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Paola Ferrario Color Photographs

Creator:
Ferrario, Paola  Search this
Extent:
0.1 Cubic feet (1 box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Color slides
Ektacolor supra ii (brand name) paper
Photographs
Slides (photographs)
Color prints (photographs)
Chromogenic color prints
Chromogenic processes
Place:
Elgin (Texas) -- 1990-2000
Guatemala -- 1990-2000
Taylor (Texas) -- 1990-2000
Texas -- 1990-2000
Date:
1989-1996
Summary:
Two color prints of industrial subjects in Elgin, Texas, and Taylor, Texas, 1995-1996; and 35mm color slide copies of 20" x 24" color prints: 12 from "Texas Cotton Towns series, 1995-1996, and 10 from "Guatemalan Altars" series, 1989-1996.
Scope and Contents:
Collection consists of color prints of industrial subjects in Elgin, Texas, and Taylor, Texas, 1995-1996 and color slide copies of 20" x 24" color prints.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into twp series.

Series 1: Color Prints

Series 2: Color Slides
Biographical / Historical:
Born in Rho (Milan) Italy in 1963. BFA, San Francisco Art Institute; M.F.A. in photography, Yale University 1988. Since then, she has completed projects in Italy, Guatemala, Turkey and the United States. She has received several awards and fellowships, including the Friends of Photography/Calumet Emerging Photographer award in 2000 and the Paul Taylor/Dorothea Lange Prize from Duke University in 2001, Puffin Foundation Grant in 2003, a Guggenheim Fellowship in Photography in 2004 and Harnish Visiting Fellowship at Smith College 2005–11 and 2016–17. Her work has been collected by the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Ferrario is the author of 19 Pictures, 22 Recipes 2012. She has published criticism in such publications as Art in America and Photograph magazine. She is represented by Rick Wester Fine Art in New York. Asssistant Professor of Photography, Rhode Island College, Providence.
Provenance:
Collection donated by Paola Ferrario, December 18, 1998 and June 26, 2002.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Paola Ferrario retains copyright. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Cotton -- 1990-2000 -- Texas  Search this
Industrial photography -- 1990-2000 -- Texas  Search this
Photography, Industrial -- 1990-2000 -- Texas  Search this
Color photography -- 1990-2000  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides -- 1990-2000
Ektacolor Supra II (brand name) paper
Photographs -- Color prints -- 20th century
Photographs -- 1980-2000
Slides (photographs) -- 1980-2000
Color prints (photographs)
Chromogenic color prints
Chromogenic processes
Citation:
Paola Ferrario Color Photographs, 1989-1996, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0699
See more items in:
Paola Ferrario Color Photographs
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0699

MS 1087 Some peculiarities of the Cakchiquel language

Creator:
Flores, Ildefonso José, -1772  Search this
Dwight, Theodore F.  Search this
Gibbs, George, 1815-1873  Search this
Extent:
5 Pages
Culture:
Mayan -- Cakchiquel  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Manuscript, taken from an octodecimo grammar presented to the American Ethnological Society, entitled, "Arte de la lengua Metropolitana del Reyno Cakchiquel e Guatemalteco, con parallello de las lenguas Metropolitanas de los Reynos Kiche, Cakchiquel y, Tutuhil, que hoy integran el Reyno de Guatemala. Composta por P. F. Ildefonso Joseph Flores, etc., etc., "En Guatemala, con licencia, etc., 1753." Theodore Dwight's copy of the original and also a copy of Mr Dwight's copy. 18 pages.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1087
General:
Previously titled "On numerals and methods of counting various objects."
Topic:
Numbers -- Maya  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Guatemala  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 1087, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1087
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1087

George Hubbard Pepper photograph collection

Creator:
Pepper, George H. (George Hubbard), 1873-1924  Search this
Extent:
1292 negatives (photographic)
23 Photographic prints (black & white)
Culture:
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Purepecha (Tarasco)  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Cochiti Pueblo  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Jemez Pueblo  Search this
K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo)  Search this
Laguna Pueblo  Search this
Nambe Pueblo  Search this
Picuris Pueblo  Search this
Pojoaque Pueblo  Search this
Puye Pueblo  Search this
San Felipe Pueblo  Search this
San Ildefonso Pueblo  Search this
Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan Pueblo)  Search this
Sandia Pueblo  Search this
Santa Ana Pueblo  Search this
Taos Pueblo  Search this
Tesuque Pueblo  Search this
Zia Pueblo  Search this
Hopi [Hano]  Search this
Pikuni (Piegan) [Blackfeet Nation, Browning, Montana]  Search this
San Carlos Apache  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Mexica (Aztec) (archaeological culture)  Search this
Pueblo (Anasazi) (archaeological)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Place:
New Mexico
Texas
New York
Montana
Arizona
Basin
Illinois
Mexico
Southwest
Guatemala
Ecuador
Utah
Plains
Date:
1895-1918
Summary:
George Hubbard Pepper specialized in the study of cultures of the American Southwest and Ecuador. Tribes which he studied are Acoma, Aztec, Blackfeet, Cochiti, Hopi, Isleta, Jemez, Laguna, Nambe, Navajo, Picuris, Pojuaque, Puye, San Carlos Apache, San Felipe, San Ildefonso, San Juan, Sandia, Santa Ana, Santa Clara, Taos, Tarascan, Tesuque, Ute, Zia, and Zuni. Photographs in the collection are of an excavation in Tottenville, New York, 1895; Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Cañon, New Mexico: Hyde Expedition, 1896-1900; and expeditions to the occupied Pueblos of the Southwest, 1904; Mexico, 1904, 1906; Guatemala; and Ecuador, 1907. There are also photos which complement a study Pepper did of the technique of Navajo weaving, and miscellaneous scenic and personal photos.
Arrangement note:
Collection arranged by item number.
Biographical/Historical note:
George Hubbard Pepper was born on February 2, 1873 in Tottenville, Staten Island, New York. As a young boy he exhibited a strong interest in archaeology and after his graduating from high school followed encouragement from Prof. Fredric W. Putnam to study at the Peabody Museum of Harvard University, where Pepper stayed from 1895-96. In 1896 he was appointed assistant curator of the Department of the Southwest in the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. From 1896 to 1900, Pepper was a member of the Hyde Exploring Expedition, which conducted excavations at Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Canyon, New Mexico. In 1904, he conducted an ethnological survey of the occupied pueblos of the Southwest and at the same time continued his study of the weaving techniques of the Navajo. Pepper also participated in excavations in the yacatas of the Tierra Caliente of Michoacan in Mexico sponsored by George Gustav Heye, and in 1907 he went with Marshall Saville on an expedition to the Province of Manabi in Ecuador, also for Heye. In 1909 Pepper was appointed assistant curator in the Department of American Archaeology at the University Museum of Philadelphia, but after only a year there he joined the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation in New York City, where he stayed until his death. In 1914 he excavated a Munsee cemetery of the historic period near Montague, New Jersey and in the following year he went on the exploration of the Nacoochee mound in the old Cherokee region in Georgia. In 1918 he joined the Hawikku explorations of the Hendricks-Hodge Expedition in New Mexico. Pepper died on May 13, 1924, in New York City. George H. Pepper was a co-founder of the American Anthropological Association, a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the American Ethnological Society of New York, a member of the American Folklore Society, and a corresponding member of the Academia Nacional de Historia of Ecuador. A complete bibliography of his works can be found in Indian Notes, v. 1, no. 3, July 1924, pp. 108-110. The George Hubbard Pepper Papers are in the Latin American Library, Tulane University Library, New Orleans, Louisiana.
Provenance:
According to Frederick Dockstader, director of MAI from 1960 to 1975, in a letter dated March 26, 1968, the collection was given to MAI by Pepper. However, the 1965 Annual Report (p. 26) states that the Photographic Department acquired through the donation of Mrs. Jeannette Cameron approximately 500 new negatives pertaining to field work done by her father from 1900-1910; and the 1966 Annual Report (p. 9) states that many papers of Dr. George H. Pepper were acquired through the courtesy of his daughter, Mrs. Jeanette Cameron.
Restrictions:
Access restricted. Researchers should contact the staff of the NMAI Archives for an appointment to access the collection.
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Photographic prints
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.034
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-001-034

