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Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) Project Files

Creator:
Johns Hopkins University  Search this
Names:
Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope  Search this
Extent:
7.36 Cubic feet ((6 records center boxes))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Memoranda
Schedules
Proposals
Reports
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of the central file for the HUT and documents the technical history of the construction of the actual flight artifact. The six cubic feet of material includes drawings as well as the following types of project documentation: project outlines, progress and status reports, memorandums, summaries, schedules, and proposals.
Biographical / Historical:
The Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) project was conceived, designed, and built by astronomers and engineers at John Hopkins University to perform astronomical observations in the far-ultraviolet portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, wavelengths of light that are inaccessible to ground-based telescopes. HUT's primary purpose was to observe wavelengths of light that are too short to be seen with the Hubble Space Telescope, although overlap was provided to allow direct comparison. The telescope flew twice aboard the space shuttle, once in December 1990 and again in March 1995, as part of a package of instruments called the Astro Observatory. HUT has been used to observe hundreds of objects, including stars, planets, and quasars. The HUT was donated to the National Air and Space Museum in 2001 and is currently part of the Explore the Universe Exhibition.
General:
The history of the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) for this record was taken in part from the John Hopkins website at http://praxis.pha.jhu.edu/hut.html.
Provenance:
Johns Hopkins University, Gift, 2002
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Astronomy  Search this
Telescopes  Search this
Spectrum analysis -- Instruments  Search this
Space shuttles  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Memoranda
Schedules
Proposals
Reports
Citation:
Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) Project Files, Accession 2002-0025, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2002.0025
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2002-0025

Observatory Postcards

Extent:
0.79 Cubic feet (2 containers)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1905-2001
Summary:
This collection consists of the observatory postcards gathered by Dr. David DeVorkin as part of the Explore the Universe exhibit.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of the postcards gathered by Dr. David DeVorkin as part of the Explore the Universe exhibit. Postcards from the following observatories are included: Allegheny; Arecibo Radio; Berlin-Treptow; Cambridge University, UK; David Dunlap; Dominion Astrophysical; European Southern; Green Bank Radio Telescope; Griffith; Harvard-SAO; Jodrell Bank; Keck; Kitt Peak National; Lick; Mauna Kea; McDonald; Mount Wilson; Palomar; Potsdam Astrophysical; Royal Observatory Greenwich; Vassar College; Very Large Array; and Whipple-MMT. The collection also contains CDs containing digital surrogates of the postcards, which were scanned by NASM staff or volunteers.
Arrangement:
Arranged by Observatory.
Biographical / Historical:
The National Air and Space Museum's (NASM) Explore the Universe exhibit shows how ideas about the Universe evolved as new astronomical instruments were developed. It presents the Universe as discerned by the naked eye, then shows how the telescope, photography, spectroscopy, and digital technology revolutionized our view. The largest section describes what astronomers today think about the nature of the Universe. As part of this exhibit, curator Dr. David DeVorkin, collected astronomical observatory postcards from the public. Some of the postcards were featured in the exhibit as well as the associated NASM website.

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Provenance:
NASM Space History Department, Transfer, 2018, NASM.2018.0060
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
Postcards -- 20th century  Search this
Observatories -- Astrophysical  Search this
Astronomy -- 20th century  Search this
Citation:
Observatory Postcards, NASM.2018.0060, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2018.0060
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2018-0060

Voyager II Uranus Moon and Ring Images

Creator:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Names:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Project Voyager  Search this
Extent:
2.18 Cubic feet ((2 records center boxes))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives
Photographs
Place:
Outer space -- Exploration
Date:
1985-1986
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of optical imaging from Voyager II's January 1986 Uranus encounter. The images are negatives and prints from the Voyager imaging computer, and include ranging data and image processing information as well was the image itself. The images cover the major moons of Uranus as well as the Uranus ring system.
Biographical / Historical:
Part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) program for space exploration included the use of remote sensing probes to the other bodies in the solar system. In 1972, NASA proposed the launching of two probes to the outer planets to take advantage of the alignment of Jupiter and Saturn in 1977, and called the program Voyager. The Voyager spacecraft were assembled at the Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) in Pasadena, CA and shipped to Cape Canaveral for launch atop Titan III-Centaur boosters on 5 Sep 1977 (Voyager I) and 20 Aug 1977 (Voyager II). The spacecraft reached Jupiter successfully in 1979 (Voyager I, 5 Mar 1979; Voyager II, 9 Jul 1979) and Saturn shortly afterward (Voyager I, 12 Nov 1980; Voyager II 25 Aug 1981), returning a wealth of scientific information and images. Following the Saturn encounter, Voyager I was placed on a course to exit the solar system. Voyager II used Saturn's gravity to change course to allow encounters with Uranus (Jan 1986) and Neptune (August 1989) before similarly leaving the solar system.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
NASM - CEPS, Transfer, 1986, 1986-0128, NASA
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Uranus (Planet)  Search this
Astronomy  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Photographs
Identifier:
NASM.1986.0128
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1986-0128

