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Apollo Space Suit Testing Photographs [Masiello]

Creator:
Masiello, Leonard N.  Search this
Extent:
0.05 Cubic feet (1 folder)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Newspaper clippings
Technical reports
Date:
1966, 2007
Summary:
In 1966, Leonard N. "Lenny" Masiello was an employee of Hamilton Standard who was asked to assist in testing the Apollo space suit. This collection consists of four photographs of Leonard N. Masiello testing a prototype version of the Apollo space suit for Hamilton Standard as well as a news clipping about space suits and three publications by the Hamilton Standard Space Hardware Heritage Team.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of four photographs of Leonard N. Masiello testing a prototype version of the Apollo space suit for Hamilton Standard. The photographs are all black and white and measure 3.5 x 4.25 inches with the exception of one larger print that measures approximately 10.5 x 7.25 inches. Two of the photographs were taken at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Manned Spacecraft Center in Houston, Texas; one was taken at Hamilton Standard in Windsor Locks, Connecticut; and one photo was taken at ILC Industries, Inc. in Dover, Delaware. The collection also contains a news clipping about space suits and three publications by the Hamilton Standard Space Hardware Heritage Team, all from 2007. The first is entitled, "Hamilton Sunstrand Space Suit Experience Supplement" (Report No. 4, Revision D); the second is entitled, "Hamilton Sunstrand's Human Space Systems" (Report No. 1, Revision A); and the third is entitled "Human Space Systems, Hamilton Sunstrand" (Report No. 6, Revision B).
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged by type of material.
Biographical / Historical:
In 1966, Leonard N. "Lenny" Masiello was an employee of Hamilton Standard who was preparing to enter U.S. Air Force pilot training. In the early part of that year, Masiello was approached by Dr. Vance Marchbanks, Jr. and was asked to assist in testing the Apollo space suit. Masiello participated in numerous tests of the suit, aided by his excellent physical condition, which contributed to the final design. One round of testing, held at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Manned Spacecraft Center in Houston, Texas, was attended by active and former astronauts including John Herschel Glenn, Jr.; John Leonard Swigert, Jr.; Leroy Gordon Cooper, Jr.; and Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom. Masiello left Hamilton Standard in late 1966 to enter pilot training, after which he was a pilot in the U.S. Air Force for 22 years before retiring as a lieutenant colonel.
Provenance:
Leonard N. "Lenny" Masiello, Gift, 2015 and materials added in 2019, NASM.2016.0007.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
Apollo Project  Search this
Space suits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Newspaper clippings
Technical reports
Citation:
Apollo Space Suit Testing Photographs [Masiello], NASM.2016.0007, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2016.0007
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2016-0007
Online Media:

Bendix Air Races Collection

Creator:
Bendix Corporation.  Search this
Bendix Aviation Corp  Search this
Names:
All-Women Trans-Continental Air Race  Search this
Bendix Air Races  Search this
First Annual Aircraft Show (Cleveland, 1946)  Search this
Gordon Bennett Balloon Race  Search this
Intercollegiate Air Meet  Search this
Medallic Art Company  Search this
National Aeronautics and Space Administration. John F. Kennedy Space Center  Search this
National Air Races  Search this
National Intercollegiate Flying Association  Search this
National Soaring Contest  Search this
Soaring Society of America  Search this
Cochran, Jacqueline  Search this
Doolittle, James Harold, 1896-1993  Search this
Mantz, Paul  Search this
Stewart, James  Search this
Thaden, Iris Louise McPhetridge  Search this
Extent:
7.28 Cubic feet (5 records center boxes, 1 16 x 20 x 3 inch flatbox, 1 12 x 16 x 3 inch flatbox)
7.66 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Manuscripts
Photographs
Publications
Financial records
Audiotapes
Telegrams
Ephemera
Date:
1931-1985
bulk 1931-1939
bulk 1946-1962
Summary:
The Bendix Corporation (1924-1983), manufacturers of devices for the automotive and aviation industries, sponsored the Bendix Trophy Race—a transcontinental speed competition for aircraft—annually from 1931-1939, then sporadically from 1946-1962. This collection includes race-related materials from the Bendix Advertising and Publicity department, along with materials from other aviation events for which Bendix was a sponsor. Approximately a third of the collection relates to the corporation's activities from circa 1960 to 1983, including military and commercial avionics and communications systems, and support for the Unites States space program, particularly the construction of Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Launch Complex 39.
Scope and Contents:
This collection centers on the activities of the Bendix Advertising and Publicity department (later Advertising and Public Relations), for many years directed by William A. Mara (later Eldon E. Fox) and assisted by the New York public relations firm Carl Byoir and Associates, Inc. Materials include correspondence, telegrams, documents, brochures, press releases, photographs, and black and white and color negatives and transparencies. As the Bendix Trophy Races were closely associated with the National Air Races, the collection includes race programs, schedules, entry forms, and related air racing ephemera, as well as a number of photographs by Robert E. Burke and Associates, for many years the official photographer of the National Air Races in Cleveland, Ohio. Similar materials relate to the National Soaring Contest held in Elmira, New York (1935-1946), and the All Woman Transcontinental Air Race (1956-1962) for which Bendix was a sponsor, various National Aircraft Shows and National Aviation Shows, and Bendix's membership in the Aircraft Industries Association of America (AIAA). The collection also includes materials relating to the design and production of the Vincent Bendix Trophy and related replicas and engraved plaques by the Medallic Art Company (New York, NY) and plaster models and plaques by The Potter-Bentley Studios, Inc. (Cleveland, Ohio). Also included are photographs and two sets of 11 audio cassette tape recordings each of interviews made as part of the 1985 program "The Golden Years," and photographs taken at the related October 30, 1985, event at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum. The later third of the collection relates to Bendix's activities circa 1960-1985, with documents and photographs relating to the construction of Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Launch Complex 39, followed by a small amount of assorted advertising ephemera for various Bendix electronic products and services.
Arrangement:
The materials are arranged in the original physical order as received from the donor, and have been grouped into four series. Folders within a series generally run in chronological order, although the last series contains an assortment of materials many of which would be more logically placed in earlier series. Folders of correspondence are generally arranged in reverse chronological order within the folder. Many of the photographs appearing in Series 2 (Bendix Trophy Races, By Year) can be found duplicated elsewhere in the collection. Boxes 6 and 7 both contain oversized materials.
Biographical / Historical:
The Bendix Corporation, founded in 1924 by inventor Victor Bendix, began as a manufacturer of devices for use in the automotive industry, initially of engine-related items such as starting motors and carburetors, but soon expanding to brakes and hydraulic systems. In 1929, renamed as Bendix Aviation, the corporation branched out into the design and manufacture of equipment for the closely related aeronautics industry, including aircraft hydraulics for brake and flap systems, aircraft engine carburetors, and various electric and electronic instruments. In 1931, Bendix decided to sponsor the first Bendix Trophy Race—a transcontinental speed competition open to all comers, male or female—"to encourage experimental developments by airplane designers and to improve the skills of aviators in cross-country flying techniques such as weather plotting, high altitude and instrument flight." The Bendix Trophy Races were held in conjunction with the National Air Races, occurring with great fanfare annually from 1931-1939, but were suspended from 1940-1945 during World War II. In 1946, the races resumed, but now had to contend with the invention of the jet engine—accordingly, the Bendix Trophy Race was split into two categories: the "R" Division for reciprocating engine airplanes, and the "J" Division for U.S. military jet airplanes. Interest in air racing had declined in the post-war period, and no race was run in 1950. In 1951 the races resumed, and from this point on were limited to U.S. military jets only. Subsequent Bendix Trophy Races occurred in 1953-1957, and then (after a three-year gap) in 1961, with the last race held in 1962.

By this point in time, the Bendix Corporation—which had branched out to dominate the US market in aircraft radio and radar equipment during World War II—was producing missile and radar systems for the US military. In the 1960s Bendix was also building ground and airbourne telecommunications and telemetry systems for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The Bendix Field Engineering division worked on the construction of Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Launch Complex 39 at the Merritt Island Launch Area (MILA) adjacent to Cape Canaveral, Florida, including the Apollo Launch Control Center, Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB), and operational support equipment. In the 1970s, Bendix and its numerous Divisions were involved in a series of mergers, sales, and other changes involving the Raytheon and Allied (later Allied-Signal Aerospace) corporations, followed by a hostile takeover attempt in 1982 by Martin Marietta. In 1983, Bendix was acquired by Allied-Signal Aerospace (later Honeywell International) which retained the avionics part of the business.