MS 3961 Draft of linguistic map of the territory comprising Washington, Oregon, and California and linguistic chart of Guatemala

Creator:
Etawa Caume  Search this
ANONYMOUS  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Map - draft
Charts
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Also linguistic chart of Guatemala.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3961
Topic:
Linguistics, general and theoretical  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Washington (State)  Search this
Oregon  Search this
California  Search this
Guatemala  Search this
Genre/Form:
Map - draft
Charts
Citation:
Manuscript 3961, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3961
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3961

Thomas T. Waterman negatives and photographs

Creator:
Waterman, T. T. (Thomas Talbot), 1885-1936  Search this
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Extent:
12 Photographic prints (black and white)
12 negatives (photographic) (black and white)
Culture:
Haida  Search this
Duwamish (Dwamish)  Search this
Tolowa  Search this
Coast Salish  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Negatives (photographic)
Photographs
Black-and-white negatives
Place:
Guatemala
California
Alaska
Washington
Date:
1921-1924
Summary:
These images were shot in California, Alaska, Washington, and Guatamala and feature images of Tolowa, Haida, Salish, and Quiché Maya (Quiché) Indians. Images include group portraits, daily activities, village scenes, and petrogylphs.
Scope and Contents:
The Waterman collection consists of photographic materials made by Waterman from 1921 to 1924 in California, Alaska, Washington State, and Guatemala. He made the bulk of the materials on behalf of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation while working in 1921 in California among the Tolowa and in Washington State among the Southern Coast Salish and Duwamish (Dwamish) and in 1922 in Alaska at Kasaan (Haida) village. Of particular note are the series of photographs of a Tolowa fisherman. The few remaining photographs date from 1923 and 1924 and depict Quiché Maya (Quiche) Indians in the Quetzaltenango Guatemalan highlands and an illustration from Waterman's contribution to the 1924 Annual Report of the Smithsonian Institution.
Arrangement note:
Negatives: organized in envelopes; arranged by negative number

Prints: organized in folders; arranged by print number
Arrangement:
Negatives Arranged by negative number (N07288-N07289, N07291, N07295-N07300, N10859, N35256, N35848)

Photographs Arranged by photograph number (P04035-P04040, P04428-P04429, P05515, P05521, P37455, P37456)
Biographical/Historical note:
Born in Hamilton, Missouri, in 1885, Thomas Talbot Waterman grew up in Calfornia and was expected, like his father, to become an Episcopalian clergyman. After taking courses in phonetics and fieldwork with P.E. Goddard, Waterman instead chose to study anthropology and in 1913 received his Ph.D in anthropology at Columbia University under the direction of Franz Boas. From 1907 to 1921, he held both teaching and curatorial positions at the University of California and the University of Washington and from 1921 to 1922 briefly joined the staff of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation as a field collector. Waterman went on to hold positions at the National Museum of Guatemala, Fresno State College, University of Arizona, Territorial Normal College (Hawaii), and University of Hawaii. He is best known for bringing Ishi, the last surviving member of the Yahi people, from the town of Oroville, California, to the University of California Museum of Anthropology. Waterman died in Honolulu at the age of 50.
Provenance:
Historically, the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation managed all photographic and related manuscript collections separately. This collection description represents current management practices of organizing and contextualizing related archival materials.
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment.
Rights:
Copyright: National Museum of the American Indian
Topic:
Petroglyphs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Photographs
Black-and-white negatives
Citation:
Thomas T. Waterman negatives and photographs, 1921-1924, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or catalog number).
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.021
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-001-021

Harris M. McLaughlin photographs of the Americas and Asia

Creator:
McLaughlin, Harris M.  Search this
Photographer:
Frashers Inc.  Search this
Names:
Chapman, H  Search this
Lindbergh, Charles A. (Charles Augustus), 1902-1974  Search this
Extent:
12 mounted prints (albumen)
370 Prints (circa, silver gelatin (including photographic postcards))
1 Print (collotype)
5 negative rolls (nitrate, 35 mm)
2 positive rolls (nitrate, 35 mm)
8 Prints (photogravure)
12 Postcards (color halftone, halftone, and color collotype)
2 color prints
1 panoramic print (color halftone)
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Hopi Indians  Search this
Cubans  Search this
Aztecs  Search this
Pueblo Indians  Search this
Apache Indians  Search this
Navajo Indians  Search this
Tohono O'Odham Indians  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Mounted prints
Prints
Negative rolls
Positive rolls
Postcards
Color prints
Panoramic print
Photographs
Place:
Guatemala
Cuba
Japan
Puerto Rico
Havana (Cuba)
Texas
Mexico
Honduras
San Antonio (Tex.)
China
Panama
Dominican Republic
Mérida (Mexico)
Chichén Itzá Site (Mexico)
Date:
circa 1898-1941
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs made and collected by Harris M. McLaughlin during his travels in the American southwest and other parts of North and South America, as well as Asia and Europe. Photographs made in Texas include images of the 1928 American Legion National Convention, the dirigible "Los Angeles" floating over San Antonio, the first train in Rio Grande City, cowboys and ranchers, missions, and city and scenic views. McLaughlin also took photographs at the Grand Canyon, Canyon del Muerto, Bryce Canyon, and Zion National Park, and collected Frashers Foto postcards with photographs of Apache Indians, Navajo Indians, a Papago dwelling, a Pueblo potterymaker, and a Hopi Snake Dance. Photographs from Guatemala include images of villages and cities (including Antigua and Zacapa), as well as a harvest ceremony in Chichicastenango. McLaughlin also took photographs during a trip to Monterey, Mexico, which include images of towns and scenic views. Additional photographs depict flood damage in Aurora, Indiana; city views and scenery of Merida, Mexico; Chichen Itza; a banana plantation in Honduras; and wartime China and Europe.

Photographs of Cuba in 1898, probably not made by McLaughlin, include images of the USS Maine wreck, and funeral services for the sailors of the ship and residents of Havana. The collection also contains photographs of trees and a dwelling in Honduras made by H. E. Chapman in 1933, photographs of people and scenery in Sumatra made by J. H. Zimmermann, and commercial photographs of archeological collections at the Museo Nacional de Arqueologia, Historia y Etnografia in Mexico. There are also images of scenery and architecture in Japan, Panama and the Canal Zone, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, Belgium, England, and other places in Europe. Depicted individuals include Charles A. Lindbergh, as well as McLaughlin and his family.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 2000-04
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Additional Frashers photographs held in National Anthropological Archives Photo Lot 59.
Restrictions:
Nitrate negatives are in cold storage and require advanced notice for viewing.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 2000-04, Harris M. McLaughlin photographs of the Americas and Asia, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.2000-04
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-2000-04

Carol Kramer Papers

Creator:
Kramer, Carol, 1943-2002  Search this
Extent:
31 Linear feet (64 boxes, 2 cassette tapes, 1 oversize box, 1 map drawer)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Books
Slides (photographs)
Manuscripts
Sound recordings
Field notes
Photographic prints
Negatives (photographic)
Maps
Place:
Iran
Jodhpur (India)
Udaipur (Rajasthan, India)
Rajasthan (India)
Guatemala
Date:
1943-2002,
bulk 1961-2002
Summary:
The bulk of these papers document the professional life of Carol Kramer, a leading figure in ethnoarchaeology, specializing in the Middle East and South Asia. She was also a major advocate for the professional development of women in anthropology and archaeology.

