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G. Harry Stine Collection

Creator:
Stine, G. Harry (George Harry), 1928-1997  Search this
Names:
Model Missiles, Inc.  Search this
National Association of Rocketry (U.S.)  Search this
Stine, G. Harry (George Harry), 1928-1997  Search this
Extent:
12.49 Cubic feet ((11 records center boxes) (1 flatbox))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Brochures
Newsletters
Clippings
Correspondence
Photographs
Date:
[ca. 1950s-1970s]
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of Stine's collection of archival material relating mainly to his involvement in rocket associations, including the NAR, and his association with model rocket manufacturers. The following mediums are included: photographs from model rocket meets, correspondence, magazine and newspaper articles, newsletters, galley proofs, committee minutes, model rocket drawings, and model rocket manufacturers' brochures.
Biographical / Historical:
G. Harry Stine (1928 - 1977) is a renowned rocket expert and a pioneer in the development of the aerospace hobby of model rocketry. Stine graduated from the University of Colorado, and first worked as an civilian scientist at White Sands Proving Ground as chief of the Controls and Instruments Section of the Propulsion Branch. In 1955, Stine went to work for the U.S. Naval Ordnance Missile Test Facility at White Sands as head of the Range Operations Division and Navy Flight Safety Engineer. Stine later worked as an engineer for Stanley Aviation Corporation and the Huyck Corporation. Stine was the founder of Model Missiles, Inc., which was the first company to produce and market model rockets. He has also served as a freelance consultant for different organizations, including the National Air and Space Museum. Stine is a prolific author of both articles and books on science, astronautics and model rocketry, and he has also written science fiction under the pseudonym, Lee Correy. In 1957, Stine founded the National Association for Rocketry (NAR), and he has remained an active member. He is also a member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astroanutics, the British Interplanetary Society, and the Explorer's Club.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
G. Harry Stine, Gift, 1973, XXXX-0573, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Rockets (Aeronautics)  Search this
Rocketry  Search this
Rockets (Aeronautics) -- Models  Search this
Genre/Form:
Brochures
Newsletters
Clippings
Correspondence
Photographs
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0573
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0573

V-2 Power Plant and Rocket Engine Drawings

Names:
Von Braun, Wernher, 1912-1977  Search this
Extent:
1.09 Cubic feet ((1 records center box))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Blueprints
Date:
1943-1945
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of engineering drawings for the V-2. The material consists of a complete set of production blueprints for the V-2 rocket powerplant and directly related accessories. The drawings are identified as 'Engineering Records File Copy' (in English).
Biographical / Historical:
The V-2 was a short-range ballistic missile designed by Germany for use against Southern England in 1944-45. The missile carried a 2000 lb. (910 kg) conventional warhead at supersonic speeds. The vehicle was fueled with sufficient alcohol and liquid oxygen for c.65 seconds of powered flight, giving a maximum range, including unpowered ballistic trajectory, of c.220 miles (352 km). A number of V-2s were captured intact by the Allies and used for rocketry experiments in the late 1940s. In addition, the V-2 design team, headed by Werner on Braun, was captured by the United States Army and returned to the United States, where it formed the core of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency and National Aeronautics and Space Administration launch vehicle design teams.
General:
Access note: Only eight of the drawings have been translated.
NASMrev
Provenance:
NASM SS&E, Transfer, 1987, 1987-0089, not NASM
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Ballistic missiles  Search this
V-2 rocket  Search this
Rocketry  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Rockets (Aeronautics)  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Blueprints
Identifier:
NASM.1987.0089
See more items in:
V-2 Power Plant and Rocket Engine Drawings
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1987-0089

Rocketry and Space Flight New Articles Scrapbook

Creator:
Peck, M. Edward  Search this
Extent:
0.1 Cubic feet ((1 scrapbook))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Clippings
Place:
Outer space -- Exploration
Date:
1944-1957
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains one hundred fifty-six news articles from sixteen different newspapers all pertaining to early rocketry and space exploration. The majority of articles are from wire news services. The following newspapers are represented in this scrapbook: Burlington Daily Times-News (BDTN), Chicago Daily News (CDN), Cincinnati Enquirer (CE), Chicago Tribune (CT), Indiana (University) Daily Student (IDS), Indianapolis Star (IS), Jeffersonville (IN) Evening News (JEN), Los Angeles Times (LAT), (Louisville) Courier-Journal (LCJ), London Daily Mail (LDM), Louisville Times (LT), New York Herald Tribune (NYHT), New York Times (NYT), Stars and Stripes (U.S. Army)(SS), Tulsa Tribune (TT), and the San Francisco Chronicle (SFC).
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
M. Edward Peck, Gift, unknown, XXXX-0585, N/A
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Rockets (Aeronautics)  Search this
Rocketry  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Clippings
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0585
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0585

United States Space Program Collection

Creator:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Space Science and Exploration Department  Search this
Names:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Space Science and Exploration Department  Search this
Project Apollo (U.S.)  Search this
Project Gemini (U.S.)  Search this
Project Mercury (U.S.)  Search this
Project Surveyor (U.S.)  Search this
Skylab Program  Search this
Extent:
13.08 Cubic feet ((12 records center boxes))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuals
Press releases
Publications
Photographs
Place:
Outer space -- Exploration
Date:
1950-1974
bulk 1959-1974
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of material gathered by the Space Science and Exploration Department, National Air and Space Museum, relating to the United States space program through the Skylab missions. The material consists of photos and reference material covering a wide variety of subjects, including space suits, food, lifting bodies, and other support and auxiliary functions, as well as material directly relating to the missions. The bulk of the material consists of photos and NASA press materials.
Biographical / Historical:
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) was inaugurated on 1 October 1958 with the intent of conducting a manned space program. NASA took over the rocketry and propulsion work previously performed by the United States Air Force, Navy, and National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. Unmanned launches began during the International Geophysical Year (1957-58) under Air Force auspices and have continued to the present with a wide variety of payloads, including space science, weather, communications, and earth observation satellites. The manned program progressed through Projects Mercury (1959-63; launches 1961-63), Gemini (1962-67; launches 1965-66), Apollo (1960-72; launches 1968-72), and Skylab (1969-74; launches 1973-74). The manned program was supported by a number of unmanned exploration vehicles in the Ranger, Lunar Orbiter, and Surveyor series throughout the 1960s, as well as research into a number of related areas.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
NASA SS&E, Transfer, 1983, XXXX-0154, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Space vehicles -- Propulsion systems  Search this
Rockets (Aeronautics)  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Rocketry  Search this
Space suits  Search this
Space Shuttle Orbiter  Search this
Space flight  Search this
Manned space flight  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuals
Press releases
Publications
Photographs
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0154
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0154