The original Vincent Bendix Trophy was donated to the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in 1985 [artifact number A19850368000]. On October 30, 1985, an event sponsored by Bendix/Allied-Signal was held at the museum in Washington, D.C., honoring aviators involved in the Bendix Trophy Races. Titled "The Golden Years," the program included interviews with several winners of the Bendix Trophy.
Provenance:
Allied-Signal Aerospace Corp, gift, 1988, NASM.1988.0115
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics -- Exhibitions  Search this
Periodicals  Search this
Mercury Project  Search this
Gemini Project  Search this
Apollo Project  Search this
Project Apollo (U.S.)  Search this
Aeronautics -- Competitions  Search this
Trophies  Search this
Saturn 5 Launch Vehicle  Search this
Radar air traffic control systems  Search this
Avionics  Search this
Gliding and soaring  Search this
McDonnell F-4 (F4H) Phantom II Family  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Manuscripts
Photographs
Publications
Financial records
Audiotapes
Telegrams
Ephemera
Citation:
Bendix Air Races Collection, Acc. NASM.1988.0115, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.1988.0115
See more items in:
Bendix Air Races Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1988-0115
Online Media:

Philatelic and First Day Cover Collection

Extent:
1.99 Cubic feet ((5 boxes))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Postage stamps
Cachets (philately)
Date:
bulk 1918-1999
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of philatelic items and first day covers from a variety of sources including flown items, cacheted covers, stamps, and first day covers. Flown items in the collection include letters from the first flights of various air mail routes; a letter carried aboard the first flight of the ZRS-4 Akron; a commemorative envelope from the First Flight Transpacific Westbound/Eastbound to Guam flown by the Pan American Clipper in 1935 which is signed by the crew and contains a narrative about the flight inside the envelope; an envelope flown aboard a special autogiro flight from Bolling Field; a letter carried on the Zeppelin LZ 129 Hindenburg that is stamped "Intended for the first eastbound trip of Airship 'HINDENBURG' in 1937. Could not be forwarded on account of accident to Airship on May 6, 1937"; a postcard and envelope carried aboard the first American Airlines non-stop flight from Los Angeles, CA to Washington, DC; a letter from the first flight of various Lufthansa routes; items carried aboard a flight commemorating the 50th anniversary of Calbraith Perry Rodgers' transcontinental flight; items from flights commemorating the 50th anniversary of air mail; a commemorative envelope flown on the first flight of the McDonnell Douglas DC-10; an oversized envelope with various postmarks and stamps from the Air Force Association's Around the World Flight in December 1949; two "Astro Letter" forms and an envelope flown by a Rocket Research Institute rocket during the time of the Apollo 16 flight; an envelope, in a commemorative folder, flown by Arnold Palmer in a Learjet 36 on an around the world record flight; balloon mail from the Atmosat America Balloon; a commemorative envelope containing a card of information flown from London to Auckland, New Zealand by Jean Batten; an envelope carried aboard the first flight of the Cessna 650 Citation III; items flown aboard the first solo transatlantic balloon flight by Joseph W. Kittinger, Jr.; two envelopes, signed by Henry T. "Dick" Merrill, flown during the 1927 Anglo-American Goodwill Coronation Flight from New York to London; two envelopes flown aboard Handley Page Dart Herald H.P.R.7 aircraft during two separate flights commemorating the 60th anniverary of scheduled air services at Cricklewood Airport; a cover carried aboard a 1937 Pan American Airways Martin (Glenn L.) Model 130 Hawaii Clipper flight from Hawaii to California; an envelope carried by Richard E. Byrd during his second Antarctic expedition; a letter carried on the first Transcontinental & Western Air Service air express flight from St. Louis, Missouri in 1931; a letter carried on Peoria (Illinois) Airport's first airmail flight; a cacheted cover flown aboard the Westinghouse Sentinel 1000 airship in 1993 to mark the bicentennial of America's first manned flight; and an envelope flown by sailplane to commemorate the dedication of the National Soaring Landmark in San Diego, CA. There are also aviation and space related stamps in the collection issued by the United States; Liberia; Rhodesia; Tanzania; India; Singapore; France; Germany; Hungary; Romania; Iceland; Peru; Brazil; Paraguay; Poland; and the Soviet Union. Stamps and cacheted and first day covers in the