Dating 1943-2002, the collection includes field notes, writings, correspondence, daily planners, teaching files, photographs, sound recordings, maps, computer disks, and botanical specimens. Her ethnoarchaeological research in "Shahabad" (a.k.a. "Aliabad") in Iran and in Rajasthan, India is well-represented in the collection.
Scope and Contents Note:
The bulk of these papers document the professional life of Carol Kramer. The collection contains field notes, writings, correspondence, daily planners, teaching files, photographs, sound recordings, maps, computer disks, and botanical specimens. Also in the collection are her notes and grade transcripts as a college and graduate student.

Her ethnoarchaeological research in "Shahabad" (a.k.a. "Aliabad") in Iran and in Rajasthan, India is well-represented in the collection in the form of her notes, maps, writings, and photographs. In addition, there are plant specimens that Kramer collected in Iran. Also among her research files are photocopies of her field notes from her work in Guatemala. Although her field notes from the Hasanlu Project are absent, the collection does contain a few photographs and some notes and correspondence from her research for her article on the Hasanlu Project's excavations at Dalma Tepe. In addition, the collection contains "A System of Pottery Classification According to Shape," a paper by Robert H. Dyson, Jr. and T. Cuyler Young, Jr. for the Hasanlu Project. Materials relating to the Godin Project consist of correspondence from 1996 and 1997 and a 1973 group photo.

Copies of her monographs are present in the collection along with drafts, figures, and correspondence for her published writings and dissertation. Many of the papers that she presented at professional meetings, seminars, and special lectures can also be found in the collection, including her 1994 AAA Distinguished Lecture, "The Quick and the Dead: Ethnography in and for Archaeology." In addition, there are two cassette tape recordings of Kramer presenting her paper, "Ceramics in Two Indian Cities," and the subsequent group discussion at the 1985 School of American Research Advanced Seminar, "Social and Behavioral Sources of Ceramic Variability." Also of special interest are materials documenting her involvement in the 1981 "Resolution to Implement the 1972 American Anthropological Association Resolution on Fair Practices in Employment of Women."

Kramer's professional correspondence is spread throughout the collection, mixed together with other documents, filed by subject. Much of her later correspondence is in the form of e-mail printouts. Letters of reference she wrote can also be found on her computer disks, which consist of several 3.50" and 5.25" floppy disks. Other files on the disks include materials for her books and articles, research data, her performance evaluations files, notes for courses she taught, and her will.

It should be noted that Kramer was briefly married during the 1960s and 1970s to Christopher Hamlin, who was a fellow graduate student at the University of Pennsylvania. Thus, she is referred to as Carol Hamlin in some of the documents from that period.
Arrangement note:
Arranged into 15 series: (1) Research, 1961-1997; (2) Writings, 1972-2002; (3) Talks, 1972-1999; (4) Grants/Fellowships, 1974-2000; (5) Professional Activities, 1966-2002; (6) Teaching, 1971-2002; (7) Student, 1961-1973; (8) Personal, 1943-2001; (9) Writings by Others, 1949-2001; (10) Photographs, 1967-1996; (11) Card Files; (12) Maps; (13) Botanical Specimens; (14) Sound Recordings, 1985; (15) Computer Disks
Biographical/Historical note:
Selected Bibliography

1971 -- "The 1971 Excavations at Seh Gabi, Iran," Archaeology, Vol. 26, pp. 224-227.

1974 -- "The Early Second Millennium Ceramic Assemblage of Dinkha Tepe," Ibid. with Louis D. Levine. "The Godin Project: Seh Gabi," Iran XII, pp. 211-213. "Seh Gabi, 1973," Archaeology, Vol. 27, pp. 274-277

1977 -- "Pots and Peoples," Mountains and Lowlands: Essays in the Archaeology of Greater Mesopotamia, edited by L.D. Levine and T.C. Young, Jr. Malibu: Undena Publications

1979 -- editor. Ethnoarchaeology: Implications of Ethnography for Archaeology. New York: Colombia University Press.

1980 -- "Estimating Prehistoric Populations: an Ethnoarchaeological Approach," L'Archéologie de I'Iraq, edited by Marie-Thérèse Barrelet, Paris: Centre National de la Rechere Scientifique.

1982 -- Village Ethnoarchaeology: Rural Iran in Archaeological Perspective. New York: Academic Press.

1988 -- with Miriam Stark. "The Status of Women in Archaeology," Anthropology Newsletter. Vol. 29, No. 9, pp. 11-12.

1991 -- Co-editor with W.A. Longcre. "Ethnoarchaeology," special issue of Expedition "Ceramics in Two Indian Cities," Ceramic Ethnoarchaeology, edited by William Longacre. Tucson: University of Arizona Press.

1997 -- Pottery in Rajasthan: Ethnoarchaeology in Two Indian Cities. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press.

2001 -- with Nicholas David. Ethnoarchaeology in Action. Cambridge (U.K.): Cambridge University Press

Chronology

1943 -- Born May 3 in New York, New York

1964 -- Earns B.A. from The City University of New York

1967, 1969 -- Site supervisor of archaeological excavations at Godin Tepe, Iran for the Royal Ontario Museum's Godin Project

1968 -- Site supervisor of archaeological excavations at Dinkha Tepe and Se Girdan, Iran for University of Pennsylvania-Metropolitan Museum of Art's Hasanlu Project.

1970 -- Ethnoarchaeological research with an urban potter in Antigua, Guatemala

1971 -- Receives Ph.D. in Anthropology from University of Pennsylvania 1971 Hired as Assistant Professor at City University of New York Assistant director of archaeological excavations at Seh Gabi, Iran for Godin Project

1973 -- Assistant director of archaeological excavations at Seh Gabi, Iran for Godin Project

1975 -- Ethnoarchaeological research in Iranian village

1977 -- Associate Professor, Lehman College and the Graduate Center, CUNY

1980 -- Ethnoarchaeological research in Rajasthan, India

1982-1984 -- Ethnoarchaeological research in Rajasthan, India

1985 -- Visiting Professor at Yale University

1986-1988 -- Visiting Professor at University of Arizona

1990 -- Hired as Professor at University of Arizona

1994 -- Presents distinguished lecture to Archaeology Section of American Anthropological Association

1995 -- Site supervisor of archaeological excavations at Gordion, Turkey

1996 -- Ethnoarchaeological research near Gordion, Turkey

1999 -- Receives "Squeaky Wheel Award" from COSWA/American Anthropological Association

2002 -- Died on December 3 at the age of 59

Carol Kramer was a leading figure in ethnoarchaeology, specializing in the Middle East and South Asia. She was also a major advocate for the professional development of women in anthropology and archaeology.

She was born on May 3, 1943 in New York City to Aaron Kramer, a poet and professor of English at Dowling College, and Katherine Kolodny Kramer, a social worker. She attended the High School of Music and Art and earned her B.A. at the City University of New York in 1964. Kramer initially studied archaeology in the graduate program at the University of Chicago, but transferred to the University of Pennsylvania after a year, where she earned her doctorate in 1971. Her dissertation was entitled "The Habur Ware Ceramic Assemblage of Northern Mesopotamia: An Analysis of its Distribution."

In 1968, she was a site supervisor for University of Pennsylvania and Metropolitan Museum of Art's joint archaeological excavations at Dinkha Tepe and Se Girdan, Iran as part of the Hasanlu Project, directed by Robert H. Dyson, Jr. She also served as site supervisor (1967, 1969) and Assistant Director (1971, 1973) for the Royal Ontario Museum's archaeological excavation at Godin Tepe, known as the Godin Project, which was directed by Louis D. Levine and T. Cuyler Young, Jr. In 1970, she conducted her first ethnoarchaeological fieldwork under Ruben Reina, working with an urban potter in Antigua, Guatemala.

