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Antoin Sevruguin Photographs

Topic:
Early Photography of Iran
Collector:
Smith, Myron Bement, 1897-1970  Search this
Photographer:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Names:
Islamic Archives  Search this
Muzaffar al-Dīn Shāh, Shah of Iran, 1853-1907  Search this
Nāsir al-Dīn Shāh, Shah of Iran, 1831-1896  Search this
Reza Shah Pahlavi, Shah of Iran, 1878-1944  Search this
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Smith, Myron Bement, 1897-1970  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smith, Myron Bement, 1897-1970  Search this
Collection Source:
Blake, Marion Elizabeth  Search this
Extent:
66 Photographic prints (various dimensions)
695 Glass negatives (b&w, 13 cm. x 18 cm)
98 Photographic prints (various dimensions)
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Glass negatives
Gelatin silver prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Iraq
India
Uzbekistan
Baghdad (Iraq)
Basṭām (Iran)
Bīshāpūr (Extinct city)
Dāmghān (Iran)
Delhi (India)
Fīrūzābād (Iran)
Hamadān (Iran)
Iṣfahān (Iran)
Naqsh-i Rustam (Iran)
Pasargadae (Extinct city)
Persepolis (Iran)
Taq-e Bostan Site (Iran)
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1880s-1933
Scope and Contents:
Antoin Sevruguin operated a successful commercial photography studio in Tehran and was a court photographer to Nasr ed-Din Shah and succeeding Qajar rulers. Sevruguin's daughter and heir donated his glass negatives to the American Presbyterian Mission in Tehran. The Committee for Islamic Culture, which administered the Islamic Archives, purchased 695 negatives from the Presbyterian Mission in 1951. The collection also includes 164 silver gelatin prints, 98 acquired by Myron Bement Smith(MBS) in 1934 and 66 donated by Joseph Upton in 1953. The glass negatives are numbered but without apparent organization. MBS organized his photoprints into subject categories. Upton's photoprints are numbered according to a handwritten caption list. [Located Bay 7] For specific information on items in the collection search Sevruguin on the Smithsonian Collections Search Center web site http://collections.si.edu .
- 66 black-and-white gelatin silver photoprints, unmounted, were a gift from Joseph Upton, received by the committee for Islamic Culture, as reported in their official minutes of October 24, 1953. The 66 photoprints were initially purchased by Joseph Upton in 1928 from Antoin Sevruguin in Tehran.
- 695 glass negatives were included into the "Islamic Archives," which was administered jontly by the committee for Islamic Culture and the committee for Arabic and Islamic Studies of the American Council of Learned Societies. According to the official minutes, the committee for Islamic Culture reported purchasing the 696 glass plates during their fiscal years 1951-1952 from the American Presbyterian Mission in Tehran. Antoin Sevruguin's daughter gave these plates to the mission with instruction that they be sold for the benefit of the mission.
- 98 gelatin silver photoprints were collected by Myron Bement Smith after he viewed a portion of Sevruguin's negatives in 1934 ( these include recent finds in the Myron Bement Smith collection).
In addition of Antoin Sevruguin's 695 glass negatives and 164 silver gelatin prints in the Myron Bement Smith collection the Archives holds: 18 albumen prints in theJay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs (FSA A.15); 34 photographic prints in the Ernst Herzfeld Papers (FSA A.6); as well as a photograph album and individual albumen prints donated by Stephen Arpee (FSA A2011.03). Finally, the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives also own 3 separate gelatin silver prints.
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Arrangement:
- 66 gelatin silver prints are arranged in sequential number following Joseph Upton's handwritten list of captions, and ultimately organized by Myron B. Smith into subject categories (royalty, people, executions, criminals, punishment, architecture).
- 695 glass negatives, numbered, without any apparent organization, are housed in document boxes and stored on shelves.
- 98 gelatin silver prints are organized by Myron B. Smith into subject categories (people, architecture, royalty, landscape).
Biographical / Historical:
Antoin Sevruguin managed and operated one of the most successful commercial photography studios in Tehran in the late 19th century. Born in the 1840s in Iran, Sevruguin's mother returned with her children to her hometown of Tbilisi after his father Vassil, a Russian diplomat in Iran, died in a horse riding accident. Trained as a painter, Sevruguin returned to Iran in the early 1870s accompanied by his two brothers, establishing a photography studio first in Tabriz and then Tehran. His studio's ties to Tbilisi, however, persisted through the years; many of the early portraits of Dervishes and women have been simultaneously attributed to Antoin Sevruguin and Dimitri Yermakov, the Georgian photographer who is often referred to as Sevruguin's mentor from Tbilisi. Many of Antoin Sevruguin's photographs were published as early as 1885 in travelogues, journals and books indicating that by that time he had a fully established practice in Tehran's Ala al-Dawla street, with ties to the court of Nasir al-Din Shah Qajar. Often unacknowledged as the producer of published images in his own time - the 1902 photographic survey of Persepolis being the most glaring of such authorial misrepresentations - he was nevertheless celebrated and acknowledged for his artistic vision and his keen eye for composition, achieving the Medal of Lion and Sun from Nasir al-Din Shah, the 1897 Medal of Honour in the Brussels International Exposition, and the 1900 Medal of Honour in Paris International Exposition. Reflecting a career that spans nearly half a century, Sevruguin's diverse body of work includes studio portraits of families, women and dervishes, survey photographs of archeological sites, objects, landscapes and architecture, and photographs of royalty, high officials and ceremonies of the Qajar court. The range of his output not only demonstrates his own pictorial concerns and artistic abilities but also the divergent interests of his clients. Despite numerous devastating incidents throughout his career - the loss of more than half of his negatives in a 1908 blast and fire, an unsuccessful attempt at diversifying into cinematography in the 1910s, and the confiscation of the remainder of his negatives in the mid-1920s to name a few - his studio remained operational even after his death in 1933. A number of negatives from the Sevruguin studio can be dated to the years after Antoin's death, indicating that the Sevruguin studio continued to be commercially viable. As one of the most prolific early commercial photographers in Iran, Antoin Sevruguin's artistic legacy has since proved far more enduring.
Local Numbers:
FSA A.04 2.12
General:
Titles and summary notes are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Abbasids  Search this
Ancient Near Eastern Art  Search this
Antiquities  Search this
Architecture  Search this
Art of the Islamic World  Search this
Clothing and dress  Search this
Criminal procedure  Search this
Executions and executioners  Search this
headgear  Search this
Inscriptions  Search this
Landscapes  Search this
Portrait photography  Search this
Pottery  Search this
Relief (Sculpture)  Search this
Religious buildings  Search this
Royalty (Nobility)  Search this
Sassanids  Search this
Shrines  Search this
Textile design  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Glass negatives
Gelatin silver prints
Collection Citation:
The Myron Bement Smith Collection. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A.04, Subseries 2.12
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith Collection
Myron Bement Smith Collection / Series 2: The Islamic Archives
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-04-ref9047