collection commemorate people and events such as the Wright Brothers; air mail; balloons; Amelia Earhart; U.S. Navy flights; Charles Lindbergh's New York to Paris flight; the 1929 National Air Races, Women's Air (Powder Puff) Derby; Blanche Stuart Scott; Glenn Curtiss; Robert Hutchings Goddard; Calbraith Perry Rodgers; Canadian aviation history; the Concorde; Alfred V. Verville; Richard E. Byrd; John F. Kennedy Space Center; the launch of Apollo 16; Apollo 17; the first flight of the Clancy Sky Baby; Floyd Bennett Field; satellites; the first emergency parachute jump, made by Harold R. Harris in 1922; the 50th anniversary of the blind flight made by James Harold "Jimmy" Doolittle in a Consolidated NY-2 (Husky) in 1929; the 50th anniversary of the first east to west transatlantic flight; the Viking Lander spacecraft; Edward Goodman and Elmer Ambrose Sperry; Pioneer 10; Jules Verne; the tenth anniversary of the Apollo 11 lunar landing; the triple launching of the USS Antietam, USS Chicago, and the USS Los Angeles from the Philadelphia Navy Yard; Walter Hinton; Hermann Julius Oberth; Henri Coanda; Harry Richman and Henry T. "Dick" Merrill's 1936 round-trip transatlantic flight; the 100th anniversary of the Smithsonian Institution; World War II; James A. Mollison; Ellington Field; International Philatelic Week; the 1938 Chicago International Air Show; Space Shuttle Mission STS-41 (36, 6 Oct 90) [note: this cacheted cover contains a ticket for the Kennedy Space Center Spaceport]; the USS Ranger; Enid Field Army Flying School; the dedication of Randolph Field; the 1937 All American Air Maneuvers in Miami, Florida; America's Model Plane Classic National Outdoor Championships held in Atlanta, Georgia in 1937; the USS Lexington; and airships including the LZ 127 Graf Zeppelin, Enterprise N1A, ZRS-4 Akron, and the ZRS-5 Macon. One item in the collection is a photocopy of an Apollo 11 commemorative envelope flown to the moon in the personal kit of Edwin "Buzz" Eugene Aldrin, Jr. and signed (on the original) by Aldrin, Michael Collins, and Neil Alden Armstrong. The collection also includes an incomplete series of Smithsonian "Milestones of Flight" commemorative envelopes. There are two philatelic souvenirs made of squares of white cloth, possibly beta cloth, which bear the Apollo 17 mission insignia along with space related stamps and a Houston postmark. There is also one newsclipping in the collection about Charles Kingsford-Smith and there is one black and white photograph that accompanies two postcards commemorating Rheinhold Tiling. A number of the items in this collection are autographed.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Space flight  Search this
Zeppelin LZ 129 Hindenburg  Search this
Airlines  Search this
Apollo Project  Search this
Air pilots  Search this
Aeronautics -- Records  Search this
Airplanes  Search this
Genre/Form:
Postage stamps
Cachets (Philately)
Citation:
Philatelic and First Day Cover Collection, Acc. XXXX-0473, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0473
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0473

Jacques Tiziou Space Collection

Names:
United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Extent:
146 Cubic feet (204 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Moon -- Exploration
Date:
bulk 1960s through 2010
Summary:
Jacques Tiziou (1939-2017) was a professional journalist and photographer, concentrating on aerospace topics. This collection includes materials from Tiziou's archive of historical documents, photography, and ephemera from the space program (both national and international) as well as his own photography and writings.
Scope and Contents:
Always an avid collector, Tiziou amassed an impressive archive of both historical documents and collectible memorabilia from the space program (both national and international), including over 800 cubic feet of press files, films, photography (including autographed crew photographs) and various souvenirs, from Sputnik to the US Space Shuttle Program. This archival collection consists of 146 cubic feet of materials drawn from Tiziou's original collection, including documents, ephemera, photographs, slides, and video/film, created or collected by Jacques Tiziou on space flight history. Much of the material was gathered from various sources such as NASA, but the collection also contains Tiziou's own photographs and writings.
Arrangement:
The material in the "Files" series has been removed from Tiziou's original file boxes and rehoused into new acid-free containers preserving the original order of each box's contents. The collection's boxes have been rearranged into subseries grouped by regional identity (USA, USSR, International, etc.) and then alphabetically by broad subject matter.