Kramer returned to Iran in 1975 to conduct ethnoarchaeological research in a Kurdish village in the Hamadān Province. Her work there resulted in several papers, including "An Archaeological View of a Contemporary Kurdish Village: Domestic Architecture, Household Size, and Wealth," published in Ethnoarchaeology: Implications of Ethnography for Archaeology (1979), which she edited. She expanded upon her paper in her 1982 book, Village Ethnoarchaeology: Rural Iran in Archaeological Perspective.

For her next project, she intended to study pottery communities in Iran, but the outbreak of the Iranian Revolution forced her to change her plans, and she decided to shift her location to India. In 1980 and 1982-1984, she studied ceramic production and distribution in Rajasthan. Articles produced from her research include "Ceramics in Two Indian Cities" (1991), "Ceramics in Rajasthan: Distribution and Scalar Variation" (1992), "A Tale of Two Cities: Ceramic Ethnoarchaeology in Rajasthan" (1994), and "Social and Locational Contexts of Ceramic Distribution in Rajasthan" (1995). She also authored Pottery in Rajasthan: Ethnoarchaeology in Two Indian Cities, published in 1997.

Kramer returned to the field in 1995, serving as site supervisor for archaeological excavations in Gordion, Turkey. She returned the next year to explore the possibility of conducting research in Yassihöyük and other villages near Gordion as an extension of her village ethnoachaeology research in Iran.

In 2001, Kramer further contributed to the field of ethnoarchaeology with the publication of Ethnoarchaeology in Action, which she co-wrote with Nicholas David. The landmark book is the first comprehensive study of ethnoarchaeology.

In addition to her work in ethnoarchaeology, Kramer was also involved in promoting the professional advancement of women in anthropology. In 1980, Kramer and her colleagues (Roger Sanjek, Rayna Rapp, Carole Vance, and Glenn Peterson) drew up a resolution to implement the 1972 Resolution on Fair Practices in Employment of Women. They campaigned to raised funds and support for the resolution, which called for the American Anthropological Association (AAA) to censure universities that hired or promoted a low percentage of women. Due to their work, the resolution passed and AAA censured five departments in 1981. In 1988, she and Miriam Stark published, "The Status of Women in Archeology," a study of gender equity in archaeology. They looked at gender differences in the number of graduate students, PhD recipients, and funding recipients as well as in faculty composition. Kramer was also a member of the Committee on the Status of Women in Anthropology (COSWA) from 1973 to 1975 and host and discussion leader at the COSWA Roundtable on professional skills and the female archaeologist at the 1998 annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology (SAA).

In 1999, Kramer was awarded the Squeaky Wheel Award by COSWA in recognition of her contributions to equity for women in anthropology. She also delivered the 1994 Distinguished Lecture to the Archaeology Section for the AAA, "The Quick and the Dead: Ethnography in and for Archaeology." In 2003, she was posthumously awarded the SAA's Award for excellence in Archaeological Analysis.

From 1971 to 1990, Kramer taught at Queens College and later Lehman College and the Graduate Center at the City University of New York, during which time she was a visiting professor at Yale University (1985). She also taught at the University of Arizona (1986-1988) as a recipient of a National Science Foundation Visiting Professorship for Women. In 1990, she joined the faculty of the University of Arizona, where she taught until her death.

Kramer passed away at the age of 59 on December 3, 2002.

Sources Consulted

Rothschild, Nan A. "Carol Kramer (1943-2002)." American Anthropologist 106.1 (2004): 214-220.

Thompson, Raymond H. and Norman Yoffee. "Carol Kramer." Anthropology News 44.3 (2003): 30.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Carol Kramer's sister, Laura Kramer.
Restrictions:
The Carol Kramer papers are open for research.

Materials with student grades and social security numbers have been restricted. The dates that the restricted items will be made available for access range from 2047 to 2064. Access to Kramer's computer disks is also restricted. Please consult an archivist for more information.
Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Ethnoarchaeology  Search this
Pottery industry -- India  Search this
Women anthropologists  Search this
Ethnoarchaeology  Search this
Women anthropologists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Books
Slides (photographs)
Manuscripts
Sound recordings
Field notes
Photographic prints
Negatives (photographic)
Maps
Citation:
Carol Kramer Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2006-14
See more items in:
Carol Kramer Papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2006-14

Orator Fuller Cook Field Books, 1894-1924

Creator:
Cook, O. F (Orator Fuller) 1867-1949  Search this
Subject:
Cook, Alice Carter 1868-  Search this
Gilbert, G. Bruce  Search this
Cook, O. F (Orator Fuller) 1867-1949  Search this
Griggs, Robert F (Robert Fiske) 1881-  Search this
Doyle, C. B (Conrad Bartling) 1884-1973  Search this
United States Department of Agriculture  Search this
Peruvian Expeditions (1912-1915)  Search this
Physical description:
1 cu. ft. (1 records storage box)
Type:
Field notes
Collection descriptions
Place:
Haiti
Guatemala
Mexico
Liberia
Peru
Date:
1894
1894-1924
Topic:
Botany  Search this
Plants  Search this
Botanists  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 12-015
See more items in:
Field Book Project 1855-2010
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_309769

George P. Goll Field Notes, 1899-1905

Creator:
Goll, George P  Search this
Subject:
Goll, George P  Search this
Physical description:
0.25 cu. ft. (1 half document box)
Type:
Field notes
Collection descriptions
Place:
Guatemala
Puerto Rico
Date:
1899
1899-1905
Topic:
Botany  Search this
Plants  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 12-047
See more items in:
Field Book Project 1855-2010
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_309993

William Ashbrook Kellerman Field Notes, 1903-1908 and undated

Creator:
Kellerman, W. A (William Ashbrook) 1850-1908  Search this
Subject:
Kellerman, W. A (William Ashbrook) 1850-1908  Search this
Physical description:
0.25 cu. ft. (1 half document box)
Type:
Field notes
Collection descriptions
Place:
Guatemala
Date:
1903
1903-1908
1903-1908 and undated
Topic:
Botany  Search this
Plants  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 12-139
See more items in:
Field Book Project 1855-2010
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_310052

Robert Merrill King Field Notes, 1950-1962

Creator:
King, Robert Merrill  Search this
Subject:
King, Robert Merrill  Search this
Soderstrom, Thomas R  Search this
Physical description:
0.5 cu. ft. (1 document box)
Type:
Field notes
Collection descriptions
Place:
Guatemala
Mexico
Panama
Costa Rica
Date:
1950
1950-1962
Topic:
Botany  Search this
Plants  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 12-141
See more items in:
Field Book Project 1855-2010
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_310054

Expedition History, 1921-1922

Creator:
Paul Carpenter Standley Botanical Explorations in Central America (1921-1922)  Search this
Subject:
Ames, Oakes 1874-1950  Search this
Standley, Paul Carpenter 1884-1963  Search this
United States National Museum  Search this
New York Botanical Garden  Search this
Harvard University Gray Herbarium  Search this
Type:
Mixed archival materials
Place:
Central America
Guatemala
El Salvador
Date:
1921
1921-1922
Local number:
SIA AH00424
See more items in:
Expedition History 1921-1922 [Paul Carpenter Standley Botanical Explorations in Central America (1921-1922)]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_292845

Project Files, 2008-2010

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian (U.S.) Office of Education and Public Programs Media Development Department  Search this
Subject:
National Museum of the American Indian (U.S.) George Gustav Heye Center  Search this
Infinity of Nations: Art and History in the Collections of the National Museum of the American Indian (Exhibition) (2010-2020: New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Type:
Electronic records
Collection descriptions
Interviews
Exhibitions
Place:
Chaco Canyon (N.M.)
Chile
Michigan
Montana
Northwest Coast of North America
Peru
Guatemala
Date:
2008
2008-2010
Topic:
Artists  Search this
Indian artists  Search this
Indian art  Search this
Indians of Central America--History  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Indians of North America--History  Search this
Indians of South America--History  Search this
Anthropologists  Search this
Historians  Search this
Indians of Central America  Search this
Indians of South America  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 10-067
Restrictions & Rights:
Restricted for 15 years, until Jan-01-2026; Transferring office; 08/25/2009 memorandum, Toda to Davis; Contact reference staff for details
See more items in:
Project Files 1973, 1991-2011 [National Museum of the American Indian (U.S.) Office of Education and Public Programs Media Initiatives Department]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_293046

MS 1981 Letters regarding the Guatemalan project, "Por los Aborígenes" at the World's Columbian Exposition

Addressee:
Solís, Ignacio, 1839-1912  Search this
Names:
Chicago World's Fair 1892  Search this
World's Columbian Exposition (1893 : Chicago, Ill.)  Search this
Extent:
62 Sheets
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sheets
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Regarding the Guatemalan Commission, Chicago in 1892, at the World's Fair. Mostly addressed to the Secretary of the Commissioner, Senor Solis, from various individuals in Mexico.