Baghdad (Iraq): Mashhad al-Kazimiya

Topic:
Early Photography of Iran
Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Names:
Islamic Archives  Search this
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Smith, Myron Bement, 1897-1970  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smith, Myron Bement, 1897-1970  Search this
Collection Source:
Blake, Marion Elizabeth  Search this
Extent:
1 Glass negative (b&w, 23.1 cm. x 17.7 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Iraq
Baghdad (Iraq)
Date:
1880-1930
Scope and Contents:
"The Shrine was repaired on the order of Nasir Al-Din Shah Qajar after his first trip to the site in 1873." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- Handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "663."
- Scratched handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "734."
- Handwritten information on slip of paper (from a 1943-1944 cash book, produced by the Bathni Brothers, Tehran) reads, "78) Kazemain ??." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information]
- Myron Bement Smith handwritten caption in English reads, "47.P; Box 37.1: Kazemain. Mosque (late) (# 78)." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information; Box 60; Folder 44: 47 P: Antoine Sevruguin, glass negatives, Iran]
Arrangement:
According to Myron B. Smith handwritten document (Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information; Box 60; Folder 44: 47 P Antoine Sevruguin, glass negatives, Iran), Antoin Sevruguin's 696 glass negatives, at the time of their acquisition, were arranged into 61 boxes without any apparent organization. Today they are housed in archival document boxes, essentially duplicating the original arrangement, and stored on shelves. This glass negative was included into "Box 37."
Biographical / Historical:
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, leaving behind only a fraction of his large collection of glass negatives, which is currently in the Archives of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.
Local Numbers:
FSA A.4 2.12.GN.37.01
General:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Religious buildings  Search this
Shrines  Search this
Genre/Form:
Glass negatives
Collection Citation:
The Myron Bement Smith Collection. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A.04, Item FSA A.4 2.12.GN.37.01
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith Collection
Myron Bement Smith Collection / Series 2: The Islamic Archives / 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs / 2.12.01: Glass Plate Negatives / Glass Plate Negatives: Sets 1-61
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-04-ref10319

Baghdad (Iraq): Mashhad al-Kazimiya: Religious Dignitaries in front of Entrance Portal

Topic:
Early Photography of Iran
Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Names:
Islamic Archives  Search this
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Smith, Myron Bement, 1897-1970  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smith, Myron Bement, 1897-1970  Search this
Collection Source:
Blake, Marion Elizabeth  Search this
Extent:
1 Glass negative (b&w, 23.8 cm. x 17.8 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Iraq
Baghdad (Iraq)
Date:
1880-1930
Scope and Contents:
- Handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "495."
- Scratched handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "1189."
- Handwritten information on slip of paper (from a 1943-1944 cash book, produced by the Bathni Brothers, Tehran) reads, "128) Entrance to Kazemain." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information]
- Myron Bement Smith handwritten caption in English reads, "47.P; Box 41.3: (P) [black-and-white print on hand]. Entrance to Kazemain. (# 128)." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information; Box 60; Folder 44: 47 P: Antoine Sevruguin, glass negatives, Iran]
Arrangement:
According to Myron B. Smith handwritten document (Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information; Box 60; Folder 44: 47 P Antoine Sevruguin, glass negatives, Iran), Antoin Sevruguin's 696 glass negatives, at the time of their acquisition, were arranged into 61 boxes without any apparent organization. Today they are housed in archival document boxes, essentially duplicating the original arrangement, and stored on shelves. This glass negative was included into "Box 41."
Biographical / Historical:
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, leaving behind only a fraction of his large collection of glass negatives, which is currently in the Archives of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.
Local Numbers:
FSA A.4 2.12.GN.41.03
General:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Clothing and dress  Search this
headgear  Search this
Religious buildings  Search this
Inscriptions  Search this
Inscriptions, Arabic  Search this
Shrines  Search this
Genre/Form:
Glass negatives
Collection Citation:
The Myron Bement Smith Collection. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A.04, Item FSA A.4 2.12.GN.41.03
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith Collection
Myron Bement Smith Collection / Series 2: The Islamic Archives / 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs / 2.12.01: Glass Plate Negatives / Glass Plate Negatives: Sets 1-61
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-04-ref10369

Quaint Basket Boats (Kufa) on the Tigris River

Topic:
Early Photography of Iran
Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Names:
Islamic Archives  Search this
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Smith, Myron Bement, 1897-1970  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smith, Myron Bement, 1897-1970  Search this
Collection Source:
Blake, Marion Elizabeth  Search this
Extent:
1 Glass negative (b&w, 23.8 cm. x 18.2 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Iraq
Date:
1880-1930
Scope and Contents:
- Handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "660."
- Handwritten information on slip of paper (from a 1943-1944 cash book, produced by the Bathni Brothers, Tehran) reads, "25) Boats of Tigris." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information]
- Myron Bement Smith handwritten caption in English reads, "47.P; Box 44.3: Boats of Tigris (cracked + yellowed)." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information; Box 60; Folder 44: 47 P: Antoine Sevruguin, glass negatives, Iran]
Arrangement:
According to Myron B. Smith handwritten document (Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information; Box 60; Folder 44: 47 P Antoine Sevruguin, glass negatives, Iran), Antoin Sevruguin's 696 glass negatives, at the time of their acquisition, were arranged into 61 boxes without any apparent organization. Today they are housed in archival document boxes, essentially duplicating the original arrangement, and stored on shelves. This glass negative was included into "Box 44."
Biographical / Historical:
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, leaving behind only a fraction of his large collection of glass negatives, which is currently in the Archives of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.
Local Numbers:
FSA A.4 2.12.GN.44.03
General:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Genre/Form:
Glass negatives
Collection Citation:
The Myron Bement Smith Collection. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A.04, Item FSA A.4 2.12.GN.44.03
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith Collection
Myron Bement Smith Collection / Series 2: The Islamic Archives / 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs / 2.12.01: Glass Plate Negatives / Glass Plate Negatives: Sets 1-61
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-04-ref10405

Unidentified City, probably Baghdad (Iraq)