Orbiting Solar Observatory (OSO) Collection [Werner M. Neupert ]

Creator:
Neupert, Werner  Search this
Extent:
2.18 Cubic feet ((2 record center boxes))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Reports
Notebooks
Charts
Transcripts
Place:
Sun
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists Werner Neupert's files and collection of publications relating to the Orbiting Solar Observatories and and the experiments associated with each. Much of the collection documents artifacts in the collection of the National Air and Space Museum, transferred from NASA by Neupert. Included are a loose-leaf notebook of charts and graphs detailing the "Bendix Electron Multiplier Tests," a loose-leaf reproduction of the June 1957 SID 66-1338-7 "Appendix 7: Ion Chambers for Detection of Vacuum Ultraviolet Radiation;" publications by contractor Ball Brothers Research Corporation; minutes of NASA's Solar Physics Subcommittee of the Space Science Steering Committee; a binder of the 1962 ZETA Command Schedule and data; the original stenographic transcript of the 14 March 1963 NASA Satellite Symposium (with lantern slides); and miscellaneous material that includes original strip chart recordings of OSO-1 telemetry. Reports found in this collection include: Appraisal and Recommendations on the Orbiting Solar Observatory Program from NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications, 1968; Space Research: Directions for the Future (Parts 1,2 and 3), published by the Space Science Board, National Academy of Sciences, 1965 and 1966; NASA Reports to the Space Science Board; NASA's America's Next Decades in Space: A Report for the Space Task Group, 1966; Solar Satellite Report from the Harvard College Observatory, 1967; and Goddard Space Flight Center's Twenty-Year Mission Plan.
Biographical / Historical:
Werner M. Neupert is known for his contributions to the fields of solar physics and spectroscopy. While at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Goddard Space Flight Center, Neupert was an essential part of the US Orbiting Solar Observatory (OSO) program. This program launched a series of eight satellites between 1962 and 1971 to collect data on the sun and to study solar flares. (The "Neupert Effect" of solar flares is named for Werner Neupert.)
Provenance:
David H. DeVorkin, Transfer, 2002
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Solar activity  Search this
Artificial satellites  Search this
Astronomical spectroscopy  Search this
Orbiting solar observatories  Search this
Astronomy  Search this
Genre/Form:
Reports
Notebooks
Charts
Transcripts
Citation:
Orbiting Solar Observatory (OSO) Collection [Werner M. Neupert ], Accession 2002-0057, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2002.0057
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2002-0057

Science Service Astronomy and Astronautics Files

Creator:
Science Service  Search this
Extent:
41.04 Cubic Feet (114 boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Clippings
Photographs
Date:
1920-1979
Summary:
Science Service was founded in 1921 by newspaper publisher Edward Willis Scripps (1854-1926) and the zoologist William Emerson Ritter (1856-1944) as a news service for the purpose of disseminating information on scientific progress to the public, and to "present facts in readable and interesting form." The Science Service Astronomy and Astronautics files in the National Air and Space Archives consists of papers, news releases, articles, newspaper and magazine clippings, and technical papers pertaining mainly to astronomy and astronautics and dating from the late 1920s through the early 1970s.
Scope and Contents:
The Science Service Astronomy and Astronautics files in the National Air and Space Archives consists of papers, news releases, articles, newspaper and magazine clippings, and technical papers pertaining mainly to astronomy and astronautics and dating from the late 1920s through the early 1970s. News coverage of the U.S.--oviet space race and the Cold War is particularly extensive. The collection also includes many sighting report telegrams sent by astronomers to Science Service. Small selections of other subjects were included in the collection.
Arrangement:
The Science Service Collection is organized in the following series:

Series 1 --Clippings, Publications, Papers, and Press Releases

Collection material was housed in folders organized and titled according to the Library of Congress Classification system.

