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Harry Copland Collection

Creator:
Copland, Harry Depew, 1896-1976  Search this
Names:
Curtiss Flying Service, Inc.  Search this
Early Birds of Aviation (Organization).  Search this
United States. Army. Air Corps. Southeast Army Air Corps  Search this
Copland, Harry Depew, 1896-1976  Search this
Extent:
0.78 Cubic feet ((1 legal document box) (3 shoeboxes))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Logs (records)
Glass negatives
Date:
1917-1953
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of three boxes of 4' and 3' glass slides, dating from the early 1930s. The slides are probably from 1919-1932 when Copland was an instructor and lecturer for Curtiss Flying Service, Inc. There are also seven log books chronicling both Copland's civilian and military flights (1917-1942) and numerous private and commerical pilots, mechanic, and medical licenses mostly from the 1920s-1940s. Lastly, there is a small black binder full of aerial photographs and notes, relating to a number of fields that were used for World War II training. All of the fields were part of the Southeast Army Air Corps, which included a number of civilian contract schools. Included in this notebook are lists of the officers for each school. The following fields and schools are included: Riddle Aero Inst., Florida; Lodwick School of Aero, Florida; Hawthorne School of Aeronautics, South Carolina; Tuskegee Institute, Alabama; Darr Aero Tech, Georgia; Graham Aviation Company, Georgia; Embry-Riddle Company, Florida; Lodwich Aviation Military Academy, Florida; Southeastern Air Service, South Carolina; Southern Aviation School, South Carolina; Clarksdale School of Aviation, Mississippi; South Aviation Training School, Alabama; Raymond-Richardson Aviation Co, Georgia; Helena Aero Tech, Arkansas; and Greenville Aviation School, Florida.
Biographical / Historical:
Harry Depew Copland (1896-1976) was an Early Bird, soloing in a glider in 1909 and in an airplane in 1911. His many achievements include: exhibition flights, (1911); British Blockade Runners, radio officer (1915-1916); Canadian Royal Flying Corps 203rd Squadron, 1st Lieutenant and Flight Commander (1917-1919); District Manager of the New England Flying Service in charge of Curtiss Primary School Flying Operations (1929-1932). During World War II he served at Maxwell Field, AL, and as commanding officer of the 19th AAF Basic Flying Detachment at Greenville, S.C. Copland was also involved with Altantic Airways, Inc., United Air Lines, and was the Director of Florida Aviation Department.
General:
Other materials: Two pouches which had held licenses and log books were transferred to NASM Aeronautics Division.
NASMrev
Provenance:
Harry Copland?, unknown, unknown, XXXX-0439, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aeronautics -- 1903-1916  Search this
Flight training  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Aerial photography  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Logs (records)
Glass negatives
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0439
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0439
Online Media:

Fred Howard Vin Fiz Special Papers

Creator:
Howard, Fred.  Search this
Names:
Armour Company  Search this
Rodgers, Calbraith Perry  Search this
Extent:
0.8 Cubic feet (2 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Telegrams
Financial records
Correspondence
Logs (records)
Newspaper clippings
Date:
1911
Summary:
The first crossing of the United States by airplane was achieved by Calbraith Perry Rodgers in 1911 in his Wright EX biplane, named the Vin Fiz.
Scope and Content:
This collection consists of the following material relating to Fred Howard and his role with the Vin Fiz Special: correspondence, newspaper clippings and articles, schedules and logs for both the Vin Fiz and the Vin Fiz Special, telegrams; train registration sheets, miscellaneous notes, passenger lists, and financial paperwork.
Arrangement:
Arranged by type of material.
Biographical/Historical note:
The first crossing of the United States by airplane was achieved by Calbraith Perry Rodgers in 1911 in his Wright EX biplane, named the Vin Fiz. Rodgers decided to attempt the coast-to-coast flight in response to publisher William Randolph Hearst's New York American challenge which offered a prize of $50,000 for the first transcontinental flight to be competed in 30 days. Rodgers began his journey from Sheepshead Bay, New York, on September 17, 1911, and as the flight was punctuated by numerous stops, delays, and accidents the 30-day time limit Hearst imposed for the prize had expired before Rodgers reached California on November 5, 1911.

To finance the trip, Rodgers had secured backing from the Armour Company, a Chicago firm which was then introducing a new grape-flavored soft drink called Vin Fiz. Armour provided Rodgers with a special train, called the Vin Fiz Special, with cars for the accommodation of Rodgers' family and his support crew, and a "hangar" car, which was a rolling workshop, filled with spare parts to repair and maintain the airplane over the course of the flight. There was even an automobile on board to pick up Rodgers after forced landings away from the rail line. Fred Howard, the division passenger agent for the Erie Railroad, was placed in charge of the Vin Fiz Special and soon also took charge of the command center, juggling both railroad matters and aviation repairs. In Chicago, Howard was commended for his effort and asked to continue with the flight to California, but he declined.
Provenance:
Eileen F. Lebow , Gift, 2006, NASM.2007.0002
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Wright (Co) Model EX "Vin Fiz"  Search this
Railroad cars  Search this
Railroad travel  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Vin Fiz Special (train)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Telegrams
Financial records
Correspondence
Logs (records)
Newspaper clippings
Citation:
Fred Howard Vin Fiz Special Papers, NASM.2007.0002, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2007.0002
See more items in:
Fred Howard Vin Fiz Special Papers
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2007-0002
Online Media:

Edward P. Baldwin Collection

Creator:
Baldwin, Edward P.  Search this
Names:
Lockheed Aircraft Corp  Search this
Extent:
7.31 Cubic feet ((29 boxes))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Photographs
Logs (records)
Manuals
Newspaper clippings
Date:
bulk 1944-1982
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of 7.31 cubic feet of material created by Edward Baldwin during his tenure as a engineer for Kelly Johnson at Lockheed Skunk Works, 1944-1982. The collection consists of original pencil on vellum Skunk Works drawings, blueprints, design studies, logs, engineering notebooks, photographs, technical manuals, correspondence, newspaper articles and newsletters relating to his work on Lockheed aircraft, including the development of the P-80, SR-71, F-94, F-104, F-117 and the U-2.
Biographical / Historical:
Edward Baldwin received his degree in Mechanical Engineering in 1940 from West Virginia University. After graduation he moved to California and began working at Lockheed Aircraft Corporation. He was first assigned to the Special Airplane Projects group, where he worked on the Model 10 Electra, Model 12 Electra Jr, Model B-14, Hudson Bomber and the Model 18 Lodestar. Baldwin was then placed on loan to the P-38 and R6-O Constitution projects. In March of 1944, Baldwin was asked by Dick Boehme to join the Fuselage Design Group of the Advanced Development Projects (ADP) "Skunk Works." Baldwin worked on the P-80, before working on the F-94C and the XF-104. In November of 1954, Baldwin was placed on the U-2 project, where he developed the configuration of the aircraft and completed the design. Baldwin also worked on the ADP's Archangel Program to develop a Mach 3+ reconnaissance aircraft, which became known as the SR-71. Baldwin was then assigned to the "Have Blue" program, which was the Skunk Work's entry into the Stealth Prototype competition. Baldwin was responsible for all structural design of the two test vehicles and when Lockheed won the contract, became the Deputy Program Manager for Structures of the F-117. He retired in September 1982, after the first four production F-117 aircraft were delivered to the Air Force.
Provenance:
Barbara Sulier and Robert Baldwin, Gift, 2016
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Lockheed (F-80) P-80A Shooting Star  Search this
Lockheed U-2 Family  Search this
Lockheed SR-71 (Blackbird) Family  Search this
Lockheed F-117A Nighthawk (Stealth Fighter)  Search this
Lockheed F-104 Starfighter Family  Search this
Lockheed F-94 Starfire Family  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Aircraft drafting  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Photographs
Logs (records)
Manuals
Newspaper clippings
Citation:
Edward P. Baldwin Collection, Accession 2017-0010, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2017.0010
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2017-0010