Includes project proposal.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1981
Topic:
Guatemala  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 1981, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1981
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1981

William Edwin Safford photograph albums relating to Easter Island, Samoa, and South America

Collector:
Safford, William Edwin, 1859-1926  Search this
Names:
Mohican Expedition  Search this
Photographer:
Gonsalves, J. A.  Search this
Thomson, William J. (William Judah), 1841-1909  Search this
Valdeavellano, Alberto G., 1861-1928  Search this
Extent:
3 Albums (circa 145 prints, silver gelatin)
Culture:
Samoans  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Albums
Photographs
Place:
Samoa
Peru
Panama
Guatemala
Ecuador
Easter Island
Chile
Date:
circa 1886-1902
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs collected by Wiliam Edwin Safford while on US Navy expeditions to Chile, Easter Island, Ecuador, Guatemala, Panama, Peru, and Samoa. They depict indigenous peoples and activities, towns, scenic views, and the crew of the USS Mohican and members of the US Navy. There are also photographs of Guatemala made by Alberto. G. Valdeavellano and J. A. Gonsalves. The Easter Island photographs were possibly made by William J. Thomson, paymaster on the Mohican.
Biographical/Historical note:
William Edwin Safford (1859-1926) was a United States Naval officer from 1880-1902 who took part in Navy expeditions and collected specimens for the United States National Museum. Safford joined the crew of the USS Mohican in South America and participated in its expedition to the South Pacific (1886-1888). In 1891-1892, he commanded an ethnological expedition to Peru and Bolivia for the Chicago Columbian Expedition. He served in the Spanish American War and was vice-governor of Guam in 1899-1900. In 1902, he resigned from the Navy and took an appointment as an economic botanist with the United States Department of Agriculture.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 76-26
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Additional photographs of the expedition to Easter Island can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in Photo Lot 97.
Additional photographs collected by Safford can be found in National Anthropological Archives in MS 3366.
The Smithsonian Institution Archives holds the William Edwin Safford Papers, 1894-1925 (SIA RU007275).
Records relating to Safford's collecting expedition in South America can be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives in SIA RU000189.
Safford's ethnographic data about Samoa can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in MS 2956.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo lot 76-26, William Edwin Safford photograph albums relating to Easter Island, Samoa, and South America, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.76-26
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-76-26

Photographs of Mexico and Latin America

Creator:
Holmes, William Henry, 1846-1933  Search this
Photographer:
Parker  Search this
Doty, Charles Edward, 1862-1921  Search this
Jackson, William Henry, 1843-1942  Search this
Kildare, Edward James  Search this
Matteson, Sumner W., 1867-1920  Search this
Waite, C. B. (Charles Betts), 1861-1927  Search this
Extent:
150 Prints (circa, silver gelatin and albumen)
1 Print (halftone)
Culture:
Mexicans  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Photographs
Place:
Cuba
Mexico
Guatemala
Chile
Date:
circa 1895-1907
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs documenting Mexican people in their built and natural environments, as well as industries, markets, and agriculture. The photographs were originally contained in envelopes labeled by William Henry Holmes, who may have collected them during his travels to Mexico. The collection also includes some photographs made in Cuba, Guatemala, and Chile, as well as Holmes's notes on Argentina. The bulk of the photographs were made by William Henry Jackson; additional photographs were made by Charles Edward Doty, E. J. Kildare, Sumner W. Matteson, C. B. Waite, and Corral and Parker studios.
Biographical/Historical note:
William Henry Holmes (1846-1933) was an artist, geologist, and archeologist who spent most of his career with the United States Geological Survey of the Territories, United States Geological Survey, Bureau of American Ethnology, and Department of Anthropology of the Smithsonian. From 1894-1897, he was the head of anthropology at the Field Columbian Museum (Field Museum of Natural History) and on the staff of the University of Chicago. During this time, he carried out investigations of ancient ruins in the Yucatan and other areas of Mesoamerica as a member of an expedition of Allison V. Armour. Holmes served as head curator for the US National Museum Department of Anthropology from 1897-1902 and head of the BAE from 1902-1909.

William Henry Jackson was a photographer for the US Geological and Geographical Surveys (1870-1878) before he opened a studio in Denver, Colorado, and began making official photographs for various railroad companies. In 1883, he made his first trip to Mexico under the sponsorship of the Mexican Central Railway. On one of his subsequent trips, he was accompanied by William Henry Holmes, who may have collected Jackson's photographs because of this trip.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 87-20
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Manuscripts and notes by Holmes can be found throughout the National Anthropological Archives in MS 4698, MS 2125, MS 7112, and MS 7570.
The Smithsonian Institution Archives holds the William Henry Holmes Papers, 1870-1931 (SIA RU007084).
Additional photographs by Jackson can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in Photo Lot 24, Photo Lot 37, Photo Lot 40, Photo Lot 60, Photo Lot 93, Photo Lot 143, Photo Lot 87-2P, Photo Lot 90-1, Photo Lot 92-3, the records of the Department of Anthropology, and the BAE historical negatives.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Agriculture  Search this
Markets  Search this
Cities and towns  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 87-20, Photographs of Mexico and Latin America, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.87-20
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-87-20