Topic:
Early Photography of Iran
Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Names:
Islamic Archives  Search this
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Smith, Myron Bement, 1897-1970  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smith, Myron Bement, 1897-1970  Search this
Collection Source:
Blake, Marion Elizabeth  Search this
Extent:
1 Glass negative (b&w, 23.5 cm. x 18 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Iraq
Baghdad (Iraq)
Date:
1880-1930
Scope and Contents:
- FSg curatorial research specialist remark on Antoin Sevruguin photo manipulation reads, "Black paper on the back and black ink on the front. The top and right edges are rugged. Ink marks all over the image over the imperfections of the negative."
- Handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "279."
- Myron Bement Smith handwritten caption in English reads, "47.P; Box 48.6: City under construction (peeling) (see 50.8)." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information; Box 60; Folder 44: 47 P: Antoine Sevruguin, glass negatives, Iran]
Arrangement:
According to Myron B. Smith handwritten document (Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information; Box 60; Folder 44: 47 P Antoine Sevruguin, glass negatives, Iran), Antoin Sevruguin's 696 glass negatives, at the time of their acquisition, were arranged into 61 boxes without any apparent organization. Today they are housed in archival document boxes, essentially duplicating the original arrangement, and stored on shelves. This glass negative was included into "Box 48."
Biographical / Historical:
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, leaving behind only a fraction of his large collection of glass negatives, which is currently in the Archives of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.
Local Numbers:
FSA A.4 2.12.GN.48.06
General:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Genre/Form:
Glass negatives
Collection Citation:
The Myron Bement Smith Collection. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A.04, Item FSA A.4 2.12.GN.48.06
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith Collection
Myron Bement Smith Collection / Series 2: The Islamic Archives / 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs / 2.12.01: Glass Plate Negatives / Glass Plate Negatives: Sets 1-61
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-04-ref10460

Baghdad (Iraq): Unidentified Mosque

Topic:
Early Photography of Iran
Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Names:
Islamic Archives  Search this
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Smith, Myron Bement, 1897-1970  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smith, Myron Bement, 1897-1970  Search this
Collection Source:
Blake, Marion Elizabeth  Search this
Extent:
1 Glass negative (b&w, 17.9 cm. x 12.7 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Iraq
Baghdad (Iraq)
Date:
1880-1930
Scope and Contents:
- Myron Bement Smith handwritten caption in English reads, "47.P; Box 50.8: City in construction (houses without roofs)." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information; Box 60; Folder 44: 47 P: Antoine Sevruguin, glass negatives, Iran]
Arrangement:
According to Myron B. Smith handwritten document (Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information; Box 60; Folder 44: 47 P Antoine Sevruguin, glass negatives, Iran), Antoin Sevruguin's 696 glass negatives, at the time of their acquisition, were arranged into 61 boxes without any apparent organization. Today they are housed in archival document boxes, essentially duplicating the original arrangement, and stored on shelves. This glass negative was included into "Box 50."
Biographical / Historical:
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, leaving behind only a fraction of his large collection of glass negatives, which is currently in the Archives of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.
Local Numbers:
FSA A.4 2.12.GN.50.08
General:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Religious buildings  Search this
Genre/Form:
Glass negatives
Collection Citation:
The Myron Bement Smith Collection. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A.04, Item FSA A.4 2.12.GN.50.08
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith Collection
Myron Bement Smith Collection / Series 2: The Islamic Archives / 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs / 2.12.01: Glass Plate Negatives / Glass Plate Negatives: Sets 1-61
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-04-ref10483

Baghdad (Iraq): Suq al Ghazl Minaret and View of the City

Topic:
Early Photography of Iran
Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Names:
Islamic Archives  Search this
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Smith, Myron Bement, 1897-1970  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smith, Myron Bement, 1897-1970  Search this
Collection Source:
Blake, Marion Elizabeth  Search this
Extent:
1 Glass negative (b&w, 13 cm. x 17.8 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Iraq
Baghdad (Iraq)
Date:
1907-1908
Scope and Contents:
- FSg curatorial research specialist remark on Antoin Sevruguin photo condition reads, "All four sides are chopped off."
- Handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "1159."
- Scratched handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "393."
- Myron Bement Smith handwritten caption in English reads, "47.P; Box 56.8: Manār." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information; Box 60; Folder 44: 47 P: Antoine Sevruguin, glass negatives, Iran]
Arrangement:
According to Myron B. Smith handwritten document (Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information; Box 60; Folder 44: 47 P Antoine Sevruguin, glass negatives, Iran), Antoin Sevruguin's 696 glass negatives, at the time of their acquisition, were arranged into 61 boxes without any apparent organization. Today they are housed in archival document boxes, essentially duplicating the original arrangement, and stored on shelves. This glass negative was included into "Box 56."
Biographical / Historical:
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, leaving behind only a fraction of his large collection of glass negatives, which is currently in the Archives of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.
Local Numbers:
FSA A.4 2.12.GN.56.08
General:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Religious buildings  Search this
Genre/Form:
Glass negatives
Collection Citation:
The Myron Bement Smith Collection. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A.04, Item FSA A.4 2.12.GN.56.08
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith Collection
Myron Bement Smith Collection / Series 2: The Islamic Archives / 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs / 2.12.01: Glass Plate Negatives / Glass Plate Negatives: Sets 1-61
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-04-ref10559
Online Media:

Quaint Basket Boats (Kufa) on the Tigris River

Topic:
Early Photography of Iran
Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Names:
Islamic Archives  Search this
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Smith, Myron Bement, 1897-1970  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smith, Myron Bement, 1897-1970  Search this
Collection Source:
Blake, Marion Elizabeth  Search this
Extent:
1 Glass negative (b&w, 17.9 cm. x 12.7 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Iraq
Date:
1880-1930
Scope and Contents:
- FSg curatorial research specialist remark on Antoin Sevruguin photo condition reads, "Red ink on the imperfections of the negative. The number is in the original print."
- Scratched handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "35?."
- Myron Bement Smith handwritten caption in English reads, "47.P; Box 60.7: Large baskets on river ?" [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information; Box 60; Folder 44: 47 P: Antoine Sevruguin, glass negatives, Iran]
Arrangement:
According to Myron B. Smith handwritten document (Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information; Box 60; Folder 44: 47 P Antoine Sevruguin, glass negatives, Iran), Antoin Sevruguin's 696 glass negatives, at the time of their acquisition, were arranged into 61 boxes without any apparent organization. Today they are housed in archival document boxes, essentially duplicating the original arrangement, and stored on shelves. This glass negative was included into "Box 60."
Biographical / Historical:
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, leaving behind only a fraction of his large collection of glass negatives, which is currently in the Archives of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.
Local Numbers:
FSA A.4 2.12.GN.60.07
General:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Transportation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Glass negatives
Collection Citation:
The Myron Bement Smith Collection. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A.04, Item FSA A.4 2.12.GN.60.07
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith Collection
Myron Bement Smith Collection / Series 2: The Islamic Archives / 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs / 2.12.01: Glass Plate Negatives / Glass Plate Negatives: Sets 1-61
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-04-ref10593