Louis W. Schalk, Jr. Collection

Names:
Lockheed Aircraft Corp  Search this
Extent:
0.23 Cubic feet ((1 box))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Logbooks
Newspaper clippings
Vhs (videotape format)
Date:
bulk 1948-1957
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of .23 cubic ft of photographs, newspaper articles, and military documentation chronicling Louis W. Schalk's aviation career. The military records include the following: medical exam documentation; 2nd Lieutenant certificate (1948); individual flight records, 1949-1957, from the Air Force Flight Test Center (ARDC) at Edwards AFB, showing him flying the Lockheed F-104A Starfighter, the North American F-86 Sabre, F-100A Super Sabre, the Douglas C-47D Skytrain, and the Republic F-84 (P-84); and memos saying he was to perform maintenance test flights in the Lockheed T-33 (TP-80, TF-80) Shooting Star, Lockheed F-80 Shooting Star, Republic F-84, McDonnell F-101 Voodoo, Lockheed F-104 Starfighter, and North American F-86 Sabre. The photographs consist of thirty-eight black and white, mostly 8 by 10 inch, images of Schalk and the various aircraft he flew. The collection also includes a folder of newspaper articles, and one videotape of the Lockheed A-12 (Blackbird)'s first flight and other Schalk-related footage.
Biographical / Historical:
Louis W. Schalk, Jr., (1929-2002) graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1948 with a bachelor of science in military arts and engineering. He received his aviation training at Nellis Air Force Base, and was assigned to a fighter bomber wing in Germany. In 1954, he attended the Test Pilot School at Edwards Air Force Base and graduated at the top of his class. Schalk served as a test pilot at Edwards until 1957, when he joined Lockheed Aircraft as an engineering test pilot. In 1959 he was selected as chief test pilot for Lockheed Martin's Advanced Development Programs, i.e., "Skunk Works." In 1962, Schalk made the first flight of the Lockheed A-12 (Blackbird), and later flew Mach 3 flights of the Lockheed SR-71 (Blackbird). He was the winner of the 1964 Society of Experimental Test Pilots Iven C. Kincheloe Award.
Provenance:
Nancie Schalk Johnson, Gift, 2012
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Test pilots  Search this
Lockheed A-12 (Blackbird)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Logbooks
Newspaper clippings
VHS (videotape format)
Citation:
Louis W. Schalk, Jr. Collection, Accession 2013-0013, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2013.0013
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2013-0013

Francis Gary Powers Collection

Creator:
Powers, Francis Gary, 1929-1977  Search this
Names:
Lockheed Aircraft Corp  Search this
Khrushchev, Nikita Sergeevich, 1894-1971  Search this
Powers, Francis Gary, 1929-1977  Search this
Extent:
1.53 Cubic feet (2 legal document boxes, 1 flat box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Clippings
Diaries
Correspondence
Telegrams
Photographs
Logs (records)
Date:
1929-1986
bulk 1952-1977
Summary:
This collection consists of material relating to Francis Gary Powers's flying career in the Air Force, Central Intelligence Agency, and later pursuits. The majority of the documents deal with the May 1960 U-2 incident, in which Powers was shot down over the Soviet Union during a reconnaisance mission and imprisoned. Materials include: logbooks; flight records from his military and civilian careers; a pocket diary and journal he kept during his Soviet imprisonment; letters to his parents; materials collected by his parents as his father attempted to visit him including a telegram from Nikita Khrushchev and a New Testament given to Powers by his mother during his Soviet trial; Congressional hearing material; newspaper articles; Life magazine; and several photographs of Powers.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of documents relating to Francis Gary Powers and his aviation career, particularly the 1960 U-2 incident with the Soviet Union. Materials include: logbooks; flight records from his military and civilian careers; a pocket diary and journal he kept during his Soviet imprisonment; letters to his parents; materials collected by his parents as his father attempted to visit him including a telegram from Nikita Khrushchev and a New Testament given to Powers by his mother during his Soviet trial; Congressional hearing material; newspaper articles; Life magazine; and several photographs of Powers.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged into three series: Early Career, the U-2 Incident, and Post U-2 Incident Life and Career.

Series 1 contains materials relating to Francis Gary Power's early career with the United States Air Force before resigning to join the CIA, including his birth certificate, military orders and forms, and his individual flight records.

Series 2 contains materials relating to the U-2 incident, in which Francis Gary Powers was shot down over the Soviet Union and imprisoned. The first set of materials relates to Powers' imprisonment, including his prison journal, pocket diary, New Testament, correspondence, and the subsequent congressional hearing. The second set of materials relates to the Powers family during the incident, including correspondence and telegrams with Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev and the United States government and Oliver Powers' passport. The third set of materials relates to the media reactions to the incident, including complete newspapers, article clippings, a television script, and artwork.

The Soviet Prison Journal and Soviet Prison Pocket Diary were on display in the Looking at Earth Gallery when the collection was digitized. The photocopies were scanned for digital access.

Series 3 contains materials from Powers' life and career after his return to the United States, including logbooks, public relations documents, flight training and insurance records, an employment application, and memorial items.

Documents with personally identifiable information (PII) have been redacted or not digitized.
Biographical/Historical note:
Francis Gary Powers (1929 -1977) learned to fly during high school. He enlisted in the United States Air Force after graduating from Milligan College in 1950. In 1956, he resigned from the Air Force to become a "civilian employee" of Lockheed on loan to the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, authorized to fly Air Force aircraft. In reality, he was a covert employee of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), training for Operation Overflight—U-2 reconnaissance missions.

Powers was captured and imprisoned after his U-2 was shot down over the Soviet Union during an aerial reconnaissance mission on May 1, 1960. Powers was placed on trial and exchanged nearly two years later for Rudolf Abel, a Soviet agent. After his return to the United States, Powers continued to work for the CIA, but then left to work at Lockheed. Powers was working for NBC's Los Angeles affiliate KGIL in 1977, when his helicopter ran out of fuel and crashed, causing his death.
Provenance:
Claudia Sue Powers, Gift, 1994, NASM.1994.0010.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
United States -- Foreign relations -- Soviet Union  Search this
Periodicals  Search this
Lockheed U-2 Family  Search this
Cold War  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Air pilots  Search this
Aerial reconnaissance  Search this
Photographic reconnaissance systems  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial  Search this
Aeronautics and state  Search this
Genre/Form:
Clippings
Diaries
Correspondence
Telegrams
Photographs
Logs (records)
Citation:
Francis Gary Powers Collection, Acc. 1994.0010, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.1994.0010
See more items in:
Francis Gary Powers Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1994-0010
Online Media:

Helen Richey Pilot Log and Collection [Suskalo]

