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Mauldin Cartoon Collection

Artist:
Mauldin, Bill, 1921-2003  Search this
Collector:
Archives of American Art  Search this
Names:
Chicago Sun-Times  Search this
St. Louis Post-Dispatch  Search this
Extent:
8 Cubic feet (20 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Clippings
Sketchbooks
Correspondence
Genealogies
Personal papers
Political cartoons
Cartoons (humorous images)
Place:
Arizona
Vietnam
Date:
1946-1987
Summary:
Collection is believed to contain all of Mauldin's published cartoons from 1946 to 1987; also periodical and newspaper articles about and by Mauldin, personal items, including his genealogy, and an original sketchbook used by Mauldin while he was in Vietnam, February 1965.
Scope and Contents:
The collection contains newspaper clippings or photocopies of Mauldin's published cartoons from 1946 to 1987. Some of his most famous cartoons from World War II were reprised during this time. Newspaper and magazine articles written and/or illustrated by Mauldin are also included as are magazine covers and a Vietnam sketchbook containing pen and ink renderings of battle scenes observed by Mauldin during a visit. Other documents include correspondence, a number of articles written about Mauldin, his genealogy and photographs of his family. Some correspondence and drawings by Mauldin's friend, artist Mailton Caniff are also included.

Series 1, Artwork and Articles, 1946-1987, include published material written or drawn by Mauldin and is arranged in chronological order.

Subseries 1, Cartoons, 1946-1987, consists of clippings and draft submissions of published cartoons and are arranged in chronological order.

Subseries 2, Articles Written by Mauldin, 1947-1982, consists of clippings and drafts of newspaper and magazine articles and is arranged in chronological order.

Subseries 3, Articles Illustrated by Mauldin, 1948-1970, consists of illustrations arranged chronologically.

Subseries 4, Related Materials, 1961-1968, consists of magazine covers, sketches and a map to his wedding and is arranged in alphabetical order.

Series 2, Biographical Information, 1947-1968; undated, includes articles written about Mauldin, biography, some correspondence and reviews of and advertisements for his books. The materials are arranged in alphabetical order.

Series 3, Other Artwork, 1948-1960, include clippings of drawings by Milton Caniff and some miscellaneous material. Materials are arranged in alphabetical order.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged in three series:

Series 1, Artwork and Articles, 1946–1987

Subseries 1.1, Cartoons, 1946-1987

Subseries 1.2, Articles Written by Mauldin, 1947-1982

Subseries 1.3, Articles Illustrated by Mauldin, 1948-1970

Subseries 1.4, Related Materials, 1961-1968

Series 2, Biographical Information, 1947-1968; undated

Series 3, Other Artwork, 1948-1960
Biographical / Historical:
William Henry (Bill) Mauldin, a two-time Pulitzer Prize winning military and political cartoonist, was born in Mountain Park, New Mexico in 1921. He studied for a year at the Academy of Fine Arts in Chicago and did some freelance cartooning before World War II. He joined the Arizona National Guard and when the war broke out he was activated and became a cartoonist for the 45th Infantry Division newspaper, and later for Stars and Stripes, a newspaper written for and distributed to GI's. It was for the Stars and Stripes that he created his two most famous characters. Willie and Joe were two dog faced infantrymen whose exploits reflected Mauldin's first hand observations of combat (he was awarded the purple heart) and the anxieties and frustrations that confronted Americans in a combat zone. His cartoons were the most popular pinups in tents and barracks along with photos of movie stars. Many of the Army's leaders, including General Patton, didn't like the disrespectful tone of some of the cartoons, but General Eisenhower did, so they continued to be published.

After the war he drew political cartoons, first for United Feature Syndicates then for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and then for the Chicago Sun Times. They ranged in subject from local matters to international politics. He was a master satirist who could find the cracks in any idol be it democratic (Kennedy), republican (Eisenhower) or demagogue (De Gaulle).

Mauldin wrote newspaper and magazine articles, some on contemporary life and politics, and some based on his visits to war zones in Korea, the Mid-East and Vietnam. He wrote a number of books including Up Front which was made into a movie.
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Alice R. Colquitt, on March 10, 1988.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Cartoonists  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Vietnamese Conflict, 1961-1975  Search this
Korean War, 1950-1953  Search this
Genre/Form:
Clippings -- 20th century
Sketchbooks -- 1940-1990
Correspondence -- 1940-1990
Genealogies
Personal papers -- 20th century
Political cartoons -- 1940-1950
Cartoons (humorous images) -- 1930-1960
Citation:
Mauldin Cartoon Collection, 1946-1987, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0307
See more items in:
Mauldin Cartoon Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0307
Online Media:

Arizona : stereograph

Collector:
Warshaw, Isadore, 1900-1969  Search this
Publisher:
Underwood & Underwood  Search this
Series Creator:
Warshaw, Isadore, 1900-1969  Search this
Extent:
1 Item
Type:
Archival materials
Landscapes (representations)
Stereographs
Photographs
Place:
Arizona -- Stereographs
Grand Canyon (Ariz.)
Colorado River -- Stereographs
Date:
ca. 1902
Scope and Contents:
View of the Colorado River and Grand Canyon.
General:
In photographs division, stereographs sub-series, box 7.
Restrictions:
Unrestricted research use on site. Photographs must be handled with white cotton gloves, unless protected by plastic sleeves.
Series Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Rivers -- Stereographs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Landscapes (representations) -- Arizona.
Stereographs
Photographs -- 1900-1910 -- Black-and-white photoprints -- Stereographs
Series Citation:
Warshaw Collection of Business Americana, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Warshaw Collection of Business Americana, Series 2: Other Collection Divisions
Warshaw Collection of Business Americana, Series 2: Other Collection Divisions / 2.6: Stereographs
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0060-s02-ref518

Helga Teiwes photograph collection

Photographer:
Teiwes, Helga  Search this
Names:
Arizona State Museum  Search this
Gila River Indian Reservation (Ariz.)  Search this
Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah  Search this
Extent:
3775 negatives (photographic)
3126 slides (photographs)
433 Photographic prints
196 Transparencies
16 Linear feet
Culture:
San Carlos Apache  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Rarámuri (Tarahumara)  Search this
Tohono O'odham (Papago)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Transparencies
Photographs
Place:
Cuzco (Peru)
Machu Picchu Site (Peru)
Peru
Arizona
Mexico
New Mexico
Date:
1965-2002
Summary:
The Helga Teiwes photograph collection contains over 7,000 negatives, slides and prints made by Teiwes between 1965 and 2002. For over thirty years Teiwes worked as a staff photographer for the Arizona State Museum, photographing and documenting Native American communities across the American Southwest. During this time, Teiwes also privately took photographs and built personal relationships among members of the Akimel O'odham, Tohono O'odham, Apache, Diné (Navajo) and Hopi tribes. These photographs include portraits of artists at work, families in their homes, daily life on the reservation, special events and landscape photography. Additionally, the Teiwes collection includes photographs from a 1975 trip to Peru and photographs of the Tarahumara (Rarámuri) community in Chihuahua, Mexico.
Scope and Contents:
The Helga Teiwes photograph collection contains over 7,000 negatives, slides and prints made by Teiwes between 1965 and 2002 across the American Southwest, Mexico and Peru. The majority of the photographs document daily life and activities, artists at work, and special events among members of the Akimel O'odham, Tohono O'odham, Apache, Diné (Navajo) and Hopi tribes in Arizona and New Mexico. A smaller amount of photographs documents trips Teiwes made to Mexico to photograph the Tarahumara (Rarámuri) community in Chihuahua and a 1975 summer trip to Peru. The collection is arranged into seven series with additional subseries.

Series 1, Akimel O'odham (Pima), 1965-1993, 2001, contains photographs mostly taken among the Gila River Indian Community in Arizona. These include intimate portraits, landscape views and views of farming and agriculture. Of particular note are photographs of Patricia "Pat" Stone and her family and basket weaver Julia Francisco. The majority of the photographs in Series 2, Apache, 1973-1994, are from two San Carlos Apache coming of age ceremonies, or "Changing Woman" ceremonies, from 1992 and 1994. The 1992 ceremony for Leia Tenille Johnson was held in Whiteriver, Arizona and the 1994 ceremony for Vanessa Jordan of Bylas, Arizona. A selection of 50 photographic prints from these ceremonies were later exhibited in "Western Apache Sunrise Ceremony" at the University of Kansas Museum of Anthropology. The largest series, Series 3, Diné (Navajo), 1969-2002, is divided into seven subseries by topics. This includes artists and artisans, families and individuals across the Navajo Nation, industry and agriculture, trading posts and markets, places, schools, and other topics. Of particular note are the photographs of the Greyeyes family from Tsegi Canyon, Arizona. In addition to photographing matriarch Bessie Salt Greyeyes at home with family, weaving, cooking, shopping around town and herding sheep and goats, Teiwes accompanied Pete Greyeyes to work at the Peabody Coal Mining Company. Other places and events of note include photographs of Monument Valley, Window Rock, seat of the Navajo Nation, the Hubbell and Shonto trading posts and the 1990 graduation from Navajo Community College (Now Diné College).

Series 4, Hopi, 1968-2002, highlights the work and artistry of Hopi basket weavers. Many of the photographs in this series were included in Teiwes's 1996 book Hopi Basket Weaving: Artistry in Natural Fibers. Coiled basket weavers from the Second Mesa include Madeline Lamson, Joyce Ann Saufkie, Evelyn Selestewa and Bertha Wadsworth, among others. Wicker basket weavers from the Third Mesa include Eva Hoyungowa, Abigail Kaursgowva, Vera Pooyouma and Vernita Silas, among others. Teiwes also photographed additional artists and events on the Hopi reservation including Maechel Saufkie's 1995 wedding. Series 5, Peru, 1975 includes photographs from Teiwes's 1975 summer trip to Peru. Teiwes visited and photographed several pre-Colombian archaeological sites including Sacsahuaman and Machu Piccu in addition to photographing in larger cities such as Cuzco, Lima and Quito (Ecuador). A large number of photographs in this series are from the Inti Raymi parade and festival held in Cuzco during their winter solstice. Series 6, Tarahumara (Rarámuri), 1971, 1977-1979 contains photographs from three trips to Chihuahua, Mexico to photograph the Tarahumara (Rarámuri) people for an Arizona State Museum exhibition held in 1979. Also included are photographs from the exhibition opening in Arizona. Series 7, Tohono O'odham, 1969-1995, 2002 contains photographs of the saguaro cactus harvest in addition to other special events among the Tohono O'odham people. Teiwes documented Juanita Ahill, and later her niece Stella Tucker, throughout the process of harvesting and processing the saguaro cactus plant to make jam and ceremonial wine. Additional events photographed in this series include the San Xavier Elders parade and Tumacacori festival.

