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United States Women in Aviation 1940-1985 Research Materials

Topic:
United States Women in Aviation, 1940-1985
Creator:
Douglas, Deborah G.  Search this
Names:
Carl, Ann  Search this
Felker, Toby  Search this
Fitzroy, Nancy  Search this
Hoffman, Margaret  Search this
Howard, Jean Ross  Search this
Hubert, Beth  Search this
Pateman, Yvonne C.  Search this
Rassmussen, Janet  Search this
Rippelmeyer, Lynn  Search this
Silitch, Mary F.  Search this
Extent:
2.57 Cubic feet (2 record center boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiocassettes
Transcripts
Reports
Notes
Articles
Newspapers
Publications
Photographs
Correspondence
Date:
1944-1994
bulk [ca. 1940s, 1980s]
Summary:
United States Women in Aviation 1940-1985, by Deborah G. Douglas, was published in 1991 as part of the Smithsonian Institution Press series on women in the aviation industry. This collection consists of a variety of different types of material compiled during the author's research for the book.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of a variety of different types of material compiled during the author's research for the book. Included are: various types of correspondence; photographs; newspapers and other publications; photocopies of book chapters and magazine and newspaper articles; working notes belonging to the author; reports (official and personal); interview transcripts; and approximately 600 bibliographic note cards. Also included are 10 cassettes containing interviews with the following aviators: Ann Carl, Toby Felker, Nancy Fitzroy, Margaret Hoffman, Jean Ross Howard, Lt. Beth Hubert, Lt. Col. Yvonne C. Pateman, Janet Rassmussen, Lynn Rippelmeyer, and Mary F. Silitch.

Note: The digital images in this finding aid were repurposed from scans made by an outside contractor for a commercial product and may show irregular cropping and orientation in addition to color variations resulting from damage to and deterioration of the original objects. In addition, images of some material in the collection have been excluded from online display due to possible copyright restrictions.
Arrangement:
Collection is arranged by topic/subject.
Biographical / Historical:
United States Women in Aviation 1940-1985, by Deborah G. Douglas, was published in 1991 as part of the Smithsonian Institution Press series on women in the aviation industry. The publication documents the stories of women involved in all aspects of aviation during this time period, from pilots and engineers, to aircraft industry personnel and flight attendants.
Provenance:
Deborah G. Douglas, Gift, 1995, NASM.1995.0062
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Flight attendants  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Women in aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Women air pilots  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiocassettes
Transcripts
Reports
Notes
Articles
Newspapers
Publications
Photographs
Correspondence
Citation:
United States Women in Aviation 1940-1985 Research Materials, NASM.1995.0062, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.1995.0062
See more items in:
United States Women in Aviation 1940-1985 Research Materials
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1995-0062
Online Media:

Gerard K. O'Neill Collection

Creator:
O'Neill, Gerard  Search this
Extent:
26.22 Cubic feet (75 Boxes)
35.14 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Book drafts
Clippings
Movie scripts
Correspondence
Magazines (periodicals)
Place:
Moon -- Exploration
Date:
1940s-1993
Summary:
Gerard Kitchen O'Neill (1927-1992) was an experimental physicist, educator, inventor, entrepreneur, writer and novelist.
Scope and Contents:
Materials in this collection include notes, business papers, patents, calendar planners, reports, a thesis, correspondence, book drafts, screenplay drafts, university publications, magazines, magazine articles, newspaper articles, glass & 35mm images, photographs, a rolodex.

The researcher should note that the collection also contains VHS tapes and audio cassettes. These items are not included in the container list but a NASM Archives staff person can assist you regarding access.
Arrangement:
Organized into 5 series:

Series 1: Professional Papers

Series 2: Publications & Reports

Series 3: Personal Papers

Series 4: Images

Series 5: Odd & Oversize
Biographical / Historical:
Gerard Kitchen O'Neill (1927-1992) was an experimental physicist, educator, inventor, entrepreneur, writer and novelist.

Gerard K. O'Neill joined the Navy at age 17, served as a radar technician from 1944 to 1946, graduated from Swarthmore College in 1950 with high honors in Physics, and received his Ph.D. in Physics from Cornell University in 1954. He went to Princeton University in that year as an Assistant Professor, becoming a Full Professor of Physics in 1965. In the 1976-77 academic year he received the honor of serving as the Jerome Clarke Hunsaker Professor of Aerospace at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He retired from Princeton in 1985 as professor emeritus.

Dr. O'Neill's main research area was high-energy particle physics and he initiated and led large-scale projects in accelerator construction. In 1956 he invented the storage-ring technique for colliding particle beams, a method which is now the basis for nearly every new high-energy particle accelerator. In 1976 he built his first Mass Driver prototype.

Dr. O'Neill was a pioneer in the field of space colonization; his studies on the humanization of space began in 1969 as a result of his undergraduate teaching at Princeton, and one of his four books, The High Frontier, detailed his vision of humanity's movement into Earth-like habitats constructed in space. The High Frontier won the Phi Beta Kappa Award as the best science book of 1977. He also authored 2081: A Hopeful View of the Human Future, The Technology Edge: Opportunities for America in World Competition and co-authored a graduate textbook, Introduction to Elementary Particle Physics.

In 1977 following the success of The High Frontier, Dr. O'Neill founded the non-profit Space Studies Institute. SSI's research included work on mass drivers and the Lunar Polar Probe (renamed Lunar Prospector and flown by NASA.)

In 1967 Dr. O'Neill was a finalist, though ultimately not selected, for NASA's Astronaut Group 6, a group of scientist-astronauts to be given assignments in the Apollo Program. He returned to NASA throughout 1975-1977 to led studies on space habitats and space manufacturing; he testified twice before Congress during that time. In 1985, he was appointed by President Reagan to the National Commission on Space.

In 1983 Dr. O'Neill founded the Geostar Corporation, a satellite based positioning and communication system, based on a patent issued to him.

In 1986, O'Neill founded O'Neill Communications, Inc. which developed LAWN, a local area network device using radio waves and still in use today.

At the time of his death, Dr. O'Neill was working on a form of high-speed ground-based transportation he called "Magnetic Flight" with another company he founded, VSE International.

Dr. O'Neill was an instrument-rated pilot with some 2,500 hours of time in powered aircraft and held the Triple Diamond Badge of the Federation of the Aeronautique Internationale for sail plane flights. He was active in ultralight aircraft aviation and a member of the Experimental Aircraft Association. On most of his travels in connection with research and lectures, he piloted his own small plane.

Dr. O'Neill died from leukemia in 1992; the Clementine Mission of 1994 was dedicated to him.
Provenance:
Tasha O'Neill, Gift, 2013
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Books  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Physics  Search this
Satellites  Search this
GPS receivers  Search this
Space stations  Search this
Space sciences  Search this
Gliders (Aeronautics)  Search this
Space colonies  Search this
Genre/Form:
Book drafts
Clippings
Movie scripts
Correspondence
Magazines (periodicals) -- 20th century
Citation:
Gerard K. O'Neill Collection, Acc. 2014-0005, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2014.0005
See more items in:
Gerard K. O'Neill Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2014-0005
Online Media:

Airline Ephemera Collection [Pullman]

Creator:
Pullman, Henry W.  Search this
Names:
Pullman, Henry W.  Search this
Extent:
0.23 Cubic feet ((1 slim legal document box))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Date:
1928-1956
bulk [ca. 1930s-1940s]
Summary:
This collection consists of the following ephemeral items documenting Pullman's travels: photographs and postcards, including three images of Wolfgang von Gronau's Dornier Wal; certificates - one "Jupiter Rex," for crossing the equator and one "Clipper Club," for flying around the world; and a red 10x13" scrapbook containing baggage labels, postcards, menus, guest lists, hotel and travel literature, decals, and tickets and napkins which were souvenirs from events and places he visited during his travels. A technical manual for Air-Ground Communication, December 2, 1941, was also donated as was a souvenir edition of "Plane News: Air Service Paper of the A.E.F.", January 25, 1919; a roster and photograph of the Ordnance Detachment, A.F. in G., Metternich, Germany, distributed on the occasion of a Thanksgiving Dinner, November 25, 1925; five July, 1938 images relating to Pan Am Philippine Clipper trip number 222; four World War I era images and one portrait of a young pilot in parachute harness.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of the following ephemeral items documenting Pullman's travels: photographs and postcards, including three images of Wolfgang von Gronau's Dornier Wal; certificates - one "Jupiter Rex," for crossing the equator and one "Clipper Club," for flying around the world; and a red 10x13" scrapbook containing baggage labels, postcards, menus, guest lists, hotel and travel literature, decals, and tickets and napkins which were souvenirs from events and places he visited during his travels. A technical manual for Air-Ground Communication, December 2, 1941, was also donated as was a souvenir edition of "Plane News: Air Service Paper of the A.E.F.", January 25, 1919; a roster and photograph of the Ordnance Detachment, A.F. in G., Metternich, Germany, distributed on the occasion of a Thanksgiving Dinner, November 25, 1925; five July, 1938 images relating to Pan Am Philippine Clipper trip number 222; four World War I era images and one portrait of a young pilot in parachute harness.