Creator:
Richey, Helen, 1909-1947  Search this
Names:
Bendix Air Races  Search this
Central Airlines  Search this
Great Britain. Air Transport Authority  Search this
United States. Bureau of Air Commerce  Search this
United States. Bureau of Air Commerce. National Air Marking Program  Search this
Women Airforce Service Pilots (U.S.)  Search this
Richey, Helen, 1909-1947  Search this
Extent:
0.1 Cubic feet (2 folders)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Clippings
Logs (records)
Date:
1933-1944
Summary:
This collection consists of Helen Richey's pilot log for 1944-1945, newspaper clippings covering the period from 1933 to 1944 and seven photographs of Ms. RIchey.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of Helen Richey's pilot log for 1944-1945, newspaper clippings covering the period from 1933 to 1944 and seven photographs of Ms. Richey.
Arrangement:
This collection is in original order.
Biographical / Historical:
Helen Richey (1909 - 1947) was an aviation pioneer who made headlines as a stunt pilot, a racing champion, a holder of speed and altitude records, a flight instructor, an Air Transport Auxiliary (ATA) and Womens Air Service Pilot (WASP) during WWII, the first women to pilot a commercial airliner on a regular scheduled run, and as the first woman to ever fly the United States mail. In April of 1930, Richey enrolled as a student pilot at Bettis Field's Curtiss-Wright flying school and on June 28, 1930, she earned her pilot's license. In December 1930, Richey was granted a limited commercial pilot's license bythe Department of Commerce. During the 1930s, Richey set a number of records and placed in several races, including as a co-pilot to Amelia Earhart in the 1936 Bendix Race. In 1934 Richey applied for a pilot's job with Central Airlines. She was hired and flew Central's route between Washington and Detroit. However, the Bureau of Air Commerce warned Centeral management to keep her on the ground in bad weather and the pilot's union rejected her application for membership. Due to these restrictions, Richey resigned from Central in October 1935. The Bureau of Air Commerce then offered Helen a new job as an air marking pilot for the government. She stayed with the air marking service until 1937 when the job was completed. In 1940 Richey was the first woman to earn an instructor's license and she was appointed an instructor for air cadets at Pittsburgh - Butler Airport. In 1942, she joined the American wing of the British Air Transport Auxiliary (ATA), where she ferried aicraft and needed materials thoughout the British Isles. Richey headed the ATA's American Group from 1942 until April 1943, when she returned to the States and joined the WASPs. Unable to find aviation employment after the WASPs disbanded in 1944, she committed suicide in 1947.
Provenance:
Gene Suskalo, Gift, 1998, NASM.1999.0006
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Women air pilots  Search this
Women in aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial -- United States  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial  Search this
Aeronautics -- Competitions  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Airports  Search this
Airports -- Location  Search this
Aeronautics -- Records  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Flight training  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Clippings
Logs (records)
Citation:
Helen Richey Pilot Log and Collection [Suskalo], NASM.1999.0006, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.1999.0006
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1999-0006
Online Media:

Basil Lee Rowe Collection

Creator:
Rowe, Basil Lee  Search this
Names:
Pan American World Airways, Inc.  Search this
West Indian Aerial Express  Search this
Lindbergh, Charles A. (Charles Augustus), 1902-1974  Search this
Rowe, Basil Lee  Search this
Extent:
5.35 Cubic feet (5 document boxes, 4 flat boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Logs (records)
Scrapbooks
Publications
Date:
1917-1973
bulk 1930-1968
Summary:
Basil Lee Rowe (1896-1973) enjoyed a long and successful career in aviation, initially as a military exhibition pilot, barnstormer, air racer, charter operator, flight instructor, aircraft salesman, and rumrunner, before moving to the West Indies to start an airline, the short-lived West Indian Aerial Express, bought out by Pan American Airways in 1928. Rowe became a pioneering senior pilot for Pan Am, flying with them for 28 years before his retirement in 1956. This collection includes scrapbooks, photo albums, memorabilia, and first day covers, in addition to the draft manuscript for Rowe's 1956 autobiography, Under My Wings.
Scope and Contents:
The collection consists of Rowe's pilot's log books covering his career from 1927 to 1956, assorted periodicals, cartoons featuring Rowe, scrapbooks and photo albums assembled by Rowe (featuring newspaper clippings, photographs, and ephemera), several draft manuscripts of Rowe's 1956 autobiography Under My Wings, and first day air mail postal covers collected by Rowe.
Arrangement:
Materials in this collection are grouped into series by format. See individual series Scope and Content notes for details on arrangement within that series. Note that with the exception of the chronologically arranged flight log books, Rowe did not appear to organize his materials in any particular order.
Biographical / Historical:
Basil Lee Rowe, born February 10, 1896, grew up in the small town of Shandaken, New York, in the Catskill Mountains. He began his flying career in 1914 as an apprentice to aviator Turk Adams after seeing Adams fly at a local county fair. Impatient to become a military pilot, Rowe arranged to join the Royal Canadian Air Force, but was sidelined by a ruptured appendix before he could get to Canada. By the time Rowe had recovered, the United States had entered World War I and Rowe was able to join the Aviation Section of the U. S. Army Signal Corps; he was sent to Texas. During the Third Liberty Loan drive, Rowe was assigned to a group of fliers who were to give exhibition flights; after his discharge, he used his savings to buy a used Avro biplane and barnstormed around the East Central United States, using Hadley Field (New Brunswick, New Jersey) as his home field. Rowe soon bought a second aircraft, hired pilot William S. "Bill" Wade, and moved his base of operations to the Aeromarine Base at Keyport, near Perth Amboy, New Jersey. Rowe prospered through the early 1920s, and his troupe the "Rowe Fliers" (including at various times wingwalkers Bill Stacy and Marguerite L. "Peggy" Roome) toured the eastern US giving exhibition flights and passenger rides. In the winter, Rowe moved his operation to Florida, and, with a rebuilt Curtiss Seagull, ferried passengers eager to escape Prohibition from Miami to Nassau, Bahamas--with a bit of rumrunning on the side. Back in New Jersey, Rowe formed the Chamberlin-Rowe Aircraft Corporation with fellow aviator Clarence Chamberlin to buy and resell Army surplus aircraft; the short-lived business went bust in 1924 when the government finished selling off its aircraft. Rowe, a talented racing pilot, kept busy from 1924 through 1926 on the racing circuit, winning numerous prizes.

By the end of 1926, at the age of thirty, Rowe felt that he had reached a turning point in his life. Dismayed by the increase in US government regulation of aviation, Rowe moved his operations to the West Indies, settling in Santo Domingo in the Dominican Republic. With Bill Wade, Rowe rapidly established a business flying charters around the country, with flights to neighboring Haiti and Puerto Rico. In June 1927, with financial backing provided by sugar industry businessmen and the government of the Dominican Republic, Rowe founded West Indian Aerial Express (abbreviated variously as WIAE or WIAX) to provide airline service between Cuba, Haiti, the Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico, hoping to be well positioned to bid on future US foreign air mail routes. With this in mind, Rowe returned to the Unites States and purchased a Fairchild FC-2W floatplane (christened "La Niña") and a larger Keystone K-47 Pathfinder trimotor (the former "American Legion," r/n NX179, rebuilt by the Keystone factory following a crash in April 1927 and rechristened as "Santa Maria"). To his dismay, Rowe was forced to acquired a US transport pilot license in order to be allowed to fly the "Santa Maria" back to Santo Domingo; he hired Canadian pilot Cy Caldwell to ferry "La Niña." On the way south in mid October 1927, Rowe found himself and his two aircraft in Florida just as Pan American Airways (PAA), which had been successful in obtaining a temporary contract to deliver mail from the US to Cuba, found itself without any aircraft able to fly out of their Key West, Florida, field to fulfill the contract before it expired. PAA struck a deal with Rowe to lease "La Niña" (piloted by Caldwell) to fly the first Pan American Airways flight on October 19, 1927.