The photographs in this collection range all media types: 6x6cm color/black and white negatives; 35mm color/black and white negatives; 35mm and 6x6cm color slides; 6x6cm transparencies; contact sheets; and 3x5, 4x6, 8x10 and larger color/black and white photographic prints, some matted for sale or exhibition purposes. Teiwes did include handwritten notations on the backs of some photographs and slide mounts. There is also a small amount of paper documentation.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged into seven series by culture group or location. Series 1: Akimel O'odham (Pima), Series 2: Apache, Series 3: Diné (Navajo), Series 4: Hopi, Series 5: Peru, Series 6: Tarahumara (Rarámuri), Series 7: Tohono O'odham.
Biographical / Historical:
Helga Kulbe Teiwes was born in Büderich, near Düsseldorf, in Germany in 1930. In 1950 Teiwes began a trade apprenticeship in photography under Master photographer Erna Hehmke-Winterer, a specialist in black and white portraiture, architectural and industrial photography. In 1957 Teiwes earned her master's degree in photography and worked as an industrial photographer in Düsseldorf until she emigrated to New York in 1960. During her four years in New York City, Teiwes worked as a darkroom worker, an assistant photographer for Cartier Jewelers and as a transparency retoucher. She also continued to build her portfolio through free-lance work. In 1964, a trip to Mesa Verde inspired Teiwes to seek work in the Southwest. The same year she was hired by Dr. Emil Haury of the University of Arizona to photograph his excavation of Snaketown on the Gila River Indian Reservation. Following Snaketown, Teiwes was hired as a museum photographer for the Arizona State Museum (ASM) at the University of Arizona in Tucson. She was also sought after for other archaeological projects during the 1960s and 1970s to take publication and studio shots. During this time, Teiwes developed a deep interest in the people and cultures of the Southwest and spent a significant amount of time on reservations building personal relationships among the Hopi, Apache, Tohono O'dham and Diné (Navajo) among others. Teiwes took a particular interest in documenting Native artists and the work they produced, including basket weavers, potters, jewelers and carvers. Teiwes also worked to capture everyday life among the Native people of the Southwest in addition to documenting special events like the Apache coming of age ceremony and the Tohono O'odham Saguaro Cactus harvest. Teiwes retired from the Arizona State Museum in 1993 but continued to work as a freelance photographer and writer in Tuscon.

Throughout her career Teiwes's photographs and essays were published nationally and internationally. Her photographic study Navajo was published by the Swiss publisher U. Bar Varlag in 1991 and published in English in 1993. Her books Kachina Dolls: The Art of the Hopi Carvers and Hopi Basket Weaving: Artistry in Natural Fibers were published by the University of Arizona Press in 1991 and 1996. From October 2003 to June 2004, the Arizona State Museum held an exhibition titled "With an Eye on Culture: The Photography of Helga Teiwes" highlighting the broad scope of her career.

In 2013, Teiwes donated her collection of personal photographs, not taken for the Arizona State Museum, to the National Museum of the American Indian, Archive Center. Teiwes's photographs taken for the Arizona State Museum are housed in the ASM's photographic archives.
Related Materials:
There is a large collection of photographs at the Arizona State Museum where Teiwes worked from 1964-1993. These photographs include harvesting of mesquite, cholla, and saguaro; traditional farming of corn at Hopi and of tepary beans among the Tohono O'odham; and craftspeople and their art in basketry, katsina carving, pottery, and weaving.
Provenance:
This collection was donated by Helga Teiwes in 2013.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Thursday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Please contact the NMAI Archive Center (NMAIArchives@si.edu) regarding the use of this collection, donor restrictions apply.
Topic:
Navajo Indians -- Agriculture  Search this
Navajo artists -- Photographs  Search this
Changing Woman Ceremony (Apache rite)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Arizona -- Photographs  Search this
Basket making -- Hopi  Search this
Indians of North America -- New Mexico -- Photographs  Search this
Saguaro -- Arizona  Search this
Basket making -- Pima  Search this
Navajo Indians -- Social life and customs  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest -- Photographs  Search this
Hopi women -- Photographs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Negatives (photographic)
Photographic prints
Slides (photographs)
Photographs
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Helga Teiwes Photograph Collection, Box and Item Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.070
See more items in:
Helga Teiwes photograph collection
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-070
Online Media:

Ernest S. and Eloise Carter Collection

Creator:
Carter, Ernest S.  Search this
Carter, Eloise  Search this
Names:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Dockstader, Frederick J.  Search this
Extent:
2415 slides (photographs)
855 negatives (photographic)
526 Photographic prints
0.85 Linear feet
Culture:
Ute  Search this
Pueblo  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Taos Pueblo  Search this
San Ildefonso Pueblo  Search this
Kewa (Santo Domingo Pueblo)  Search this
Laguna Pueblo  Search this
Hopi-Tewa  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Slides (photographs)
Negatives (photographic)
Photographic prints
Photographs
Slides
Place:
Arizona
California
Nevada
Colorado
Utah
New Mexico
Date:
1947-1986
bulk 1964-1975
Summary:
The Ernest S. and Eloise Carter collection includes photographic prints, negatives and slides taken between 1950 and 1976 in the American Southwest, Mexico and Bolivia. The Carters were research associates for the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation between 1964 and 1975 and focused much of their research on petroglyphs and pictographs. In addition to photographic material there is also correspondence and documentation about the photographs in the collection.
Scope and Contents:
The Ernest S. and Eloise Carter collection includes photographic prints, negatives and slides taken between 1950 and 1976 in the American Southwest, Mexico and Bolivia as well as documentation and notes regarding their work. The bulk of the photographs and notes were made by the Carters from 1964 to 1976 while they were research associates for the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. The Carters spent much of their time photographing and researching petroglyph and pictograph sites in Arizona, New Mexico, California and Nevada producing black and white and color negatives, color slides, and photographic prints that were sent back to the MAI along with maps, notes, and reports as they were completed.

Series 1: Photographs, 1950-1975, is organized into four separate subseries. Subseries 1.1 Mexico and Bolivia, Landscapes and People, 1950-1951, includes photographs taken in Bolivia, circa 1950-1951 and in Mexico in 1964. Although it is unclear whether or not Ernest Carter took the Bolivia photographs himself or acquired them while he was traveling there, the photographic prints include landscape views and portraits shot in around the city of Potosí, Bolivia. The photographs shot in Mexico include black and white negatives the Carters took at the Monte Alban and Mitla ruins in Oaxaca, Mexico in July, 1964. Subseries 1.2 US Southwest: Landscapes and Petroglyphs, 1964-1973, the largest group of materials in the collection, includes the bulk of the work done by the Carters for the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. The subseries is arranged chronologically and then by location including sites in Arizona, New Mexico, California, Nevada and Utah. Both Eloise and Ernest shot photographs, though Eloise generally shot in black and white and Ernest in color. This subseries includes negatives(5x7 and 35mm), slides (120 and 35mm), and photographic prints of various sizes, some mounted. Images include wide shots of petroglyph, pictograph, and acorn grinding sites, close-ups of petroglyphs as well as landscape views.

The Carters were also prolific collectors of kachinas and other ethnographic objects from the Southwest. Subseries 1.3 Object Photography: Kachinas, Pottery, Baskets and Other Objects, 1967-1975 includes photographs of the Carter kachinas, pottery and basket collections as well as several photographs of the Carters in their home alongside their collections. Subseries 1.4: Educational Materials and Other Selected Studies, 1970-1973 includes photographs the Carters put together for use by the educational department. Mostly mounted prints and slides, these photographs generally were sent with specific descriptions and were selected to highlight the variations between the petroglyph sites. This subseries also includes "Pueblo Life and Work" a series of photographs shot by the Carters at Taos Pueblo, Ildenfonso Pueblo, Laguna Pueblo and Hopi Pueblo in 1973.

Series 2: Correspondence and Photograph Documentation, 1964-1987, includes correspondence and documentation about the photographs in the Carter collection. The majority of the correspondence is between Ernest Carter and Frederick Dockstader, director of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation (MAI), regarding the donation of photographs and objects from the Carters to the museum between 1964 and 1976. The correspondence also includes detailed expense records which document where the Carters where traveling when as well as when shipments of photographs and objects were being made through the years. The documentation includes detailed reports from the Carters research on petroglyphs, maps of various petroglyph sites, photograph lists with descriptions as well as drawings and notes.
Arrangement note:
This collection is arranged into two series. Series 1: Photographs, 1950-1976, is organized in four subseries. Subseries 1.1: Mexico and Bolivia, Landscapes and People, 1950-1951, 1964; Subseries 1.2: US Southwest: Landscapes and Petroglyphs, 1964-1973; Subseries 1.3: Object Photography: Kachinas, Pottery, Baskets and Other Objects, 1967-1975; Subseries 1.4: Educational Materials and Other Selected Studies, 1970-1973. These subseries are then arranged chronologically. Series 2: Correspondence and Photograph Documentation is arranged alphabetically and then by document number.
Biographical/Historical note:
Ernest Carter was born Ernest (Eryst of Eruie) Sigmund Schickler in Vienna, Austria in 1922. Following World War II, he left Europe for South America where he spent four years in the Andes on climbing expeditions. He changed his name from Schickler to Carter when he moved to the United States in 1951 and officially became an American citizen in 1957. Eloise Carter was born in Nebraka in 1928 and eventually became a dental assistant in the Bay Area, California, where she met and married Ernest around 1960. In 1964 Ernest and Eloise were made research associates of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation which began a long term relationship with the MAI. During this time the Carters traveled throughout California, Nevada and other location in the Southwest and Mexico to photograph petroglyphs and pictographs which were subsequently shipped to the Museum. They also collected objects which were donated to the MAI including baskets, pottery and kachinas among other items. Their relationship with the MAI tapered off after Frederick Dockstader left the museum in 1975. The Carters continued to travel and work with communities in the southwest and eventually settled in Mountain View, California.
Provenance:
Donated by Ernest and Eloise Carter between 1964-1975 with additional photographs donated in 1986.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Thursday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited users to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not changed, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian.
Topic:
Petroglyphs  Search this
Picture-writing  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Photographs
Slides
Negatives (photographic)
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Ernest S. and Eloise Carter collection, Item Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.034
See more items in:
Ernest S. and Eloise Carter Collection
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-034
Online Media:

Jesse L. Nusbaum negatives and photographs

Creator:
Nusbaum, Jesse L. (Jesse Logan)  Search this
Extent:
205 acetate negatives
25 albumen prints
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Acetate negatives
Albumen prints
Negatives
Photographic prints
Photographs
Place:
New Mexico
Arizona
Santa Clara Pueblo (N.M.)
Zuni (N.M.)
Utah
Pecos National Historical Park (N.M.)
Puye (New Mexico)
Hawikuh (N. M.)
Jemez Pueblo (N.M.)
Date:
1910-1928
Summary:
Includes images from the excavations at Hawikku near Zuni Pueblo and Basketmaker's Cave in Kane County, Utah, as well as objects found at Cave Lakes, also in Kane County, Utah. Also included are views of Zuni Pueblo, Santa Clara Pueblo, Jemez Pueblo, Puye cliff dwellings, Pecos Mission and other views of Arizona and New Mexico.
Arrangement note:
Negatives: organized in individual sleeves; arranged by negative number

Prints: organized in folders; arranged by print number
Biographical/Historical note:
Jesse L. Nusbaum, a long-time archaeologist and administrator for the National Park Service and recipient of the Distinguished Service ward from the Department of the Interior (1954), began his career as a teacher, attending Colorado Teachers College in Greeley, where he received his Bachelor of Pedagogy in 1907. He then moved to Las Vegas to teach science and manual arts at New Mexico State Normal School. Later that year, he made his first connection with Mesa Verde as a photographer and archeological assistant to A. V. Kidder; Nusbaum spent the next year working as an assistant to the archeologist. In June of 1909 he became the first employee of the School of American Archeology and Museum of New Mexico in Santa Fe under Dr. Edgar L. Hewett. Nusbaum traveled to Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Colorado, and New Mexico where he undertook archeological surveys, investigations, excavations, and ruins stabilization.

Nusbaum's work at the museum brought him back to Mesa Verde for the excavation, repair, and stabilization of the Balcony House, a project which extended into the winter of 1910. In 1913, he supervised the completion of the New Mexico Palace of Governors in Santa Fe and worked in the Mayan ruins of the Yucatan with Dr. S. G. Morley. He then supervised the construction of the state art museum from 1916 to 1918. Nusbaum enlisted during World War I in the hopes of becoming an aviator, but instead he became an engineer and served in France until his discharge in 1919. After the war, Nusbaum moved to New York City and worked at the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. While Nusbaum was working in New York he took part in several expeditions to the Southwest, including those at Hawikku (Hawikuh) Pueblo and Basketmaker Cave.

In 1921, while still in New York, he was selected by Stephen Mather and Arno Cammerer to become superintendent at Mesa Verde National Park. Director Mather had become disgusted with the conditions that had developed there under a political superintendent. Nusbaum was a very effective superintendent, advancing the development of the park and preserving the archeological resources. He discontinued grazing, built a museum and developed good interpretive programs, especially ones designed to explain the Antiquities Act. His involvement with the Act led to his designation in 1927 as the lead archeologist and prime enforcer of the Act for the Southwest (while remaining Mesa Verde superintendent).

Nusbaum continued this dual capacity until 1930, when he took a leave of absence to organize and direct the Laboratory of Anthropology at Santa Fe, New Mexico. He continued as director of the laboratory until 1935, having earlier returned to the Park Service and resumed his dual duties as Mesa Verde superintendent and Department of the Interior archeologist enforcing the Antiquities Act. Nusbaum continued this dual position for many years. In 1946 he left Mesa Verde and his dual role for Santa Fe. At the National Park Service office there, he took up increased duties as the senior archeologist of the National Park Service. In this capacity, Nusbaum began one of the first salvage archeology projects when he persuaded El Paso Natural Gas Company to allow archeological excavation along their pipelines. After a year's extension Nusbaum was forced to retire from the NPS at the age of 71 in 1957. However, he continued to do consulting work for many years. He died in Santa Fe in December 1975, at the age of 88.
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment.
Rights:
Restricted: Cultural Sensitivity
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Photographs
Citation:
Jesse L. Nusbaum negatives and photographs, 1910-1928, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or catalog number).
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.012
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-001-012