Note: The digital images in this finding aid were repurposed from scans made by an outside contractor for a commercial product and may show irregular cropping and orientation in addition to color variations resulting from damage to and deterioration of the original objects.
Arrangement:
The Airline Ephemera Collection [Pullman]-- is arranged by content type.
Biographical / Historical:
Henry W. Pullman's job as the export manager for a major oil tool company required him to travel extensively from the late 1920s to the 1950s. Pullman used the following airlines in his travels: Trans World Airlines (TWA); Pan American Airways; Royal Dutch Air Lines (KLM); Royal Netherlands Indies Airways; and American Airlines.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
Henry Pullman, gift, 1993, NASM.1993.0018
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Dornier Do J Wal (Whale)(Do 16)  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial -- United States  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Airline Ephemera Collection [Pullman], Acc. NASM.1993.0018, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.1993.0018
See more items in:
Airline Ephemera Collection [Pullman]
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1993-0018
Online Media:

509th Composite Group Material [Korff]

Creator:
Korff, Frederick Francis "Bud,", 1926-2016  Search this
Extent:
0.38 Cubic feet ((2 boxes))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Newsletters
Newspaper clippings
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of approximately 0.38 cubic feet of material relating to Frederick Francis "Bud" Korff's service with the 509th Composite Group. There is a folder of correspondence between Korff and various friends and relatives, most frequently letters from Korff to his mother. The collection also contains news clippings; "The Atomic Blast" newsletters, dated June-July 1946, issued by the 509th Composite Group from Kwajalein Island; several issues of the Kwajalein newspaper "The Hourglass"; yearbooks for various units under Task Group 1.5 (formed from the 58th Bombardment Wing, part of Joint Army/Navy Task Force One, which conducted the Bikini Atoll tests) including Headquarters, The Air Photo Unit (1.52), Air Instrumentation and Test Requirement Unit (1.53), and the Air Transport Unit (1.54); blank stationery with letterhead art work for the 58th Bomb Wing Crossroads Project and with two different designs for the Operation Crossroads Atomic Tests; Kwajalein Island orientation materials; and a copy of Korff's discharge certificate. Other items of interest include a postal cover flown aboard Boeing B-29 Superfortress "Dave's Dream" in the first atomic test of Operation Crossroads, and a short snorter in various sizes designed for Joint Army/Navy Task Force One/Operation Crossroads. The largest copy of the short snorter measures 13 by 6 inches and is signed by various members of the group.
Biographical / Historical:
Frederick Francis "Bud" Korff (1926-2016) served as an airplane and engine mechanic with the 509th Composite Group, first at Roswell Army Airfield, New Mexico and later as part of Operation Crossroads, an atmospheric nuclear weapon test series conducted in the summer of 1946 at Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Islands. Korff was honorably discharged from the U.S. Army Air Forces in November 1946.
Provenance:
Eric F. Witzke, Gift, 2017
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Operation Crossroads, 1946  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Newsletters
Newspaper clippings
Citation:
509th Composite Group Material [Korff], Acc. 2017-0019, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2017.0019
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2017-0019
Online Media:

Major John Stanley Henderson Collection

Creator:
Henderson, John Stanley.  Search this
Names:
United States. Marine Corps  Search this
Extent:
0.95 Cubic feet ((2 boxes))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Newspaper clippings
Telegrams
Technical manuals
Awards
Correspondence
Publications
Date:
bulk 1941-1952
Scope and Contents:
Included in this collection are photographs of John Stanley Henderson, fellow servicemen, and airfields; diary and notebooks; flight logs; award citations and military orders; newspaper clippings; a map of the Solomon Islands; phrase books in French and Japanese as well as the CBI Pointie Talkie; pocket guides to Egypt and Australia; The Marines Handbook, seventh edition; telegram relating the death of Major Henderson; Certificate of Death in Service; condolence letters; and Power of Attorney and Last Will and Testament.
Biographical / Historical:
Major John Stanley Henderson (?-1952) joined the US Marine Corps in 1941 and served two tours in the World War II Pacific Theater, earning the Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC) and four Air Medals. He served as a dive bomber pilot at Guadalcanal and a transport pilot on Guam. He was on active duty with the Marine Reserves as Executive Officer of the Marine Air Detachment at NAS Olathe, Kansas, at the time of his death at 33, killed while preparing for his departure to Korea.
Provenance:
Bryn Henderson, Gift, 2005
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Aerial operations  Search this
Medals -- United States  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Newspaper clippings
Telegrams
Technical manuals -- 20th century
Awards
Correspondence
Publications
Citation:
Major John Stanley Henderson Collection, Accession number 2005-0015, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2005.0015
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2005-0015

Octave Chanute Collection [Avery]

Creator:
Chanute, Octave, 1832-1910  Search this
Names:
Avery, William  Search this
Chanute, Octave, 1832-1910  Search this
Extent:
0.45 Cubic feet ((1 legal document box))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Lantern slides
Glass negatives
Correspondence
Photographs
Publications
Date:
1886-1926
Scope and Contents:
The collection consists of newspaper clippings dating from 1886-1926; correspondence from Sept. 1904-September 1922; glass negatives and lantern slides; publications dating from 1886-1910; and a variety of photographs. Images represented include the Chanute biplane hang glider used in St. Louis in 1904, miscellaneous gliders, Chanute's gliding experiments at the Indiana dunes in 1896, and miscellaneous photos of Chanute and his colleagues.
Biographical / Historical:
Octave Chanute, born in Paris in 1832, was one of America's leading civil engineers, specializing in railroads and railroad bridges with the first bridge across the Missouri River to his credit. After developing a reputation as a scientist, writer and speaker, Chanute's interests turned to the possibility of flight. Beginning in 1891 he wrote a series of articles on his research and published them in book form, making him the first aviation historian. In 1896 he designed and constructed four gliders aided by William Avery and Augustus Herring, testing them on the Indiana shores of Lake Michigan. The Chanute team made more than 1,000 manned flights without accident, and with a few modifications his 2-surfaced glider was to become the prototype of all modern biplanes. As he grew older, Chanute turned to writing, speaking and corresponding with inventors to encourage them to continue where he had left off. He died at the age of 78 in 1910, one of the foremost pioneers in aviation.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
H.N. Staats (originally collected by William Avery), gift, unknown, XXXX-0489, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Gliding and soaring  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Periodicals  Search this
Genre/Form:
Lantern slides
Glass negatives
Correspondence
Photographs
Publications
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0489
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0489
Online Media:

Fred Howard Vin Fiz Special Papers

Creator:
Howard, Fred.  Search this
Names:
Armour Company  Search this
Rodgers, Calbraith Perry  Search this
Extent:
0.8 Cubic feet (2 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Telegrams
Financial records
Correspondence
Logs (records)
Newspaper clippings
Date:
1911
Summary:
The first crossing of the United States by airplane was achieved by Calbraith Perry Rodgers in 1911 in his Wright EX biplane, named the Vin Fiz.
Scope and Content:
This collection consists of the following material relating to Fred Howard and his role with the Vin Fiz Special: correspondence, newspaper clippings and articles, schedules and logs for both the Vin Fiz and the Vin Fiz Special, telegrams; train registration sheets, miscellaneous notes, passenger lists, and financial paperwork.
Arrangement:
Arranged by type of material.
Biographical/Historical note:
The first crossing of the United States by airplane was achieved by Calbraith Perry Rodgers in 1911 in his Wright EX biplane, named the Vin Fiz. Rodgers decided to attempt the coast-to-coast flight in response to publisher William Randolph Hearst's New York American challenge which offered a prize of $50,000 for the first transcontinental flight to be competed in 30 days. Rodgers began his journey from Sheepshead Bay, New York, on September 17, 1911, and as the flight was punctuated by numerous stops, delays, and accidents the 30-day time limit Hearst imposed for the prize had expired before Rodgers reached California on November 5, 1911.