The "Photography" series has not yet been processed.
Biographical / Historical:
Jacques Tiziou (1939-2017) was a professional journalist and photographer, concentrating on aerospace topics. Born in Montélimar, France, he began his career while still a teen as a freelance journalist, and even before graduating in 1962 from the French engineering school Estaca he had worked for various European publications, radio, and television. Between 1965 and 1968, he was the Editor in Chief of the first Encyclopedia of Space and in 1969 he published A l'assault de la lune (A Storm of the Moon). Tiziou then moved to Florida, where he closely followed the Apollo and Skylab programs as a correspondent for Aviation Magazine, French TV channels and photo agencies, including Dalmas, Gamma, and Sygma (Corbis). While in Florida, Tiziou became friends with most American astronauts, and entertained them at his home. Tiziou was also interested in space policy affairs, and after the end of the Skylab program, he moved to Washington DC. Jacques Tiziou was awarded the Silver Feathers and Gold of the French Press, was named a correspondent for the Air and Space Academy in 1993, and was elected to the French National Academy of Air and Space in 1993.
Provenance:
Jacques-Jean Tiziou, Gift, 2018, NASM.2018.0078.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Supersonic transport planes  Search this
Artificial satellites  Search this
Ballistic missiles  Search this
Rocketry  Search this
Space flight  Search this
Space vehicles  Search this
Cold War -- 1950-1970  Search this
Apollo Project  Search this
Mercury Project  Search this
Gemini Project  Search this
Soyuz Program (Russia)  Search this
Saturn 5 Launch Vehicle  Search this
Space Shuttle Program (U.S.)  Search this
Project Vanguard  Search this
Vostok (manned satellite)  Search this
Citation:
Jacques Tiziou Space Collection, Acc. 2018.0078, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2018.0078
See more items in:
Jacques Tiziou Space Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2018-0078

Apollo Program Lecture Lantern Slides

Creator:
United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Extent:
0.17 Cubic feet (2 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Lantern slides
Date:
1962-1970
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of 160 Apollo era presentation lantern slides, 3.25 by 4 inch mounts as well as a few 35 mm slides. These slides were presumedly used by NASA as part of informational briefings given to upper management. The slides include the following: photographs of the moon, NASA facilities, rockets and equipment; charts, including NASA organizational charts and charts highlighting Apollo Program objectives and lunar site selection status; space-themed cartoons; maps showing NASA facilities; and artist concepts of the anticipated missions, including entering and leaving lunar orbit, the Lunar Excursion Module on the moon, reentering into Earth atmosphere, and splashdown.
Biographical / Historical:
The Apollo program began as part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) ten-year plan from 1959, which planned for lunar exploration sometime in the 1970s. Following President Kennedy's speech of 25 May 1961, which called for a lunar landing by the end of 1969, NASA accelerated its development scheme accordingly. Flights began in November 1967 with the unmanned launches of Apollos 4, 5, and 6. The first manned launch occurred in October 1968 with Apollo 7. Apollo 8 (21 Dec - 27 Dec 1968) was the first manned mission to orbit the moon. Apollos 9 (3 Mar - 13 Mar 1969) and 10 (18 May -26 may 1969) tested the lunar module in Earth and Lunar orbit respectively. Apollo 11 (16 Jul - 24 Jul 1969) was the first manned craft to land on the moon, followed by Apollos 12 (14 Nov - 24 Nov 1969), 14 (31 Jan - 9 Feb 1971), 15 (26 Jul - 7 Aug 1971), 16 (16 Apr - 27 Apr 1972), and 17 (7 Dec - 19 Dec 1972). Apollo 13 (11 Apr - 17 Apr 1970) was planned as a lunar landing mission, but an explosion in the Apollo Service Module caused the mission to be aborted. In all 12 men landed on the moon and carried out numerous scientific experiments and returned more than 837 pounds of lunar soil for analysis.
Provenance:
Charles Petruzzo, Gift, 2015
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
Manned space flight  Search this
Apollo Project  Search this
Genre/Form:
Lantern slides
Citation:
Apollo Program Lecture Lantern Slides, Acc. NASM.2015.0038, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2015.0038
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2015-0038