Pilgrims at the Shrine of Najaf (Iraq)

Topic:
Early Photography of Iran
Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Names:
Islamic Archives  Search this
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Smith, Myron Bement, 1897-1970  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smith, Myron Bement, 1897-1970  Search this
Collection Source:
Blake, Marion Elizabeth  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print, b&w, 24 cm. x 18 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iraq
Date:
1880s-1930
Scope and Contents:
- On recto of the print, handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "893."
- On recto of the print, scratched handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "---(?)."
- On verso of the print (lower left corner), original stamp, in French and Persian, reads, "Photographie Sevruguin."
- On verso of the print, Myron Bement Smith caption in English reads, "Mullahs."
Arrangement:
Gelatin silver prints organized by Myron B. Smith into subject categories (People; Architecture - Pre-Islamic; Royalty - Residences - Gulistan Palace (Tehran; Architecture; Landscapes). This print is in the following subject category: People.
Biographical / Historical:
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Local Numbers:
[18(A5)]

FSA A.4 2.12.Sm.04
General:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Clothing and dress  Search this
headgear  Search this
Religious buildings  Search this
Inscriptions  Search this
Inscriptions, Arabic  Search this
Genre/Form:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
The Myron Bement Smith Collection. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A.04, Item FSA A.4 2.12.Sm.04
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith Collection
Myron Bement Smith Collection / Series 2: The Islamic Archives / 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs / 2.12.02: Sevruguin Smith Prints / People
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-04-ref9819

Baghdad (Iraq): Mashhad al-Kazimiya: Religious Dignitaries in front of Entrance Portal

Topic:
Early Photography of Iran
Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Names:
Islamic Archives  Search this
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Smith, Myron Bement, 1897-1970  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smith, Myron Bement, 1897-1970  Search this
Collection Source:
Blake, Marion Elizabeth  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print, b&w, 24 cm. x 18 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iraq
Baghdad (Iraq)
Date:
1880s-1930
Scope and Contents:
- On recto of the print, handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "495."
- On recto of the print, scratched handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "1189."
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "41.3."
- On verso of the print (lower left corner), original stamp, in French and Persian, reads, "Photographie Sevruguin."
Arrangement:
Gelatin silver prints organized by Myron B. Smith into subject categories (People; Architecture - Pre-Islamic; Royalty - Residences - Gulistan Palace (Tehran; Architecture; Landscapes). This print is in the following subject category: People.
Biographical / Historical:
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Local Numbers:
[18(A6)]

FSA A.4 2.12.Sm.05
General:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Clothing and dress  Search this
headgear  Search this
Religious buildings  Search this
Inscriptions  Search this
Inscriptions, Arabic  Search this
Shrines  Search this
Genre/Form:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
The Myron Bement Smith Collection. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A.04, Item FSA A.4 2.12.Sm.05
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith Collection
Myron Bement Smith Collection / Series 2: The Islamic Archives / 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs / 2.12.02: Sevruguin Smith Prints / People
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-04-ref9820

Baghdad (Iraq): Mashhad al-Kazimiya

Topic:
Early Photography of Iran
Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Names:
Islamic Archives  Search this
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Smith, Myron Bement, 1897-1970  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smith, Myron Bement, 1897-1970  Search this
Collection Source:
Blake, Marion Elizabeth  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print, b&w, 24 cm. x 18 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iraq
Baghdad (Iraq)
Date:
1880s-1930
Scope and Contents:
- On recto of the print, handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "663."
- On recto of the print, scratched handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "734."
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "37.1."
- On verso of the print (lower left corner), original stamp, in French and Persian, reads, "Photographie Sevruguin."
- On verso of the print, Myron Bement Smith caption in English reads, "Persia; Kasemain(?) Mosque."
Arrangement:
Gelatin silver prints organized by Myron B. Smith into subject categories (People; Architecture - Pre-Islamic; Royalty - Residences - Gulistan Palace (Tehran); Architecture; Landscapes). This print is in the following subject category: Architecture.
Biographical / Historical:
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Local Numbers:
[19(B9)]

FSA A.4 2.12.Sm.62
General:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Religious buildings  Search this
Shrines  Search this
Genre/Form:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
The Myron Bement Smith Collection. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A.04, Item FSA A.4 2.12.Sm.62
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith Collection
Myron Bement Smith Collection / Series 2: The Islamic Archives / 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs / 2.12.02: Sevruguin Smith Prints
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-04-ref9877

Ctesiphon (Iraq): Taq-i Kisra (Arch of Khusrow)

Topic:
Early Photography of Iran
Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Names:
Islamic Archives  Search this
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Smith, Myron Bement, 1897-1970  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smith, Myron Bement, 1897-1970  Search this
Collection Source:
Blake, Marion Elizabeth  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print, b&w, 24 cm. x 18 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iraq
Baghdad (Iraq)
Date:
1880s-1930
Scope and Contents:
- On recto of the print, scratched handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "---(?)."
- On verso of the print (lower left corner), original stamp, in French and Persian, reads, "Photographie Sevruguin."
- On verso of the print, Myron Bement Smith caption in English reads, "Irak; Ctesiphon (Taq-E-Kisra)."
Arrangement:
Gelatin silver prints organized by Myron B. Smith into subject categories (People; Architecture - Pre-Islamic; Royalty - Residences - Gulistan Palace (Tehran); Architecture; Landscapes). This print is in the following subject category: Architecture.
Biographical / Historical:
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Local Numbers:
[19(C4)]

FSA A.4 2.12.Sm.65
General:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Sassanids  Search this
Palaces  Search this
Genre/Form:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
The Myron Bement Smith Collection. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A.04, Item FSA A.4 2.12.Sm.65
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith Collection
Myron Bement Smith Collection / Series 2: The Islamic Archives / 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs / 2.12.02: Sevruguin Smith Prints
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-04-ref9880