To finance the trip, Rodgers had secured backing from the Armour Company, a Chicago firm which was then introducing a new grape-flavored soft drink called Vin Fiz. Armour provided Rodgers with a special train, called the Vin Fiz Special, with cars for the accommodation of Rodgers' family and his support crew, and a "hangar" car, which was a rolling workshop, filled with spare parts to repair and maintain the airplane over the course of the flight. There was even an automobile on board to pick up Rodgers after forced landings away from the rail line. Fred Howard, the division passenger agent for the Erie Railroad, was placed in charge of the Vin Fiz Special and soon also took charge of the command center, juggling both railroad matters and aviation repairs. In Chicago, Howard was commended for his effort and asked to continue with the flight to California, but he declined.
Provenance:
Eileen F. Lebow , Gift, 2006, NASM.2007.0002
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Wright (Co) Model EX "Vin Fiz"  Search this
Railroad cars  Search this
Railroad travel  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Vin Fiz Special (train)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Telegrams
Financial records
Correspondence
Logs (records)
Newspaper clippings
Citation:
Fred Howard Vin Fiz Special Papers, NASM.2007.0002, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2007.0002
See more items in:
Fred Howard Vin Fiz Special Papers
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2007-0002
Online Media:

Humphrey Toomey NYRBA Papers

Creator:
Toomey, Humphrey, 1900-1974  Search this
Names:
New York, Rio and Buenos Aires Line (NYRBA)  Search this
Pan American World Airways, Inc.  Search this
Extent:
0.51 Cubic feet (2 boxes))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Maps
Telegrams
Correspondence
Newspaper clippings
Black-and-white photographs
Memorandums
Date:
bulk 1929 - 1933
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of .5 cubic ft of documentary material chronicling Humphrey Toomey's aviation career with the New York, Rio and Buenos Aires Line (NYRBA). The following types of material are included in this collection: Navy and Air Corps strip maps used on the Bridgeport, Connecticut to Buenos Aires flight; correspondence; telegrams; memorandums; reports; employment agreements with NYRBA; sanitary bills of health at different ports; NYRBA 1930 annual report and brochure; NYRBA time schedules; copies of Toomey's passports; small brown notebook with notes; black and white photographs; newspaper articles; and the insignia of the NYRBA. There are also a few items from Toomey's early Pan American career, including a film, report, and related material on Toomey's aerial expedition of the lower Amazon system in October of 1933.
Biographical / Historical:
Humphrey Toomey (1900-1974) graduated from the Naval Academy in 1922 as an aeronautical engineer. Following his training and service as a naval aviator, Toomey resigned from the Navy in 1929 to pilot a Sikorsky S-38 on a flight from Bridgeport, Connecticut to Buenos Aires. This flight laid the groundwork for the commercial routes to South America for the New York, Rio and Buenos Aires Line (NYRBA). Toomey was a pilot for NYRBA from 1929 until it was acquired in 1930 by Pan American Airways (PAA). Toomey then worked for PAA as Chief Pilot and Operations Manager for their Brazil-Argentina sector. In this capacity Toomey established a series of airports for PAA and organized the Brazilian national airline, PAA do Brazil. In 1933, Toomey made the first official survey flight up the Amazon River, which won him membership in the New York Explorers Club. During World War II he managed the Military Contact Division of PAA, and from 1946 to 1952 he served as Manager of the Latin American Division in Miami , Florida. In 1952, Toomey returned to Rio de Janeiro as PAA Vice President for Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay and Paraguay. Toomey retired from PAA in 1962 and was the recipient of many awards, including the Brazilian "Ordem Nacional do Cruzeiro do Sul."
Provenance:
Gailbraith "Gail" Toomey, Gift, 2006
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics -- South America  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial  Search this
Airlines  Search this
Genre/Form:
Maps
Telegrams
Correspondence
Newspaper clippings
Black-and-white photographs
Memorandums
Citation:
Humphrey Toomey NYRBA Papers, Accession number 2006-0068, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2006.0068
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2006-0068

Pamela A. Melroy Papers

Extent:
17.6 Cubic feet (19 containers)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Technical reports
Photographic prints
Newspaper clippings
Correspondence
Date:
1961-2008
bulk 1980s-2000s
Summary:
This collection consists of 17 cubic feet of papers relating to the life and career of astronaut Pamela A. Melroy.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of 17 cubic feet of correspondence, memoranda, reports, checklists, manuals, notes, photographs, brochures, pamphlets, programs, newsletters, newspaper and magazine articles, and related training materials created or collected by Pamela A. Melroy over the course of her life and career. This material is particularly rich in materials documenting her NASA astronaut career, but also includes significant insight into her USAF career and material relating to her childhood and college years.
Arrangement:
No final arrangement as collection has not been fully processed; box listing is available.
Biographical / Historical:
Pamela Ann Melroy (Col., USAF, Ret.), had a distinguished 26-year career as a pilot in the US Air Force and NASA's Shuttle-era astronaut corps. Melroy is one of only two women to command spaceflight missions, and she is one of the earliest women to fly combat missions, graduate from USAF Test Pilot School, and serve as a military test pilot. Melroy graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Physics and Astronomy from Wellesley College, 1983 and a Master of Science degree in Earth and Planetary Sciences from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1984. Melroy joined the Air Force ROTC program, becoming Cadet Wing Commander and Top Graduate, in 1983. She entered the US Air Force, completed flight training in 1985, and received assignments to fly the McDonnell Douglas KC-10 refueling tanker aircraft. She flew combat missions and supported combat operations in Operation Just Cause and Operation Desert Storm/Desert Shield (1990-1991). She then graduated from Air Force Test Pilot School at Edwards AFB and was assigned to evaluate the C-17 transport aircraft, setting eleven world records in that effort. Rising to the rank of major, serving as aircraft commander and instructor, and flying more than 50 different aircraft, Melroy attained the experience needed to compete for selection as a NASA pilot astronaut. NASA selected Melroy in 1995 in astronaut Class XV. She completed training and technical assignments and flew her first mission as pilot on STS-92 (Discovery) in 2000, attaining the rank of colonel upon completing delivery and installation of the Z1 truss on the International Space Station. Her second flight, STS-112 (Atlantis), occurred in 2002, for delivery and installation of the third ISS truss segment. Melroy then was selected for two very significant roles in the wake of the STS-107 Columbia tragedy in 2003. She first served as Lead for the Crew Module/Crew Equipment recovery and reconstruction effort, and then co-led the subsequent Columbia Crew Survival Investigation Study and resultant published report (NASA SP 2008-565). Melroy's third and final shuttle mission was STS-120 (Discovery) to deliver Node 2 (Harmony) to the International Space Station in 2007. In addition, it included a technically challenging unplanned repair of damaged solar arrays. This mission marked the first time that two spacecraft in orbit simultaneously were commanded by women, Melroy on the shuttle and Peggy Whitson on the space station. Melroy's final assignment before retiring from NASA in 2009 was Chief of the Orion branch of the Astronaut Office, working on development of the next crew vehicle. Upon leaving NASA, she became involved in developing regulations for commercial spaceflight and other pursuits.
Provenance:
Pam Melroy, Gift, 2018, NASM.2018.0034
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
United States Air Force  Search this
Astronauts  Search this
Space Shuttle Program (U.S.)  Search this
Technical manuals  Search this
McDonnell Douglas KC-10  Search this
International Space Station (ISS)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Technical reports
Photographic prints
Newspaper clippings
Correspondence -- 21st century
Citation:
Pamela A. Melroy Papers, NASM.2018.0034, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2018.0034
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2018-0034

William C. McDonald Papers

Creator:
McDonald, William C., 1906-1984  Search this
Names:
American Volunteer Group  Search this
China National Aviation Corporation  Search this
Caniff, Milton Arthur, 1907-1988  Search this
Chennault, Anna  Search this
Chennault, Claire Lee, 1893-1958  Search this
Chiang, Kai-shek, 1887-1975  Search this
Chiang, May-ling Soong, 1897-2003  Search this
Extent:
2 Cubic feet ((7 boxes))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Photographs
Correspondence
Newspaper clippings
Date:
bulk 1917-1980s, 2016
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of two cubic feet of material relating to William C. "Mac" McDonald's flying career, focusing on his time in the Army Air Forces as one of the "Men on the Flying Trapeze," his time training Chinese pilots at the Central Aviation School to fly before and during World War II, and as a Chinese National Aviation Corporation (CNAC) pilot flying the "Hump," and ferrying vital supplies in China for the Chinese troops, the "Flying Tigers" and the 14th Air Force. The material includes the following types of material: photographs, correspondence, military records, manuscripts, and newspaper articles. The collection contains material referencing the following notables: Claire Chennault, Anna Chennault, Frank "Dude" Higgs, Charles "Chuck" Sharp, Sebie Smith, Milton Caniff and Generalissimo and Madame Chiang Kai-shek.
Biographical / Historical:
William Clifford "Mac" McDonald (1906-1984) received his first airplane ride at age 14 from his neighbor, World War I ace, James "Jimmy" Meissner. After attending college at Washington and Lee University (Lexington, VA) and Howard College (Birmingham, AL), McDonald joined the 106th Observation Squadron of the Alabama National Guard, where he was an airplane mechanic. McDonald decided he wanted to be a pilot, and in May 1930 he was appointed as a US Army Air Corps Flying Cadet at Brooks Field, Texas. In 1931, McDonald was assigned to the 94th Pursuit Squadron at Selfridge Field, Michigan, and by June 1932 he had completed his active duty, graduated, and was released from the Army Air Forces. As McDonald was unable to find a job as a civilian pilot, he soon reenlisted in the Army so that he could join Claire Chennault's newly formed Army aerial aerobatics team, "Men on the Flying Trapeze." From 1932 to 936 the aerobatics team participated in numerous air shows. Through William Pauley, president of Central Aviation Manufacturing Company (CAMCO), the aerobatic team pilots met with Chinese Air Force General Mow Pang-Tsu who, impressed with their performance, invited them to come to China to train Chinese pilots in the American military flying style. MacDonald and his teammate John H. "Luke" Williamson, resigned from the Army Air Corps and accepted the offer and left for China during the summer of 1936, with Chennault following in 1937. McDonald became the senior American Instructor for the Central Aviation School, located outside Hanghow, China. Madame Chiang Kai-Shek headed the Chinese Commission on Aeronautics Affairs and was the real power behind the aviation school. During the fall of 1936, McDonald was also assigned to Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek's squadron and several times served as his pilot on military business. After four years training Chinese pilots, McDonald resigned from the school and started with the Chinese National Aviation Corporation (CNAC) ferrying vital supplies in China for the Chinese Air Force, Chennault's American Volunteer Group "Flying Tigers," and then the 14th Air Force. By mid-1943, McDonald was the Operations Assistant in Calcutta, India, and by the end of the year, he was the Chief Pilot. In Calcutta, McDonald met his wife, Margaret "Peggy" Spain, who was volunteering with the American Red Cross. The McDonald's left China in 1947, when Mac stepped down as Chief Pilot and took a transfer to Pan American Airways (PAA), working first in the United States and then for three years in Brazil. After his wife contracted polio in South America, McDonald moved his family back to Birmingham and he stopped flying. By that point, McDonald had over 20,000 flying hours. McDonald helped to found the CNAC Association and served as its president. Through McDonald's publishing company, the four volumes of Wings over Asia, which contained first person stories form CNAC personnel and friends, were published. McDonald was inducted in the Alabama Aviation Hall of Fame in 1981, and passed away in 1984.
Related Materials:
William C. McDonald Papers,
Provenance:
William C. McDonald, III, Gift, 2017
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
World War, 1939-1945 -- China  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Photographs
Correspondence
Newspaper clippings
Citation:
William C. McDonald Papers, Accession 2017-0048, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2017.0048
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2017-0048