Library of Congress Classification Subjects in the Science Service Collection:

B - Philosophy. Psychology. Religion BF Psychology

Q - Science QB Astronomy QC Physics QD Chemistry QL Zoology

T - Technology TJ Mechanical engineering and machinery TL Motor vehicles, Aeronautics. Astronautics [A small group of TL files, filed under QB] [Another group of TL files]

V - Naval Science VK Navigation. Merchant marine VM Naval architecture. Shipbuilding. Marine engineering

Series 2 --Photographs

Subseries 1 --Photographs in Folders or with Subjects Indicated

Subseries 2 --Loose Photographs without Subject Headings

Series 3 --Miscellaneous Material
Historical Note:
Science Service was founded in 1921 by newspaper publisher Edward Willis Scripps (1854-1926) and the zoologist William Emerson Ritter (1856-1944) as a news service for the purpose of disseminating information on scientific progress to the public, and to "present facts in readable and interesting form." The service provided news stories to subscribing newspapers and issued the Daily Science News Bulletin (later renamed the Daily Mail Report) and the Science News Letter. Science Service made major contributions to science education through its sponsorship of the Science Clubs of America, the Science Talent Search, and National Science Fairs. Its monthly Things of Science educational kits were distributed by subscription from 1940 to 1989. The Science News Letter was renamed Science News in 1966. In 1988, Science Service became the Society for Science & the Public.
Provenance:
Science Service Astronomy and Astronautics Files, gift, 1986
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Astronomy  Search this
Rocketry  Search this
Cold War  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Space race  Search this
Genre/Form:
Clippings
Photographs
Citation:
Science Service Astronomy and Astronautics Files, Acc. 1987-0125, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.1987.0125
See more items in:
Science Service Astronomy and Astronautics Files
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1987-0125
Online Media:

Space Astronomy Oral History Project

Creator:
DeVorkin, David H., 1944-  Search this
Names:
National Air and Space Museum (U.S.). Division of Space History  Search this
Space Astronomy Oral History Project (SAOHP) (U.S.)  Search this
Aaron, Jules  Search this
Baum, William  Search this
Behring, William  Search this
Bergstralh, Jay T.  Search this
Bleach, Richard  Search this
Brunk, William Edward, 1928-  Search this
Code, Arthur D.  Search this
Connor, Jerry  Search this
DeVorkin, David H., 1944-  Search this
Drake, Frank D.  Search this
Fastie, William  Search this
Fraser, Lorence  Search this
Friedman, Herbert  Search this
Frier, Phyllis  Search this
Frosch, Robert  Search this
Gianoplis, George  Search this
Gold, Thomas  Search this
Goldberg, Leo  Search this
Harwit, Martin, 1931-  Search this
Hibbs, Albert R.  Search this
Hinners, Noel W.  Search this
Hinteregger, Hans H.  Search this
Johnson, Charles Yothers, 1920-  Search this
Johnson, Francis  Search this
Jursa, Adolph S.  Search this
Kondracki, Henry  Search this
Krause, Ernst H.  Search this
Neugebauer, G. (Gerry)  Search this
Neupert, Werner  Search this
Newburn, R. L. (Ray L.)  Search this
Newkirk, Gordon Allen, 1928-  Search this
Ney, Edward  Search this
Nier, Alfred  Search this
O'Dell, Charles  Search this
Pickering, William  Search this
Porter, Richard W. (Richard William), 1913-1996  Search this
Purcell, J. DeWitt (James DeWitt), 1912-1986  Search this
Rense, William  Search this
Roberts, Walter  Search this
Roman, Nancy Grace, 1925-  Search this
Rosen, Milton W.  Search this
Scheiderman, Dan  Search this
Schorn, Ronald  Search this
Schwarzschild, Martin  Search this
Silberstein, Richard  Search this
Simpson, John A. (John Alexander), 1916-  Search this
Spencer, Nelson  Search this
Spitzer, Lyman, 1914-  Search this
Strand, K. Aage (Kaj Aage), 1907-  Search this
Strong, John  Search this
Tape, Gerald  Search this
Tombaugh, Clyde William, 1906-  Search this
Tousey, Richard, 1908-1997  Search this
Tycz, Mona  Search this
Van Allen, James Alfred, 1914-  Search this
Wasserburg, Gerald  Search this
Webb, James E. (James Edwin), 1906-  Search this
Westphal, James  Search this
Whitsett, Charles  Search this
Wilshusen, Fred  Search this
Withbroe, G. L. (George L.)  Search this
Extent:
3.59 Cubic Feet (19 boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Transcripts
Date:
1981-1991
Summary:
The collection consists of the transcripts for the Space Astronomy Oral History Project (SAOHP), which examined the early use of rockets and satellites to study the upper atmosphere and space for the period 1946 through the early 1960s. This project constitutes one of several oral history projects conducted within the Department of Space History, NASM. The principal investigator for the SAOHP was David H. DeVorkin, and the interview set contains 225 hours of interviews with 56 individuals. The central thread of this collection is how the availability of new technologies for research, first the rocket and later satellites, helped to create a new social matrix for research. The following were interviewed: Jules Aaron; Ball Brothers; William Baum, William Behring; Jay Bergstrahl; Richard Bleach; William Brunk; Arthur Code; Jerry Conner; Frank Drake; William Fastie; Lorence Fraser; Herbert Friedman; Phyllis Frier; Robert Frosch; George Gianoplis; Thomas Gold; Leo Goldberg; Martin Harwit; Ralph Havens; Albert Hibbs; Noel Hinners; Hans Hinteregger; Charles Johnson; Francis Johnson; Adolph Jursa; Henry Kondracki; Ernst Krause; Alfred Nier; Gerry Neugebauer; Werner Neupert; Ray Newburn; Gordon Newkirk; Edward Ney; Charles O'Dell; William Pickering; Richard Porter; James Purcell; William Rense;Walter Roberts; Nancy Roman; Milton Rosen; Dan Scheiderman; Ronald Schorn; Martin Schwarzschild; Richard Silberstein; John Simpson; Lyman Spitzer; Kaj Strand; Nelson Spencer; John Strong; Gerald Tape; Clyde Tombaugh; Richard Tousey; Mona Tycz; James Van Allen; Gerald Wasserburg; James Webb; James Westphal; Charles Whitsett; Fred Wilshusen; and George Withbroe.
Scope and Contents:
Audio cassettes and transcipts.
Arrangement:
The Space Astronomy Oral History Project interviews are arranged alphabetically by interviewee.
Historical Note:
This collection contains the interviews for the Space Astronomy Oral History Project. These interviews explore the early use of rockets and satellites over the period 1946 through the early 1960s to investigate the upper atmosphere and space. This project constitutes one of several oral history projects conducted within the National Air and Space Museum's (NASM) Department of Space History. The principal interviewer for this project was David H. DeVorkin and the interview set consists of 225 hours of interviews with 67 individuals. Please note that there are a few instances where audio cassette tapes of the interview subjects exist but without written transcripts while there are also a few cases of existing transcripts of the interviews without any audio cassette tapes. The following were interviewed for this project: Jules Aaron; Frank Bateson; William Alvin Baum; William Behring; Jay Thor Bergstrahl; Richard Bleach; William E. Brunk; Arthur Dodd Code; Jerry Conner; Fred Dolder; Frank Donald Drake; William G. Fastie; Lorence Fraser; Phyllis Freier; Herbert Friedman; Robert Frosch; Reuben H. Gablehouse; R.A.Gaiser; George Gianopolis; Thomas Gold; Leo Goldberg; Martin Otto Harwit; Ralph Havens; Albert Roach Hibbs; Noel Hinners; Hans Erich Hinteregger; Charles Yothers Johnson; Francis S. Johnson; Adolph Simon Jursa; Jerome Kohl; Henry Kondracki; Ernst Henry Krause; R.C. Mercure; Alfred O. Neir; Gerry Neugebauer; Werner Neupert; Ray Leon Newburn; Gordon Allen Newkirk; Edward P. Ney; Charles Robert O'Dell; William Hayward Pickering; Richard W. Porter; James D. Purcell; William A. Rense; Walter Orr Roberts; Nancy Grace Roman; Milton W. Rosen; Dan Schneiderman; Ronald A. Schorn; Martin Schwarzschild; Richard Silberstein; John Simpson; Nelson W. Spencer; Lyman Spitzer, Jr.; Kaj Strand; John Strong; Gerald Tape; Clyde William Tombaugh; Richard Tousey; Mona Tycz; James Van Allen; Gerald Joseph Wasserburg; James Edwin Webb; James A. Westphal; Charles Edward Whitsett; Fred Wilshusen and George Withbroe.
Provenance:
Space History, NASM, Transfer, 1999, 1999-0034, Varies
Restrictions:
The audio cassette tapes of these interviews have yet to be remastered and, due to their fragility, are unavailable to researchers. Transcripts are available to researchers though, there are restrictions placed on a number of them. A NASM staff member will advice the patron which transcripts are available for copying or viewing and how to order copies of transcripts and/or CDs.
Rights:
Permissions Requests
Topic:
Rockets (Aeronautics)  Search this
Atmosphere, Upper -- Rocket observations  Search this
Astronomy  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Artificial satellites  Search this
Genre/Form:
Transcripts
Citation:
Space Astronomy Oral History Project, Acc. 1994-0034, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.1999.0034
See more items in:
Space Astronomy Oral History Project
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1999-0034
Online Media:

Phoebe Waterman Haas Photo Album [Digital Scans]

Creator:
Waterman Haas, Phoebe  Search this
Extent:
157 digital scans
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
digital scans
Digital images
Date:
bulk 1909-1914
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of digital scans of photographic prints and negatives from a Haas family scrapbook, including all the pages of album plus details of 70 selected individual images; and the front and back of a postcard found loose in the photo album.
Biographical / Historical:
Emma Phoebe Waterman was born at Fort Totten in the Dakota Territory (now North Dakota) in 1882. Her father, John Charles Waterman, commissioned in the U.S. Cavalry, had been sent to Fort Totten after General Custer's failure at Little Big Horn. As a teenager, her parents wanted Phoebe to receive a better education, so they sent her to live with her father's family in Michigan so she could attend high school. She continued her education at Vassar, earning a BA (1904) and MA (1906) in mathematics and astronomy. After graduation, she traveled to the Philippines with her father. Upon her return, she was employed as a computer at the Mount Wilson Observatory in Pasadena, California. Working with several highly respected astronomers ignited her passion to follow her dreams of being one as well. In 1911, she applied and was accepted into the doctoral program at University of California - Berkley. She was awarded a Ph.D. in astronomy in 1913, becoming one of the first of two women to do so.
Shortly after being awarded her Ph.D., Phoebe was appointed as an assistant to the Argentine National Observatory in Cordoba, Argentina. While on the ship to Buenos Aires, she met Otto Haas; they married in February 1914. Phoebe put her astronomy dreams on hold while she supported her husband's business and took care of their family. Despite her commitment to her family, Phoebe never lost her passion for astronomy. Through the suggestions of others, she volunteered with the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO). In 1927, through the assistance of Leon Campbell, recorder for AAVSO at Harvard Observatory, Phoebe purchased a Clark telescope from the Cranis estate. She used this telescope to make 338 observations between 1928 and 1933.
Provenance:
Thomas Haas, Gift, 2015
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Astronomy  Search this
Women scientists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Digital images
Citation:
Phoebe Waterman Haas Photo Album [Digital Scans], Accession 2015-0045, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2015.0045
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2015-0045

Leo Goldberg Diary

Creator:
Goldberg, Leo  Search this
Extent:
0.05 Cubic Feet ((1 folder))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Diaries
Date:
bulk 1960, 1979
Scope and Contents:
This item is a 8.5 x 7.5 inch diary written by Leo Goldberg. Only the first fifteen pages, and last page of the diary have any entries. Of greatest importance is that Goldberg writes of his decision to leave the University of Michigan for Harvard University.
Biographical / Historical:
Leo Goldberg (1913-1987) was an astrophysicist who carried out research into the composition of stellar atmospheres and the dynamics of the loss of mass from cool stars. His main subject of research was the study of the sun from space. Born in Brooklyn, New York to Polish immigrants, Goldberg received his degrees from Harvard and went on to be the director of three important observatories: University of Michigan (1946-60), Harvard (1960-71), and Kitt Peak National Observatory (1971-77). He played an important role in founding the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Kitt Peak National Observatory, and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. Goldberg was the president of the American Astronomical Society (1964-1966) and the International Astronomical Union (1971-1976).
Provenance:
Beverely (BD) Lynds, Gift, Year received
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Astronomy  Search this
Genre/Form:
Diaries
Citation:
Leo Goldberg Diary, Accession 2004-0059, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2004.0059
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2004-0059