SQ 9: Pahlavik, publ. Paikuli. p.133

Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Names:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Collection Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (paper squeeze, b&w, 18 in.x 24 in. (45.7 cm. x 61 cm.))
Container:
Item SQ-9
Type:
Archival materials
Paper squeezes
Place:
Asia
Iraq
Paikuli (Iraq)
Date:
1911-1923
Scope and Contents note:
Print corresponds to negative 4311.
Scope and Contents:
- Original handwritten annotation reads, "."
- Additional information from Ernst Herzfeld's 1924 Paikuli publication reads, "[Plate] 133. Pahlavik version B'.6 (photograph of the paper squeeze)."
- Additional information from Joseph Upton's Finding Aid reads, "No. 9 ([neg.] 4311) Pahlavik, published in Paikuli. p.133."
- Information from Helmut Humbach and Prods O. Skjærvø's publication reads, "The ruin of the Sassanian monument of Paikuli is situated close to the southern ascent to the [Paikuli] pass. Originally, the monument consisted of a solid square tower. Four identical colossal busts of one and the same king of kings were built into the four walls. The western wall bore a large Middle-Persian inscription (eight rows of blocks, with a total of 46 lines), whereas the eastern wall bore the Parthian version of this (seven rows, with a total of 42 lines, all of them surviving in a fragmentary state. The subject of the inscription, carefully carved and written in perspective, is the quarrel over the succession, between Narseh (293-303) and Varahrān (293). In the course of his first two expeditions, in 1911 and 1913, E. Herzfeld had discovered a total of 97 inscribed blocks (54 Middle Persian, 43 Parthian). On his last visit to Paikuli in 1923, Herzfeld excavated the site and found 30 additional blocks (20 Middle Persian, 10 Parthian), which raise the total number of surviving blocks to 133." [Helmut Humbach and Prods O. Skjærvø's publication, 1980: "The Sassanian Inscription of Paikuli; Supplement to Herzfeld's Paikuli. Wiesbaden: Reichert; pp.13-16."]
The Sassanian Inscription of Paikuli (Iraq): Squeeze B'.6, Parthian Version
Arrangement:
Papers squeezes are organized in sequential number following language scripts, which are housed in folders, and stored in metal flat files.
Local Numbers:
M-009

FSA A.6 06.M009
General:
- Title is provided by Xavier Courouble, FSg Archives cataloger, based on Ernst Herzfeld's publication, "Paikuli: Monument and Inscription of the Early History of the Sasanian Empire; Berlin: D. Reimer, 1924," and Helmut Humbach and Prods O. Skjærvø's publication, "The Sassanian Inscription of Paikuli; Supplement to Herzfeld's Paikuli. Wiesbaden: Reichert, 1980."
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Paper squeezes related primarly to two expeditions to Paikuli (Iraq), in 1911 and 1913, as well an excavation campaign carried out on site by Ernst Herzfeld in 1923.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology)  Search this
Inscriptions  Search this
Inscriptions, Pahlavi  Search this
Inscriptions, Parthian  Search this
Middle Persian language  Search this
Sassanids  Search this
Genre/Form:
Paper Squeezes
Collection Citation:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Ernst Herzfeld, 1946
Identifier:
FSA.A.06, Item FSA A.6 06.M009
See more items in:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers
Ernst Herzfeld Papers / Series 6: Paper Squeezes of Inscriptions / 6.2: Middle Persian Inscriptions
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-06-ref10004

SQ 10: Pahlavik, publ. Paikuli. p.135

Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Names:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Collection Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (paper squeeze, b&w, 18 in.x 24 in. (45.7 cm. x 61 cm.))
Container:
Item SQ-10
Type:
Archival materials
Paper squeezes
Place:
Asia
Iraq
Paikuli (Iraq)
Date:
1911-1923
Scope and Contents note:
Print corresponds to negative 4312.
Scope and Contents:
- Original handwritten annotation reads, "."
- Additional information from Ernst Herzfeld's 1924 Paikuli publication reads, "[Plate] 135. Pahlavik version B'.7 (photograph of the paper squeeze)."
- Additional information from Joseph Upton's Finding Aid reads, "No. 10 ([neg.] 4312) Pahlavik, published in Paikuli. p.135."
- Information from Helmut Humbach and Prods O. Skjærvø's publication reads, "The ruin of the Sassanian monument of Paikuli is situated close to the southern ascent to the [Paikuli] pass. Originally, the monument consisted of a solid square tower. Four identical colossal busts of one and the same king of kings were built into the four walls. The western wall bore a large Middle-Persian inscription (eight rows of blocks, with a total of 46 lines), whereas the eastern wall bore the Parthian version of this (seven rows, with a total of 42 lines, all of them surviving in a fragmentary state. The subject of the inscription, carefully carved and written in perspective, is the quarrel over the succession, between Narseh (293-303) and Varahrān (293). In the course of his first two expeditions, in 1911 and 1913, E. Herzfeld had discovered a total of 97 inscribed blocks (54 Middle Persian, 43 Parthian). On his last visit to Paikuli in 1923, Herzfeld excavated the site and found 30 additional blocks (20 Middle Persian, 10 Parthian), which raise the total number of surviving blocks to 133." [Helmut Humbach and Prods O. Skjærvø's publication, 1980: "The Sassanian Inscription of Paikuli; Supplement to Herzfeld's Paikuli. Wiesbaden: Reichert; pp.13-16."]
The Sassanian Inscription of Paikuli (Iraq): Squeeze B'.7, Parthian Version
Arrangement:
Papers squeezes are organized in sequential number following language scripts, which are housed in folders, and stored in metal flat files.
Local Numbers:
M-010

FSA A.6 06.M010
General:
- Title is provided by Xavier Courouble, FSg Archives cataloger, based on Ernst Herzfeld's publication, "Paikuli: Monument and Inscription of the Early History of the Sasanian Empire; Berlin: D. Reimer, 1924," and Helmut Humbach and Prods O. Skjærvø's publication, "The Sassanian Inscription of Paikuli; Supplement to Herzfeld's Paikuli. Wiesbaden: Reichert, 1980."
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Paper squeezes related primarly to two expeditions to Paikuli (Iraq), in 1911 and 1913, as well an excavation campaign carried out on site by Ernst Herzfeld in 1923.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology)  Search this
Inscriptions  Search this
Inscriptions, Pahlavi  Search this
Inscriptions, Parthian  Search this
Middle Persian language  Search this
Sassanids  Search this
Genre/Form:
Paper Squeezes
Collection Citation:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Ernst Herzfeld, 1946
Identifier:
FSA.A.06, Item FSA A.6 06.M010
See more items in:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers
Ernst Herzfeld Papers / Series 6: Paper Squeezes of Inscriptions / 6.2: Middle Persian Inscriptions
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-06-ref10006