Wright Brothers First Flight Story Collection [Moore]

Extent:
1.78 Cubic feet (3 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Correspondence
Newspapers
Newspaper clippings
Place:
Wright Brothers
Date:
1903-2003
Summary:
This collection consists of approximately 1.78 cubic feet of material pertaining to Harry P. Moore and newspaper coverage of the Wright Brothers first flight on December 17, 1903.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of approximately 1.78 cubic feet of material pertaining to Harry P. Moore and newspaper coverage of the Wright Brothers first flight on December 17, 1903. Materials include a handwritten draft of Moore's newspaper article on the flight; typewritten final version of the article and copies sent to various news outlets; letters about the event by telegraph operator C. C. Grant, Virginian-Pilot newsroom chief of staff C. G. Kizer, reporter Frank S. Wing, and managing editor T. H. Lamb; news coverage of the flight including the December 19, 1903 editions of the Norfolk Public Ledger and the New York Tribune and the January 2, 1904 issue of Harper's Weekly; later news clippings regarding Moore and the Wright Brothers flight story; a letter to Moore from Orville Wright written in 1928; and a First Flight Centennial program from 2003.
Arrangement:
Collection is arranged by topic or sometimes type of material with items put in chronological order within folders when applicable.
Biographical / Historical:
The Wright brothers inaugurated the aerial age with the world's first successful flights of a powered heavier-than-air flying machine. The Wright 1903 Flyer was the product of a sophisticated four-year program of research and development conducted by Wilbur and Orville Wright beginning in 1899. After building and testing three full-sized gliders, the Wrights' first powered airplane flew at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, on December 17, 1903, making a 12-second flight, traveling 36 m (120 ft), with Orville piloting. The best flight of the day, with Wilbur at the controls, covered 255.6 m (852 ft) in 59 seconds.

Harry P. Moore was a marine reporter for the Norfolk Virginian-Pilot who had been following the Wrights' work at Kitty Hawk based on a tip he overheard in a restaurant in September 1903. Moore asked several contacts in the U.S. Coast Guard to keep him apprised of any developments. Less than an hour after the Wrights' first successful flight on December 17, 1903, C. C. Grant, assistant weather observer at Norfolk, dispatched a message to Moore from a Coast Guardsman at Kitty Hawk about the flight. Moore worked with editor Keville Glennan on a draft of the story and began offering it to various news outlets, although only five ordered the story.
Provenance:
Steve Fritts, Gift, 2018, NASM.2018.0012
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Wright (Brothers) 1903 Flyer  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Correspondence
Newspapers
Newspaper clippings
Citation:
Wright Brothers First Flight Story Collection [Moore], NASM.2018.0012, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2018.0012
See more items in:
Wright Brothers First Flight Story Collection [Moore]
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2018-0012
Online Media:

Patty Wagstaff Papers

Creator:
Wagstaff, Patty.  Search this
Extent:
10.2 Cubic feet ((34 box))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Newspaper clippings
Photographs
Programs
Date:
bulk 1984 - 2004
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of ten cubic feet of magazines, newspaper articles, flight sequences, photographs, correspondence and airshow programs chronicling the aerobatic career of Patty Wagstaff.
Biographical / Historical:
In 1991, Patty Wagstaff became the first woman to win the title of US National Aerobatic Champion, a title she then successfully defended in 1992 and 1993. Wagstaff, now based in St. Augustine, Florida, was raised in Japan and worked as a model and a shipwreck diver in Australia before moving to Alaska in 1978. There she began flight instruction in a Cessna 185 on floats and earned her private pilot license in 1979. Wagstaff moved quickly to earn her commercial and instrument ratings for single and multiengine aircraft and seaplanes. She entered her first aerobatic competition in 1984 and moved to the Unlimited category (most proficient) in only two years. Wagstaff was a six-time member of the US Aerobatic Team, which competes in world competition every two years, until her retirement from competition in 1996. Today, Wagstaff is a premier aerobatic pilot in air shows throughout the United States, performing dynamic and precise routines in her Extra 300L. She is also a commercially rated helicopter pilot, a flight instructor for unlimited aerobatics, and she flies for motion pictures and television. Wagstaff is a four-time winner of the Betty Skelton First Lady of Aerobatics Trophy and was the 1995 recipient of the National Air and Space Museum Trophy for Current Achievement in Aviation. She has written, with Ann Cooper, her autobiography, Fire and Air: A Life on the Edge. The aircraft in which she became US National Aerobatic Champion is the Extra 260, a German-built aircraft which is on display in the Pioneers of Flight gallery of the National Air and Space Museum. In 2004, Wagstaff was inducted into the National Aviation Hall of Fame.
Provenance:
Patty Wagstaff, Gift, 2005
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aeronautics -- Exhibitions  Search this
Aeronautics -- Competitions  Search this
Stunt flying  Search this
Extra 300L  Search this
Periodicals  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Newspaper clippings
Photographs
Programs
Citation:
Patty Wagstaff Papers, Accession number 2005-0053, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2005.0053
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2005-0053

Giuseppe M. Bellanca Collection

Creator:
Bellanca, Giuseppe M., 1886-1960  Search this
Names:
Bellanca  Search this
Wright Aeronautical Corporation  Search this
Chamberlin, Clarence  Search this
Extent:
248.5 Cubic feet (245 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Financial records
Newspaper clippings
Drawings
Photographic prints
Date:
1919-1959
Summary:
This collection consists of the archives of Giuseppe M. Bellanca and his company, including the following types of mediums: drawings, stress analysis tests, reports, photographs/negatives, documents, correspondence, patent information, newspaper clippings, business records, and financial statements.
Scope and Contents:
Series I: Mr. Bellanca's professional life

Here, the researcher will find documents regarding the day-to-day operations of the Bellanca Aircraft Corporation. The material is generally divided into core documents of the corporation, correspondence, financial documents, subcontracting pursuits, patents, employee relations, and company history.

Series II: Technical Material

This material is separated into the following subseries: Miscellaneous Handwritten Notes and Sketches, Bellanca Aircraft Technical Data, Bellanca Aircraft Corporation Reports, Technical Research Files, Bellanca Aircraft Drawing Lists, Bellanca Aircraft Drawings, and Bellanca Aircraft Drawing Indexes. The Bellanca Collection is not a complete history of the Bellanca Aircraft Corporation. Over the years, it appears that many items were loaned out by the Bellanca Family to researchers and not returned. Therefore, there are significant gaps in correspondence, formal, numbered reports, and other areas of the collection. For example, the earliest report in the Bellanca Collection is Report #28, the next report which appears is report #45.