Jacques Tiziou Space Collection

Names:
United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Extent:
146 Cubic feet (204 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Moon -- Exploration
Date:
bulk 1960s through 2010
Summary:
Jacques Tiziou (1939-2017) was a professional journalist and photographer, concentrating on aerospace topics. This collection includes materials from Tiziou's archive of historical documents, photography, and ephemera from the space program (both national and international) as well as his own photography and writings.
Scope and Contents:
Always an avid collector, Tiziou amassed an impressive archive of both historical documents and collectible memorabilia from the space program (both national and international), including over 800 cubic feet of press files, films, photography (including autographed crew photographs) and various souvenirs, from Sputnik to the US Space Shuttle Program. This archival collection consists of 146 cubic feet of materials drawn from Tiziou's original collection, including documents, ephemera, photographs, slides, and video/film, created or collected by Jacques Tiziou on space flight history. Much of the material was gathered from various sources such as NASA, but the collection also contains Tiziou's own photographs and writings.
Arrangement:
The material in the "Files" series has been removed from Tiziou's original file boxes and rehoused into new acid-free containers preserving the original order of each box's contents. The collection's boxes have been rearranged into subseries grouped by regional identity (USA, USSR, International, etc.) and then alphabetically by broad subject matter.

The "Photography" series has not yet been processed.
Biographical / Historical:
Jacques Tiziou (1939-2017) was a professional journalist and photographer, concentrating on aerospace topics. Born in Montélimar, France, he began his career while still a teen as a freelance journalist, and even before graduating in 1962 from the French engineering school Estaca he had worked for various European publications, radio, and television. Between 1965 and 1968, he was the Editor in Chief of the first Encyclopedia of Space and in 1969 he published A l'assault de la lune (A Storm of the Moon). Tiziou then moved to Florida, where he closely followed the Apollo and Skylab programs as a correspondent for Aviation Magazine, French TV channels and photo agencies, including Dalmas, Gamma, and Sygma (Corbis). While in Florida, Tiziou became friends with most American astronauts, and entertained them at his home. Tiziou was also interested in space policy affairs, and after the end of the Skylab program, he moved to Washington DC. Jacques Tiziou was awarded the Silver Feathers and Gold of the French Press, was named a correspondent for the Air and Space Academy in 1993, and was elected to the French National Academy of Air and Space in 1993.
Provenance:
Jacques-Jean Tiziou, Gift, 2018, NASM.2018.0078.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Supersonic transport planes  Search this
Artificial satellites  Search this
Ballistic missiles  Search this
Rocketry  Search this
Space flight  Search this
Space vehicles  Search this
Cold War -- 1950-1970  Search this
Apollo Project  Search this
Mercury Project  Search this
Gemini Project  Search this
Soyuz Program (Russia)  Search this
Saturn 5 Launch Vehicle  Search this
Space Shuttle Program (U.S.)  Search this
Project Vanguard  Search this
Vostok (manned satellite)  Search this
Citation:
Jacques Tiziou Space Collection, Acc. 2018.0078, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2018.0078
See more items in:
Jacques Tiziou Space Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2018-0078

Boris E. Chertok Papers

Creator:
Chertok, Boris E.  Search this
Extent:
3.15 Cubic feet ((7 boxes))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Diaries
Place:
Soviet Union
Outer space -- Exploration -- Soviet Union
Date:
bulk 1945-1992
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of 51 of Boris E. Chertok's diaries, covering the years from 1945 to 1988. The diaries, all in Russian, are handwritten and are in small notebooks of various sizes and types. Some of the diaries have loose pages or loose covers and each diary has a paper cover note pasted to the outside of the notebook. The 1945 diary contains Chertok's notes on the examination of German rockets and sites in Germany. The collection also contains the envelopes, with notes in Russian, that the diaries came in. Finally, the collection contains a manuscript draft of Chertok's autobiography, Rockets and People, in Russian. The manuscript is largely handwritten, but contains some typewritten pages.
Biographical / Historical:
Dr. Boris E. Chertok is a former Soviet rocket engineer whose early work included designing the first Soviet aircraft with a rocket engine, and collaboration with the designer of the Katyusha rocket. During World War II, Chertok worked on developing Soviet heavy bombers and on rocket technology. In 1945, Dr. Chertok founded the Rabi Institute in which was appointed by Joseph Stalin to be the organization responsible for assimilating World War II German rocket technology. Chertok was assigned to Sergei Korolev's NII-88 institute in August 1946 and was named Deputy Chief Designer in 1956, a position he would hold with that bureau and its successors until his retirement in 1992. During the Cold War, Chertok worked on the control systems for the SS-6 Missile (R-7, Sapwood) and the Vostok, Voskhod, and Soyuz spacecraft programs. In the 1990s, Chertok published his autobiography, Rockets and People. After leaving the reorganized Energia enterprise in 1992, Chertok worked remained active as a professor in Moscow.
Provenance:
Boris Chertok, Purchase, Purchased by NASM and Arthur M. Dula in 1997, transferred from the Space History Department to the Archives in 2009
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
Vostok (manned satellite)  Search this
Rocketry  Search this
Rockets (Ordnance) -- Soviet Union  Search this
SS-6 Missile (R-7, Sapwood)  Search this
Soyuz Program (Russia)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Diaries
Citation:
Boris E. Chertok Papers, Accession 2009-0036, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2009.0036
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2009-0036

V-2 White Sands Collection

Creator:
Novak, Charles Frank, Sr.  Search this
Names:
Novak, Charles Frank, Sr.  Search this
Extent:
0.23 Cubic feet (1 slim legal document box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Motion pictures (visual works)
Photographs
Date:
1946
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of eighteen prints and 2 reels of color and black and white footage relating to the White Sands Project.
Biographical / Historical:
Charles Frank Novak, Sr., worked on the V-2 project at White Sands, New Mexico. Novak's specific project was work on the release system for the V-2 smoke generator. The smoke generator was used to study wind velocities in the upper atmosphere by means of visible smoke clouds.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
Joseph Suarez, Gift, 1994, 1995-0008, Public Domain
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Launch complexes (Astronautics) -- White Sands Proving Ground, New Mexico  Search this
V-2 rocket  Search this
Rocketry  Search this
Astronautics and state  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Rockets (Aeronautics)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Motion pictures (visual works)
Photographs
Identifier:
NASM.1995.0008
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1995-0008

