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NASA F-8 Supercritical Wing Collection

Creator:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Langley Research Center  Search this
Names:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Langley Research Center  Search this
North American Aviation, Inc.  Search this
Whitcomb, Richard, 1921-  Search this
Extent:
5.85 Cubic feet (13 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Reports
Drawings
Manuscripts
Correspondence
Notes
Photographs
Publications
Date:
1964-1972
Summary:
The supercritical wing concept was developed by Dr. Richard T. Whitcomb of the NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. Whitcomb's airfoil was designed to delay formation of shock waves at high speeds.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains documents gathered from Langley Research Center on the development of the supercritical wing concept and the F-8 test bed program. The material primarily consists of notes and reports covering the wind tunnel development, flight testing, and evaluation of the concept. The collection also includes general and press information about the program.
Series and Subseries Organization:
The NASA F-8 Supercritical Wing Collection is divided into four series:

Series 1 - Background Information

The Background Information Series contains publicity material, articles, general information, and technical reports. The technical reports are then arranged chronologically.

Series 2 - Wind Tunnel Testing

Test reports of the Wind Tunnel Testing Series are arranged numerically, and reports are arranged alphabetically by folder title.

Series 3 - Development and Flight Testing

The Development and Flight Testing Series begins with work statements and requests for proposal (RFP) information. These are followed by notes arranged in chronological order. Developmental technical reports are in alphabetical order by folder title. The flight test reports are arranged chronologically. These reports are then followed by photographs.

Series 4 - Evaluation of the Supercritical Wing

Evaluation reports on the Supercritical Wing Series are in chronological order
Biographical Note:
Richard T. Whitcomb (1921- ) was born in Evanston, Illinois. His family later moved to Worcester, Massachusetts, where Whitcomb attended public schools. He received a B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from Worcester Polytechnic Institute in 1943. Following graduation he accepted a position with the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA, the forerunner of NASA) at Langley Laboratories, Virginia. Whitcomb devoted much of his career to research in the problems of supersonic flight.

In the early 1950s Whitcomb discovered the transonic area rule concept. This rule amounts to a sensitive balance of fuselage and wing volume, which minimizes drag at transonic speeds. This concept was applied to post World War II fighters and resulted in operational military aircraft capable of supersonic flight.

Whitcomb earned international acclaim through his accomplishments with the area rule concept and the supercritical wing. Until his retirement from NASA he worked on aircraft energy efficiency and new winglet configurations.
Historical Note:
The supercritical wing concept was developed by Dr. Richard T. Whitcomb of the NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. Whitcomb's airfoil was designed to delay formation of shock waves at high speeds.

In comparison with conventional wing cross sections, the supercritical wing was flattened on top, delaying the formation of shock waves and moving them further aft along the wing to increase total wing efficiency. To compensate for the lift lost with the flattened wing top, the rear lower surface was shaped with a deeper, more concave curve. The Mach number (the speed of the aircraft calculated as a percentage of the speed of sound) at which the relative airflow reaches the speed of sound at some point on the airframe is called the critical Mach number. Below the critical Mach number the flow is said to be subcritical, and above the critical Mach number it is called supercritical. The initial wind tunnel tests of the supercritical wing indicated that the new airfoil shape could allow highly efficient flight near the speed of sound of approximately 660 mph at cruising altitudes.

Initial designs for the supercritical wing were produced in 1964. The development of the supercritical airfoils included three phases: slotted (1964-1966); integral (1967); and thickened trailing edge integral (1968-1969). Flight testing of the supercritical wing began in 1971 and ended in December 1972. A Ling-Temco-Vought (LTV) F-8 aircraft modified with the supercritical wing was used in these tests, making its first flight on 25 March 1955. The LTV F-8 was a single place land or carrier based supersonic aircraft equipped with radar to provide an all-weather capability. Its most unusual feature was the hydraulically operated variable incidence wing.

The blunt leading edge of the supercritical wing led to better takeoff, landing, and maneuvering characteristics. Subsonic transports, business jets, STOL (short takeoff and landing) aircraft, and remotely piloted vehicles made use of the supercritical wing technology, using less fuel and flying more efficiently than aircraft with conventional wings.