With its two new aircraft, West Indian Aerial Express started regularly scheduled twice-weekly flights on December 1, 1927, between Cuba, Haiti, Santo Domingo, and Puerto Rico, later extending the routes to St. Thomas and St. Croix in the US Virgin Islands. On June 30, 1928, WIAX filed a bid with the US government for air mail service on the route from Key West to Puerto Rico, but was outmanuevered by the more politically-savvy Pan American Airways which won the contract. A final crippling blow was dealt to WIAX in September 1928 when a severe hurricane hit their base in San Juan, Puerto Rico, destroying "La Niña" and two older Waco biplanes. Rowe made his last flight in the "Santa Maria" on September 20, 1928, before turning the aircraft over to Pan American. On October 16, 1928, PAA purchased WIAX, with Rowe becoming PAA's senior pilot.

During his first ten years with Pan Am, Rowe flew a record number of hours and surveyed most of the new air routes through the Caribbean to Central and South America, several times flying with Charles Lindbergh. When the US entered World War II, Rowe was assigned to Pan Am's Africa and Orient Division to serve with the US Army Air Forces Air Transport Command on their supply route across the South Atlantic and Africa to India and China (the "Cannonball Run"). His wife, Florence May Sharp, whom Rowe had married in 1930, served as an aircraft spotter during the war. During the Korean Conflict, Rowe was once again pressed into service, and was transferred to Pan Am's Pacific Division to fly transpacific supply routes and medical evacuation flights. May's early death in 1943 left Rowe a widower at his retirement from Pan Am in 1956. At their Coral Gables, Florida, home he wrote his autobiography, Under My Wings (The Bobbs-Merrill Company, Inc., New York, 1956) and remained active as a tennis instructor until his death on October 28, 1973.
Related Materials:
See related collection Basil Lee Rowe First Day Air Mail Covers, NASM.XXXX.0487.

Basil Lee Rowe air racing medals in the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum collection:

Medal, 1926 National Air Races [Winner, Relay Race], A19690242000.

Medal, 1926 National Air Races [Winner, Relay Race], A19690243000.

Medal, Aviation [Dayton Air Race], A19690244000.

Medal, Third Annual Dayton Air Race Winner, A19690245000.

Medal, 1926 National Air Races [2nd Place, Free-For-All Race, 510 cu. in. Class], A19690246000.

Medal, 1926 National Air Races [Winner, First Elimination, 500 cu. in. Class], A19690247000.

Basil Lee Rowe air racing trophies in the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum collection:

Trophy, Allen W. Hinkle, Basil L. Rowe, A19690238000 [Allen W. Hinkle Trophy for Two, Three, and Four Place Airplanes, 1924]

Trophy, Glenn H. Curtiss, Basil L. Rowe, A19690239000 [The Glenn H. Curtiss Trophy for Two Seater Low Horsepower Airplane, National Air Races, Mitchel Field L. I., 1925]

Plaque, B.B.T. Corporation, National Air Races 1926, A19690240000 [B.B.T. Corporation of America Relay Race for Commercial Planes won by Basil L. Rowe, Charles S. Jones, A. H. Kreider]

Plaque, 1926 National Air Races, Benjamin Franklin Trophy, A19690241000 [Benjamin Franklin Trophy donated by Joseph A. Steinmetz, Relay Race for Commercial Planes won by Basil L. Rowe, Charles S. Jones, A. H. Kreider]
Provenance:
Basil Lee Rowe, gift, 1969; United States Air Force Museum, transfer, 1973; NASM.XXXX.0019
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Aeronautics -- Exhibitions  Search this
Aeronautics -- Competitions  Search this
Air pilots  Search this
World War, 1914-1918  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Periodicals  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Logs (records)
Scrapbooks
Publications
Citation:
Basil Lee Rowe Collection, Acc. NASM.XXXX.0019, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0019
See more items in:
Basil Lee Rowe Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0019
Online Media:

Richard E. Schreder Papers and Drawings

Creator:
Schreder, Richard E. "Dick"  Search this
Extent:
11.67 Cubic feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Audiotapes
Logs (records)
Photographs
Drawings
Date:
bulk 1930-2000
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of eleven cubic feet of archival material chronicling the aviation career of Richard E. Schreder. Included are the following types of material: 95 drawings of Schreder's kit designs; logbooks; correspondence; photographs; awards; military paperwork; and Schreder interview tapes with CD copies.;
Biographical / Historical:
Richard E. Schreder (1915-2002) was a naval aviator and American sailplane enthusiast who designed and developed kit sailplanes. Schreder built his first powered aircraft, a single seat aircraft with a Henderson motorcycle engine, at age 19. He received a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering form the University of Toledo in 1938 and he then joined the US Navy as a Naval Aviation Cadet. Schreder served in the Navy until 1952, rising to the rank of Commander. He won the Distinguished Flying Cross for the sinking of a German U-boat during World War II. After leaving the Navy, Schreder founded a successful drafting supplies business in Toledo Ohio, and continued experimenting with small aircraft. He designed an all-metal low-wing single-seater called the Airmate 5, which won the Experimental Aircraft Association's (EAA) best workmanship award in 1954. Soon after however, Schreder became fascinated with soaring. He bought a Bowlus Baby Albatross and a Schweizer 1-23D before building his own sailplane designs. In 1956 Schreder built the HP-7 which he flew to a four-place finish in that year's US National Championship contest. Schreder's next design, the HP-8 won the 1958 US Nationals and established speed records in the 100, 200, and 300 km courses. Schreder's first attempt at developing a glider specifically for kit manufacture was the HP-10. That design was followed by the HP-11, HP-14, HP-15, HP-16, RS-15, HP-17, HP-18, HP-19, HP-20, HP-21 and HP-22. The aircraft were so successful the Schreder set up a company, Bryan Aircraft Inc., in 1966 to market the plans and kits, eventually selling more than 470 kits. Schreder won three US national sailplane contests (1958, 1960,1966) in sailplanes he designed and represented the United States at four international sailing contests. Due to Schreder's contribution to soaring, both in design and piloting skill, he was elected to the Soaring Society of American Hall of Fame in 1962.
Provenance:
Carol Schreder and Karen Schreder Barbera, Gift, 2008
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautical sports  Search this
Gliding and soaring  Search this
Schreder HP-7 Sailplane  Search this
Schreder HP-10 Sailplane  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Audiotapes
Logs (records)
Photographs
Drawings
Citation:
Richard E. Schreder Papers and Drawings, 2008-0038, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2008.0038
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2008-0038