The Giuseppe M. Bellanca Collection contains over 10,000 drawings. (At the time of processing, not all drawings were entered into the Bellanca Drawings Database. These drawings will be entered as time allows.) The drawings vary in size from 8 x 11 inches to 36 x 185 inches. There are original pencil drawings, blueprints, and blueline drawings. Over 130 models of Bellanca aircraft are represented in the Collection. There are General Arrangement, or Three-View drawings for over 80 of these models. Bellanca drawings are not easy to decipher. Most of the drawings have data blocks which contain only a finite amount of information. Often the aircraft has been identified only by serial number. In some cases the model number of the aircraft is also the drawing number. Other times, the aircraft name would be given, but no model number, i.e. Skyrocket. Also, words were abbreviated and it was left up to the processing archivist to determine their probable meaning. Despite the explanation in the scope and content notes, the Bellanca Corporation was not consistent when assigning model numbers. Letters were sometimes assigned that reflected a United States War Department designation, i.e. the VSO and the VF. By using the Bellanca Drawing indexes, the processing archivist was able to supply model numbers for some of the drawings.

7136 Bellanca Aircraft Company Drawings have been added to the National Air and Space Museum Miscellaneous Drawings Database. As time allows, the remaining Bellanca Drawings will be added to this database. An Archives Staff member will assist researchers in retrieving these materials from the database finding aid.

The Bellanca drawings were stored for over thirty years in less-than-ideal conditions. Many of the drawings were drawn on poor-quality tracing paper, and have become extremely brittle and fragile. Therefore, many of the drawings in the Bellanca Collection may not be available to researchers.

During processing of the collection, the project archivist has gained some insight about how Mr. Bellanca chose the model designations for his aircraft. The earliest system of model designations was based upon letters of the alphabet. No model designations appear for any Bellanca design until his work for Maryland Pressed Steel in 1916. The CD, which he designed for that company, was his fourth aircraft design that was built, and the letter D is the fourth letter of the alphabet. This pattern continues through the Bellanca CF. During 1926, when Mr. Bellanca worked for the Wright Corporation, he already had in mind an improved version of the CF, which was designated the CG. This aircraft received the designation WB-1 from the Wright Corporation.

When Mr. Bellanca formed his own company in 1927, the letter pattern described above reasserted itself for a time with the introduction of the Bellanca CH. It was a common practice of manufacturers of the time to also include the engine horsepower as part of the model number, so the Bellanca CH actually received its Approved Type Certificate (ATC) as the CH-200. When the next model came out, it was the CH-300 with a 300 horsepower Wright Whirlwind engine. This system remained in place through the CH-400. Names were given to some Bellanca aircraft. It appears that the names were a marketing tool meant to appeal to the buying public. With this idea in mind, the CH-300 became the "Pacemaker", the CH-400 became the "Skyrocket", and the P 100 was christened the "Airbus". In the early 1930's, the Bellanca Corporation moved away from the alphabetical designations and moved to numerical designations. Later Bellanca aircraft model designations consist of a series of numbers, such as 31-50. The first number was the wing area, in this case, 310 square feet, divided by 10. The second number was the horsepower of the engine, 500, divided by 10. This resulted in a distinctive system of model designations, which lasted until Mr. Bellanca sold the company.

Series III: Mr. Bellanca's personal material.

In this series, the researcher will find personal correspondence among family members, from both Giuseppe and Dorothy Bellanca's families and personal, legal and financial records for Bellanca family. As the lines between Mr. Bellanca's personal and professional lives were sometimes blurred, a fine line of separation between the two was not always possible. For example, at one time or another, two of Mr. Bellanca's brothers, John and Frank, worked for the Bellanca Aircraft Corporation and Andrew Bellanca, Mr. Bellanca's nephew, was his lawyer throughout his life. Therefore, the processing archivist suggests that the researcher look in the professional series of documents as well as Mr. Bellanca's personal papers for a more complete representation of Mr. Bellanca's correspondence.

After processing was completed, publications which previously had been offered to the NASM Branch Library were returned to the collection. They are listed in an addendum at the end of this finding aid.

Series IV: Photographs.

The researcher will find photographs of Bellanca aircraft, including the Bellanca Aircraft Corporation's Master Photograph Files, photographs of the Bellanca factory and factory workers, and photographs of Giuseppe M. Bellanca, business associates, and family members.

Series V: Miscellaneous and Oversize Materials.

This series contains ephemera of the Bellanca Collection: Scrapbooks, Loose Newspaper Clippings, Artwork, Ephemera and Magazine Clippings.

The Bellanca Collection included 27 motion picture films. In May of 2000, this film was transferred to the NASM Film Archives. Researchers wishing to access this part of the collection should contact the NASM Film Archivist.
Arrangement:
Series I: Mr. Bellanca's Professional Life

Series II: Technical Data

Series III: Personal Papers

Series IV: Photographs

Series V: Miscellaneous and Oversize Materials
Biographical / Historical:
Giuseppe Mario Bellanca was born in 1886 in Sciacca, Sicily. As a young man, he attended the Technical Institute in Milan, graduating with a teaching degree in mathematics in 1908. During his quest for a second mathematics and engineering degree, he became enamoured of aviation, and set out to design and build his own airplane. Bellanca's first aircraft design was a "pusher" aircraft, somewhat similar to the Wright Flyer. Lacking funds for such an endeavor, he joined with two partners, Enea Bossi, and Paolo Invernizzi. The union of the three produced the first flight of a totally Italian-designed and Italian-built aircraft in early December of 1909. The flight was short, but it was a start. Bellanca's second design was a tractor-type aircraft. Although the aircraft was successfully constructed, it was never flown due to insufficient funds for an engine.

At the urging of his brother Carlo, who was already established in Brooklyn, New York, Giuseppe Bellanca immigrated to America in 1911. Before the end of the year, he began construction of his third airplane design, a parasol monoplane. After construction was completed, he took the small craft to Mineola Field on Long Island, NY, and proceeded to teach himself to fly. He began by taxiing. He then, taxied faster, which gave way to short hops. The hops got longer, until, on May 19, 1912, there was not enough room to land straight ahead, and Bellanca had to complete a turn in order land safely. Having successfully taught himself to fly, Bellanca then set about teaching others to fly, and from 1912 to 1916, he operated the Bellanca Flying School. One of his students was a young Fiorello La Guardia, the future mayor of New York City. In return for flying lessons, La Guardia taught Bellanca how to drive a car.

In 1917 the Maryland Pressed Steel Company of Hagerstown, MD hired Bellanca as a consulting engineer. While there, he designed two trainer biplanes, the CD, and an improved version, the CE. With the conclusion of WWI, Maryland Pressed Steel's contracts were cancelled and the company entered into receivership. Thus, the CE never went into production.

In 1921, a group of investors lured Bellanca westward to Omaha, NE, in hopes of establishing that town as a center for aircraft manufacture. Before the aircraft could be built, the company went bankrupt, but construction of the aircraft continued under the financial backing of a local motorcycle dealer named Victor Roos. The resultant aircraft, the Bellanca CF, was called by Janes's All the World's Aircraft "the first up-to-date transport aeroplane that was designed, built, and flown with success in the United States." Among the local people helping to build the aircraft was the daughter of Bellanca's landlord, Dorothy Brown. Giuseppe and she were married on November 18, 1922.

Despite its advanced design, the Bellanca CF could not compete with the economics of the time. In the days just after World War I, a surplus Curtiss Jenny could be purchased for as little as $250.00. A Bellanca CF, with a price tag of $5000.00, was just too expensive and the aircraft never went into production. After the disappointment of the CF, Bellanca designed wings for the Post Office Department's DH-4's. His new wings were a tremendous improvement over the original design, but only a few aircraft were so modified.

In 1925, Bellanca went to work for the Wright Aeronautical Corporation of Paterson, NJ. His assignment there was to develop an aircraft around the new Wright Whirlwind engine. He already had a design in mind, which was an improved version of the CF, called the CG. This design evolved into the Wright-Bellanca WB-1.

The WB-1 enjoyed a short, but successful flying career. The aircraft had already won one race and efficiency contest before an untimely accident destroyed the craft during preparation for an attempt to break the world's non-refueled endurance record. Fortunately, at the time of the crash, Bellanca was already working on an improved version, of the WB-1 designated the WB-2.

During 1926, the WB-2 won two efficiency trophies at the National Air Races in Philadelphia. Wright considered putting the aircraft into production, but decided against it to avoid alienating other aircraft companies that were potential customers for their engines. Disappointed by Wright's decision, Bellanca left the company and joined with a young businessman named Charles Levine to form the Columbia Aircraft Company. Wright sold the WB-2 and all drawings and production rights to the new company. The WB-2 went on to a long and fruitful flying career starting with establishing a new world's non-refueled endurance record of 51 hours, 11 minutes, and 59 seconds in April of 1927.

In the latter half of 1926, Charles Lindbergh wanted to buy the WB-2, now named the 'Columbia', for his proposed flight from New York to Paris. He was rebuffed by Levine who also had designs on the flight and the $25,000 prize money. Lindbergh then went to Ryan for his specially designed NYP. Meanwhile Levine, in choosing the crew, managed to promise two seats to three people. So while the Columbia was grounded by a court order brought by the third party, Lindbergh took off on his successful flight to Paris.