The F-8 Supercritical Wing Collection was received by the National Air and Space Museum in July 1984 from NASA's Langley Research Center. The collection was assembled originally by Dennis W. Bartlett Richard Whitcomb's colleague at Langley's 8-Foot Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. The material in the collection came from the offices and warehouses of the tunnel facility.
Provenance:
NASA, gift, 1984, XXXX-0104, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Permissions Requests
Topic:
Vought F-8 (F8U) Crusader Family  Search this
Airplanes -- Flight testing  Search this
Aerodynamics  Search this
Transonic wind tunnels  Search this
Aerodynamics, Transonic  Search this
Periodicals  Search this
Genre/Form:
Reports
Drawings
Manuscripts
Correspondence
Notes
Photographs
Publications
Citation:
NASA F-8 Supercritical Wing Collection, Acc. XXXX-0104, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0104
See more items in:
NASA F-8 Supercritical Wing Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0104
Online Media:

Apollo Milton Olin (A. M. O.) Smith Papers

Creator:
Smith, Apollo Milton Olin (A. M. O.), 1911-1997  Search this
Names:
Smith, Apollo Milton Olin (A. M. O.), 1911-1997  Search this
Extent:
1.09 Cubic feet ((1 records center box))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Drawings
Photographs
Publications
Date:
1935-1981
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of the significant writings of Smith, including writings relating to his contributions to boundary layer theory. The collection also includes Smith's notebooks and related photographs of his post-World War II on-site appraisal of Nazi aeronautical developments.
Biographical / Historical:
Apollo Milton Olin Smith (1911-1997), an aircraft designer and engineer known as 'AMO' for most of his life, was born in Columbia, Missouri. He began constructing gliders in high school and earned Masters Degrees in both Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering from Caltech in 1938. After graduation, he began work for Douglas Aircraft, where he was to be employed until his retirement in 1975. His work for Douglas included wind tunnel testing of the A-20 bomber, performance analysis of the DC-5 and aerodynamic design of the A-26 light bomber. During a leave of absence from Douglas, he served as first chief engineer of the Aerojet Co. Smith's work in aerodynamics led to his participation in an important post-World War II mission to Germany, which revealed that country's developments in swept-wing design. AMO Smith's subsequent research would make him a leader in aerodynamics, especially regarding his contributions to boundary layer theory. He was the recipient of many honors and awards during his lifetime and was responsible for advances in research involving the use of rocket motors to assist takeoff (JATO) and the design of the D-558 Phase 1 airplane and the F4D Skyray.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
Elisazbeth Krost Smith, Gift, 2000, 2000-0014, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aerodynamics  Search this
Airplanes -- Wings, Swept-back  Search this
Airplanes -- Jet propulsion  Search this
Airplanes -- Assisted take-off  Search this
Boundary layer  Search this
Airplanes -- Motors  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Airplanes -- Germany  Search this
Douglas F4D (F-6) Skyray Family  Search this
Douglas D-558 Family  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Drawings
Photographs
Publications
Identifier:
NASM.2000.0014
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2000-0014

Vornado Plane Material [Ralph K. Odor]

Creator:
Odor, Ralph K., 1895-1987.  Search this
Extent:
0.54 Cubic feet (1 box, 1 reel, and 1 DVD)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Reports
Technical drawings
Patents
Motion pictures
Date:
1929-1986
bulk 1930s
Summary:
Ralph K. Odor (1895-1987) was an inventor who conceived an aircraft design in the 1920s in which the air was pushed from a propeller into a tube, later named the Vornado Plane. This collection consists of approximately 0.54 cubic feet of material relating to Ralph K. Odor and the Vornado Plane.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of approximately 0.54 cubic feet of material relating to Ralph K. Odor and the Vornado Plane including photographs; news clippings; technical reports and drawings; patents; legal documents; test reports; documents outlining the history of the Vornado Plane's development; and correspondence. Also included are two CDs which hold scans (made by the donor) of some of the textual and photographic materials contained in the collection as well as a 16mm film showing a test of a Vornado Plane scale model at the Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, and a copy of the film on DVD.
Arrangement:
Collection is arranged by type of material.
Biographical / Historical:
Ralph K. Odor (1895-1987) was an inventor who conceived an aircraft design in the 1920s in which the air was pushed from a propeller into a tube. A small model of the aircraft was tested in 1929. In 1932, Odor was invited to work with the Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, Oklahoma Engineering Experiment Station (Project No. 26), to further develop his propeller assembly concept and it was there that the name "Vornado Plane" was born. Odor filed a patent on his propeller assembly in 1934, which was approved in 1938. The Vornado Trust was formed in 1935 to handle all legal and financial aspects of the Vornado Plane and Vornado principle. In 1936, Odor began to work with Kern Dodge, a mechanical engineer and member of the Vornado Trust. Additional testing was conducted on using the Vornado principle for air circulation and by 1938, the concept of the Vornado Plane was put aside to focus on using the technology for fans. Additional patents were granted to this end in the late 1930s and early 1940s. In 1939, the Vornado Trust contracted with the Propellair company to produce fans using Odor's principles, however these plans were derailed by World War II.
Provenance:
Donald Morris, Gift, 2016, NASM.2016.0012
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Aerodynamics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Reports
Technical drawings
Patents
Motion pictures
Citation:
Vornado Plane Material [Ralph K. Odor], NASM.2016.0012, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2016.0012
See more items in:
Vornado Plane Material [Ralph K. Odor]
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2016-0012
Online Media:

Rockwell HiMAT RPRV Documentation

Creator:
Rockwell International  Search this
Names:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Rockwell International  Search this
Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (Ohio)  Search this
Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (Ohio). Flight Dynamics Laboratory  Search this
Extent:
5.68 Cubic feet ((1 slim legal document box) (5 records center boxes) (2 flatboxes))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Reports
Photographs
Correspondence
Software
Punched cards
Date:
1976-1981
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of documentation on the NASM HiMAT. The material includes correspondence, color photographs, test information, computer programs, printouts, punch tapes, and schematics.
Biographical / Historical:
The Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology (HiMAT) program was established by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards AFB, CA and the USAF Flight Dynamics Laboratory at Wright-Patterson AFB, OH to decrease the time needed to flight test advanced design technology by providing a low-cost, low-risk test bed vehicle. Following control technical development in 1975, NASA awarded a contract to Rockwell International for two HiMAT Remotely-Piloted Research Vehicles (RPRV). The Rockwell HiMAT consisted of a basic core vehicle containing the power plant, control, and telemetry systems and modular main wings, canard and tail surfaces, and engine intake and afterburner/exhaust structures to allow flight testing of alternate designs. The first of the HiMATs was delivered to NASA in March 1978 and the second in June, with the first free flight occurring in July 1979. The Rockwell HiMAT was controlled by a ground-based pilot through television, radar, and telemetry links to the vehicle with backup systems on chase aircraft and a self-righting system on the RPRV in the event of ground control loss. One HiMAT was donated to the National Air and Space Museum (NASM) and placed on display in May 1989.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
NASA/Dryden FRC, Transfer, 1989, 1989-0059, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aerodynamics  Search this
Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology (HiMAT)  Search this
HiMAT Remotely-Piloted Research Vehicles (RPRV)  Search this
Drone aircraft  Search this
Airplanes -- Flight testing  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Reports
Photographs
Correspondence
Software
Punched cards
Identifier:
NASM.1989.0059
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1989-0059

Theodore von Karman Collection Microfiche

Creator:
Von Kármán, Theodore, 1881-1963  Search this
Names:
Daniel Guggenheim Fund for the Promotion of Aeronautics, Inc.  Search this
United States. Air Force  Search this
United States. National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics  Search this
Von Kármán, Theodore, 1881-1963  Search this
Extent:
2 Cubic Feet ((10 shoeboxes))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Microfiche
Date:
1871-1963
Scope and Contents:
This collection covers von Karman's life, but the core of the collection is records relating to: his career in Germany after World War I; materials pertaining to his assocation with such organizations as the Daniel Guggenheim Fund for the Promotion of Aeronautics, the National Advisory Committee on Aviation, the United States Air Force, and the International Union of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics; and personal and scientific correspondence with colleagues and students from around the world.
Biographical / Historical:
Theodore von Karman (1881-1963) was an accomplished physicist, aerodynamicist, applied mathematician, and science advisor. Born in Hungary, von Karman received a degree in mechanical engineering from The Royal Joseph Technical University, and a doctor's degree from The University of Gottingen. In 1930, von Karman was appointed as professor of aeronautics, director of the Daniel Guggenheim Aeronautical Laboratory at the Califonia Institute of Technology, and director of the Daniel Guggenheim Airship Institute at Akron Ohio. He was a founding member of the Institute of Aeronautical Sciences and was the recipient of many awards, including the U.S. Medal of Merit and the first U.S. National Medal of Science.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
California Institute of Technology, unknown, 1980, XXXX-0537, California Institute of Technology
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access, restrictions on permission to publish.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aeronautics -- Research  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Mathematics  Search this
Physics  Search this
Aerodynamics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Microfiche
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0537
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0537