Gemini and Apollo Crew Splashdown Recovery Color Slides [Don Blair]

Creator:
Blair, Donald W.  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Cubic feet (One box.)
Container:
Box 1
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Date:
1966-1972
Summary:
This collection consists of color slides taken by Don Blair during his coverage of astronaut crew splashdowns and recoveries, 1960s.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of 35 mm color slides taken by Don Blair during his coverage of astronaut crew splashdowns and recoveries for the following missions: Gemini 9, June 1966 with USS Wasp (CVS-18); Gemini 10, July 1966 with USS Guadalcanal (LPH-7); Gemini 11, September 1966 with USS Guam; (LPH-9); Apollo 11, July 1969 with the USS Hornet (CVS-12); and Apollo 15, August 1972 with the USS Okinawa (LPH-3). The collection also includes two 35 mm black and white negative strips from Apollo 15, a small contact sheet of 35 mm three negatives from Apollo 11, and a few 35 mm copy slides of official National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) photographs. A set of digital scans of most of the original slides was provided by the donor on a USB flash drive.
Arrangement:
Slides are arranged by space mission recovery event, with black and white negatives appearing at the end of the collection.
Biographical / Historical:
Donald W. Blair (1933-2018) served in the Army from 1953 to 1955, and then attended the Cambridge School of Radio and TV in Manhattan, New York. The first 10 years of his career were spent in local radio before he joined the Mutual Network and from 1966 until 1989 he worked at Mutual, WCBS Radio, ABC Entertainment and NBC. Blair covered astronaut splashdowns and recoveries for the following missions: Gemini 9, June 1966 with USS Wasp (CVS-18); Gemini 10, July 1966 with USS Guadalcanal (LPH-7); Gemini 11, September 1966 with USS Guam; (LPH-9); Apollo 11, July 1969 with the USS Hornet (CVS-12); and Apollo 15, August 1972 with the USS Okinawa (LPH-3). Blair detailed his experience in his book, Splashdown: NASA and the Navy, which was published in 2004.
Provenance:
Robert Fish, Gift, 2019, NASM.2019.0034
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
Astronauts  Search this
Gemini Project  Search this
Apollo Project  Search this
Helicopters  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides -- 1960-1990
Citation:
Gemini and Apollo Crew Splashdown Recovery Color Slides [Don Blair], NASM.2019.0034, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2019.0034
See more items in:
Gemini and Apollo Crew Splashdown Recovery Color Slides [Don Blair]
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2019-0034
Online Media:

Fairchild Lunar Mapping Camera System Scrapbook [Hutchins]