SQ 12: Pahlavik, publ. Paikuli. p.141

Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Names:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Collection Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (paper squeeze, b&w, 18 in.x 26 in. (46 cm. x 66 cm.))
Container:
Item SQ-12
Type:
Archival materials
Paper squeezes
Place:
Asia
Iraq
Paikuli (Iraq)
Date:
1911-1923
Scope and Contents note:
Print corresponds to negative 4315.
Scope and Contents:
- Original handwritten annotation reads, "."
- Additional information from Ernst Herzfeld's 1924 Paikuli publication reads, "[Plate] 141. Pahlavik version B'.13 (photograph of the paper squeeze)."
- Additional information from Joseph Upton's Finding Aid reads, "No. 12 ([neg.] 4315) Pahlavik, published in Paikuli. p.141."
- Information from Helmut Humbach and Prods O. Skjærvø's publication reads, "The ruin of the Sassanian monument of Paikuli is situated close to the southern ascent to the [Paikuli] pass. Originally, the monument consisted of a solid square tower. Four identical colossal busts of one and the same king of kings were built into the four walls. The western wall bore a large Middle-Persian inscription (eight rows of blocks, with a total of 46 lines), whereas the eastern wall bore the Parthian version of this (seven rows, with a total of 42 lines, all of them surviving in a fragmentary state. The subject of the inscription, carefully carved and written in perspective, is the quarrel over the succession, between Narseh (293-303) and Varahrān (293). In the course of his first two expeditions, in 1911 and 1913, E. Herzfeld had discovered a total of 97 inscribed blocks (54 Middle Persian, 43 Parthian). On his last visit to Paikuli in 1923, Herzfeld excavated the site and found 30 additional blocks (20 Middle Persian, 10 Parthian), which raise the total number of surviving blocks to 133." [Helmut Humbach and Prods O. Skjærvø's publication, 1980: "The Sassanian Inscription of Paikuli; Supplement to Herzfeld's Paikuli. Wiesbaden: Reichert; pp.13-16."]
The Sassanian Inscription of Paikuli (Iraq): Squeeze B'.13, Parthian Version
Arrangement:
Papers squeezes are organized in sequential number following language scripts, which are housed in folders, and stored in metal flat files.
Local Numbers:
M-012

FSA A.6 06.M012
General:
- Title is provided by Xavier Courouble, FSg Archives cataloger, based on Ernst Herzfeld's publication, "Paikuli: Monument and Inscription of the Early History of the Sasanian Empire; Berlin: D. Reimer, 1924," and Helmut Humbach and Prods O. Skjærvø's publication, "The Sassanian Inscription of Paikuli; Supplement to Herzfeld's Paikuli. Wiesbaden: Reichert, 1980."
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Paper squeezes related primarly to two expeditions to Paikuli (Iraq), in 1911 and 1913, as well an excavation campaign carried out on site by Ernst Herzfeld in 1923.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology)  Search this
Inscriptions  Search this
Inscriptions, Pahlavi  Search this
Inscriptions, Parthian  Search this
Middle Persian language  Search this
Sassanids  Search this
Genre/Form:
Paper Squeezes
Collection Citation:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Ernst Herzfeld, 1946
Identifier:
FSA.A.06, Item FSA A.6 06.M012
See more items in:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers
Ernst Herzfeld Papers / Series 6: Paper Squeezes of Inscriptions / 6.2: Middle Persian Inscriptions
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-06-ref10010

SQ 15: Pahlavik, publ. Paikuli. p.147

Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Names:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Collection Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (paper squeeze, b&w, 19 in.x 27 in. (48.3 cm. x 68.5 cm.))
Container:
Item SQ-15
Type:
Archival materials
Paper squeezes
Place:
Asia
Iraq
Paikuli (Iraq)
Date:
1911-1923
Scope and Contents note:
Print corresponds to negative 4318.
Scope and Contents:
- Original handwritten annotation reads, "."
- Additional information from Ernst Herzfeld's 1924 Paikuli publication reads, "[Plate] 147. Pahlavik version C'.3 (photograph of the paper squeeze)."
- Additional information from Joseph Upton's Finding Aid reads, "No. 15 ([neg.] 4318) Pahlavik, published in Paikuli. p.147."
- Information from Helmut Humbach and Prods O. Skjærvø's publication reads, "The ruin of the Sassanian monument of Paikuli is situated close to the southern ascent to the [Paikuli] pass. Originally, the monument consisted of a solid square tower. Four identical colossal busts of one and the same king of kings were built into the four walls. The western wall bore a large Middle-Persian inscription (eight rows of blocks, with a total of 46 lines), whereas the eastern wall bore the Parthian version of this (seven rows, with a total of 42 lines, all of them surviving in a fragmentary state. The subject of the inscription, carefully carved and written in perspective, is the quarrel over the succession, between Narseh (293-303) and Varahrān (293). In the course of his first two expeditions, in 1911 and 1913, E. Herzfeld had discovered a total of 97 inscribed blocks (54 Middle Persian, 43 Parthian). On his last visit to Paikuli in 1923, Herzfeld excavated the site and found 30 additional blocks (20 Middle Persian, 10 Parthian), which raise the total number of surviving blocks to 133." [Helmut Humbach and Prods O. Skjærvø's publication, 1980: "The Sassanian Inscription of Paikuli; Supplement to Herzfeld's Paikuli. Wiesbaden: Reichert; pp.13-16."]
The Sassanian Inscription of Paikuli (Iraq): Squeeze C'.3, Parthian Version
Arrangement:
Papers squeezes are organized in sequential number following language scripts, which are housed in folders, and stored in metal flat files.
Local Numbers:
M-015

FSA A.6 06.M015
General:
- Title is provided by Xavier Courouble, FSg Archives cataloger, based on Ernst Herzfeld's publication, "Paikuli: Monument and Inscription of the Early History of the Sasanian Empire; Berlin: D. Reimer, 1924," and Helmut Humbach and Prods O. Skjærvø's publication, "The Sassanian Inscription of Paikuli; Supplement to Herzfeld's Paikuli. Wiesbaden: Reichert, 1980."
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Paper squeezes related primarly to two expeditions to Paikuli (Iraq), in 1911 and 1913, as well an excavation campaign carried out on site by Ernst Herzfeld in 1923.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology)  Search this
Inscriptions  Search this
Inscriptions, Pahlavi  Search this
Inscriptions, Parthian  Search this
Middle Persian language  Search this
Sassanids  Search this
Genre/Form:
Paper Squeezes
Collection Citation:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Ernst Herzfeld, 1946
Identifier:
FSA.A.06, Item FSA A.6 06.M015
See more items in:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers
Ernst Herzfeld Papers / Series 6: Paper Squeezes of Inscriptions / 6.2: Middle Persian Inscriptions
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-06-ref10016