Space Telescope History Project

Creator:
National Air and Space Museum (U.S.). Division of Space History  Search this
Names:
National Air and Space Museum (U.S.). Division of Space History  Search this
National Air and Space Museum. Department of Space History  Search this
Space Telescope History Project (U.S.)  Search this
Adams, Robert  Search this
Aucremanne, M.  Search this
Bahcall, John N.  Search this
Bahcall, Neta  Search this
Baum, William  Search this
Belton, M. J. S.  Search this
Bensimon, March  Search this
Bless, Robert, 1927-  Search this
Boeshaar, Greg  Search this
Boggess, Albert  Search this
Brandt, John C.  Search this
Brown, Art  Search this
Brown, Robert A.  Search this
Bulkin, Bert  Search this
Burbidge, E. Margaret  Search this
Caldwell, J. J.  Search this
Carr, Frank  Search this
Chapman, Clark R.  Search this
Clark, John  Search this
Costa, Frank  Search this
Danielson, E. G.  Search this
Davidsen, Arthur Falnes, 1944-  Search this
Disney, Michael  Search this
Downey, John  Search this
Doxsey, Rodger E.  Search this
Edmondson, Frank K. (Frank Kelly)  Search this
Elliot, James, 1943-2011  Search this
Emanuel, Garvin  Search this
Fastie, William  Search this
Giacconi, Riccardo  Search this
Goldberg, Alan  Search this
Groth, Edward  Search this
Guha, Arun  Search this
Hall, Donald N. B.  Search this
Harms, Richard  Search this
Havens, Kitty  Search this
Henry, Richard B. C.  Search this
Hinners, Noel W.  Search this
Hulst, H. C. van de (Hendrik Christoffel), 1918-  Search this
Hunten, Donald M.  Search this
Keathley, William  Search this
Keller, Sam  Search this
Keller, Warren  Search this
King, Ivan R.  Search this
Lane, A. L.  Search this
Lasker, Barry M.  Search this
Laurence, Robin  Search this
Leckrone, David  Search this
Longair, M. S., 1941-  Search this
Lowrance, John  Search this
Macchetto, F.  Search this
McCandless, Bruce  Search this
Meserve, Kent  Search this
Mitchell, Jesse  Search this
Moore, Jim  Search this
Nein, Mas  Search this
Noah, Don  Search this
Norman, Memphis  Search this
Norris, T. Bland  Search this
Odom, James  Search this
Olivier, Jean  Search this
Pellerin, Charles  Search this
Reetz, Arthur  Search this
Rehnberg, Jack  Search this
Richards, Evan  Search this
Roman, Nancy Grace, 1925-  Search this
Rose, James  Search this
Rosendhal, Jeffrey D.  Search this
Russell, Jane  Search this
Scherrill, Thomas  Search this
Schreier, Ethan  Search this
Schroeder, D. J.  Search this
Simmons, F. Pete  Search this
Smith, Robert W. (Robert William), 1952-  Search this
Sobieski, Stanley  Search this
Speer, Fred  Search this
Spitzer, Lyman, 1914-  Search this
Stockman, Peter  Search this
Stuhlinger, Ernst, 1913-  Search this
Teem, John  Search this
Tenerelli, Domenik  Search this
Tifft, William G.  Search this
Trevino, Robert  Search this
Weiler, Edward  Search this
Welch, James  Search this
Westphal, James  Search this
White, Richard Lee, 1953-  Search this
Zedekar, Ray  Search this
Extent:
3.7 Cubic Feet (15 cassette boxes; 5 letter-size document boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Slides (photographs)
Press releases
Transcripts
Photographs
Reports
Publications
Date:
1983-1991
Summary:
This collection consists of the oral history transcripts and related research documentation for the Space Telescope History Project (STHP), which examined the space sciences, predominantly astronomy, viewed through the lens of a particular undertaking, the Hubble Space Telescope, 1970s-1980s.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of the oral history transcripts and related research documentation for the Space Telescope History Project (STHP), which examined the space sciences, predominantly astronomy, viewed through the lens of a particular undertaking, the Hubble Space Telescope, 1970s-1980s. The principal investigator for the STHP was Robert W. Smith, and the interview set contains 235 hours of interviews with 80 individuals. The central thread of this collection was the problem of configuring new political relations among the space sciences and sponsors. The following were interviewed: Bob Adams (with Robert Trevino and Kitty Havens); M. Aucremanne; John Bahcall; Neta Bahcall; William Baum; Michael Belton; March Bensimon; Robert Bless; Greg Boeshaar; Albert Boggess; John Brandt; Robert Brown; Bert Bulkin; Margaret Burbidge; J. J. Caldwell; Frank Carr; Clark Chapman; John Clark; Art Code; Frank Costa; E. G. Danielson; Arthur Davidsen; Mike Disney; John Downey; Rodger Doxsey; Frank Edmondson; James Elliot; Garvin Emanuel; William Fastie; Riccardo Giacconi; Alan Goldberg; Edward Groth; Arun Guha; Don Hall; Richard Harms; Richard Henry; Noel Hinners; Donald Hunten; William Keathley; Warren Keller; Sam Keller; Ivan King; A.L. Lane; Barry Lasker; Robin Laurence; David Leckrone; Malcolm