Thomas Taylor Neill Collection

Creator:
Neill, Thomas Taylor, 1903-1988  Search this
Names:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
National Air and Space Museum (U.S.)  Search this
United States. National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics  Search this
United States. National Bureau of Standards. Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory  Search this
Neill, Thomas Taylor, 1903-1988  Search this
Extent:
17.25 Cubic feet ((2 legal document boxes) (15 records center boxes))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Financial records
Photographs
Drawings
Logs (records)
Manuscripts
Publications
Reports
Date:
1926-1972
bulk 1938-1943
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains the research material that Neill used in compiling his book. The material consists of correspondence and reports dealing with inspection, specifications, and performance tests of automobile and aircraft engines and fuels from 1926 to 1944. There are also reports, articles, and log books of specific engine types, both aeronautical and automotive, collected from all over the world, as well as a rough manuscript copy of Neill's book.
Biographical / Historical:
Thomas Taylor Neill (1903-1988) was an aeropropulsion engineer and author. Following the completion of his degrees at Catholic University of America (BS.ME 1925) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MS 1926) he went to work in the Aircraft Engine Research lab at the United States National Bureau of Standard (engineer 1926-39). He served as an ignition engineer for the Army Air Corps in Dayton, OH (1939-42). He then spent nearly twenty years in research for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (Assistant to the Director of Research 1942-58) and its successor the National Aeronautics and Administration (NASA; Chief of Research Administration Division, Office of Advanced Research Programs 1958-61; Chief of Research and Technical Reports, Office of Advance Research and Technology, 1961-70). Following his retirement from NASA, Neill worked as a consultant to the National Air and Space Museum (1971- ) where he began compiling a book on aviation engines in the inter-war period.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
Thomas Neill, transfer, unknown, XXXX-0181, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aeronautical engineers  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Aircraft engines  Search this
Airplanes -- Rocket engines  Search this
Airplanes -- Motors  Search this
Airplanes -- Jet propulsion  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Financial records
Photographs
Drawings
Logs (records)
Manuscripts
Publications
Reports
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0181
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0181

Space Acceleration Measurement Unit System (SAMS) Collection

Creator:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Names:
Mir (Space station)  Search this
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Extent:
2.18 Cubic feet ((3 legal document boxes) (1 flatbox))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Optical disks
Correspondence
Logs (records)
Drawings
Reports
Date:
[ca. 1990s]
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of the following types of documentation relating to SAMS: test plans and reports; drawings; maintenance logs; and memorandums and correspondence. This collection also contains optical discs from the SAMS/MIR project, which contain the raw data.
Biographical / Historical:
The Space Acceleration Measurement Unit System (SAMS) is an acceleration measurement and data acquisition instrument, not a classical micro gravity research experiment. SAMS consists of a main unit and up to three remotely positioned triaxial sensor heads. The data is used to provide investigators with a time history of this environment to improve for future experiment design. This instrument was flown on the Space Shuttle and Mir Space Station, from 1994 to 1998.
General:
Additional materials: The actual artifact, project decals and official SAMS log books are housed in the National Air and Space Museum Depart of Space History.
NASMrev
Provenance:
NASA Glenn Research Center, Transfer, 2000, 2000-0040, Public Domain
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
Space Acceleration Measurement Unit System (SAMS)  Search this
Reduced gravity environments  Search this
Space shuttles  Search this
Genre/Form:
Optical disks
Correspondence
Logs (records)
Drawings
Reports
Identifier:
NASM.2000.0040
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2000-0040

Roland Chilton Collection

Creator:
Chilton, Roland.  Search this
Names:
Aeromarine Plane & Motor Co.  Search this
Extent:
0.91 Cubic feet ((2 boxes))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Patents
Photograph albums
Reports
Drawings
Logs (records)
Patent applications
Date:
bulk 1914-1965
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of the following items documenting Roland Chilton's aviation patent career: photographs; two 11 x 7 inch black photo albums, labeled "Healey-Aeromarine Bus Co., Inc. Keyport - New Jersey USA," which contain photographs of engines from Aeromarine Plane & Motor Co.; log book for a Wright R 760 engine; Chilton's pilot log books; World War I registration cards and passports; newspaper clippings; patent and tax paperwork; reports on Chilton's trip to the United Kingdom in 1941; an Aeromarine S-12 Engine report; and drawings of Blade Rolling Machines.
Biographical / Historical:
Roland Chilton (1890- ) was a prolific designer of over 150 aviation engine and accessory mechanisms. Born in Wolverhampton, England, Chilton immigrated to the United States in 1918, becoming a naturalized citizen in 1941. Chilton started his career working at Sunbeam Motor Car Co., LTD, in Wolverhampton, England, before moving to London where he was in charge of the engine section of B. Napier & Son. In 1914, Chilton became the Chief Engineer for Fergus Motors and entered the United States to work in Fergus' American offices. Chilton then joined Aeromarine Plane & Motor Co. as the Chief Engineer for Aero Engines, Starters and Buses in 1920. Ten years later, he was hired as a Consulting Engineer for Wright Aeronautical Corporation. He retired from Wright Aeronautical Corporation in 1949, and by that time held over 150 United States patents, ranging from articulated propellers to the Chilton Damper.
Provenance:
Bonnie Hampton, Gift, 2005
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Airplanes -- Motors  Search this
Aeromarine S-12  Search this
Genre/Form:
Patents
Photograph albums
Reports
Drawings
Logs (records)
Patent applications
Citation:
Roland Chilton Collection, Accession number 2005-0042, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2005.0042
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2005-0042

Space Suit Component and Survival Rucksack Collection

Creator:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Names:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Project Apollo (U.S.)  Search this
Project Gemini (U.S.)  Search this
Skylab Program  Search this
Extent:
3.36 Cubic feet ((2 Records center boxes) (2 flatboxes))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Logs (records)
Reports
Date:
1966-1977
Scope and Contents:
This collection documents the development of space suits and accessories for post-Mercury manned missions. The material includes acceptance data packages and test papers for the suits, life support systems, and survival rucksack which chart the testing and development of these systems.
Arrangement:
Arrangement: The papers are arranged chronologically by program, beginning with the Gemini mission in Folder One of Box One (S-1C-1). The papers continue chronologically until concluding with the Skylab and Shuttle missions in Folder 28 of Box Two. Box Three contains binders from the Blue David Clark Co., Inc. These binders include operational logs from NASA and the field, malfunction reports, maintenance logs and serialization control records. Blue prints of the systems tested are also included. Box Four includes two computer printouts. Printout number one contains the summary of hardware located at the Smithsonian as of 3-27-1973. Number two contains the summary of hardware located at the Smithsonian as of 9-10-1973.
Biographical / Historical:
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) was inaugurated on 1 October 1958 with the intent of conducting a manned space program. NASA took over the rocketry and propulsion work previously performed by the United States Air Force, Navy, and National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. Unmanned launches began during the International Geophysical Year (1957-58) under Air Force auspices and have continued to the present with a wide variety of payloads, including space science, weather, communications, and earth observation satellites. The manned program progressed through Projects Mercury (1959-63; launches 1961-63), Gemini (1962-67; launches 1965-66), Apollo (1960-72; launches 1968-72), and Skylab (1969-74; launches 1973-74). After a hiatus following the Skylab program, the manned program focused on the Space Shuttle, a reusable spacecraft. The manned program was supported by a number of unmanned exploration vehicles in the Ranger, Lunar Orbiter, and Surveyor series throughout the 1960s, as well as research into a number of related areas.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
NASA, Transfer, 1988, 1988-0114, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Space shuttles  Search this
Space suits  Search this
Manned space flight  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Logs (records)
Reports
Identifier:
NASM.1988.0114
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1988-0114