Peenemünde Interviews Project

Topic:
Peenemunde Interviews Project (NASM)
Creator:
Neufeld, Michael J., 1951-  Search this
Names:
Peenemunde Research and Development Station  Search this
Dahm, Werner  Search this
Danneberg, Konrad  Search this
Haeussermann, Walter  Search this
Heimberg, Karl  Search this
Hoelzer, Helmut  Search this
Mueller, Fritz  Search this
Neufeld, Michael J., 1951-  Search this
Oberth, Hermann, 1894-1989  Search this
Rees, Eberhard  Search this
Reisig, Gerhard  Search this
Rudolph, Arthur  Search this
Tessman, Bernhard  Search this
Wiesman, Walter  Search this
von Tiesenhausen, Georg  Search this
Extent:
2.51 Cubic feet (4 records center boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Transcripts
Oral history
Date:
1985-1990
Summary:
This collection consists of the oral history recordings and transcripts for the Peenemünde Interviews Project, which examined the development of the German Peenemünde complex from the early 1930s through World War II.
Scope and Contents:
The collection consists of 39 hours of interviews with 13 individuals (in both audio cassette and transcript formats).
Arrangement:
The Peenemünde Interviews Project is arranged alphabetically by interviewee. Boxes 1, 2 and 3 contain the interviews on cassette tapes; box 4 contains the edited transcripts of the audio.
Historical note:
The collection consists of the oral history recordings and transcripts for the Peenemünde Interviews Project, which examined the development of the German Peenemünde complex from the early 1930s through World War II. This project constitutes one of several oral history projects conducted within the Department of Space History, NASM. The principal investigator for this project was Michael Neufeld and the following individuals were interviewed: Werner Dahm; Konrad Danneberg; Walter Haeussermann; Karl Heimberg; Helmut Hoelzer; Fritz Mueller; Herman Oberth; Eberhard Rees (with Mrs. Rees); Gerhard Reisig; Arthur Rudolph; Bernhard Tessman (with Karl Heimburg); Georg von Tiesenhausen; and Walter Wiesman.
Provenance:
Space History, NASM, Transfer, 1999, 1999-0038, Varies
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
V-1 rocket  Search this
V-2 rocket  Search this
Rocketry  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Airplanes -- Germany  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Airplanes -- Rocket engines  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Rockets (Aeronautics)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Transcripts
Oral history
Citation:
Peenemünde Interviews Project, Acc. 1999.0038, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.1999.0038
See more items in:
Peenemünde Interviews Project
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1999-0038
Online Media:

Richard Porter Papers

Creator:
Porter, Richard W. (Richard William), 1913-1996  Search this
Names:
General Electric Company  Search this
General Electric Company. Guided Missiles Department  Search this
International Council of Scientific Unions. Committee on Space Research. United States Academy  Search this
National Academy of Sciences (U.S.)  Search this
National Academy of Sciences (U.S.). Space Sciences Board. International Relations Committee  Search this
Project Hermes  Search this
United Nations. Committe on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space  Search this
United States. National Committee for the International Geophysical Year  Search this
United States. National Committee for the International Geophysical Year. Earth Satellite Program. Technical Panel  Search this
Porter, Richard W. (Richard William), 1913-1996  Search this
Von Braun, Wernher, 1912-1977  Search this
Extent:
6.54 Cubic feet (6 records center boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Notes
Programs
Photographs
Publications
Correspondence
Clippings
Date:
circa 1930s-1980
Summary:
This collection consists of six feet of material documenting Porter's many scientific contributions. The following types of material are included: photographs, lecture notes, correspondence, trip notes, newspaper clippings, symposium programs, papers, and periodicals, circa 1930s-1980s.
Scope and Content:
The Richard Porter Collection reflects Porter's career as an electrical engineer, rocketry expert, and a corporate manager and consultant. Almost the entirety of this collection consists of materials related to his professional work. This includes correspondence, memoranda, meeting minutes, reports, notes, speeches, photographs, brochures, pamphlets, programs, magazines, newsletters, papers, articles, newspaper clippings, miscellaneous materials (directories, mailing lists, transcript, etc.), as well as a scrapbook. It is worth singling out a few of the aforementioned materials for their particular historical significance pertaining to the development of rocketry and space exploration. Some of the correspondence, memoranda and notes reveal the inner workings of Operation Paperclip: the U.S. plan to seek out, debrief, recruit and evacuate German rocket scientists from war-torn Germany to America. Additionally, other examples of correspondence and notes give candid appraisals of some key figures in the aerospace field, as well as to illustrate exchanges between Porter and such scientific luminaries as Carl Sagan, Wernher von Braun, Simon Ramo, Holger Toftoy, Fred Durant III, Edith Goddard and Clyde Tombaugh.

The Porter Collection is arranged both chronologically and alphabetically. Correspondence, memoranda, meeting minutes, notes, notebooks, speeches, photographs, brochures, pamphlets, programs, magazines, journals, articles, newspaper clippings and miscellaneous materials are organized by the former method. Reports are arranged alphabetically by organizational name while newsletters and papers are grouped alphabetically by title and then chronologically.

The reader should note that the Porter Collection was exposed to a fire in Porter's office sometime during the late 1970s. The fire, along with the subsequent dousing of water from the firefighters, destroyed much of this collection. All that remained are the materials described here. While the surviving materials generally suffered only minor damage (mainly to their original folders), scorch marks can be occasionally observed on some correspondence, speeches, reports, etc.. More serious problems exist with seven folders containing photographs. For conservation purposes, they have been separated from the rest of the photographs in this collection and are currently unavailable to researchers.
Arrangement:
The Porter Collection is arranged both chronologically and alphabetically. Correspondence, memoranda, meeting minutes, notes, notebooks, speeches, photographs, brochures, pamphlets, programs, magazines, journals, articles, newspaper clippings and miscellaneous materials are organized by the former method. Reports are arranged alphabetically by organizational name while newsletters and papers are grouped alphabetically by title.
Biographical/Historical note:
As an established authority on rockets, GE placed Porter in overall charge of the company's guided missiles department in 1953. By the mid-1950s, his great knowledge in this field also lead to a position as head of a panel of scientists tasked with developing a U.S. space program in time for the International Geophysical Year (IGY) of 1957-58. On February 1, 1958, Porter was given the honor of announcing to reporters that the U.S. had launched its first satellite, Explorer 1, the previous night. The booster employed for this endeavor, an Army Jupiter-C, was designed and built mainly by the German rocket scientists (including their leader, Wernher von Braun) Porter helped to bring to America thirteen years earlier. By this time, GE assigned him as a company-wide consultant. Besides serving as leader of the U.S. IGY effort, he also served on many other boards and panels such as the International Relations Committee of the Space Sciences Board, U.S. National Academy of Science, the U.S. Academy in the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR), U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) and the U.S. delegation for the U.N. Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space. During his long career in engineering and aerospace development, Porter was also the recipient of numerous honors and awards. These included the Coffin Award, Goddard Award and the Scientific Achievement Award given by Yale University.

