81 Cubic feet ((9 records center boxes))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Maps
Motion pictures (visual works)
Charts
Manuals
Photographs
Date:
1966-1974
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists primarily of the Flight Data File issued to Spacecraft Pilot William R. Pogue (1930- ) for training during the three months prior to launch. The material consists of crew manuals, checklists, and other procedural documentation, including both Skylab 4 'mission only' as well as general 'all missions' manuals. The collection also includes Pogue's 'cue cards', including daily in-flight work schedules, menu cards, and so on. As Pogue was also a backup crewman for the Apollo lunar missions, the collection also includes material relating to Apollo Lunar Excursion Module operations.
Biographical / Historical:
Skylab 4, the third manned Skylab mission (Skylab 1 was the launch of the unmanned vehicle itself), was launched by NASA on 16 November 1973. During their record-setting 84 days in space, the three-man crew, consisting of astronauts Gerald Carr, Edward Gibson, and William Pogue, conducted a variety of experiments and observations, including material handling, medical, and student-designed experiments. Upon their return to earth on 8 February 1974, Skylab 4 became, and still remains, the longest duration US manned space flight.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
NASA, Transfer, 1974, XXXX-0145, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Space vehicles  Search this
Manned space flight  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Skylab Orbital Workshop  Search this
Genre/Form:
Maps
Motion pictures (visual works)
Charts
Manuals
Photographs
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0145
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0145

Skylab 4 Commander's Flight Data File (Gerald Carr Collection

Creator:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Names:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Skylab Program  Search this
Carr, Gerald Paul, 1932-  Search this
Gibson, Edward George, 1936-  Search this
Pogue, William Reid, 1930-  Search this
Extent:
4.36 Cubic feet ((4 records center boxes))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Manuals
Date:
1973
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of the Flight Data File issued to Mission Commander Gerald P. Carr (1933 - ) for training during the three months prior to launch. The material consists of crew manuals, checklists, and other procedural documentation, including both Skylab 4 'mission only' as well as general 'all missions' manuals. The collection also includes Carr's 'cue cards', including the daily in-flight work schedules, menu cards (for all three manned flights), and so on.
Biographical / Historical:
Skylab 4, the third manned Skylab mission (Skylab 1 was the launch of the unmanned vehicle itself), was launched by NASA on 16 November 1973. During their record-setting 84 days in space, the three-man crew, consisting of astronauts Gerald Carr, Edward Gibson, and William Pogue, conducted a variety of experiments and observations, including material-handling, medical, and student-designed experiments. Upon their return to earth on 8 February 1974, Skylab 4 became, and still remains, the longest duration US manned space flight.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
NASA, Transfer, 1974, XXXX-0089, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Space vehicles  Search this
Manned space flight  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Skylab Orbital Workshop  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuals
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0089
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0089

Skylab Interior Design Concept Photography

Creator:
Douglas Aircraft Company  Search this
Extent:
0.49 Cubic Feet ((1 box))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographic prints
Color slides
DVDs
Date:
1960s
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of 11 color slides, 23 color prints, and two DVDs, one containing scans of the drawings and one containing a PowerPoint presentation, all relating to early interior design concepts of the Skylab main interior. There is also one brochure, "Skylab," produced by the McDonnell Douglas Corporation.
Biographical / Historical:
Skylab was a manned space station launched into Earth orbit by the United States in May 1973. It was made from the third stage of a Saturn V launch vehicle. A crew of three astronauts occupied Skylab during each of three missions. The Skylab missions obtained vast amounts of scientific data, and they demonstrated to the American public that people could live and work productively in space for months at a time.
Provenance:
Donald A. Gerds, Gift, 2013
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
Manned space flight  Search this
Space vehicles  Search this
Skylab Orbital Workshop  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Color slides
DVDs
Citation:
Skylab Interior Design Concept Photography, Accession 2014-0001, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2014.0001
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2014-0001

Manned Space Laboratory Proposal Papers

Creator:
Hanson, Carl M.  Search this
Extent:
0.72 Cubic Feet ((2 boxes))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Sketches
Slides (photographs)
Transparencies
Photographs
Reports
Date:
bulk 1962-1967
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of slides, transparencies, photographs, sketches, and documents donated by Carl Hanson documenting his proposal to transform the Saturn V stage into a manned space laboratory. Included here are patent applications and correspondence for the Space Vehicle Centrifuge; NASA Technical Note D-1504, "A Report on the Research and Technological Problems of Manned Rotating Spacecraft" August 1962; two copies of the ASME publication, "Utilization of Expended Booster Stages for Manned Space Laboratories;" March 7, 1963 press release; four reports from the Missile and Space Systems Division of the Douglas Aircraft Company, Inc.; four sketches; 28 photographs; and 63 slides used for his presentation.
Biographical / Historical:
In 1962 and 1963, Carl Mellren Hanson, an employee of Douglas Aircraft Company, Inc. traveled the country promoting his idea to transform the Saturn V stage into a manned space laboratory. This idea eventually caught the attention of Wernher von Braun of NASA. Although von Braun was intrigued by Hanson's proposal, he considered the idea too risky. Soon after, work began on Skylab. Hanson's proposed idea helped to lay the groundwork for the Skylab program.
Provenance:
Carl Hanson, Gift, 2006
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Space flight  Search this
Skylab Orbital Workshop  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Saturn 5 Launch Vehicle  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketches
Slides (photographs)
Slides (photographs)
Transparencies
Photographs
Reports
Citation:
Manned Space Laboratory Proposal Papers, Accession number 2006-0057, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2006.0057
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2006-0057

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