John Matthew Miller III Collection

Creator:
Miller, John Matthew, III, 1896-  Search this
Names:
Kellet Autogiro Corp  Search this
Miller Aviation Corp (John Matthew Miller III) (Aircraft manufacturer) (1927-1929)  Search this
New Brunswick (NJ) Aero Club  Search this
Pitcairn (Pitcairn-Cierva)  Search this
Pitcairn Autogiro Co, Inc.  Search this
Pitcairn Aviation  Search this
Johnson, Robert Woods  Search this
Miller, John Matthew, III, 1896-  Search this
Extent:
0.8 Cubic feet (1 legal document box, 1 slim legal document box, 1 map folder (18 x 48 inches))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Financial records
Correspondence
Clippings
Pamphlets
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Logs (records)
Date:
1910-1973
Summary:
John Matthew Miller III (born June 3, 1896) was active in aviation throughout his life, as a naval aviator, air mail pilot, transport pilot, autogiro pilot, flight instructor, aircraft manufacturer, airport operator, agricultural pilot, and helicopter test pilot, working at different times for the United States Navy, the U.S. Aerial Mail Service, Pitcairn Aeronautical Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture; from 1927-1929 Miller operated his own business, the Miller Aviation Corporation of New Brunswick, New Jersey. The collection includes Miller's pilot licenses and log books, scrapbooks, photographs, newspaper clippings and assorted ephemera, predominantly from the 1914 to 1939 period of Miller's life.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains both original materials and photocopies of materials loaned by the donor for copying. Original materials include Miller's United States Navy Naval Aviator Certificate, an aircraft log book for the Curtiss Seagull "Jacques Cartier" (owned by The Chicago Tribune), a photo album entitled "The Miller Corporation, New Brunswick Airport" featuring images of the Miller (Corp) MCA-1 Amphibian Biplane, assorted loose photographs, correspondence from Robert Woods Johnson (of Johnson & Johnson), two panoramic group photographs of the US Navy Flight A Naval Aviation detachment at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1917, newspaper clippings (several covering James G. Ray's autogiro flight over Washington, DC in 1934), assorted ephemera relating to Miller's aviation career, and two bound books: Flying Officers of the U.S.N. (US Navy): 1917-1919 and Saga of the US Air Mail Service: 1918-1927, (Air Mail Pioneers, Inc., 1962). Photocopied materials include two of Miller's pilot log books, two of Miller's pilot licenses, a scrapbook, and selected pages from additional scrapbooks from which individual photographs were copied by the National Air and Space Museum in 2001. The collection also includes Smithsonian Institution numbered copy prints of these selected photographs.
Arrangement:
Materials in this collection are grouped into Series by type; materials within a series are generally arranged chronologically, grouped by subject.
Biographical / Historical:
John Matthew Miller III was born June 3, 1896, at Tacoma, Washington. As a teenager, Miller came east to study at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and found summer employment with the Burgess Company aircraft manufacturers at Marblehead, Massachusetts. In 1917, following the entry of the United States into World War I, Miller was accepted into the Massachusetts School for Naval Air Service (Flight A Naval Aviation detachment at MIT), and, after two months, moved on to elementary flying instruction at Hampton Roads, Virginia, and then advanced instruction at Pensacola, Florida. He was commissioned into the United States Naval Air Service as an Ensign on March 16, 1918, and stationed at Naval Air Station Rockaway Beach, New York, where he performed patrol and convoy work off New York harbor, until ordered to inactive duty on December 15, 1918. Miller promptly joined the US Aerial Mail Service; after training in Dayton Wright DH-4 air mailplanes at Belmont Park, Long Island, Miller was posted to Bustleton, Pennsylvania, as station manager. Following his two years of air mail service, Miller worked at a number of aviation jobs, including time with the America Trans Oceanic Company (Miami, Florida, 1920), survey flights in Quebec (Canada, 1922), and managing operations for Pitcairn Aeronautical Corporation at their base adjacent to Hadley Field in South Plainfield, New Jersey (the New York terminal for the New York to Chicago and New York to Atlanta air mail routes). Miller was an active member of the New Brunswick (NJ) Aero Club, owners of a Pitcairn PA-3 Orowing based at Pitcairn's field. On August 1, 1927, Miller organized the Miller Aviation Corporation, operating out of New Brunswick Airport (a.k.a. "Miller Field"), a short-lived airfield located southwest of the city of New Brunswick. Miller Aviation offered flying instruction, local sightseeing flights, and charter passenger flights in the mid-Atlantic seaboard region. In 1928-1929, the Miller Aviation Corporation designed, constructed, and tested the Miller (Corp) MCA-1 Amphibian Biplane; sadly, the aircraft crashed during its first ground landing. After his company failed, Miller returned to Pitcairn Aeronautical as an autogiro pilot, making a number of flights through the 1930s for Pitcairn, the US Department of Agriculture, and others. During World War II, Miller temporarily rejoined the Navy as a Lieutenant Commander, serving as a helicopter test pilot at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Maryland. Miller later worked for the Department of Agriculture until his retirement in 1956.

NOTE: John Matthew Miller III (born 1896, died circa 1980s), the subject of this collection, should not be confused with fellow air mail and autogiro pilot John McDonald "Johnny" Miller (1905-2008), occasionally referenced in this collection. Johnny Miller was more closely associated with the Kellett Autogiro Corp (Philadelphia, PA), and was famous for being the first to land an aircraft on the roof of a building.
Provenance:
Lee M. Gunther-Mohr, Gift, 2001, NASM.2001.0036.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Burgess Aircraft Family  Search this
Autogiros  Search this
Aircraft industry -- United States  Search this
Aircraft industry  Search this
Airplanes  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial -- United States  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial  Search this
Aeronautics -- Societies, etc.  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Pitcairn PCA-2 Autogiro  Search this
Miller Corp MCA-1 Amphibian Biplane  Search this
Kellett Autogiro Family  Search this
Pitcairn PA-3 Orowing  Search this
Waco 10 Family (Aircraft)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Financial records
Correspondence
Clippings
Pamphlets
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Logs (records)
Scrapbooks
Citation:
John Matthew Miller III Collection, Acc. NASM.2001.0036, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2001.0036
See more items in:
John Matthew Miller III Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2001-0036
Online Media:

George A. Page Jr. Collection

Creator:
Page, George Augustus, Jr., 1892-1983  Search this
Names:
Aeromarine Plane & Motor Co.  Search this
Aeronca (Aeronautical Corp of America)  Search this
American Trans Oceanic Co.  Search this
Curtiss-Wright Corporation  Search this
Early Birds of Aviation (Organization).  Search this
Heinrich Aeroplane Co, Inc.  Search this
Moisant Monoplane Co.  Search this
Page, George Augustus, Jr., 1892-1983  Search this
Extent:
0.45 Cubic feet ((1 legal document box))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Correspondence
Logs (records)
Publications
Clippings
Date:
1921-1977
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of the following material documenting Page's aviation career: membership cards and licenses; log books; newspaper and magazine articles; biographical material; and photographs.
Biographical / Historical:
George Augustus Page (1892-1983) was an Early Bird and a pioneer aircraft designer. Page was issued his pilot's license in 1914 and went on to became an aeronautical engineer despite the fact that he had no formal training. Page began his aeronautical design career by working for small aviation companies -- Aeromarine Plane and Motor Co., Heinrich Aeroplane Company, Inc, and Moisant. Besides a brief time in 1919-1921, when Page was a mechanic and pilot for American Trans Oceanic Co. -- an early airline operation between Miami and Cuba, Page worked for Curtiss-Wright Air Plane Division from 1917 to 1951. Curtiss-Wright hired Page as director of engineering and in this position he directed production of 130 types of aircraft. One of Page's most famous designs was the C46 cargo plane use in the India-Burma-ChinaTheater during World War II. Page left Curtiss-Wright in 1951 to work for Aeronca, Inc.
Provenance:
Estate of George Page, Gift, unknown, XXXX-0126
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aircraft industry -- United States  Search this
Aircraft industry  Search this
Airplanes -- Design and construction  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial -- United States  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial  Search this
Aeronautics -- 1903-1916  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Periodicals  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Correspondence
Logs (records)
Publications
Clippings
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0126
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0126