Aside from his career, Porter had a busy personal life. In 1946, he married Edith Wharton Kelly. The couple had two daughters and a son. Porter enjoyed horticulture -- especially growing orchids, as well as skiing and playing the clarinet. He died on October 6, 1996 at the age of 83.
General note:
Dr. Porter had a fire that destroyed most of his papers. These six boxes are all that remain.
Provenance:
Susan Porter Beffel and Thomas Andrew Porter, Gift, 1997, 1997-0037, NASM
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Topic:
V-2 rocket  Search this
Launch complexes (Astronautics) -- White Sands Proving Ground, New Mexico  Search this
Astronautics and state  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Periodicals  Search this
Rockets (Aeronautics)  Search this
Rocketry  Search this
Genre/Form:
Notes
Programs
Photographs
Publications
Correspondence
Clippings
Identifier:
NASM.1997.0037
See more items in:
Richard Porter Papers
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1997-0037
Online Media:

Peenemunde Document Collection

Creator:
Peenemunde Research and Development Station  Search this
Names:
Peenemunde Research and Development Station  Search this
Dornberger, Walter, 1895-  Search this
Oberth, Hermann, 1894-1989  Search this
Von Braun, Wernher, 1912-1977  Search this
Extent:
0.45 Cubic feet ((1 legal document box))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Telegrams
Reports
Memoranda
Date:
1941-1944
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of Peenemunde documents, including the following: memorandums, correspondence, telegrams, and reports. These documents are in German, and some of the documents have signatures of General Dornberger, Wernher von Braun, and Hermann Oberth. This collection also contains a few translated documents from the Wright Field Collection.
Biographical / Historical:
The Peenemunde Research and Development Station, Germany, was established in the mid-1930s. By the late 1930s, the research station was dedicated to the study and development of rocket driven projectiles, notably the V-2. Peenemunde was also the location of the V-1 test flying program and the test site for several other secret projects including the Messerschmitt 163 rocket-propelled aircraft.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
Various sources, gift/transfer, 1994, 1991-0083, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
V-2 rocket  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
V-1 rocket  Search this
Messerschmitt 163 Komet (Comet) Family  Search this
Rockets (Aeronautics)  Search this
Rocketry  Search this
Airplanes -- Rocket engines  Search this
Airplanes -- Germany  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Telegrams
Reports
Memoranda
Identifier:
NASM.1991.0083
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1991-0083

Office of Commercial Space Transportation Collection [Johnson]

Creator:
United States. Office of Commercial Space Transportation  Search this
Johnson, Sara Madeline  Search this
Extent:
0.79 Cubic feet (2 letter document boxes.)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1986
Summary:
This collection consists of documents relating to Madeline Johnson and her role as Director of the Office of Commercial Space Transportation (OCST).
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of documents relating to Madeline Johnson and her role as Director of the OCST, including agendas, memorandums, reports, presentations, her statements in front of Congress, and newspaper articles. Of special interest are the Economic Policy Council's Commercial Space Working Group documents and recommendations to President Reagan on commercializing satellite launches.
Arrangement:
No arrangement.
Biographical / Historical:
President Reagan signed Executive Order 12465 on February 25, 1984, designating the Department of Transportation to be the lead agency for commercial expendable launch vehicles. Later that year, the Office of Commercial Space Transportation (OCST) was established and placed in the Office of the Secretary. Madeline Johnson was selected by then Secretary of Transportation Elizabeth Dole to be the Director of OCST in 1986. During her tenure, Johnson worked to build a cross-government coalition to persuade President Reagan to create the opportunity for a private-sector satellite launching industry; this was especially needed as the Challenger accident had grounded Space Shuttle missions. The OCST was moved from the Office of the Secretary and today resides with the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The OCST now gives final approval of any commercial rocket launch operations involving a U.S. launch operator or a launch from the U.S.
Provenance:
Estate of Sara Madeline Johnson, Gift, 2020, NASM.2020.0015
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Astronautics and state  Search this
Rocketry  Search this
Space Shuttle Program (U.S.)  Search this
Satellites  Search this
Space industrialization  Search this
Citation:
Office of Commercial Space Transportation Collection [Johnson], NASM.2020.0015, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2020.0015
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2020-0015

Konstantin Tsiolkovsky Brochures

Creator:
T︠S︡iolkovskiĭ, K. (Konstantin), 1857-1935  Search this
Names:
T︠S︡iolkovskiĭ, K. (Konstantin), 1857-1935  Search this
Extent:
0.05 Cubic feet ((1 folder))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Pamphlets
Date:
1930-1932
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of the following three brochures written by Konstantin Tsiolkovsky: 'Stratoplan-Semijet,' 1932; 'Scientific Ethics,' 1930; and 'How to Boost Energy of the Explosion (Heat) Engines,' 1931. These booklets are in the Russian/Cyrillic language.
Biographical / Historical:
Konstantin Tsiolkovsky (1857-1935) is regarded in the Soviet Union as the 'father of rocketry' and has been universally recognized for his pioneering work in astronautics-cosmonautics. Tsiolkovsky solved, theoretically, the problem of escape from Earth's gravity, designed multistage rockets, and foresaw interplanetary flights.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
Constantine Domashnev, Gift, 2000, 2000-0015, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Rockets (Aeronautics)  Search this
Rocketry  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Interplanetary voyages  Search this
Gravity  Search this
Genre/Form:
Pamphlets
Identifier:
NASM.2000.0015
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2000-0015

Rocket Society Publications (Elder Collection)