Thomas Dale Stewart Papers

Creator:
Stewart, T. D. (Thomas Dale), 1901-1997  Search this
Names:
American Association of Physical Anthropologists  Search this
Department of Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History  Search this
National Academy of Sciences (U.S.)  Search this
National Geographic Society (U.S.)  Search this
Angel, J. Lawrence (John Lawrence)  Search this
Collins, Henry B. (Henry Bascom), 1899-1987  Search this
Hrdlička, Aleš, 1869-1943  Search this
McKern, T. W.  Search this
Extent:
65 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Place:
Alaska
Shanidar Cave (Iraq)
Virginia
Maryland
Delaware
Mexico
Peru
Guatemala
Chaco Canyon (N.M.) -- Archeology
Date:
1875-1991, bulk 1931-1991
bulk 1927-1991
Summary:
Thomas Dale Stewart was a physical and forensic anthropologist and worked at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History from 1931 until his death in 1997. He worked under Ales Hrdlicka until 1943, became the head curator in 1960, director of the museum in 1962, and retired in 1971. Stewart's research interests included physical and forensic anthropology and archaeology, mostly in North and South America. He also worked with the F.B.I. frequently to aid in homicide investigations, and worked extensively with the U.S. Army to identify skeletal remains from the Korean War in Operation Glory. The Thomas Dale Stewart Papers primarily deal with his life and career at the Smithsonian, particularly his research projects and publications between 1931 and 1991. Materials consist mainly of correspondence, photographic material, dossiers based on writings and research projects, and administrative files.
Scope and Contents:
The Thomas Dale Stewart Papers document his research and professional activities from 1931 to 1991 and primarily deal with his anthropological and archaeological research in North and South America. There is also significant material related to ancient human skeletal remains found in Egypt and the Middle East, Stewart's work identifying skeletal remains for the U.S. Army (Operation Glory), and the history of physical and forensic anthropology. Material documenting Stewart's work with Ales Hrdlicka and other colleagues are also represented in this collection. The collection consists of correspondence, writings and research files, project data, skeletal data punch cards, photographic and illustration materials, and administrative and financial papers.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in 9 series: Series 1. Biographical and Background, 1937-1983; Series 2. Correspondence, 1931-1990; Series 3. Writings and Research, 1875, 1902-1990; Series 4. Operation Glory, 1954-1957; Series 5. Professional Organizations, 1930-1990; Series 6. Trip Files, 1945-1985; Series 7. Teaching and Lectures, 1950-1970; Series 8. Exhibit Material, 1961-1969; Series 9. Photographs, 1928-1979.
Biographical note:
Thomas Dale Stewart was a curator of physical anthropology at the Smithsonian specializing in anthropometry, early man, and forensic anthropology. He worked in the Department of Anthropology for over seventy years. Born in Delta, Pennsylvania in 1901, Stewart moved to Washington, D.C. to pursue a degree at George Washington University. While attending school, he also began working at the Smithsonian in 1924 as a temporary substitute for John Baer, a family friend from Delta. After Baer died during conducting research in Panama, Stewart was invited to stay on as assistant to Ales Hrdlicka, curator of physical anthropology. Hrdlicka was impressed by Stewart's abilities and quickly took him on as a student. Promised that he would succeed Hrdlicka one day if he obtained an M.D., Stewart enrolled at The Johns Hopkins University and graduated in 1931. After graduating, Stewart was rehired by the Smithsonian as an assistant curator.

Stewart rose through the ranks of the Department of Anthropology quickly, being promoted to associate curator in 1939 and curator in 1943 after the death of his mentor Hrdlicka. Stewart was appointed head curator of the department in 1960 and director of the Natural History Museum in 1962. He continued to work at the Smithsonian well after he retired in 1971, conducting research and producing a stream of publications well into his 90s. He died in 1997 at the age of 96. Many of Stewart's early research interests matched those of his mentor: a focus on dental caries, separate neural arch and spondylolisthesis, ossuary excavation, cranial deformations, and other examinations of archaeological remains throughout North America. While Hrdlicka was alive, Stewart provided support for many of his research projects and publications. After Hrdlicka died, Stewart expanded his interests to include forensic topics and analysis of other archaeological remains.

Anthropometry was prominent in a great deal of his work. He was the first to describe Tepexpan Man from Mexico and Midland Man from Texas. He also studied the remains of Neanderthal specimens that Ralph S. Solecki, of the Bureau of American Ethnology, had uncovered at Shanidar Cave in Iraq. In forensic work, as Hrdlicka's heir, Stewart assumed work for the Federal Bureau of Investigation and other law enforcement officials. Moreover, Stewart devised new methods and published books and articles concerning forensic analysis, including his Essentials of Forensic Anthropology. In closely related work during 1954-1955, the United States Army engaged Stewart to go to Japan to examine skeletal remains repatriated after the Korean War in a project called "Operation Glory."

In terms of his areal specialization, Stewart was essentially an Americanist. In North America, he worked in Alaska with Henry B. Collins in 1927, and in subsequent years he excavated several ossuaries and other sites in the Washington, D.C., vicinity. These included a site on Potomac Creek in Virginia, Piscataway sites in Maryland, and the Townsend site in Delaware. He also carried out laboratory studies and prepared reports on skeletal remains uncovered by Smithsonian colleagues. In the 1940s and 1950s, Stewart conducted field work at archaeological sites in Mexico, Guatemala, and Peru.

He was awarded the Viking Medal in Physical Anthropology in 1953, the Joseph Henry Medal of the Smithsonian Institution in 1967, and an award from the physical anthropology section of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences in 1981.

Sources: Ubelaker, Douglas H. "Thomas Dale Stewart, A Biographer Memoir," National Academy of Sciences, 2006.

Pace, Eric. "T. Dale Stewart Dies at 96; Anthropologist at Smithsonian," The New York Times, 1997.

Chronology

1901 -- Born in Delta, Pennsylvania.

1922-1927 -- Moved to Washington, D.C. and attended George Washington University.

1924 -- Began working at the Smithsonian Institution.

1927 -- Sent by Ales Hrdlicka to Alaska to collect skeletal remains with Henry Collins.

1931 -- Graduated from The Johns Hopkins University with an M.D.

1931 -- Appointed assistant curator at the Smithsonian under Hrdlicka.

1939 -- Promoted to associate curator.

1939 -- Field work in Mexico.

1941 -- Field work in Peru.

1943 -- Taught at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

1943 -- Promoted to curator after Hrdlicka dies.

1943 -- Began working on forensic cases for the F.B.I.

1945 -- Field work in Mexico.

1949 -- Field work in Peru.

1947, 1949 -- Field work in Guatemala.

1954-1955 -- Traveled to Japan to assist in the identification of skeletal remains from the Korean War (Operation Glory).

1957-1967 -- Taught at the George Washington University School of Medicine.

1960-1962 -- Served as head curator of the Department of Anthropology.

1962-1965 -- Served as the director of the National Museum of Natural History.

1964 -- Assisted in the production of Smithsonian exhibits on physical anthropology.

1966 -- Retired from administrative duties and appointed senior scientist.

1971 -- Retired from the Smithsonian.

1997 -- Died in Bethesda, Maryland.
Related Materials:
The following manuscripts related to Stewart and his work can be found at the NAA:

NAA MS 1615- Excavations in Mancos Canyon, Colorado September 1943.

NAA MS 4669- The Townsend Site Near Lewes, Delaware 1962 by Henri Omwake.

NAA MS 4843- Report by T. Dale Stewart on Human Skeletal Material Excavated by W.M. Walker at Cedar Grove Cave, Arkansas and Natchitoches, Louisiana.

NAA MS 7025- A Tentative Closing Report on the Willin Site, Eldorado, Maryland September 1, 1952.

NAA MS 7121- "Memories from Half a Century at the Smithsonian January 11, 1978" recording.

NAA MS 7223- The Townsend Site January 1950.

NAA MS 7264- Documents Concerning Preserved Paleolithic Human Remains Found in the Vicinity of Cueva, Spain 1969-1972.

NAA MS 7357- Material Relating to Dermatoglyphics of Mayan Groups ca. 1947-1949.

NAA MS 7358- Personal Identification in Mass Disasters December 9-11 1968.

NAA MS 7359- T. Dale Stewart on the Identification of Human Remains April 6, 1970.

NAA MS 7474- Sketches of Burials at Ossuary 2, Juhle Site ca. 1971-1972.

Additional material T. Dale Stewart created while assisting Ales Hrdlicka is located at the National Anthropological Archives, The Papers of Ales Hrdlicka, ca. 1887-1943.