William J. Powell Collection

Topic:
Craftsmen Aero News (journal)
Creator:
Powell, William J., 1899-1942  Search this
Names:
"Five Blackbirds" Demonstration Team  Search this
Bessie Coleman Aero Club  Search this
Craftsmen of Black Wings, Inc.  Search this
United States. Army. American Expeditionary Forces  Search this
Powell, William J., 1899-1942  Search this
Extent:
0.31 Cubic feet (1 shared legal-size box 1 flat box 1 oversize folder)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Clippings
Logs (records)
Date:
1917 - 1942
Summary:
The William J. Powell Collection consists of materials concerning the career and personal life of African-American entrepreneur and pilot William J. Powell, including his service in the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF) in World War I, his automobile business in Chicago, and his advocacy for African-American aviation as the founder of Craftsmen of Black Wings, Inc., author of Black Wings, and a primary organizer of the Bessie Coleman Aero Club and the "Five Blackbirds" demonstration team. Materials include identification and membership cards, flight logs and officer records, newspaper clippings, advertisements, and photographs.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains materials concerning the career and personal life of African-American entrepreneur and pilot William J. Powell, including his service in the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF) in World War I, his automobile business in Chicago, and his advocacy for African-American aviation as the founder of Craftsmen of Black Wings, Inc., author of Black Wings, and a primary organizer of the Bessie Coleman Aero Club and the "Five Blackbirds" demonstration team.

The following types of materials are included: AEF identification card and records book, advertisements for his automobile business, his 1938-1939 flight logs, legal documents, marriage license, diploma, membership cards, burial and funeral records, and newspaper clippings. The collection also includes photographs from his time with the AEF and Bessie Coleman Aero Club, as well as portraits of Powell and his family. Materials found in the collection seem to indicate that some photographs have come from individuals other than Powell.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into three categories: Aviation Career (American Expeditionary Forces and African-Americans in Aviation), Personal Materials (marriage and death records, automobile business, and memberships), and Photographs (AEF, aviation, portraits and family, and albums). Within these categories, materials are arranged chronologically.
Biographical Note:
William J. Powell (1899-1942) was a prominent African-American entrepreneur and pilot who urged African-Americans to become part of the future aviation industry.

Powell was born in Henderson, Kentucky, on July 29, 1899. He moved to Chicago at the age of eight. He entered the University of Illinois in 1916. He went to Officers' Training Camp in Fort Des Moines, Iowa, in June 1917, and was commissioned as a First Lieutenant in the American Expeditionary Forces at the completion of training camp. He served with the 317th Engineers and 365th Infantry during World War I. After his honorable discharge in 1919, he returned to the University of Illinois, graduating with honors and a degree of Bachelor of Science in electrical engineering in 1922.

He worked as an electrical engineer and electric welding instructor for Rock Island Railroad for two years. In 1924, he opened his first filling station and in two years' time, he had built a successful automobile business in South Chicago before moving to Los Angeles in 1928.

During the late 1920s and 1930s, Powell worked tirelessly to promote airmindedness in the black community. Under his umbrella organization, Craftsmen of Black Wings, Inc., Powell wrote a thinly disguised autobiography, Black Wings, in 1934; wrote and directed a 1935 documentary film, Unemployment, the Negro and Aviation; and published a trade journal entitled Craftsmen Aero News (1937-1938). Powell was also instrumental in organizing the Bessie Coleman Aero Club and the "Five Blackbirds" demonstration team. William J. Powell died in July 1942.
Provenance:
Donated by William H. Powell, III, gift, in 1999. Materials found in the collection seem to indicate that some photographs have come from individuals other than Powell.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Permissions Requests
Topic:
African Americans in aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics -- Societies, etc.  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Clippings
Logs (records)
Citation:
William J. Powell Collection, Accession 1999-0049, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.1999.0049
See more items in:
William J. Powell Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1999-0049
Online Media:

Elsbeth and Margarete Grosse Balloon Ascension Collection

Names:
Grosse, Elsbeth  Search this
Grosse, Margarete  Search this
Hackstetter, Karl  Search this
Extent:
0.05 Cubic feet (1 folder)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Logbooks
Date:
1910
Summary:
On March 27 and 28, 1910, sisters Elsbeth and Margarete Grosse of Meisen, Germany made an ascent in the "Graf Zeppelin" balloon that was piloted by Karl Hackstetter. This collection consists of a logbook and three letters written by the Grosse sisters to Hackstetter.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of a logbook entitled "Dresdener Wallfahrt 1910 - Wallfahrt des sächsischen ballon 'Graf Zeppelin', 27 u. 28 März 1910" ("Dresden Pilgrimage 1910 - Pilgrimage of the Saxon balloon 'Graf Zeppelin', March 27-28 1910"). The log contains entries (written in German Sütterlin script) written from 5:57 AM, March 27 to 3:23 AM, March 28. It is not known if the log was kept by Hackstetter or by either of the Grosse sisters. Also included in the collection are three letters written by the Grosse sisters to Hackstetter, dated April 4, 19 and 20, 1910, with an account of their balloon ascent.
Arrangement:
Collection is arranged by type of material, with the letters in chronological order.
Biographical / Historical:
On March 27 and 28, 1910, sisters Elsbeth and Margarete Grosse of Meisen, Germany made an ascent in the "Graf Zeppelin" balloon. The balloon was piloted by Karl Hackstetter (1876-1932), a balloonist, aeronaut, and designer of airships and airplanes. Margarete Grosse later wrote a book, Frauen auf Ballon- und Bergfahrten (Women in Balloons and Mountain Climbing), dedicated to her sister and published in 1951.
Provenance:
Unknown, Gift, Unknown, NASM.XXXX.1171
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Balloons  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Logbooks
Citation:
Elsbeth and Margarete Grosse Balloon Ascension Collection, NASM.XXXX.1171, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.1171
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-1171

James Kirkpatrick World War II Color Slides and Log Book

Creator:
Kirkpatrick, James J, 1922-2008  Search this
Names:
United States. Army. Air Corps  Search this
Extent:
0.23 Cubic feet ((1 box))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Color slides
Logbooks
Date:
bulk 1943-1946
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of eighty color 35 mm slides taken by 1st Lt. James J. Kirkpatrick, U. S. Army Air Corps, during his World War II service in the Pacific Theater. The collection also contains Kirkpatrick's pilot log (1943-1946) and five copy prints of Kirkpatrick and the aircraft he flew -- a Douglas C-47 Skytrain and a Curtiss C-46 Commando.
Biographical / Historical:
James J. Kirkpatrick (1922 - 2008) was in the United States Army Air Corps during World War II, serving in the Pacific Theater. Kirkpatrick was a pilot of Douglas C-47 Skytrains and Curtiss C-46 Commandos, delivering food and medicine and transporting the wounded. After the war, Kirkpatrick graduated from the University of Tennessee, where he received his bachelor's degree (1948) and his master's degree (1949). In 1953, Kirkpatrick received his Ph.D. in Industrial Psychology from Syracuse University and was a management consultant for Fortune 500 companies. Kirkpatrick then became a full professor at New York University and was awarded a Ford Foundation Grant to research fair employment; he was the lead author in the resulting book, Testing and Fair Employment: Fairness and Validity of Personnel Tests for Different Ethnic Groups. Kirkpatrick was a leading expert on fair employment and he became involved in many leading precedent setting cases as an experienced expert witness. He was a professor emeritus at California State University at Long Beach.
Provenance:
Martha Bonar, Gift, 2011
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Douglas C-47 Skytrain Family  Search this
Curtiss C-46 Commando Family  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Aerial operations  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Campaigns -- Pacific Area  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Logbooks
Citation:
James Kirkpatrick World War II Color Slides and Log Book, Accession 2012-0006, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2012.0006
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2012-0006