Creator:
Elder, Henry G.  Search this
Names:
American Rocket Society  Search this
Reaction Research Society (U.S.)  Search this
Extent:
0.55 Cubic feet ((1 records center box))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Publications
Reports
Pamphlets
Date:
1945-1960
bulk 1953-1957
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of pamphlets, bulletins, reports, and meeting notices from the ARS, RRS, and other rocket societies, compiled by Henry G. Elder.
Biographical / Historical:
The American Rocket Society (ARS), founded in 1930, is a national association of rocket and jet propulsion engineers devoted to the encouragement of research and engineering development of jet propulsion, rockets, and all types of jet-propelled devices. The Reaction Research Society (RRS), formed in 1943, is a nonprofit civilian organization whose purpose is to aid in the development of reaction propulsion and its applications.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
Henry G. Elder, Gift, 1967, XXXX-0182, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Jet propulsion  Search this
Rockets (Aeronautics)  Search this
Rocketry  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Publications
Reports
Pamphlets
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0182
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0182

James Hart Wyld Collection

Creator:
Wyld, James Hart.  Search this
Names:
American Rocket Society  Search this
Extent:
0.5 Cubic feet (2 Boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Negatives
Date:
bulk 1930-1939
Summary:
A collection of items attributed to rocket pioneer James Hart Wyld dating from the 1930s and 1940s. The collection consists of two boxes, with one containing notes and prints attributed to Wyld and the other containing original negatives.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of approximately 140 black-and-white negatives (28 35mm strips of 8 frames each, seven 35mm strips of 2 frames each, and six 3.5 x 6 inch sheets), predominantly taken by James H. Wyld, of American Rocket Society meets and rocket tests and an Elmira, New York, glider meet, and images taken by Wyld on various trips around the New York City area and elsewhere. Buildings, engineering projects, and landscapes pictured include the Lincoln Tunnel and the Triborough Bridge (under construction), the Empire State Building, Central Park, Gilgo Beach and Long Beach (Long Island), Port Washington, Fire Island, the 1939 World's Fair in Flushing Meadows, the Vanderbilt Cup races in Mineola, New Rochelle, Cornwall, and the Catskills, all in New York. Also included are images taken in Princeton, New Jersey; Connecticut; Mount Washington, New Hampshire; and Massillon, Ohio. Individuals pictured include Frank Harrison, Albert Rice, and Bill Baum. The collection also consists of Wyld's personal papers including a diary covering the period of February 1931 to May 1936; a 1932 scientific notebook; two photographs of rocket test activities; a post card addressed to Wyld from "John" (possibly John Shesta) referencing a postponement; a portraint of James Wyld; handwritten report, "An Automatic Thrust and Mixture Control for Rocket Motors," 1946.an envelope full of information relating to a court case involving the American Society of Mechanical Engineers; a Princeton University Alumni Lectures pamphlet entitled America's Problem of National Defense by Professor Harold Sprout; five newspaper clippings related to rockets; an undated letter, missing the first page, to Wyld from Bernard E. "Ben" Smith regarding rocket testing; two letters, dating from 1938-1939, from Wyld to "John" (possibly John Shesta) regarding rocket testing; a report entitled Long Range Rocket, Section II (Propellant Systems) by Dr. Paul F. Winternitz, Director of Laboratories, Reaction Motors, Inc.; "Proposal for Unguided Liquid-Propellant Rocket Projectile" by an unknown author, possibly Wyld; two drawings of rockets; three pages of notes handwritten by Wyld, and a letter from Albert M. Paquin to the American Rocket Society, with handwritten comment attached, regarding financial assistance from the Society for rocket research. In addition, the collection contains a memo to Wyld regarding Reaction Motors, Inc. stock prices; and Wyld's handwritten notes and drawings entitled, "The Design of Streamline Hulls and Fins for Rockets," "The Nature of Rocket Flight" (noted as draft of Chapter IV of Introduction to Rocketry), "Pumping Mechanism" (appears to be missing pages), "Superchargine Airplane with Oxygen," and six additional pages of miscellaneous notes and drawings. Some pages of the notes have been initialled and noted by Shesta and Lawrence.
Biographical / Historical:
Rocket pioneer James Hart Wyld was born in 1913 and received a degree in Mechanical Engineering from Princeton University in 1935. He joined the American Interplanetary Society (later the American Rocket Society) in 1931. In the late nineteen thirties, Wyld developed and tested the first modern liquid-propellant rocket motors. In 1941 he, along with John Shesta, Lovell Lawrence, Jr., and Hugh Franklin Pierce, formed Reaction Motors, Inc. (RMI), the first US rocket propulsion company.
Related Materials:
The American Rocket Society's Rocket Test Stand No. 2 is featured in negatives present in this collection. More information concerning this artifact can be found at American Rocket Society's Rocket Test Stand No. 2.
Provenance:
Anne W. Blizard, Gift, 2005, NASM.2005.0051
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Rocketry  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Rocket engines  Search this
Rockets (Aeronautics) -- Performance  Search this
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Citation:
James Hart Wyld Collection, Accession 2005-0051, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2005.0051
See more items in:
James Hart Wyld Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2005-0051
Online Media:

Rocket, Space, and Early Artillery History

Creator:
National Air and Space Museum (U.S.). Division of Space History  Search this
Names:
National Air and Space Museum (U.S.). Division of Space History  Search this
Extent:
15.26 Cubic feet ((14 records center boxes))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Charts
Photographs
Reports
Manuscripts
Publications
Correspondence
Date:
[ca. 1000-1960]
bulk [ca. 1940-1960]
Scope and Contents:
This collection is a compilation of various reports, journals, letters, and books on three main subjects: early artillery, rockets, and space technology. The early artillery history is covered by manuscripts and reports from the Middle Ages to the mid-19th century. The collection then covers rocket development in Russia, Germany, England, the United States, and Austria from the mid-19th century to the 1960s.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
Space History, NASM, transfer, 1986, XXXX-0007, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Artillery -- History  Search this
Artillery  Search this
Rockets (Aeronautics)  Search this
Rocketry  Search this
Rockets (Aeronautics) -- History  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Astronautics -- History  Search this
Genre/Form:
Charts
Photographs
Reports
Manuscripts
Publications
Correspondence
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0007
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0007

Peenemünde Technical Reports (Fort Bliss / Putkammer Collection)