Edward Harvey Davis photograph collection

Creator:
Davis, Edward H., b. 1862  Search this
Extent:
770 Photographic prints (approximate number, black & white)
2000 negatives (photographic) (approximate number)
Culture:
Cochiti Pueblo  Search this
Cora  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Cochimi  Search this
Cahuilla  Search this
Cocopa  Search this
Cora  Search this
Hualapai (Walapai)  Search this
Kiliwa  Search this
Kumeyaay (Diegueño)  Search this
Mojave (Mohave)  Search this
Opata  Search this
Piipaash (Maricopa)  Search this
Quechan (Yuma/Cuchan)  Search this
Seri  Search this
Tohono O'odham (Papago)  Search this
Wixarika (Huichol)  Search this
Yavapai  Search this
Chemehuevi  Search this
Yoreme (Mayo)  Search this
Nevome (Pima Bajo)  Search this
Paipai (Pi-Pi/Pais)  Search this
Guaycura (Waicuri)  Search this
Yoeme (Yaqui)  Search this
Campo Band of Kumeyaay  Search this
Kamia (Desert Kumeyaay)  Search this
Manzanita Band of Kumeyaay  Search this
San Carlos Apache  Search this
White Mountain Apache  Search this
Pechanga Band Luiseño  Search this
Soboba Luiseño  Search this
Payómkawichum (Luiseño)  Search this
Yavapai [Fort McDowell]  Search this
Cahuilla [Morongo Band of Mission Indians]  Search this
Desert Cahuilla [Torres-Martinez Reservation/Torres-Martinez Band]  Search this
Yoeme (Yaqui) [Pascua Yaqui]  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Negatives (photographic)
Negatives
Place:
Mexico
Arizona
California
Date:
1903-1939
Summary:
Davis visited the Diegueno and Luiseno in southern California; the Pi-pi (Pais), Kil-e-wah (Cahuilla), and Waicuri of Lower California, Mexico; the Yuma, Cocopah, Pima, Papago, Maricopa, Mojave, Hualapai (Walapai), Yaqui, and White Mountain Apache in Arizona; the Cora, Huichol, Opata, Mayo, and Yaqui of Mexico; the Seri of Tiburon Island; the Chemehuevi of Nevada and California; the Modoc and Klamath Lake Indians in Oregon; and the Paiute in Nevada. His collection contains photographs of Apache, Cahuilla, Chemehuevi, Cochimi, Cochiti Pueblo, Cocopa, Cora, Guaicuruj, Huichol, Kawia, Kiliwa, Kumeyaay (Diegueno), Luiseno, Maricopa, Mayo, Mission, Mohave, Opata, Paipai, Papago (Tohono O'odham), Pima (Akimel O'odham), San Carlos Pueblo, San Manuel, Seri, Ute, Walapai (Hualapai), Yaqui, and Yuma.
Arrangement note:
Collection arranged by item number.
Biographical/Historical note:
Artist, photographer, and artefact collector, Edward Harvey Davis was born on June 18, 1862 in New York. He traveled to California in 1884 for health reasons (Bright's disease i.e. actue of chronic nephritis (a kidney disorder)), arriving in 1885, and settled on 320 acres in an area called Mesa Grande, east of San Diego. Later that year he returned to New York to marry, bringing his new bride, Anna May Wells back to California with him. They would eventually have four children. Shortly after settling in California, Davis became interested in the the Kumeyaay (Northern Diguenos), the Mesa Grande Indians indigenous to that area, and spent the remainder of his life collecting artifacts, studying and photographing them. He collected so many items that his ranch house ran out of room for them, necessitating the building of another structure (adobe) to house them. As a result of this interest and care of the Mesa Grande Indians in San Diego County, in 1907, Davis was named a ceremonial chief by the Indians themselves. Originally trained as an artist, Davis first worked as a drafter and architect. Upon his arrival in San Diego in 1885, he fortuitously invested in and profited from the booming real estate industry of the time. Davis became known to George Gustav Heye when Heye initially purchased a collection of Indian artifacts from him for the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation in 1915. With the money from the sale of his collection, Davis was able to open a resort lodge called the Powam that same year. His real estate investments and his lodge enabled Davis to finance his fieldwork, most of which he did on his own. In 1916 however, Davis also became an official field collector for the Museum of the American Indian in New York. Sporadically, from 1917 to 1930, Heye contracted Davis to conduct field trips to California, Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada, Mexico, and Tiburon Island, visiting over two dozen different Indian peoples in the course of his travels. Wherever he went, Davis continued to photograph the Native peoples, but did not consider these photographs to be part of his contract with Heye. Heye later purchased the bulk of Davis's photograph collection. Davis also had sketched objects and landscapes during his travels as a method of preserving what he saw. Davis died in San Bernardino on February 22, 1951. In addition to his photographs, Davis authored several scholarly articles.
Provenance:
Purchased;, Edward H. Davis;, 1917 and 1948.
Restrictions:
Access restricted. Researchers should contact the staff of the NMAI Archives for an appointment to access the collection.
Topic:
Indians of Mexico -- Photographs  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest -- Photographs  Search this
Indians of North America -- Basin -- Photographs  Search this
Indians of North America -- California -- Photographs  Search this
Indians of North America -- Arizona -- Photographs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Photographic prints
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.031
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-001-031