Creator:
Hutchins, Albert G.  Search this
Names:
Fairchild Camera and Instrument Corporation  Search this
Extent:
0.51 Cubic feet (1 box)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Scrapbooks
Date:
1966-1972
Summary:
This collection consists of a brown 11.5 by 12 by 3 inch scrapbook entitled, " Apollo 15, 16, 17." The scrapbook documents the Fairchild Space and Defense System (FSDS) Lunar Mapping Camera, and the role of Albert G. Hutchins, program director of the FSDS's Lunar Mapping Camera Systems.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of a brown 11.5 by 12 by 3 inch scrapbook entitled, " Apollo 15, 16, 17." The scrapbook documents the Fairchild Space and Defense System (FSDS) Lunar Mapping Camera, and the role of Albert G. Hutchins, program director of the FSDS's Lunar Mapping Camera Systems. The following types of material are included: newspaper articles; articles from the FSDS newsletter, FOCUS; photographs of the camera; general NASA photographs; Fairchild lunar photographs; patches; philately; brochures; and a 1966 volvelle, "Star and Satellite Pathfinder."
Arrangement:
Collection is in original order.
Biographical / Historical:
Fairchild Space and Defense Systems (FSDS), a division of Fairchild Camera and Instrument Corporation produced for NASA a Lunar Mapping Camera System that produced high resolution metric photographs of the Moon's surface. The system consisted of two precisely oriented frame cameras mounted in the forward portion of the Apollo Scientific Instrument Module for the Apollo 15, 16, and 17 missions. It was remotely operated by the Command Module pilot during lunar orbit, and was deployed from the Apollo spacecraft when ready for use. Upon completion of the photographic mission, the camera was retracted and an astronaut performed an EVA to retrieve the film record container. The resulting photography was processed on the ground and provided scientific information of selenodesy as well as data on landing site analysis and topographic map compilation. Albert G. Hutchins was the program director of the FSDS's Lunar Mapping Camera Systems, working at FSDS from 1957 until 1975.
Provenance:
Linda Hutchins, Gift, 2015, NASM.2015.0048
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Lunar photography  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Apollo Project  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Fairchild Lunar Mapping Camera System Scrapbook [Hutchins], NASM.2015.0048, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2015.0048
See more items in:
Fairchild Lunar Mapping Camera System Scrapbook [Hutchins]
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2015-0048
Online Media:

NASA Headquarters Color Transparencies Collection

Creator:
United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Extent:
3.5 Cubic feet ((14 containers))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Color transparencies
Date:
bulk 1958-1986
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists 3.5 cubic feet of color transparencies from the NASA HQ photography series; this series consists of a 'best of' selection of photography from the NASA research centers and facilities across the United States; they are not inclusive of any one project, although the Apollo Program is well-represented, nor do they represent the only 'official' images.
Biographical / Historical:
The Office of Public Affairs for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Headquarters (NASA HQ) is located in Washington, DC. The Office of Public Affairs's mission is to provide for the widest practiable and appropriate dissemination of information relating to NASA activities and results to the media and general public office. Over the years, their outreach has included providing photography to the public.
Provenance:
NASA, Gift, Unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
Apollo Project  Search this
Space flight  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color transparencies
Citation:
NASA Headquarters Color Transparencies Collection, Accession XXXX-0695, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0695
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0695

Apollo Panoramic Camera (APC) Collection

Creator:
Itek Corporation  Search this
Extent:
0.79 Cubic Feet (2 containers)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Panoramic photographs
Technical documents
Date:
1969-1971
Summary:
This collection consists of technical manuals and documents relating to the Apollo Panoramic Cmaera (APC).
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of the following technical manuals and documents: Critical Design Review Light Sensor and AEC Modification Panoramic Camera for Apollo Scientific Instrument Module; Photographic Data Utilization Manual; "Panoramic Camera for Scientific Instrument Model Monthly Progress Reports," 1969-1971; Panoramic Camera for Apollo Scientific Instrument Module, 1970; V\H Problem Analysis - Apollo 15, Panoramic Camera, Experiment S-163, 1971, two revisions one September and one November 1971; Familiarization and Integration Manual for Prototype Panoramic Camera for Scientific Instrument Module, 1970; a folder of Itek Critical Design Review actions; and a Preliminary Work Breakdown Structure Chart.
Arrangement:
No arrangement.
Biographical / Historical:
The Apollo Panoramic Camera (APC) was mounted in the Scientific Instrumentation Module of Apollos 15, 16 and 17. Itek built the panoramic camera for NASA to be used in the scientific mapping done during the final three Apollo missions. The camera provided high resolution photography along orbital groundtracks. The camera, which could operate in stereo mode, was mounted on the service module and recorded images on a film cassette. The cassette was then retrieved by the Command Module Pilot during an extravehicular activity (EVA) during the trans-Earth portion of the mission. The camera is a direct technological descendent of the Itek camera used in the U-2 photo reconnaissance programs.
Provenance:
Stennis Space Center, Gift, 2018, NASM.2018.0007
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
Apollo Project  Search this
Technical manuals  Search this
Genre/Form:
Panoramic photographs
Technical documents
Citation:
Apollo Panoramic Camera (APC) Collection, NASM.2018.0007, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2018.0007
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2018-0007