SQ 24: Pahlavik, publ. Paikuli. p.165

Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Names:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Collection Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (paper squeeze, b&w, 18 in.x 27 in. (46 cm. x 68.5 cm.))
Container:
Item SQ-24
Type:
Archival materials
Paper squeezes
Place:
Asia
Iraq
Paikuli (Iraq)
Date:
1911-1923
Scope and Contents note:
Print corresponds to negative 4327.
Scope and Contents:
- Original handwritten annotation reads, "."
- Additional information from Ernst Herzfeld's 1924 Paikuli publication reads, "[Plate] 165. Pahlavik version D'.10 (photograph of the paper squeeze)."
- Additional information from Joseph Upton's Finding Aid reads, "No. 24 ([neg.] 4327) Pahlavik, published in Paikuli. p.165."
- Information from Helmut Humbach and Prods O. Skjærvø's publication reads, "The ruin of the Sassanian monument of Paikuli is situated close to the southern ascent to the [Paikuli] pass. Originally, the monument consisted of a solid square tower. Four identical colossal busts of one and the same king of kings were built into the four walls. The western wall bore a large Middle-Persian inscription (eight rows of blocks, with a total of 46 lines), whereas the eastern wall bore the Parthian version of this (seven rows, with a total of 42 lines, all of them surviving in a fragmentary state. The subject of the inscription, carefully carved and written in perspective, is the quarrel over the succession, between Narseh (293-303) and Varahrān (293). In the course of his first two expeditions, in 1911 and 1913, E. Herzfeld had discovered a total of 97 inscribed blocks (54 Middle Persian, 43 Parthian). On his last visit to Paikuli in 1923, Herzfeld excavated the site and found 30 additional blocks (20 Middle Persian, 10 Parthian), which raise the total number of surviving blocks to 133." [Helmut Humbach and Prods O. Skjærvø's publication, 1980: "The Sassanian Inscription of Paikuli; Supplement to Herzfeld's Paikuli. Wiesbaden: Reichert; pp.13-16."]
The Sassanian Inscription of Paikuli (Iraq): Squeeze D'.10, Parthian Version
Arrangement:
Papers squeezes are organized in sequential number following language scripts, which are housed in folders, and stored in metal flat files.
Local Numbers:
M-024

FSA A.6 06.M024
General:
- Title is provided by Xavier Courouble, FSg Archives cataloger, based on Ernst Herzfeld's publication, "Paikuli: Monument and Inscription of the Early History of the Sasanian Empire; Berlin: D. Reimer, 1924," and Helmut Humbach and Prods O. Skjærvø's publication, "The Sassanian Inscription of Paikuli; Supplement to Herzfeld's Paikuli. Wiesbaden: Reichert, 1980."
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Paper squeezes related primarly to two expeditions to Paikuli (Iraq), in 1911 and 1913, as well an excavation campaign carried out on site by Ernst Herzfeld in 1923.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology)  Search this
Inscriptions  Search this
Inscriptions, Pahlavi  Search this
Inscriptions, Parthian  Search this
Middle Persian language  Search this
Sassanids  Search this
Genre/Form:
Paper Squeezes
Collection Citation:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Ernst Herzfeld, 1946
Identifier:
FSA.A.06, Item FSA A.6 06.M024
See more items in:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers
Ernst Herzfeld Papers / Series 6: Paper Squeezes of Inscriptions / 6.2: Middle Persian Inscriptions
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-06-ref10034

SQ 23: Pahlavik, publ. Paikuli. p.173

Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Names:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Collection Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (paper squeeze, b&w, 19 in.x 24 in. (48.3 cm. x 61 cm.))
Container:
Item SQ-23
Type:
Archival materials
Paper squeezes
Place:
Asia
Iraq
Paikuli (Iraq)
Date:
1911-1923
Scope and Contents note:
Print corresponds to negative 4331.
Scope and Contents:
- Original handwritten annotation reads, "."
- Additional information from Ernst Herzfeld's 1924 Paikuli publication reads, "[Plate] 173. Pahlavik version E'.14 (photograph of the paper squeeze)."
- Additional information from Joseph Upton's Finding Aid reads, "No. 28 ([neg.] 4331) Pahlavik, published in Paikuli. p.173."
- Information from Helmut Humbach and Prods O. Skjærvø's publication reads, "The ruin of the Sassanian monument of Paikuli is situated close to the southern ascent to the [Paikuli] pass. Originally, the monument consisted of a solid square tower. Four identical colossal busts of one and the same king of kings were built into the four walls. The western wall bore a large Middle-Persian inscription (eight rows of blocks, with a total of 46 lines), whereas the eastern wall bore the Parthian version of this (seven rows, with a total of 42 lines, all of them surviving in a fragmentary state. The subject of the inscription, carefully carved and written in perspective, is the quarrel over the succession, between Narseh (293-303) and Varahrān (293). In the course of his first two expeditions, in 1911 and 1913, E. Herzfeld had discovered a total of 97 inscribed blocks (54 Middle Persian, 43 Parthian). On his last visit to Paikuli in 1923, Herzfeld excavated the site and found 30 additional blocks (20 Middle Persian, 10 Parthian), which raise the total number of surviving blocks to 133." [Helmut Humbach and Prods O. Skjærvø's publication, 1980: "The Sassanian Inscription of Paikuli; Supplement to Herzfeld's Paikuli. Wiesbaden: Reichert; pp.13-16."]
The Sassanian Inscription of Paikuli (Iraq): Squeeze E'.14, Parthian Version
Arrangement:
Papers squeezes are organized in sequential number following language scripts, which are housed in folders, and stored in metal flat files.
Local Numbers:
M-028

FSA A.6 06.M028
General:
- Title is provided by Xavier Courouble, FSg Archives cataloger, based on Ernst Herzfeld's publication, "Paikuli: Monument and Inscription of the Early History of the Sasanian Empire; Berlin: D. Reimer, 1924," and Helmut Humbach and Prods O. Skjærvø's publication, "The Sassanian Inscription of Paikuli; Supplement to Herzfeld's Paikuli. Wiesbaden: Reichert, 1980."
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Paper squeezes related primarly to two expeditions to Paikuli (Iraq), in 1911 and 1913, as well an excavation campaign carried out on site by Ernst Herzfeld in 1923.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology)  Search this
Inscriptions  Search this
Inscriptions, Pahlavi  Search this
Inscriptions, Parthian  Search this
Middle Persian language  Search this
Sassanids  Search this
Genre/Form:
Paper Squeezes
Collection Citation:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Ernst Herzfeld, 1946
Identifier:
FSA.A.06, Item FSA A.6 06.M028
See more items in:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers
Ernst Herzfeld Papers / Series 6: Paper Squeezes of Inscriptions / 6.2: Middle Persian Inscriptions
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-06-ref10042