United States Army Around the World Flight (1924) Collection

Creator:
United States. Army. Air Service  Search this
Names:
United States. Army. Air Service  Search this
Extent:
3 Cubic feet (6 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Logs (records)
Clippings
Correspondence
Memoranda
Date:
1920-1925
Scope and Content:
This collection consists of correspondence, memos, newspaper articles and logbooks concerning the flight.
Arrangement:
The documents on the microfilm are only arranged by Record Groups and not chronologically. The material covers correspondence, memos, newspaper articles, logbooks, descriptions of the Douglas World Cruiser (DWC) aircraft, memos dealing with permission to overfly and photograph foreign countries, the flight route, pilot selection, aircraft selection, equipment and weather forecasts. The decision was made during the processing to arrange the photocopied documents by subject and then chronologically.
Historical note:
In 1924, the U.S. Army Air Service decided to attempt an around the world flight to prove that the airplane was a valuable and viable method of transportation and could therefore have a great impact on the world's future. The Douglas Aircraft Company was commissioned by the Army Air Service to build an aircraft for the flight. The result was the Douglas O-5 Observation Seaplane, which was referred to in 1924 as the Douglas World Cruiser (DWC). The O-5 grew out of the 1923 Douglas Observation Seaplane (DOS).

On April 6, 1924, four Army Air Service DWC Seaplanes departed from Seattle, Washington in an attempt to fly around the world. They were the: "Seattle", "Chicago", "Boston" and "New Orleans". The "Seattle" was delayed by a forced landing caused by engine trouble early on and was trying to catch up to the others when bad weather forced it off course. It crashed near Chignik, Alaska. The "Boston" suddenly lost oil pressure and had to land at sea between Orkney and Faroe Islands. Although the landing was successful, the "Boston" was damaged beyond repair during an attempt to hoist it on board the USS Richmond. At Pictou Harbor, Nova Scotia, the prototype aircraft arrived to join the remaining two and became the "Boston II". From there the planes flew on across the United States and landed at Sand Point Field in Seattle, Washington on September 28, 1924 having accomplished the 27,553-mile flight around the world.

Two of the World Cruisers still survive. The "New Orleans" (#4) is in the Air Force Museum at Dayton, Ohio. The "Chicago" (#2) is in the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.
Provenance:
National Archives, Purchase, 1971, XXXX-0152, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Permissions Requests
Topic:
Flights around the world  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Aeronautics -- Records  Search this
Endurance flights  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics -- Flights  Search this
Douglas World Cruiser (DWC)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Logs (records)
Clippings
Correspondence
Memoranda
Citation:
United States Army Around the World Flight (1924) Collection, Acc. XXXX-0152, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0152
See more items in:
United States Army Around the World Flight (1924) Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0152
Online Media:

Rubye Berau Collection

Creator:
Berau, Rubye, 1900-1978  Search this
Names:
National Air Races  Search this
Ninety-Nines (Organization)  Search this
Doolittle, James Harold, 1896-1993  Search this
Harter, Harry  Search this
Kitchingman, Ray "Kitch"  Search this
Settle, Thomas G. W.  Search this
Smith, Babe Walker  Search this
Extent:
0.18 Cubic feet (1 flat box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Articles
Logs (records)
Telegrams
Tickets
Place:
Ohio -- Akron
Date:
bulk 1931-1977
Summary:
The Rubye Berau Collection measures 0.18 cubic feet and dates from 1931-1977. The collection materials document Berau's aviation career.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of the following types of material chronicling the aviation career of Rubye Berau: scrapbook pages; photographs, including shots of Berau, Babe Walker Smith, Admiral T. G. W. Settle, Harry Harter, Major Addison, Ray "Kitch" Kitchingman, Jimmy Doolittle, and groups shots of Squadron of Death (S. O. D.) members; newspaper articles; Berau's logbook (1931-1936); Berau's 1935 noncommercial pilot's license; telegram; S.O.D. Emblem; and autographed National Air Race tickets, 1934-1935.

Note: The digital images in this finding aid were repurposed from scans made by an outside contractor for a commercial product and may show irregular cropping and orientation in addition to color variations resulting from damage to and deterioration of the original objects.
Biographical / Historical:
Rubye Berau (1900-1978) was the proprietor of "The Canteen" in Akron, Ohio, when she became interested in aviation. In 1931, she became a member of the Squadron of Death (S.O.D.), an all-woman group of student fliers based at the Akron Airport. The Squadron had thirteen members and met the second Friday of each month and always on a Friday the 13th. Berau completed her training under Ray "Kitch" Kitchingman and received her pilot's license on August 23, 1932. She was part of an act with Babe Smith Walker, where Berau flew the aircraft and Walker was the parachute jumper. Berau also bought an aircraft, flown by Kitchingman, which was used to charter trips. She was a member of the Ninety-Nines.
Provenance:
Robert B. Cooley, Gift, 2004, NASM.2004.0066
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Women air pilots  Search this
Aeronautics -- Exhibitions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Articles
Logs (records)
Telegrams
Tickets
Citation:
Rubye Berau Collection, Acc. 2004.0066, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2004.0066
See more items in:
Rubye Berau Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2004-0066
Online Media:

Geraldine Mock Collection

Creator:
Mock, Geraldine L. "Jerrie"  Search this
Extent:
0.25 Cubic feet ((1 box))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Logbooks
Photographs
Correspondence
Date:
bulk 1963-1964
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of materials from Geraldine Mock's record setting flight around the world. Documents in this collection include requests for sponsorship; correspondence with foreign dignitaries; pilot's daily log; documentation of the record set; aircraft modifications; maps of Hawaii, the Philippines, and Europe; an insurance statement; menus; receipts for gas; photographs; permissions to land from foreign countries; weather forecasts; and flight plans.
Biographical / Historical:
Geraldine L. "Jerrie" Mock was born November 22, 1925 in Newark, Ohio. She studied aeronautical engineering at Ohio State University. She was nicknamed "the flying housewife" when she became the first woman to circle the globe. She left Columbus, Ohio on March 19, 1964. Her airplane, the "Spirit of Columbus" was a 1953 single-engine Cessna 180 monoplane. Mock landed April 18, 1964 having taken 29 days, 11 hours, and 59 minutes to fly around the world. The trip also made her the first woman to cross the Atlantic and the Pacific. She was named the Vice-Chairman of the Women's Advisory Committee on Aviation to the FAA. On May 4, 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson gave her the FAA's Gold Medal for Exceptional Service. In 1966, she set a straight line distance record for a flight between Honolulu, Hawaii and Columbus, Ohio. Overall, Mock set twenty-one world records, seven of which were set flying around the world. She wrote about her experience in Three Eight Charlie.
Provenance:
Geraldine Mock, Gift, Unknown, Deed signed in 2007
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Women air pilots  Search this
Aeronautics -- Flights  Search this
Aeronautics -- Records  Search this
Genre/Form:
Logbooks
Photographs
Correspondence
Citation:
Geraldine Mock Collection, Accession XXXX-0833, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0833
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0833

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