Creator:
Peenemunde Research and Development Station  Search this
Names:
Peenemunde Research and Development Station  Search this
Extent:
1.58 Cubic feet (4 boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Manuscripts
Publications
Photographs
Charts
Maps
Date:
1940-1945, circa 1950
bulk 1940-1945
Summary:
The German Army and Navy experimental station at Peenemunde, on the North Sea coast of Germany, was established in the mid-1930s to continue the rocketry work begun at Kummersdorf in 1930.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of copies of reports primarily from the Peenemünde Archiv 14, 66, and 86 series.
Arrangement:
The documents are in German and are filed in order by Archiv Number (for example: 11/8, 14/2, 14/3).
Biographical/Historical note:
The German Army and Navy experimental station at Peenemunde, on the North Sea coast of Germany, was established in the mid-1930s to continue the rocketry work begun at Kummersdorf in 1930. By the end of World War II (1939-1945) the research station produced a number of successful weapons, including the first surface-to-surface guided missile (V-1), the first ballistic missile (V-2), and the first operational air-to-surface missile (He 293), as well as other designs. The equipment developed at Peenemunde formed the basis for postwar research and designs by both the United States and the Soviet Union.
Provenance:
No donor information, gift, unknown date
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Permissions Requests
Topic:
He 293 (missile)  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Rockets (Aeronautics) -- Thermodynamics  Search this
Rockets (Aeronautics) -- Guidance systems  Search this
Guided missiles -- Propulsion systems  Search this
Rockets (Aeronautics)  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Thermodynamics  Search this
V-1 rocket  Search this
Rocketry  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
V-2 rocket  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Publications
Photographs
Charts
Maps
Citation:
Peenemünde Technical Reports (Fort Bliss / Putkammer Collection), Acc. XXXX-0192, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0192
See more items in:
Peenemünde Technical Reports (Fort Bliss / Putkammer Collection)
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0192
Online Media:

Rocket-Sonde Research Section (Naval Research Laboratory), V-2 Panel Papers

Topic:
Science with a Vengeance
Creator:
DeVorkin, David H., 1944-  Search this
Names:
Naval Research Laboratory (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Naval Research Laboratory (Washington, D.C.). Rocket Sonde Branch  Search this
DeVorkin, David H., 1944-  Search this
Extent:
1.13 Cubic feet ((1 slim legal document box) (2 legal document boxes))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Memoranda
Charts
Date:
1945-1986
Scope and Contents:
This collection is comprised mostly of administrative memoranda of the portion of the V-2 Panel which represented the Rocket-Sonde Research Section of NAR. The thirty-four files from Rocket-Sonde members are roughly chronological and are followed by files from other entities such as the Ad Hoc Committee on Rocket, Satellite and Space Research. The material in this collection was gathered by David DeVorkin while he conducted research for his book, _Science with a Vengeance_.
Biographical / Historical:
The Rocket-Sonde Research Section of the Naval Research Laboratory (NAR) participated in the V-2 Panel (ACA V-2 Upper Atmosphere Research Panel), which, with the use of captured German V-2 rockets, conducted in the 1940s and 1950s a long series of experiments which sought to to further our understanding of the upper atmosphere and the nature of solar radiation, as well as the technology utilized in the V-2 itself.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
David DeVorkin, Transfer, 1998, 1998-0025, Public Domain
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Artificial satellites  Search this
V-2 rocket  Search this
Rocketry  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Rockets (Aeronautics)  Search this
Atmosphere, Upper -- Rocket observations  Search this
Ballistic missiles  Search this
Genre/Form:
Memoranda
Charts
Identifier:
NASM.1998.0025
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1998-0025

Willy Ley Papers

Creator:
Ley, Willy, 1906-1969  Search this
Names:
American Interplanetary Society  Search this
American Rocket Society  Search this
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Ley, Willy, 1906-1969  Search this
Extent:
48.29 Cubic feet (107 Boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Correspondence
Photographs
Manuscripts
Publications
Financial records
Date:
1859-1969
bulk 1930-1969
Summary:
This collection consists of Willey Ley's personal files, including his business correspondence, book contracts, and galley proofs, as well as publicity concerning Dr. Ley and his activities, and inquiries and comments from Ley's readership during his tenure as columnist for Galaxy Magazine (1952-1969). The material also includes articles gathered by Ley on topics ranging from astronomy and space travel to biology and natural parks to mythology, psychic phenomena, and UFOs.
Scope and Contents note:
The Willy Ley Collection reflects Ley's broad, restless curiosity about the world around him. However, the main thrust of this material emphasizes his intense interest in the aerospace field. Ley's significant contributions as a great proponent, theorist and historian of rocketry and space travel are quite evident in this collection.

For the most part, the collection encompasses the years Ley spent in the U.S., roughly, from the mid 1930s to his death in 1969. Accordingly, very little pertaining to Ley's time in the VfR is found here. This wide array of materials was sold to the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum (NASM) by Ley's widow, Olga, in 1970.(1) Later that year, NASM personnel traveled to Ley's home in New York to transfer this collection to the museum. They were careful to maintain the overall order of the collection which reflects its original organizational structure, as well as the research techniques and thinking processes of Ley himself.

The collection of materials listed in the finding aid is arranged into four series. The first series is composed of personal materials that include correspondence, book and article contract materials, galley proofs, manuscript and article drafts, notes, articles, lecture invitations and brochures, photographs, drawings, travel and war-time memorabilia, newspaper and press clippings, book reviews, personal bills and receipts, business cards, children's' report cards and Christmas cards. The materials of this series range in date from the early 1930s to 1969. Except for moving this series to the beginning of the collection, original order was maintained. Additionally, original folder titles were retained (as they were for the rest of the collection). Correspondence, book/article contracts materials, research notes, articles, newspaper and press clippings and miscellaneous personal materials are arranged chronologically while the manuscript drafts, galley proofs and book reviews are organized alphabetically by title.

The second series comprises the bulk --about two-thirds, of the Willy Ley Collection. This series, the aerospace subject files, ranges in date from the late 1800s to 1969, and covers the following topics: biography (Ley and others), aviation, inventions, astronomy, space travel, rockets, artificial satellites, manned space flight, ground support and rocket test centers. The folders include correspondence, photographs, notes, reports, brochures, pamphlets, magazines, articles and newspaper clippings. Original order was maintained for this series. The materials are organized by subject.

The third series consists of printed materials. This series ranges in date from the early 1950s to 1970 and includes various publications (newsletters, pamphlets, journals, reports, directories, magazines and books). Also included are article and newspaper clippings. Ley organized the newsletters by title and then chronologically.