Eventually, the 'Columbia' was cleared of litigation and took off on its successful transatlantic flight on June 4, 1927. In the cockpit were Clarence Chamberlin, one of the pilots of the endurance record and Charles Levine, who became the first transatlantic passenger. The plan was to fly all the way to Berlin, and Chamberlin had vowed to fly until they ran out of fuel. Forty-three hours later, they landed in Eisleben, Germany, the first of two successful Atlantic crossings for Bellanca's most famous aircraft.

Disappointed because the 'Columbia' was not the first aircraft to accomplish the New York to Paris flight, Bellanca severed all relations with Levine, and started his own company, the Bellanca Aircraft Corporation of America, and rented facilities on Staten Island, NY. The new Bellanca model was designated the CH, and was basically a commercial version of the WB-2. The new company also had two other models that were built for special orders, the Bellanca Model J and the Model K.

It was not long before Bellanca caught the attention of the Du Pont family of Delaware. They wanted to start aircraft manufacturing in Delaware, and in late 1927, an agreement was made with Bellanca to locate his factory outside of Wilmington. The site was large enough for a first-class airfield, with a seaplane ramp on the nearby Delaware River.

This was a busy time in Bellanca's life. Along with all that was happening in his professional life, he and Dorothy celebrated the birth of their son August T. Bellanca in March of 1927.

With the exception of a few years immediately before and during the early stages of WWII, Bellanca was President and Chairman of the Board from the corporation's inception on the last day of 1927 until he sold the company to L. Albert and Sons in 1954. After his departure from the company, Giuseppe and his son, August, formed the Bellanca Development Company with the purpose of building a new aircraft. It would have increased performance due to the use of lighter materials for its structure. Work on this aircraft was progressing when Giuseppe Bellanca succumbed to leukemia and died on December 26, 1960. After his father's death, August continued the project, and under his guidance, the aircraft first flew in 1973.

In 1993, August Bellanca donated his father's personal and professional papers to the National Air and Space Museum Archives. Prior to that time, they were kept in the Bellanca home near Galena, MD, and administered by Dorothy and August Bellanca.

1886 -- Born in Sciacca, Sicily

1909 -- Built first airplane. It completed the first flight of an Italian-designed, Italian-built, aircraft on December 8, 1909.

1911 -- Immigrated to America, settled in Brooklyn, NY.

1912 -- Completed construction of parasol monoplane. Successfully learned to fly this aircraft at Mineola, Long Island, NY.

1912 - 1916 -- Taught others to fly the parasol monoplane, including Fiorello LaGuardia.

1917 - 1920 -- Employed as a consulting engineer for Maryland Pressed Steel Company of Hagerstown, MD. While there, Bellanca designed and built the Bellanca CD and CE tractor biplanes.

1921 - 1922 -- Moved to Omaha, NE, and with Victor Roos, formed the Roos-Bellanca Aircraft Company. Bellanca designed and built the Bellanca CF. Married Dorothy Brown on November 18, 1922, in Omaha, NE.

1923 -- Moved back to New York, and designed and built new sets of wings for the Post Office Department's DH-4 mailplanes

1925 -- Employed by the Wright Aeronautical Corporation of Paterson, NJ, designing an aircraft around their new "Whirlwind" engine. The Wright-Bellanca 1, or WB-1, was the result, and was first flown in the latter part of that year.

1926 -- First flight of the WB-2.

1927 -- Bellanca started the Bellanca Aircraft Corporation of America, on Staten Island, NY. Bellanca established the Bellanca Aircraft Corporation of New Castle, DE. Wright decided not to enter into quantity production of the WB-2. Bellanca entered into a partnership with Charles A. Levine, and together, they formed the Columbia Aircraft Corporation. From Tuesday, April 12 to Thursday, April 14, Clarence Chamberlin and Bert Acosta set a new world's non-refueled endurance record in the WB-2, which was shortly thereafter, renamed the "Columbia". On June 4th, the Columbia set off across the Atlantic, and landed in Eisleben, Germany.

1941 - 1943 -- Head of the aviation department at Higgins Industries, Inc., in New Orleans, designing large cargo aircraft for troop movement during the war.

1954 -- Formed the Bellanca Development Company, to conduct research in lightweight aircraft construction materials.

1960 -- Died of leukemia in New York, December 26.
Provenance:
Mr. and Mrs. August Bellanca, Gift, 1993, NASM.1993.0055
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Bellanca WB-2 "Miss Columbia"  Search this
Transatlantic flights  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Financial records
Newspaper clippings
Drawings
Photographic prints
Citation:
Giuseppe M. Bellanca Collection, Acc. NASM.1993.0055, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.1993.0055
See more items in:
Giuseppe M. Bellanca Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1993-0055
Online Media:

Richard Tousey Papers

Creator:
Tousey, Richard, 1908-1997  Search this
Names:
Naval Research Laboratory (U.S.)  Search this
Naval Research Laboratory (U.S.), Rocket Spectroscopy Branch  Search this
Tousey, Richard, 1908-1997  Search this
Extent:
14.13 Cubic feet ((7 records center boxes) (17 other boxes) (1 flatboxes))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Glass negatives
Lantern slides
Transcripts
Photographs
Minutes
Speeches
Correspondence
Date:
[ca. 1940s-1980s]
bulk [ca. 1960s]
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of Tousey's professional papers, including the following types of material: notebooks, correspondence, speeches, minutes and proceedings, photographs and prints, coronagraphs, film, oral interview transcripts, lantern slides and glass plates.
Biographical / Historical:
Richard Tousey (1908 - 1997) was a prominent Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) space scientist whose career spans the V-2, Aerobee, OSO, Solrad, and Skylab eras. Tousey graduated from Tufts College in 1928, and received his Ph.D. in physics from Harvard in 1933. After teaching physics and conducting research at Harvard and Tufts, Tousey began his long association with the NRL -- starting first in the Optics Division (1941) and then working in the Atmosphere and Astrophysics Division (1959). Under Tousey's direction, a series of high-altitude probes, beginning in 1946 with the use of captured German V-2 rockets, produced the first detailed record of the sun's radiation in the far ultraviolet region of the spectrum. In addition to his important work relating to the solar spectrum, Tousey also contributed to the fields of vision and atmospheric optics. Later in his career, Tousey guided the NRL's program of research on the visibility of earth satellites and was the head of the Rocket Spectroscopy Branch of the NRL. Tousey was a prolific writer and a frequent contributor to the 'Journal of the Optical Society of America.' He was the recipient of many awards, including: the Progress Medal of the Photographic Society of America; the Frederick Ives Medal of the Optical Society of American; the Prix Ancel of the Societe Francasie de Photographie; and the Draper Medal.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
David van Keuren/Dean Bundy -- NRL, Transfer, 1996, 1997-004, Public Domain
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Spectrograph  Search this
V-2 rocket  Search this
Spectrum, Solar  Search this
Visual fields  Search this
Meteorological optics  Search this
Atmosphere, Upper -- Rocket observations  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Glass negatives
Lantern slides
Transcripts
Photographs
Minutes
Speeches
Correspondence
Identifier:
NASM.1997.0004
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1997-0004

William J. Hammer Collection

Creator:
Hammer, William J. (William Joseph), 1858-1934 (electrical engineer)  Search this
Names:
Hudson-Fulton Celebration (1909)  Search this
Curtiss, Glenn Hammond, 1878-1930  Search this
Hammer, William J. (William Joseph), 1858-1934 (electrical engineer)  Search this
Wright, Wilbur, 1867-1912  Search this
Extent:
5.66 Cubic feet (13 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Scrapbooks
Publications
Manuscripts
Correspondence
Photographs
Date:
1881-1934
bulk 1905-1915
Summary:
The collection is the result of Major Hammer's passion for amassing material related to aeronautics and technology, and it is arranged into eleven series: articles, clippings, correspondence, drawings and blueprints, leaflets, legislation, minutes, miscellaneous, photographs, programs and publications. Housed in 23 folders, the correspondence is the most comprehensive series, reflecting the original order which grouped the letters into series by topic. Much of the correspondence concerns the planning of the Hudson-Fulton Celebration of 1909, and the involvement of Wilbur Wright and Glenn Curtiss. There is also a scrapbook of black and white photographs providing front and side views of specified airplanes. Each page has 3 photos showing different views of the same plane accompanied by a label with additional information. (See written copy for details. Also, please see information written on 8x11 notebook paper.)
Scope and Contents:
The William J. Hammer Collection reflects Hammer's great interest in aeronautics --a passion he cultivated for several decades by accumulating a veritable storehouse of materials. Hammer's important contributions to the early development of aviation are also evident in this collection.

The collection of materials listed in the finding aid is arranged into two series. The first series includes correspondence, reports, handbooks, drawings, brochures, programs, leaflets, magazines, articles, newspaper clippings and miscellaneous materials. The second series is comprised of photographs of various sizes, scrapbooks, scrapbook pages and miscellaneous materials (the front pages of newspapers, certificates, posters, etc.).