Many objects and artifact materials collected by T. Dale Stewart throughout his career are also held by the Smithsonian Department of Anthropology. These include skeletal remains and other materials from the Shanidar Cave in Iraq, forensic anthropological material including bone casts from Operation Glory, archaelogical materials from excavations in Maryland and Virginia including the Nanjemoy and Potomac Creek sites, and skeletal remains and other related materials from Stewart's 1927 expedition to Alaska with Henry Collins. Contact Anthropological Collections for more information.
Provenance:
Materials were transferred from T. Dale Stewart to the National Anthropological Archives in multiple accretions between 1975 and 2000 under accessions 1981-52, 1981-59, 1986-04, 1988-15, 1988-33, 1995-04, 1998-61, and 2000-46.The bulk of materials in this collection were transferred to the NAA from the Department of Anthropology in 1994 (1995-04).
Restrictions:
The Thomas Dale Stewart papers are open for research.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Physical anthropology  Search this
Operation Glory  Search this
anthropometry  Search this
Anthropology, physical -- Eskimo  Search this
Anthropology, physical -- American Indian  Search this
Americans  Search this
Aging  Search this
Anthropology -- Exhibits  Search this
Fossil hominids  Search this
Early man -- Neanderthal  Search this
George Washington University  Search this
Forensic anthropology  Search this
Anthropology, history of  Search this
Archaeology  Search this
Physical anthropology -- Early man  Search this
Primates  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Thomas Dale Stewart Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NAA.1988-33
See more items in:
Thomas Dale Stewart Papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-1988-33

Chris Gjording papers

Creator:
Gjording, Chris N., 1943-1993  Search this
Names:
Jesuits  Search this
Extent:
6.34 Linear feet (15 document boxes, 1 cassette tape, and 37 computer disks)
Culture:
Guaymi Indians  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Panama
El Salvador
Guatemala
Honduras
Mexico
Nicaragua.
Peru
Venezuela
Date:
1966-1991
bulk 1977-1991
Summary:
The papers of Chris Gjording primarily document his research and activities in Central America, particularly his research on the Guaymíes and the Cerro Colorado copper mining project in Chiriquí, Panama. Materials pertaining to Panama include Gjording's field notes (portions of which are missing due to severe insect infestation); photographs; reference materials he collected; and his writings, which include his articles, dissertation, and drafts of his dissertation revised for publication. In addition to his work in Panama are his field notes and photographs from his research on campesino communities in Guatemala and El Salvador. Gjording also kept subject files on Latin American countries, focusing on the poor and oppressed and the social and political climate. His writings on those subjects are present in the collection and include a draft of his unpublished paper on peasant uprising in El Salvador and issues of Informacciónes, the Spanish-language newsletter that Gjording published and wrote articles for in Honduras. The collection also contains correspondence and notes relating to his visits to the Guatemalan Indian refugee camps in Los Lirios and Maya Balam in Quintana Roo in Mexico. In addition, the collection contains some of his correspondence with his mentor Ricardo Falla, a Guatemalan Jesuit priest and anthropologist, whom he refers to as "RF" in his notes. The collection also contains computer disks with chapters in Spanish from Falla's book on Ixcán, possibly Masacres de la selva: Ixcán, Guatemala (1992).
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Chris Gjording primarily document his research and activities in Central America, particularly his research on the Guaymíes and the Cerro Colorado copper mining project in Chiriquí, Panama. Materials pertaining to Panama include Gjording's field notes (portions of which are missing due to severe insect infestation); photographs; reference materials he collected; and his writings, which include his articles, dissertation, and drafts of his dissertation revised for publication. In addition to his work in Panama are his field notes and photographs from his research on campesino communities in Guatemala and El Salvador. Gjording also kept subject files on Latin American countries, focusing on the poor and oppressed and the social and political climate. His writings on those subjects are present in the collection and include a draft of his unpublished paper on peasant uprising in El Salvador and issues of Informacciónes, the Spanish-language newsletter that Gjording published and wrote articles for in Honduras. The collection also contains correspondence and notes relating to his visits to the Guatemalan Indian refugee camps in Los Lirios and Maya Balam in Quintana Roo in Mexico. In addition, the collection contains some of his correspondence with his mentor Ricardo Falla, a Guatemalan Jesuit priest and anthropologist, whom he refers to as "RF" in his notes. The collection also contains computer disks with chapters in Spanish from Falla's book on Ixcán, possibly Masacres de la selva: Ixcán, Guatemala (1992).

Additional materials in the collection are copies of Gjording's curriculum vitae; his student papers; and his college and graduate school diplomas. In addition, the collection contains a letter approving Gjording's advancement to the diaconate and priesthood and his decree of dismissal from the Society of Jesus in 1991.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Arrangement:
Arranged into 7 series: (1) Correspondence, 1985-91; (2) Panama, 1977-91; (3) Latin America, 1977-90; (4) Journals, 1977-1982, 1988-1989; (5) Personal Files, 1966-1991; (6) Photographs, 1976-89; (7) Computer Disks
Biographical Note:
Chris Gjording was an anthropologist and Jesuit priest, best known for his research on the Guaymí people of Panama and how they were affected by a transnational copper mining project on their land.

Gjording was born on January 12, 1943 in Los Angeles, California. In 1960 he entered a Jesuit seminary in Sheridan, Oregon and obtained his A.B. in philosophy from Spring Hill College in 1966. After earning his M.A. in philosophy from Tulane University (1967) and his M.Div. in theology from the Toronto School of Theology (1973), he was ordained as a Jesuit priest in Spokane, Washington. He taught philosophy and liberation theology at Gonzaga University (1973-75) before continuing his education at the New School for Social Research, where he received his M.A. (1978) and Ph.D. (1985) in social and cultural anthropology.

As both a priest and anthropologist, he felt that "field research essentially involves interpersonal relationships; and [he had] no category for engaging in such relationships with nothing in view as a potential benefit for the other." (Gjording's journal, January 11, 1978) Influenced by liberation theology, Gjording consequently focused his research on the rural poor of Central America during a period of social and political turmoil.

As a graduate student in 1977, Gjording spent the summer conducting ethnographic fieldwork among campesino communities in Chinacá, Guatemala and in Chirilagua, San Miguel, El Salvador. He returned to Central America the following year to work in Chiriquí, Panama with Centro de Estudios y Acción Social (CEASPA), a Jesuit-sponsored organization, as the anthropologist on an interdisciplinary team studying the Cerro Colorado copper mining project and its impact on Panama. Gjording's research focused on the Guaymí people, who lived on the land where the mining project was to occur. His research became the subject of his dissertation, "The Cerro Colorado Copper Project: Panama, Multinational Corporations and the Guaymi Indians." A revised version of the dissertation was published by the Smithsonian Institution Press in 1991 as Conditions Not of Their Choosing: The Guaymí Indians and Mining Multinationals in Panama.

Gjording left Panama in 1982 but returned to Central America after completing his dissertation in 1985 to serve as codirector of Equipo de Reflexión, Investigación y Comunicación (E.R.I.C.), a Jesuit organization in El Progreso, Yoro, Honduras. As part of his responsibilities, he published and wrote many of the articles for Informaciones, a bimonthly newsletter in Spanish on the social, political, and economic situation in Honduras. In addition, he wrote articles for the Panamanian magazine Diálogo Social; due to the political climate in Panama, he wrote some of the articles under the pseudonym "Enrique Lobo," a name he chose in honor of the anthropologist Eric Wolf. From 1987 to 1989, he made several trips to the Guatemalan refugee camps in Quintana Roo, Mexico. He conducted informal research on the background and situation of the refugees and taught workshops that provided them guidance on whether to return to Guatemala or stay in Mexico.

Gjording returned to the United States in 1989 on a sabbatical from Central America. He left the priesthood in 1991 and obtained a position teaching anthropology and peace studies at Guilford College in Greensboro, North Carolina.

Gjording died of lung cancer on July 5, 1993 at the age of 50.

Sources Consulted

Gjording, Chris. 1978. [Daily Journal]. Chris Gjording Papers. National Anthropological Archives.

Roseberry, William. 1993. Chris N. Gjording. Anthropology Newsletter. 34(7): 44.