Longair; John Lowrance; Duccio Macchetto; Bruce McCandless; Kent Meserve; Jesse Mitchell; Jim Moore; Mas Nein; Don Noah; Memphis Norman; T. Bland Norris; James Odom; Jean Olivier; Charles Pellerin; Arthur Reetz; Jack Rehnberg; Evan Richards; Nancy Roman; James Rose; Jeffrey Rosendhal; Jane Russell; Ethan Schreier; Daniel Schroeder; Thomas Sherrill; F. Pete Simmons; Stanley Sobieski; Fred Speer; Lyman Spitzer; Peter Stockman; Ernst Stuhlinger; John Teem; Domenick Tenerelli; William Tifft; Hedrick van de Hulst; Edward Weiler; James Welch; James Westphal; Richard White; and Ray Zedekar. The collection also contains the following documentation gathered from a variety of sources: photographs, slides, NASA publications and reports, contractor reports and studies, press releases, and finding aids produced by the Space History Department, NASM.
Arrangement:
The Space Telescope History History Project interviews are arranged alphabetically by interviewee. Boxes 1-14 contain interviews on audio cassette tapes. These tapes have yet to be remastered and, due to their fragility, are not available to researchers. Boxes 15-20 contain the transcripts for these cassette tapes. Most of these transcripts are available to researchers though, restrictions are placed on a small number of them. A NASM staff member will advise the patron which transcripts are available for copying and/or viewing and how to order copies of transcripts. Transcripts with user restrictions are highlighted in bold type.
Biographical / Historical:
This collection contains the interviews for the Space Telescope History Project. These interviews examine the early planning and development of what would eventually be known as the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The period covered is from the 1970s into the 1980s. This project constitutes one of several oral history projects carried out within the National Air and Space Museum's (NASM) Department of Space History. This interview set consists of over 235 hours of interviews with 94 individuals. Please note that there are a few instances where audio cassette tapes of the interview subjects exist but without written transcripts while there are a few cases of existing transcripts of the interviews without any audio cassette tapes. Those interviewed include astronomers, scientists, engineers, as well as administrators, all of whom were involved in the space telescope project. The following were interviewed for this project: Bob Adams, Ken Ando, Marcel Aucremanne, John N. Bahcall, Neta Bahcall, William Baum, Michael J.S. Belton, Marc Bensimon, Livingston Biddle, Robert C. Bless, Greg Boeshaar, Albert Boggess, III, John Brandt, Robert A. Brown, Bert Bulkin, Margaret E. Burbridge, J.J. Caldwell, Frank Carr, Clark R. Chapman, John Clark, Art Code, Frank V. Costa, Allan Cree, E.G. Danielson, Arthur Davidsen, Mike Disney, James A. Downey, III, Roger Doxsey, Frank K. Edmondson, James L. Elliot, Garvin Emmanuel, William G. Fastie, George Field, Don Fordyce, Laurence W. Fredrick, Riccardo Giaconi, Alan Goldberg, Edward Groth, Arun K. Guha, Don Hall, Richard Harms, Kitty Havens, Richard Henry, Noel Hinners, Donald Hunten, William W. Keathley, Warren J. Keller, Sam Keller, Ivan King, A.L. Lane, Barry Lasker, Robin J. Laurance, David Leckone, Malcolm Longair, John L. Lowrance, Duccio Macchetto, Bruce McCandless, Kent Meserve, Jesse L. Mitchell, Jim Moore, Max Nein, Don Noah, Memphis Norman, T. Bland Norris, James B. Odom, Jean R. Olivier, Charles Pellerin, Arthur J. Reetz, Jack Rehnberg, Evan Richards, Nancy Roman, James Rose, Jeffrey D. Rosendahl, Jane Russell, Ethan Schreier, Daniel J. Schroeder, Thomas J. Sherrill, Pete F. Simmons, Stanley Sobieski, Fred A. Speer, Lyman Spitzer, Peter Stockman, Ernst Stuhlinger, John Teem, Domenick Tenerelli, William G. Tifft, Rodger Thompson, Robert Trevino, Hendrick C. van de Hulst, Edward Weiler, James C. Welch, James A. Westphal, Richard L. White and Ray Zedekar.
General note:
Additional material: This collection consists only of the interview transcripts, not the tapes. The tapes are housed in the National Air and Space Museum Department of Space History.
Provenance:
Department of Space History, NASM, Transfer, 1999, 1999-0035, Varies.
Restrictions:
Some restrictions apply; see permission forms in the collection accession file.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
Astronomy  Search this
Space sciences  Search this
Telescopes  Search this
Genre/Form:
Slides (photographs)
Press releases
Transcripts
Photographs
Reports
Publications
Citation:
Space Telescope History Project, Acc. 1999-0035, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.1999.0035
See more items in:
Space Telescope History Project
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1999-0035
Online Media:

Ray L. Newburn Collection

Creator:
Newburn, R. L. (Ray L.)  Search this
Names:
Jet Propulsion Laboratory. University of California.  Search this
Table Mountain Station, California  Search this
Neugebauer, Marcia  Search this
Newburn, R. L. (Ray L.)  Search this
Urey, Harold Clayton, 1893-1981  Search this
Extent:
1.8 Cubic Feet ((4 legal document boxes))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Publications
Correspondence
Reports
Date:
[ca. 1950s-1960s]
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of publications and memoranda from JPL relating to Newburn's work with the Laboratory, as well as correspondence with colleagues, including Marcia Neugebauer and H.C. Urey.
Biographical / Historical:
Ray Leon Newburn (1933-), noted lunar and planetary scientist, first came to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) as a summer employee, after pursuing graduate study in astronomy at the California Institute of Technology. In his long tenure with JPL, he participated in the development of plans for lunar and planetary exploration and planetary models for mission design, served as JPL representative to NASA's Space Sciences Steering Committee's Astronomy Subcommittee and help establish the Table Mountain Observatory in 1962.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
Joseph Tatarewicz, David DeVorkin, Division of Space History, NASM, transfer, 1998, 1998-0058, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Astrometry  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Comets  Search this
Planetary theory  Search this
Astronomy  Search this
Genre/Form:
Publications
Correspondence
Reports
Identifier:
NASM.1998.0058
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1998-0058

William E. Brunk Collection

Creator:
Brunk, William Edward, 1928-  Search this
Names:
American Astronomical Society. Division for Planetary Sciences  Search this
Project Mariner (U.S.)  Search this
Brunk, William Edward, 1928-  Search this
Extent:
0.68 Cubic Feet ((1 legal document box) (1 slim legal document box))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Correspondence
Reports
Date:
1963-1984
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of publications and correspondence relating to William Brunk's work with DPS, infrared telescope projects, planetary radio astronomy and Mariner Mars projects.
Biographical / Historical:
Astronomer William Edward Brunk (1928- ) served as a research scientist with NASA's Lewis Research Center and planetary scientist with Univ. Space Research Association, among other posts. He was active in the American Astronomical Society Division for Planetary Sciences (DPS) and much involved in projects advancing radio and infrared astronomy. In 1985 he received the Exceptional Service Medal from NASA.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
Joseph Tatarewicz and David DeVorkin, Transfer, 1998-0059, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Infrared telescopes  Search this
Radio astronomy  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Astronomy  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Reports
Identifier:
NASM.1998.0059
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1998-0059

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