Hammer's papers are arranged both chronologically and alphabetically. Correspondence, drawings, brochures, programs, leaflets, miscellaneous materials, scrapbook pages, articles and newspaper clippings are organized by the former method. Reports, handbooks, magazines and booklets are grouped alphabetically by either title of publication or author. Photographs are arranged either by subject or chronologically.

The reader should note that at some point, Hammer produced a series of large format photographs. These mounted photographs are duplicates. Due to the very fragile condition of these particular images, the photographs and are not available to researchers.

Additional photographic material regarding Hammer Collection photographs can be found in the NASM Archives Images database. An Archives staff member will assist you with research using this database.

Box 13 of the William J. Hammer Collection has not been scanned.

Note: The digital images in this finding aid were repurposed from scans made by an outside contractor for a commercial product and may show irregular cropping and orientation in addition to color variations resulting from damage to and deterioration of the original objects.
Arrangement:
The William J. Hammer Collection is arranged by content type.
Biographical/Historical note:
William J. Hammer was born in Cressona, Pennsylvania, on February 26, 1858, was an associate of Thomas Edison and an early aviation supporter and enthusiast. He began his career as an assistant to Edward Weston of the Weston Malleable Nickel Company. In 1879, he moved on to a new position as laboratory assistant to Thomas Edison at Menlo Park, New Jersey. His duties ranged from aiding in conducting experiments on such devices as the phonograph, telephone and ore separator to acting as Edison's key person in further developing the incandescent electric lamp. By 1880, he was made chief engineer of the Edison Lamp Works. A year later, Edison dispatched Hammer to London to be chief engineer of the English Electric Light Company. In this position, he helped construct the Holborn Viaduct Central Electric Light Station in London. This was the first central station ever built for incandescent electric lighting. In 1883, Hammer became chief engineer for the German Edison Company. This task included planning and supervising the construction of all Edison plants in Germany. He returned to the United States late in the following year and acted as chief inspector of central stations of the parent Edison Electric Light Company. In 1886-87, Hammer was general manager and chief engineer of the Boston Edison Electric Illuminating Company. In 1888, he worked as an independent engineer and supervised the completion of the then-largest isolated electric lighting plant, located at the Ponce de Leon Hotel in St. Augustine, Florida. During that year, Hammer also was chosen as consulting electrical engineer to the Cincinnati Centennial Exposition. Subsequently, Edison selected him as his personal representative to the Paris Exposition of 1889. This assignment rounded out Hammer's eleven years with Edison. During his time as one of Edison's most trusted and important employees, Hammer devised a number of innovations to the incandescent electric lamp. He designed and built the first electric sign, which spelled out the name "Edison". While in Germany, he invented the automatic motor-driven flashing electric lamp sign. This particular sign flashed the word "Edison" letter by letter and then all at once. At the International Electrical Exhibition, held in Philadelphia in 1884, Hammer also constructed the first flashing column of electric lights.

Upon his return to the U.S. in 1890, Hammer worked as an independent consulting electrical engineer by assisting in a variety of electrical projects, carrying out tests, giving lectures and providing expert testimony in patent disputes. He based this modest enterprise in an office in New York City and continued in this occupation until 1925. His career as an electrical engineering consultant was interrupted by World War I. In June 1918, he was commissioned a major in the U.S. Army. He was assigned to the Inventions Section of the War Plans Division of the General Staff in charge of Aeronautical and Electrical Inventions at the Army War College, Washington, D.C.. By December of that year, he was attached to the Operations Division General Staff at the War Department (Inventions Section). During the war and on into 1919, Hammer also worked for the U.S. Patent Office by identifying any aviation-related patents likely to convey too much information to potential enemies. In conjunction with his War Department duties, he acted as a member of the Advisory Board of Experts affiliated with the Alien Property Commission.

Busy as he was with his private consulting work, Hammer also immersed himself in other scientific activities. He took a particular interest in radium after visiting Pierre and Marie Curie in Paris in 1902. The two discoverers of radium gave him some samples of this substance. Soon after returning to the United States, Hammer experimented with radium. His research yielded numerous useful applications for this material such as radium-luminous powders and paints that were used to coat everything from watch and clock dials to aeronautical instruments, switches and toys. Hammer also advocated the use of radium for cancer and tumor treatment. Beyond his interest in this material, he invented selenium light-sensitive cells and recommended many practical uses for them. He also conducted a great deal of laboratory work on X-rays, ultraviolet and cathode rays, phosphorescence and wireless communications. Accordingly, he lectured and published extensively on many of these fields of research and study.

Hand in hand with his overall interest in science and technology, Hammer had a particular passion for aeronautics. Beyond paying careful attention to the rapid progress made in this field at the turn of the twentieth century, he also played an active role as participant and supporter. He made his first balloon flight over France during the Paris Exposition of 1889. His last lighter-than-air journey took place in 1931 aboard the U.S. Navy dirigible Los Angeles. Moreover, he attended and officiated over many balloon, airship and airplane exhibitions and races. Hammer was a member of the Aero Club of America and a director of the Aeronautical Society. This latter group made the first ever purchase of an airplane in January 1909. He served as expert and secretary of the Aeronautics Committee on the Hudson-Fulton Celebration Commission of 1909 and wrote the contracts for Wilbur Wright and Glenn Curtiss to fly their airplanes for this event. This occasion in New York was important as it marked the first time a large gathering of people in the U.S. witnessed heavier-than-air powered flight. As a friend of the Wright brothers, Hammer testified as an expert witness on their behalf during various patent litigation suits. His contact with aviation pioneers went beyond the Wrights and Curtiss. He also knew and interacted with, among others, Samuel Langley, Alberto Santos-Dumont, Henri Farman and Count Ferdinand von Zeppelin. Even his work with radium had applications for aviation. Hammer developed radium-based luminous compounds and used them on aircraft instruments so pilots could more easily view their cockpits' dials and gauges.

Hammer's last years were filled with serving as Historian General of the Military Order of the World War, as well as participating in many scientific, engineering and aeronautical committees and societies. During this time, he was the recipient of numerous honors and awards, including the Elliott Cresson Gold Medal, John Scott Medal from the Franklin Institute and the Cross of the Legion of Honor from France. Up until his death on March 24, 1934, he also labored in his efforts to organize a vast personal collection of rare and valuable scientific artifacts, photographs and other materials accumulated since his days with Edison. Following Hammer's death, this important collection was left in the care of his daughter Mabel (his wife of twelve years, Alice, having died in 1906). Some years later, International Business Machines (IBM) acquired it. In 1962, IBM donated the William J. Hammer Scientific Collection to the Smithsonian Institution. The bulk of the collection resides with the National Museum of American History's Archives Center. In the mid 1980s, the aeronautical portion of this collection was transferred to the National Air and Space Museum (NASM) Archives.
Provenance:
IBM (Mr. William J. Hammer Collection), gift, 1961, XXXX-0074, not NASM
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Aeronautics -- Exhibitions  Search this
Aeronautics -- 1903-1916  Search this
Periodicals  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Scrapbooks
Publications
Manuscripts
Correspondence
Photographs
Citation:
William J. Hammer Collection, Acc. NASM.XXXX.0074, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0074
See more items in:
William J. Hammer Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0074
Online Media:

Orville and Wilbur Wright Memorabilia Collection

Names:
Hammer, William J. (William Joseph), 1858-1934 (electrical engineer)  Search this
Peterkin, C. R.  Search this
Wright, Orville, 1871-1948  Search this
Wright, Wilbur, 1867-1912  Search this
Extent:
0.5 Cubic feet ((1 box))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Ephemera
Photographs
Brochures
Correspondence
Date:
1906-1948
bulk 1907-1928
Scope and Contents:
The collection contains letters, telegrams, brochures, photographs and miscellaneous ephemera pertaining to Orville and Wilbur Wright. Included with the correspondence are letters written to William J. Hammer, who was an aeronautical pioneer and associated with the Wright Brothers, as well as other individuals including C. R. Peterkin. Additional items are, brochures from the Wilbur Wright Memorial, a brochure of the 25th Anniversary celebration of the first successful airplane flight, December 17, 1928, a sketch on an envelope by Wilbur Wright of a flight around the Statue of Liberty in 1909, a sympathy acknowledgment card for the Wrights' for Wilbur's death, and a photograph signed by Orville Wright. Also enclosed with the collection is a piece of wood from the Wright Brothers hangar at Kitty Hawk, presented by Orville Wright.
Biographical / Historical:
Wilbur Wright was born April 16, 1867, his brother Orville Wright on August 19, 1871. They, along with sister Katharine and brothers Reuchlin and Lorin, were raised near Millville, Indiana and in Dayton, Ohio by their mother, Susan Wright, and father, Milton Wright, bishop of the United Brethren Church. As young men, Wilbur and Orville launched a printing business and a bicycle shop. An interest in aeronautics, spurred by the accounts of the experiments of Otto Lilienthal, prompted Wilbur to request information on the subject from the Smithsonian Institution in 1899. In August of 1900, Wilbur built his first glider and that year and the next the brothers tested gliders at Kitty Hawk. The Wrights constructed a wind tunnel to gather accurate aeronautical data and, benefiting from this new information, another glider was built in 1902. In 1903, the brothers were ready to began construction of a powered craft. With the assistance of mechanic Charles Taylor, they added a 4-cylinder, 12-horsepower engine and propellers to the 1903 Flyer and it was sent to Kitty Hawk for testing. At 10:35 am, December 17, on Kill Devil Hill, Orville achieved a flight of 12 seconds--traveling a distance of 120 feet. By 1908 the Wrights were demonstrating their machines in Europe. The U.S. Army Signal Corps advertised for bids for a two-seat observation aircraft and in 1908 and 1909, the Wrights flew at official Army trials at Fort Myer, Virginia. (It was here that powered flight's first fatality occurred: the tragic death of Lieutenant Thomas Selfridge.) The Army was to purchase the Military Flyer (Signal Corps No. 1) for {dollar}30,000 in 1909. In that same year, The Wright Company was established to manufacture Wright aircraft. Wilbur died in Dayton, Ohio on May 30,1912. Orville Wright would live until January 30, 1948.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
Various Donors, Gift, unknown, XXXX-0079, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aeronautics -- Records  Search this
Aeronautics -- Awards  Search this
Aeronautics -- 1903-1916  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Ephemera
Photographs
Brochures
Correspondence
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0079
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0079