Chronology

1943 -- Born January 12 in Los Angeles, California

1966 -- Earns A.B. from Spring Hill College in Philosophy

1967 -- Earns M.A. from Tulane University in Philosophy

1973 -- Earns M.Div. from Toronto School of Theology Becomes an ordained Jesuit priest

1977 -- Spends summer in Central America conducting fieldwork in campesino communities in Guatemala and El Salvador

1978 -- Earns M.A. from the New School for Social Research in Anthropology

1978-1980 -- Conducts fieldwork in Chiriquí, Panama on the Guaymíes and the Cerro Colorado copper mining project

1985 -- Earns Ph.D. from the New School for Social Research in Anthropology

1985-1988 -- Codirector of E.R.I.C. (Equipo de Reflexión, Investigación y Comunicación), El Progreso, Yoro, Honduras

1989 -- Returns to United States

1991 -- Leaves priesthood Teaches Anthropology and Peace Studies at Guilford College in Greensboro, North Carolina

1993 -- Dies on July 5 at the age of 50

Selected Bibliography

1979 -- Gjording, Chris N. "Nicaragua's Unfinished Revolution," America 141 (October 6, 1979): 166-171.

1980 -- Lobo, Enrique. "La Nueva Política Indigenista (o bien: Acabemos con el Indio)," Diálogo Social 123 (May 1980): 15- 18. Lobo, Enrique. "El Pueblo Guaymí y el Gobierno Panameño (o bien: Acabemos con el Guaymí)," Diálogo Social 125 (July 1980): 22-25.

1981 -- Gjording, Chris N. The Cerro Colorado Copper Project and the Guaymí Indians of Panama. Occasional Paper No. 3. Cambridge: Cultural Survival, 1981.

1983 -- Gjording, Chris N. "The Guaymí People and Cerro Colorado." In Panama in Transition: Local Reactions to Development Policies. Monographs in Anthropology 6, edited by John Bort and Mary Helms, 19-52. Columbia: Museum of Anthropology, University of Missouri, 1983.

1987 -- Gjording, Chris N. "25 Años de Reforma Agraria . . . ¿Y Que?." Informaciones 8 (May-July 1987): 9-21.

1991 -- Gjording, Chris N. Conditions Not of Their Choosing: The Guaymí Indians and Mining Multinationals in Panama. Washington: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1991.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Karin Gjording.
Restrictions:
Computer disks in the collection are restricted due to preservation concerns.
Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Copper mining  Search this
Refugees -- Guatemala -- Ixcán  Search this
Mining -- Peru  Search this
Anthropology  Search this
Anthropologists  Search this
Citation:
Chris Gjording papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2008-19
See more items in:
Chris Gjording papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2008-19

Janet Longcope photographs of world travels

Creator:
Longcope, Janet, ca. 1886-1974  Search this
Extent:
600 mounted prints (circa 600 mounted prints, silver gelatin)
4,000 color slides (circa)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Mounted prints
Color slides
Photographs
Place:
Pakistan -- Description and Travel
Fiji -- Description and Travel
Ethiopia -- Description and Travel
Easter Island -- Description and Travel
Yemen -- Description and Travel
Honduras -- Description and Travel
Peru -- Description and Travel
Guatemala -- Description and Travel
Israel -- Description and Travel
Vietnam -- Description and Travel
Solomon Islands -- Description and Travel
Colombia -- Description and Travel
Thailand -- description and travel
Taiwan -- description and travel
Jordan -- Description and Travel
Uzbekistan -- Description and Travel
Singapore -- Description and Travel
Bhutan -- Description and Travel
Afghanistan -- Description and Travel
Burma -- Description and Travel
Brazil -- Description and Travel
Australia -- Description and Travel
Lebanon -- Description and Travel
Iraq -- Description and Travel
Iran -- Description and Travel
India -- description and travel
New Guinea -- Description and Travel
Syria -- Description and Travel
Nepal -- Description and Travel
Hong Kong -- Description and Travel
Cambodia -- Description and Travel
Sri Lanka -- Description and Travel
Chile -- description and travel
Mexico -- description and travel
Japan -- Description and Travel
Italy -- description and travel
Morocco -- description and travel
Spain -- description and travel
Mongolia -- Description and Travel
New Zealand -- Description and Travel
Russia -- Description and Travel
Kenya -- Description and Travel
Macau (China) -- Description and Travel
Malaysia -- Description and Travel
Yucatan -- Description and Travel
Indonesia -- Description and Travel
Date:
1954-1971
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs made by Janet Longcope during trips to countries around the world. They depict landscapes, buildings, markets, dances, agriculture, arts and crafts, ceremonies, children, cooking, musicians, and transportation. Locations depicted include Afghanistan, Australia, Bhutan, Brazil, Burma, Cambodia, Chile, Colombia, Easter Island, Egypt, Ethiopia, Fiji, Greece, Guatemala, Hawaii, Honduras, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Macao, Malaysia, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Nepal, New Guinea, New Zealand, Pakistan, Peru, Russia, Siberia, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Spain, Sri Lanka, Syria, Taiwan, Thailand, Uzbekistan, Vietnam, Yemen, and Yucatan. Longcope used many of these photographs in lectures.
Biographical/Historical note:
Janet Longcope (1886-1974) was a bookbinder and world traveler who gave informal lectures about her travels. Ater the death of her husband Dr. Warfield T. Longcope in 1953, she visited countries all over the world, returning to some, such as India, as many as nine times.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 75-26
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Markets  Search this
Dance  Search this
Transportation  Search this
Agriculture  Search this
Cooking  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo lot 75-26, Janet Longcope photographs of world travels, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.75-26
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-75-26

Gregory Mason negatives

Creator:
Mason, Gregory, b. 1889  Search this
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Extent:
86 acetate negatives (black and white, 4 x 6 inches.)
Culture:
Maya  Search this
Maya (archaeological culture)  Search this
Ika (Ica/Arhuaco)  Search this
Kogi (Kagaba)  Search this
Wayuu (Guajira/Goajiro)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Acetate negatives
Black-and-white negatives
Place:
Chichén Itzá Site (Mexico)
Guatemala
Quintana Roo (Mexico : State)
Belize
Colombia
Mexico
Date:
1916-1931
Summary:
This collection contains 86 black-and-white negatives taken by Gregory Mason from 1916-1931. The images depict scenes of Belize, Guatemala, Colombia and Mexico, including Mexico City, Cozumel, Chichén Itzá and other sites in Quintana Roo.
Scope and Contents:
The Gregory Mason collection contains negatives made from 1916 to 1931 by Mason. The 1916 negatives depict the streets in and suburbs of Mérida, Mexico, and of people bundling fibers on a nearby plantation. The negatives dating from 1922 were made in Chichén Itzá. In 1928, Mason made negatives in Belize, Guatemala, and Mexico. The Belize negatives depict Mayan antiquities, various street scenes, and native peoples gathering leaves and chicle, spinning fiber, and canoeing; the Quintana Roo, Mexico, negatives depict Isla Cozumel and other Mayan sites; and the Guatemala negatives Quiriguá. The 1931 negatives made in Colombia primarily depict individuals from the Kogi, Ika, and Wayuu culture groups. Mason made some of these negatives on behalf of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation.
Arrangement:
Arranged by negative number (N20447-N20532)
Biographical/Historical note:
Born in 1889, Gregory Mason was an American journalist with a keen interest in anthropology. Early in his career, he traveled widely as a reporter for the newspaper New York Evening Sun and the news magazine The Outlook. In 1926, he and Herbert Spinden led the Mason-Spinden expedition to explore Mayan ruins in Mexico. Funded in part by Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, Mason led four additional expeditions to Central and South America. He wrote several books, including "Silver Cities of Yucatan" (1927), "Columbus Came Late" (1931), and "Remember the Maine" (1939). From 1941 to 1954, he was chairman of the Department of Journalism at New York University. Mason died in Greenwich, Connecticut, in 1968.
Provenance:
Historically, the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation managed all photographic and related manuscript collections separately. This collection description represents current management practices of organizing and contextualizing related archival materials.
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment.
Rights:
Copyright: National Museum of the American Indian.
Genre/Form:
Black-and-white negatives
Citation:
Gregory Mason negatives, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or catalog number).
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.029
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-001-029

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