Apollo 1 (AS-204) Fire Collection

Creator:
Needell, Allan A.  Search this
Names:
Chaffee, Roger B. (Commander)  Search this
Grissom, Virgil I.  Search this
White, Edward Higgins, 1930-1967  Search this
Extent:
one Cubic Feet ((1 box))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Publications
Date:
bulk 1960-2002
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of a cubic feet of copies of material gathered by Allan Needell on the Apollo 1 fire. Material was gathered from magazines, reports, memorandums, letters, and the Congressional Record. There is also a folder of photographs taken on October 26, 1998, of the opening and inspection of the Apollo 204 Capsule container at the NASA Langley Research Center.
Biographical / Historical:
On January 27, 1967, a fire broke out at 18:31 EST, in the cockpit of Apollo Command Module 012 while the "Block I" (Earth orbit capable) spacecraft sat atop an unfueled Saturn 1B rocket on launch pad 34 at Cape Canaveral, Florida. The system was undergoing a manned test in preparation for the scheduled Apollo 204 mission (now universally referred to as Apollo 1), the first scheduled manned orbital test of an Apollo Block I spacecraft. The three astronauts aboard, Virgil I. Grissom, Edward H. White, and Roger B. Chaffee, were killed by asphyxiation. In addition to the heartrending loss of life, the tragedy threatened to derail the United States' ambitious program to meet President John F. Kennedy's challenge to land a man on the Moon and return him safely to Earth before the end of the decade.
Provenance:
Allan Needell / Space History, Transfer, 2017
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Manned space flight  Search this
Apollo Project  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Apollo 1 Mission  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Publications
Citation:
Apollo 1 (AS-204) Fire Collection, Accession 2017-0029 , National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2017.0029
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2017-0029

Apollo 9 Audio Tape

Extent:
0.05 Cubic Feet ((1 tape))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Audiotapes
Date:
bulk 1969
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of one 5.5 inch reel-to-reel tape recording some of the activities and voice communications of James McDivitt and Russell L. Schweickart during the test flight of the Apollo 9 Lunar Module Pilot in Earth Orbit. There is also a CD-R copy made by NASM staff.
Biographical / Historical:
The flight of Apollo 9 (3 Mar - 13 Mar 1969) was the third manned mission for the United States Apollo Space Program. The Apollo 9 crew, consisting of Commander James McDivitt, Command Module Pilot David Scott, and Lunar Module Pilot Rusty Schweickart, tested aspects critical to landing on the Moon, with an emphasis on testing the Lunar Module (LM).
Provenance:
NASA Johnson Space Center, Gift, Unknown, 2010?
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Manned space flight  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Apollo Project  Search this
Lunar excursion module  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes
Citation:
Apollo 9 Audio Tape, Accession 2013-0041, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2013.0041
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2013-0041

United States Manned Space Program Manuals Collection [Donald Thompson]

Creator:
North American Rockwell Corp  Search this
Names:
Apollo Soyuz Test Project  Search this
Extent:
22 Cubic Feet ((22 boxes))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Technical manuals -- 20th century
Reports
Date:
bulk 1960s-1970s
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of 22 cubic feet of manned space manuals from the Gemini, Apollo and Apollo-Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) programs. The collection consists of reports, manuals and working papers, including mission reports, flight crew logs, and technical and crew debriefings.
Biographical / Historical:
Donald B. Thompson was employed in the Downey, California, Project Integration Office of North American Rockwell from 1962 until his retirement in 1994. As Thompson's office monitored the testing and mission activities of most boilerplate, prototype and flown spacecraft, they maintained a large collection of NASA and company documents relating to all North American contracts with NASA, especially the Apollo, Skylab and the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) programs. Thompson later removed these documents from the Downey plant to preserve them for posterity as they were scheduled for destruction. The documents were later returned to North American Rockwell, where they were gone through to remove company-sensitive material and then forwarded to Johnson Space Center for further review before being donated to the National Air and Space Museum.
Provenance:
NASA, Gift, 2013
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
Space flight  Search this
Gemini Project  Search this
Apollo Project  Search this
Genre/Form:
Technical manuals -- 20th century
Reports
Citation:
United States Manned Space Program Manuals Collection [Donald Thompson] , Accession 2013-0031, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2013.0031
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2013-0031

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