John Herschel Glenn, Jr. Orbital Flight Letter

Creator:
Glenn, John Herschel, Jr., 1921-2016  Search this
Names:
Glenn, John Herschel, Jr., 1921-2016  Search this
Extent:
0.05 Cubic feet (1 folder)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Date:
January 15, 1964
Summary:
This collection consists of a letter written by John Herschel Glenn, Jr. to Tim Jones, dated January 15, 1964. In the letter, which is on Glenn's National Aeronautics and Space Administration letterhead, Glenn discusses his thoughts on faith both during his orbital flight as well as in a general sense.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of a letter written by John Herschel Glenn, Jr. to Tim Jones, dated January 15, 1964. In the letter, which is on Glenn's National Aeronautics and Space Administration letterhead, Glenn discusses his thoughts on faith both during his orbital flight as well as in a general sense.
Arrangement:
Collection is in original order.
Biographical / Historical:
John Herschel Glenn, Jr. (1921-2016) became the first American to orbit the Earth on February 20, 1962 in the Mercury MA-6 Friendship 7. Glenn's three-orbit mission was a sterling success, as he overcame problems with the automatic control system that would have ended an unmanned flight. However, reentry was tense, as a faulty telemetry signal from the spacecraft indicated that the heat shield might be loose. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Mission Control instructed Glenn not to jettison the retrorocket package after firing in order to better hold the heat shield in place. Glenn reentered successfully and splashed down in the Atlantic 4 hours, 55 minutes and 23 seconds after launch.

Tim Jones was a sixteen year old boy when John Glenn made his orbital flight. Jones was enamored with the idea of flight and space travel and discussions in his church youth group at the time inspired Jones to write to John Glenn and ask about his thoughts on God during Glenn's mission.
Provenance:
Tim Jones, Gift, 2018, NASM.2019.0005
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
Space flight  Search this
Astronauts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Citation:
John Herschel Glenn, Jr. Orbital Flight Letter, NASM.2019.0005, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2019.0005
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2019-0005
Online Media:

Alfred Edward Moore Collection

Creator:
Hazen, Henry Allen, 1849-1900  Search this
Moore, Alfred Edward  Search this
Names:
Hazen, Henry Allen, 1849-1900  Search this
Moore, Alfred Edward  Search this
Extent:
0.05 Cubic feet (1 folder)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Newsclippings
Date:
1886-1887
Summary:
This collection consists of two letters from Henry Allen Hazen to Alfred Edward Moore as well as two news clippings.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of two letters from Henry Allen Hazen to Alfred Edward Moore. The first, dated May 19, 1887, discusses their upcoming flight in the World balloon including an interview Hazen had with a reporter about the flight and about necessary provisions. The second letter, dated June 28, 1887, includes observations from that same flight as well as notes about the scientific data they obtained and the post-flight coverage in the press. The collection also includes a copy of an article by Edward Duffy about the World balloon flight entitled "Three Miles High in a Balloon," dated December 1887; and the September 1886 issue of The Century Illustrated Monthly Magazine, which includes an article by Moore and one by John G. Doughty about earlier balloon flights.
Arrangement:
Collection is in chronological order.
Biographical / Historical:
Alfred Edward "Fred" Moore (1858-1890) was a balloonist who made several ascents in and around Winsted, Connecticut. In June 1887, Moore ascended from St. Louis, Missouri in a balloon that was financed by the New York World and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch on an expedition that included Henry Allen Hazen, a meterologist with the U. S. Signal Service Weather Bureau, photographer John G. Doughty, and Edward Duffy, correspondent. Though widely reported to have reached an altitude of 16,000 feet, the flight was cut short due to a hand injury sustained by Moore upon take-off as well as mechanical difficulties.
Provenance:
David Carlton Moore, Gift, 2018, NASM.2019.0009
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Balloons  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Newsclippings
Citation:
Alfred Edward Moore Collection, NASM.2019.0009, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2019.0009
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2019-0009
Online Media:

Wright 1903 Flyer "Operation Homecoming" Scrapbook

Creator:
National Air Museum (U.S.)  Search this
Names:
National Air Museum (U.S.)  Search this
Science Museum of London  Search this
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
Wright, Orville, 1871-1948  Search this
Extent:
0.66 Cubic feet (1 flatbox)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Clippings
Correspondence
Programs
Scrapbooks
Date:
1948-1949
Summary:
This scrapbook chronicles the return of the Wright 1903 Flyer to the United States, beginning with the early negotiations with England to the reception at the Smithsonian following receipt of the aircraft.
Scope and Contents:
This scrapbook chronicles the return of the Wright 1903 Flyer from the early negotiations with England to the reception following receipt of the aircraft. The scrapbook includes the following types of material: reception invitation and program; remarks from the reception; a letter sent by Harry Truman which was read during the reception; newspaper articles; and photographs, including shots of the curators setting up the display and hanging the aircraft in the National Air Museum in the North Hall of Arts and Industry Building.
Arrangement:
This collection is in original order.
Biographical / Historical:
After disagreements with the Smithsonian Institution, Orville Wright elected to loan his Wright 1903 Flyer to the Science Museum in England. Upon his death, an agreement was reached to return to aircraft to the United States where it would be housed by the National Air Museum.
Provenance:
Prepared by the National Air Museum, Transfer, unknown, NASM.XXXX.0393
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aeronautics -- 1903-1916  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Airplanes  Search this
Wright (Brothers) 1903 Flyer  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Clippings
Correspondence
Programs
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Wright 1903 Flyer "Operation Homecoming" Scrapbook, NASM.XXXX.0393, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0393
See more items in:
Wright 1903 Flyer "Operation Homecoming" Scrapbook
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0393
Online Media:

Ernest Smith/Emory Bronte Flight Scrapbook

Creator:
Smith, Ernest, 1907-1975 (Seneca)  Search this
Bronte, Emory  Search this
Names:
Bronte, Emory  Search this
Smith, Ernest, 1907-1975 (Seneca)  Search this
Extent:
1.11 Cubic feet (1 flatbox, 1 folder, and 1 oversized folder)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Clippings
Photographs
Correspondence
Scrapbooks
Date:
1917-1934
bulk 1927
Summary:
On July 14-15, 1927, Ernest Smith and Emory Bronte made the first civilian transpacific flight from California to Hawaii. This collection includes a scrapbook that chronicles their flight, a map of the Hawaiian islands, and a letter from President Franklin D. Roosevelt to Emory Bronte.
Scope and Contents:
This scrapbook, covered with Tahitian tapa cloth, chronicles the Smith-Bronte historic flight and consists of the following: including 30 letters; 23 telegrams; 197 photographs; 357 news articles; and 20 miscellaneous items. The collection also includes a map of the Hawaiian islands, dated August 1917, that was used by Smith and Bronte on their flight; and a letter from President Franklin D. Roosevelt presenting Emory B. Bronte with the honor of the "Distinguished Flying Cross," dated 6 September 1934.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged by type of material.
Biographical / Historical:
On July 14-15, 1927, Ernest Smith and Emory Bronte made the first civilian transpacific flight from California to Hawaii in their Travelair City of Oakland. Although they planned to land in Honolulu, problems with the gasoline pump and radio receiving apparatus forced them to crash-land in Molakai.
Provenance:
Unknown, Gift?, unknown, NASM.XXXX.0389.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Travel Air aircraft family  Search this
Aeronautics -- Records  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Transpacific flights  Search this
Genre/Form:
Clippings
Photographs
Correspondence
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Ernest Smith/Emory Bronte Flight Scrapbook, NASM.XXXX.0389, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0389
See more items in:
Ernest Smith/Emory Bronte Flight Scrapbook
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0389
Online Media:

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