Peenemünde Aerodynamics Reports

Creator:
Peenemunde Research and Development Station  Search this
Names:
Peenemunde Research and Development Station  Search this
Extent:
2.2 Cubic Feet (5 boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Reports
Date:
1938-1945
bulk 1942-1944
Summary:
The German Army and Navy experimental station at Peenemünde, on the North Sea coast of Germany, was established in the mid-1930s to continue the rocketry work begun at Kummersdorf in 1930.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of copies of reports from the Peenemünde Archiv 66 series covering aerodynamic work on the V-2 (A4), A5, and Wasserfall missiles.
Arrangement:
The collection is divided into two series: first are blueprint copies, which include photographs as illustrations, followed by autopositive copies, which include copy negatives used to produce illustrative photographs. There is significant overlap between these two series. In each series the documents are in order by Archiv Number.
Biographical/Historical note:
The German Army and Navy experimental station at Peenemünde, on the North Sea coast of Germany, was established in the mid-1930s to continue the rocketry work begun at Kummersdorf in 1930. By the end of World War II (1939-1945) the research station produced a number of successful weapons, including the first surface-to-surface guided missile (V-1), the first ballistic missile (V-2), and the first operational air-to-surface missile (He 293), as well as other designs. The equipment developed at Peenemünde formed the basis for postwar research and designs by both the United States and the Soviet Union.
Provenance:
Unknown, gift, unknown year
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Rocketry  Search this
V-1 rocket  Search this
V-2 rocket  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Rockets (Aeronautics)  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Rockets (Aeronautics) -- Performance  Search this
Aerodynamics  Search this
He 293 (missile)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Reports
Citation:
Peenemünde Aerodynamics Reports (Fort Bliss/Puttkamer Collection), NASM.XXXX.0192, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0193
See more items in:
Peenemünde Aerodynamics Reports
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0193
Online Media:

Matthew Bacon Sellers II Collection

Creator:
Sellers, Matthew Bacon, II, 1869-1932  Search this
Names:
1909 Fort Myer Military Trials  Search this
Sellers, Matthew Bacon, II, 1869-1932  Search this
Extent:
0.68 Cubic Feet ((2 legal document boxes))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Reports
Photographs
Correspondence
Notes
Diaries
Place:
Fort Myer (Va.)
Date:
1889-1924
Scope and Contents:
This donation includes the following: eighteen diaries of Sellers, 1899-1903 and 1907-1909; his laboratory daybook in which he wrote many of the details of his aeronautical work; Sellers' personal correspondence, 1899-1917; photographs, including images of Sellers quadruplane hang gliders, wind tunnels, and biplane; photographs by Sellers of the Wright Model A at the 1909 Fort Myer Military Trials; miscellaneous reports; and family papers.
Biographical / Historical:
Matthew Bacon Sellers II (1869 - 1932) received a LL.B. from Harvard Law School in 1893 and during 1893-94 studied chemistry, physics, and mechanical arts from the Lawrence Scientific School at Harvard University, and Drexel Institute. From childhood, Sellers exhibited an interest in artificial flight, making his own kites, hot-air and hydrogen balloons, and various kinds of 'mechanical birds.' In 1903 Sellers began to direct his full attention to aeronautical research and invention. From 1903 to 1925, Sellers was involved with building gliders, aircraft and wind tunnels to accurately measure lift and drag of various airfoil curves. Sellers made his first powered hop in 1908 and among the mechanical innovations that he received patents on was an undercarriage design featuring retractable wheels. He was considered a leading authority on aerodynamics and was appointed to several boards, including the Aerodynamic Laboratory Commission, and the Naval Consulting Board as an expert on aviation and related matters. Sellers was also the technical editor of 'Aeronautics' and authored 30 articles on aerodynamics.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
John Clark Sellers and Matthew Bacon Sellers III, Gift, 1986, 1986-0050, NASM
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aerodynamics  Search this
Wind tunnels  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial  Search this
Aeronautics -- 1903-1916  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Sellers 1908 Quadruplane (Sellers No 5)  Search this
Sellers 1909 Quadruplane (Sellers No 6)  Search this
Sellers 1924 Multiplane  Search this
Wright (Co) Type A Family  Search this
Genre/Form:
Reports
Photographs
Correspondence
Notes
Diaries
Identifier:
NASM.1986.0050
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1986-0050

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