The fourth and final series of this collection contains non-aerospace subject files. Ley's certificates, citations and a scrapbook are found in this series. The certificates and citations are for Ley's civic and professional achievements. The scrapbook contains miscellaneous newspaper clippings regarding rocketry and space travel (in English and German) from the 1930s and 1940s. However, this series, ranging in date from the early 1900s to 1969, mainly encompasses materials not directly related to aviation, rocketry or space travel. Original order was maintained for this series. The materials are organized by subject.

The researcher should note that all the folders (except for those of Series 4) are numbered. This numbering system reflects an effort by NASM's Department of Space History in 1970 to create a rough catalog of the Willy Ley Collection as it was being moved to the museum. Though now obsolete as an index, these penciled numbers were retained and are written in the upper right corner of the folders.

Endnotes: 1. That same year, Mrs. Ley also sold her husband's collection of books and journals to the University of Alabama at Huntsville. Currently, it is known as the Willy Ley Memorial Collection and resides at the University's library. Wernher von Braun and NASA Saturn launch vehicle program manager Arthur Rudolph participated in the dedication ceremony in 1971.
Arrangement note:
Series 1: Personal Materials

Series 2: Aerospace Subject Files

Series 3: Printed Materials

Series 4: Non-Aerospace Subject Files
Biographical/Historical note:
Willy Ley was a world-renown expert in and proponent of rocketry and space travel. Born in Berlin, Germany on October 2, 1906, Ley attended the Universities of Berlin and Konigsberg and studied astronomy, paleontology, zoology and physics. Beyond these studies however, he developed a passionate interest in rocketry and its potential applications for space travel. Accordingly, he wrote and published his first book, Die Fahrt in den Weltraum (Travel in Outer Space) in 1926 and helped found Germany's early rocketry and spaceflight club, Verein fur Raumschiffahrt or VfR (Society for Space Travel) the following year. In 1929, Ley, along with well-known rocketry theorist Hermann Oberth, acted as a technical consultant on Fritz Lang's film, Frau im Mond (Woman in the Moon). Throughout the late 1920s and early 1930s, he continued to write books, as well as numerous articles in German and foreign publications, on the subject of rockets and spaceflight. Once Adolf Hitler took power in 1933, the Nazis pressured Ley to cease publishing his articles in foreign journals and magazines due to rocketry's potential as a weapon in Germany's arsenal. Also, the VfR disbanded during the Nazis' first year in power amid concerns among the membership regarding the interest the German military was taking in their activities. These factors compelled Ley to leave Germany for Britain briefly and then to the U.S. in 1935. He became an American citizen in 1944.

Until World War II, Ley focused his writing career on topics unrelated to rocketry and space travel. He discovered little interest in these fields among the U.S. public. He was successful though, with a number of non-space publications such as Salamanders and Other Wonders and The Lungfish, the Dodo and the Unicorn. From 1940-44, Ley was science editor of the New York newspaper, PM and later lectured as a professor at Fairleigh Dickinson University in New Jersey. He was also a regular contributor to a myriad of magazines, encyclopedias and digests such as Popular Mechanics, Cowles Encyclopedia and Galaxy. However, once World War II began and especially after Germany launched V-2 missile attacks on Britain in 1944, Ley found himself in great demand as an expert in rocketry. Following the end of the war, his writings, lectures and newspaper, radio and television interviews helped to spur even greater public interest in rockets and their potential for space flight. Additionally, his books on this subject were widely read in the U.S. and around the world. First published in 1944, Ley's Rockets, Missiles, & Space Travel enjoyed a great deal of popularity and justified numerous printings of revised editions. Other highly successful titles that Ley produced during the 1950s and 1960s included The Conquest of Space, The Conquest of the Moon (written with Wernher von Braun and astronomer Fred Whipple) and Beyond the Solar System. Ley, along with von Braun, artist Chesley Bonestell and others, collaborated on a series of space-themed issues of Collier's (1952-54) that helped to foster popular support for future U.S. missions to earth orbit, the moon and the planets.

Aside from his busy career as a prolific author and populizer of rockets and space travel, Ley was also a husband and father of two children. His wife, Olga, was an accomplished ballet dancer, model and author in her own right. The couple had to two daughters, Sandra and Xenia. Ley had hoped to attend the Apollo 11 launch at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida but died of a heart attack at his home in Jackson Heights, New York, on June 24, 1969. His death came only four weeks before the launch of mankind's first landing on the moon's surface.

1906 October 2 -- Ley born in Berlin, Germany

1920 January 11 -- Smithsonian Institution publishes A Method of Reaching Extreme Altitudes, a pamphlet written by U.S. rocket scientist Dr. Robert H. Goddard

1923 -- Romanian rocket scientist Hermann Oberth publishes short book, Die Rakate zu den Planetenraumen (The Rocket into Planetary Space)

1926 -- Ley writes and publishes first book, Die Fahrt in den Weltraum(Travel in Outer Space)

1926 March 16 -- Goddard successfully launches first liquid-fueled rocket in Auburn, Massachusetts

1927 July 5 -- Ley helps found Germany's early rocketry and space travel club, Verein fur Raumschiffahrt or VfR (Society for Space Travel)

1929 -- Ley (along with Oberth) acts as a technical consultant for Fritz Lang film, Frau im Mond (Woman in the Moon)

1933 January 30 -- Adolf Hitler becomes chancellor of Germany

1935 -- Russian rocket scientist Konstantin Tsiolkovsky dies

1935 -- Ley leaves Germany for Britain and then to the U.S.

1939 September 1 -- Germany invades Poland – World War II begins

1940 -- Ley begins stint as science editor of New York newspaper, PM

1942 October 3 -- First successful launch of Nazi V-2 (A-4) rocket, Peenemunde, Germany

1944 -- Ley becomes a U.S. citizen

1944 -- Ley publishes first edition of book, Rockets (book would eventually see many revised editions and renamed Rockets, Missiles, & Space Travel)

1944 September 7-8 -- First V-2 rocket attacks on London and Paris

1945 May 8 -- Germany surrenders to Allies

1945 August 10 -- Goddard dies

1945 September 2 -- Japan surrenders to Allies

1945 September 29 -- Wernher von Braun and other captured German rocket scientists are taken to the U.S.

1945 October -- Arthur C. Clarke first proposes concept of communication satellites in Wireless World magazine

1946 April 16 -- First successful launch by the U.S. of a captured V-2

1950 -- Ley publishes book, The Conquest of Space

1952 -- Ley collaborates with von Braun, artist Chesley Bonestell and others on a series of space-themed issues of Collier's