SQ 31: Pahlavik, publ. Paikuli. p.179

Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Names:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Collection Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (paper squeeze, b&w, 18 in.x 24 in. (46 cm. x 61 cm.))
Container:
Item SQ-31
Type:
Archival materials
Paper squeezes
Place:
Asia
Iraq
Paikuli (Iraq)
Date:
1911-1923
Scope and Contents note:
Print corresponds to negative 4334.
Scope and Contents:
- Original handwritten annotation reads, "."
- Additional information from Ernst Herzfeld's 1924 Paikuli publication reads, "[Plate] 179. Pahlavik version F'.3 (photograph of the paper squeeze)."
- Additional information from Joseph Upton's Finding Aid reads, "No. 31 ([neg.] 4334) Pahlavik, published in Paikuli. p.179."
- Information from Helmut Humbach and Prods O. Skjærvø's publication reads, "The ruin of the Sassanian monument of Paikuli is situated close to the southern ascent to the [Paikuli] pass. Originally, the monument consisted of a solid square tower. Four identical colossal busts of one and the same king of kings were built into the four walls. The western wall bore a large Middle-Persian inscription (eight rows of blocks, with a total of 46 lines), whereas the eastern wall bore the Parthian version of this (seven rows, with a total of 42 lines, all of them surviving in a fragmentary state. The subject of the inscription, carefully carved and written in perspective, is the quarrel over the succession, between Narseh (293-303) and Varahrān (293). In the course of his first two expeditions, in 1911 and 1913, E. Herzfeld had discovered a total of 97 inscribed blocks (54 Middle Persian, 43 Parthian). On his last visit to Paikuli in 1923, Herzfeld excavated the site and found 30 additional blocks (20 Middle Persian, 10 Parthian), which raise the total number of surviving blocks to 133." [Helmut Humbach and Prods O. Skjærvø's publication, 1980: "The Sassanian Inscription of Paikuli; Supplement to Herzfeld's Paikuli. Wiesbaden: Reichert; pp.13-16."]
The Sassanian Inscription of Paikuli (Iraq): Squeeze F'.3, Parthian Version
Arrangement:
Papers squeezes are organized in sequential number following language scripts, which are housed in folders, and stored in metal flat files.
Local Numbers:
M-031

FSA A.6 06.M031
General:
- Title is provided by Xavier Courouble, FSg Archives cataloger, based on Ernst Herzfeld's publication, "Paikuli: Monument and Inscription of the Early History of the Sasanian Empire; Berlin: D. Reimer, 1924," and Helmut Humbach and Prods O. Skjærvø's publication, "The Sassanian Inscription of Paikuli; Supplement to Herzfeld's Paikuli. Wiesbaden: Reichert, 1980."
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Paper squeezes related primarly to two expeditions to Paikuli (Iraq), in 1911 and 1913, as well an excavation campaign carried out on site by Ernst Herzfeld in 1923.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology)  Search this
Inscriptions  Search this
Inscriptions, Pahlavi  Search this
Inscriptions, Parthian  Search this
Middle Persian language  Search this
Sassanids  Search this
Genre/Form:
Paper Squeezes
Collection Citation:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Ernst Herzfeld, 1946
Identifier:
FSA.A.06, Item FSA A.6 06.M031
See more items in:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers
Ernst Herzfeld Papers / Series 6: Paper Squeezes of Inscriptions / 6.2: Middle Persian Inscriptions
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-06-ref10048

SQ 33: Pahlavik, publ. Paikuli. p.183

Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Names:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Collection Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (paper squeeze, b&w, 18 in.x 35 in. (45.7 cm. x 89 cm.))
Container:
Item SQ-33
Type:
Archival materials
Paper squeezes
Place:
Asia
Iraq
Paikuli (Iraq)
Date:
1911-1923
Scope and Contents note:
Print corresponds to negative 4336.
Scope and Contents:
- Original handwritten annotation reads, "."
- Additional information from Ernst Herzfeld's 1924 Paikuli publication reads, "[Plate] 183. Pahlavik version F'.7 (photograph of the paper squeeze)."
- Additional information from Joseph Upton's Finding Aid reads, "No. 33 ([neg.] 4336) Pahlavik, published in Paikuli. p.183."
- Information from Helmut Humbach and Prods O. Skjærvø's publication reads, "The ruin of the Sassanian monument of Paikuli is situated close to the southern ascent to the [Paikuli] pass. Originally, the monument consisted of a solid square tower. Four identical colossal busts of one and the same king of kings were built into the four walls. The western wall bore a large Middle-Persian inscription (eight rows of blocks, with a total of 46 lines), whereas the eastern wall bore the Parthian version of this (seven rows, with a total of 42 lines, all of them surviving in a fragmentary state. The subject of the inscription, carefully carved and written in perspective, is the quarrel over the succession, between Narseh (293-303) and Varahrān (293). In the course of his first two expeditions, in 1911 and 1913, E. Herzfeld had discovered a total of 97 inscribed blocks (54 Middle Persian, 43 Parthian). On his last visit to Paikuli in 1923, Herzfeld excavated the site and found 30 additional blocks (20 Middle Persian, 10 Parthian), which raise the total number of surviving blocks to 133." [Helmut Humbach and Prods O. Skjærvø's publication, 1980: "The Sassanian Inscription of Paikuli; Supplement to Herzfeld's Paikuli. Wiesbaden: Reichert; pp.13-16."]
The Sassanian Inscription of Paikuli (Iraq): Squeeze F'.7, Parthian Version
Arrangement:
Papers squeezes are organized in sequential number following language scripts, which are housed in folders, and stored in metal flat files.
Local Numbers:
M-033

FSA A.6 06.M033
General:
- Title is provided by Xavier Courouble, FSg Archives cataloger, based on Ernst Herzfeld's publication, "Paikuli: Monument and Inscription of the Early History of the Sasanian Empire; Berlin: D. Reimer, 1924," and Helmut Humbach and Prods O. Skjærvø's publication, "The Sassanian Inscription of Paikuli; Supplement to Herzfeld's Paikuli. Wiesbaden: Reichert, 1980."
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Paper squeezes related primarly to two expeditions to Paikuli (Iraq), in 1911 and 1913, as well an excavation campaign carried out on site by Ernst Herzfeld in 1923.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology)  Search this
Inscriptions  Search this
Inscriptions, Pahlavi  Search this
Inscriptions, Parthian  Search this
Middle Persian language  Search this
Sassanids  Search this
Genre/Form:
Paper Squeezes
Collection Citation:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Ernst Herzfeld, 1946
Identifier:
FSA.A.06, Item FSA A.6 06.M033
See more items in:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers
Ernst Herzfeld Papers / Series 6: Paper Squeezes of Inscriptions / 6.2: Middle Persian Inscriptions
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-06-ref10052

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