George Hubbard Pepper photograph collection

Creator:
Pepper, George H. (George Hubbard), 1873-1924  Search this
Extent:
1292 negatives (photographic)
23 Photographic prints (black & white)
Culture:
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Purepecha (Tarasco)  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Cochiti Pueblo  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Jemez Pueblo  Search this
K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo)  Search this
Laguna Pueblo  Search this
Nambe Pueblo  Search this
Picuris Pueblo  Search this
Pojoaque Pueblo  Search this
Puye Pueblo  Search this
San Felipe Pueblo  Search this
San Ildefonso Pueblo  Search this
Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan Pueblo)  Search this
Sandia Pueblo  Search this
Santa Ana Pueblo  Search this
Taos Pueblo  Search this
Tesuque Pueblo  Search this
Zia Pueblo  Search this
Hopi [Hano]  Search this
Pikuni (Piegan) [Blackfeet Nation, Browning, Montana]  Search this
San Carlos Apache  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Mexica (Aztec) (archaeological culture)  Search this
Pueblo (Anasazi) (archaeological)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Place:
New Mexico
Texas
New York
Montana
Arizona
Basin
Illinois
Mexico
Southwest
Guatemala
Ecuador
Utah
Plains
Date:
1895-1918
Summary:
George Hubbard Pepper specialized in the study of cultures of the American Southwest and Ecuador. Tribes which he studied are Acoma, Aztec, Blackfeet, Cochiti, Hopi, Isleta, Jemez, Laguna, Nambe, Navajo, Picuris, Pojuaque, Puye, San Carlos Apache, San Felipe, San Ildefonso, San Juan, Sandia, Santa Ana, Santa Clara, Taos, Tarascan, Tesuque, Ute, Zia, and Zuni. Photographs in the collection are of an excavation in Tottenville, New York, 1895; Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Cañon, New Mexico: Hyde Expedition, 1896-1900; and expeditions to the occupied Pueblos of the Southwest, 1904; Mexico, 1904, 1906; Guatemala; and Ecuador, 1907. There are also photos which complement a study Pepper did of the technique of Navajo weaving, and miscellaneous scenic and personal photos.
Arrangement note:
Collection arranged by item number.
Biographical/Historical note:
George Hubbard Pepper was born on February 2, 1873 in Tottenville, Staten Island, New York. As a young boy he exhibited a strong interest in archaeology and after his graduating from high school followed encouragement from Prof. Fredric W. Putnam to study at the Peabody Museum of Harvard University, where Pepper stayed from 1895-96. In 1896 he was appointed assistant curator of the Department of the Southwest in the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. From 1896 to 1900, Pepper was a member of the Hyde Exploring Expedition, which conducted excavations at Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Canyon, New Mexico. In 1904, he conducted an ethnological survey of the occupied pueblos of the Southwest and at the same time continued his study of the weaving techniques of the Navajo. Pepper also participated in excavations in the yacatas of the Tierra Caliente of Michoacan in Mexico sponsored by George Gustav Heye, and in 1907 he went with Marshall Saville on an expedition to the Province of Manabi in Ecuador, also for Heye. In 1909 Pepper was appointed assistant curator in the Department of American Archaeology at the University Museum of Philadelphia, but after only a year there he joined the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation in New York City, where he stayed until his death. In 1914 he excavated a Munsee cemetery of the historic period near Montague, New Jersey and in the following year he went on the exploration of the Nacoochee mound in the old Cherokee region in Georgia. In 1918 he joined the Hawikku explorations of the Hendricks-Hodge Expedition in New Mexico. Pepper died on May 13, 1924, in New York City. George H. Pepper was a co-founder of the American Anthropological Association, a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the American Ethnological Society of New York, a member of the American Folklore Society, and a corresponding member of the Academia Nacional de Historia of Ecuador. A complete bibliography of his works can be found in Indian Notes, v. 1, no. 3, July 1924, pp. 108-110. The George Hubbard Pepper Papers are in the Latin American Library, Tulane University Library, New Orleans, Louisiana.
Provenance:
According to Frederick Dockstader, director of MAI from 1960 to 1975, in a letter dated March 26, 1968, the collection was given to MAI by Pepper. However, the 1965 Annual Report (p. 26) states that the Photographic Department acquired through the donation of Mrs. Jeannette Cameron approximately 500 new negatives pertaining to field work done by her father from 1900-1910; and the 1966 Annual Report (p. 9) states that many papers of Dr. George H. Pepper were acquired through the courtesy of his daughter, Mrs. Jeanette Cameron.
Restrictions:
Access restricted. Researchers should contact the staff of the NMAI Archives for an appointment to access the collection.
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Photographic prints
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.034
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-001-034