1953 -- Ley collaborates with von Braun and Fred Whipple and publishes book, The Conquest of the Moon

1957 October 4 -- Russia's successful launch of first artificial satellite, Sputnik 1

1958 January 31 -- Successful launch of first U.S. artificial satellite, Explorer 1

1961 April 12 -- Russia's successful launch of first human into space, Yuri Gagarin aboard Vostok 1

1961 May 5 -- Successful launch of first U.S. astronaut into space, Alan Shepard aboard Mercury-Redstone 3 (Freedom 7)

1964 -- Ley collaborates with Bonestell and publishes book, Beyond the Solar System

1969 June 24 -- Ley dies at his home in Jackson Heights, New York

1969 July 16-24 -- Flight of Apollo 11 succeeds in landing U.S. astronauts on the moon
List of Acronyms:
AFB -- Air Force Base

ARCAS -- All-Purpose Rocket for the Collection of Atmospheric Soundings

AS -- Apollo-Saturn [spacecraft-launch vehicle stack]

ELDO -- European Launcher Development Organization

GALCIT -- Guggenheim Aeronautical Laboratory of the California Institute of Technology

GAPA -- Ground-to-Air Pilotless Aircraft

GT -- Gemini-Titan [spacecraft-launch vehicle stack]

HASP -- High Altitude Sounding Projectile

IMP -- Interplanetary Monitoring Platform [satellite]

JPL -- Jet Propulsion Laboratory [Pasadena, California]

MA -- Mercury-Atlas [spacecraft-launch vehicle stack]

MOL -- Manned Orbiting Laboratory

NACA -- National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics

NACA RM -- National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, Research Memorandum

NACA TM -- National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, Technical Memorandum

NARTS -- Naval Air Rocket Test Station

NACA TN -- National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, Technical Note

NASA -- National Aeronautics and Space Administration

OGO -- Orbiting Geophysical Observatory

OSO -- Orbiting Solar Observatory

PET -- Propulsion, Experimental

RAT -- Rocket-Assisted Torpedo

UFO -- Unidentified Flying Object

USSR -- Union of Soviet Socialist Republics

VfR -- Verein fur Raumschiffahrt [Society for Space Travel]
General note:
Other material: Skin sample from Echo-series satellites.
Provenance:
Willy Ley Estate, Purchase, unknown, XXXX-0098, not NASM
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Topic:
Rockets (Aeronautics)  Search this
Rocketry  Search this
Space flight  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Periodicals  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Photographs
Manuscripts
Publications
Financial records
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0098
See more items in:
Willy Ley Papers
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0098
Online Media:

Wadsworth W. Mount Collection

Creator:
Mount, Wadsworth W., 1907-1985  Search this
Names:
United States. Bureau of Ordnance  Search this
United States. Navy. Naval Ordnance Lab [NOL]  Search this
Mount, Wadsworth W., 1907-1985  Search this
Extent:
1.09 Cubic feet ((1 records center box))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Negatives
Drawings
Correspondence
Reports
Date:
[ca. 1940s-1977]
bulk [ca.1940s-1950s]
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains photographs, negatives, blueprints, patents, test reports and correspondence dealing with Mount's rocket application inventions.
Biographical / Historical:
Wadsworth W. Mount (1907-1985) was educated at Amherst College and New York University. Besides practicing business and finance, he patented and successful demonstrated a number of inventions, including wire and cable carrying rocket projectors for antiaircraft and lifesaving applications. Among his rocket patents are 4 types of ordnance equipment for the US Navy in WWII. After WWII he worked with the Naval Ordnance Lab and Bureau of Ordnance requirements, and conducted experiments on the use of small rocket motors for firing steel cable ashore from ships in distress.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
Wadsworth W. Mount, gift, XXXX-0368, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Rockets (Aeronautics)  Search this
Rocketry  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Antiaircraft missiles  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Negatives
Drawings
Correspondence
Reports
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0368
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0368

Harry W. Bull Papers

Creator:
Bull, Harry W., 1909-1971  Search this
Extent:
0.15 Cubic feet (3 folders)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Date:
1925-1935 and undated
Summary:
This collection consists of approximately 0.15 cubic feet of material relating to Harry W. Bull and his work with rockets.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of approximately 0.15 cubic feet of material relating to Harry W. Bull and his work with rockets. Included in the collection are photocopies of items loaned by the donor for copying, including copies of pages of a scrapbook which includes captions by Bull. Additional types of material contained in the collection include correspondence; photographs; news clippings; technical papers written by Bull; pages of notes on Bull's research and experiments including calculations, drawings, and notes on various tests; three notebooks of technical information compiled by Bull; and copies of diary entries made by Bull in 1925. There is a section of material relating specifically to Bull's rocket-propelled sled. Notable correspondents whose letters appear in the collection include Robert Hutchings Goddard and George Edward Pendray.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged according to location.
Biographical / Historical:
Harry W. Bull (1909-1971) was an American rocketry pioneer who conducted more than 800 individual tests during the period from 1926 to 1934, as well as building and successfully riding a rocket-propelled sled in 1931. Bull was credited by James Hart Wyld with being the first American to design and build a regeneratively-cooled rocket motor and the first to experiment with a monopropellant rocket motor. Bull also did extensive research on steam propulsion as well as various types of propellants. Bull financed his education by lecturing on rocketry, and by selling photos of his successful rocket sled experiments to various news outlets. Bull also was able to use publicity generated by the sled run to produce and sell a copyrighted specification booklet. Bull graduated from the College of Applied Science at Syracuse University with a Bachelor of Science degree in mechanical engineering in 1932. After graduating, Bull was employed by Church and Dwight Company to design and test packaging machines, then went to work in 1935 with the Tennessee Valley Authority where he was involved in aerial mapping. Bull joined The Dow Chemical Company in 1937 as a design engineer, becoming a packaging coordinator in 1954, and he was named Director of Packaging in 1962. Bull retired from Dow in 1968 due to ill health. Bull was a member of the American Interplanetary Society, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and was a charter member of the American Rocket Society, as well as belonging to various organizations relating to his work in packaging.
Provenance:
Bertha K. Bull, Gift, 1973, NASM.XXXX.1207
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
Rocketry  Search this
Citation:
Harry W. Bull Papers, NASM.XXXX.1207, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.1207
See more items in:
Harry W. Bull Papers
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-1207
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