Mark Raymond Harrington photograph collection

Creator:
Harrington, M. R. (Mark Raymond), 1882-1971  Search this
Heye, George G. (George Gustav), 1874-1957  Search this
Donor:
Harrington, Marie Walsh  Search this
Harrington, Marie Walsh  Search this
Extent:
2133 negatives (photographic)
3 lantern slides
174 Photographic prints (black & white)
Culture:
Mesoamerica  Search this
Southwest  Search this
Island Caribbean  Search this
Paiute  Search this
Achomawi (Pit River)  Search this
Alibamu  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Cahuilla  Search this
Catawba  Search this
Chitimacha  Search this
Coushatta (Koasati)  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Kiowa  Search this
Lenape (Delaware)  Search this
Maidu  Search this
Menominee (Menomini)  Search this
Miami  Search this
Mohegan  Search this
Nanticoke  Search this
Narragansett  Search this
Niantic  Search this
Niuam (Comanche)  Search this
Osage  Search this
Northern Paiute (Paviotso)  Search this
Pomo  Search this
Potawatomi  Search this
Sac and Fox (Sauk & Fox)  Search this
Seminole  Search this
Tolowa  Search this
Bribri  Search this
Chiricahua Apache  Search this
Eastern Band of Cherokee  Search this
Kickapoo [Oklahoma]  Search this
Kikapu (Mexican Kickapoo)  Search this
Mattaponi  Search this
Mississippi Choctaw  Search this
Oklahoma Delaware  Search this
Oklahoma Shawnee  Search this
Oneida  Search this
Onondaga  Search this
Pamunkey  Search this
Peoria  Search this
Seneca  Search this
Shinnecock  Search this
Sisitonwan Dakota (Sisseton Sioux)  Search this
Wyandot  Search this
Yara Taíno  Search this
Absentee Shawnee [Shawnee, Oklahoma-Pottawatomie County]  Search this
Cayuga [Six Nations/Grand River (Brantford, Ontario)]  Search this
Mississauga (Missisauga)  Search this
Munsee Delaware  Search this
Wyandotte [Oklahoma]  Search this
Gay Head Wampanoag  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Lantern slides
Photographic prints
Negatives
Place:
Cuba
Texas
Arkansas
Louisiana
Northeastern States
Missouri
California
New Mexico
Tennessee
New York
Florida
Southern States
Nevada
Mexico
Great Basin
Southwestern States
Arizona
Canada
Ecuador
Date:
1899-1947
Summary:
Includes photographs of individual tribal members, artifacts; and the following archeological sites: Hawikku (Hawikuh), Zuni Pueblo, New Mexico; Mill Creek, Tehama County, California; Coachilla Valley, California; Sandal Cave, New Mexico; Eagle Canyon, Texas; Thea Heye Cave, Pyramid Lake, Nevada; Crown Peak, Chisos Mountains, Texas; Pueblo Grande, Nevada; Salt Caves, St. Thomas, Nevada; Chuckawalla Cave, Nevada; Lovelock Cave, Pershing County, Nevada; other sites in Nevada; cacti in Brewster County, Texas and California; archaeological sites in Arkansas, Florida, Missouri, New York, and Tennessee Collection also includes a variety of scenic shots in different states; shots of persons, identified and unidentified; personal photographs of Harrington, his son, and one of his wives (ELH); and photographs taken during his expeditions to Cuba and Ecuador. Includes photographs of the Alibamu, Apache, Catawba, Cherokee, Chitimacha, Choctaw, Chumash, Comanche, Delaware, Iowa, Iroquois, Kaw, Kickapoo, Kiowa, Klamath, Koasati, Maidu, Mattaponi, Mohegan, Nanticoke, Narragansett, Navajo, Niantic (Nyantic),Ojibwa (Chippewa), Osage, Paiute, Pamunkey, Peoria, Pit River, Potawatomi, Quapaw, Sac and Fox (Sauk and Fox), Seminole, Shawnee, Tolowa, Tulare, Wampanoag, Wichita, Wyandot, Yara, and Zuni tribes.
Arrangement note:
Collection arranged by format and item number.
Biographical/Historical note:
Mark Raymond Harrington was born on the campus of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor on July 6, 1882. He received his BS in 1907 and his MA in 1908 from Columbia University, where he studied under Franz Boas. He met George Heye while working at Covert's Indian store in New York in 1908 and Heye hired him shortly thereafter. Harrington spent from 1908-1911 visiting and collecting from tribes in the east and Midwest for Heye. From 1911-1915 Harrington was assistant curator at the University of Pennsylvania Museum. From 1916-1917 he conducted archeological surveys in Cuba and Arkansas, after which he spent a short time in the U.S. Army during the First World War. After his return in 1919 he started a series of archeological surveys in Tennessee, Arkansas, Missouri, Oklahoma, Nevada, and Texas. Harrington worked for George G. Heye as an archaeologist, ethnologist, field collector, and curator, primarily along the eastern seaboard, in the south, Midwest, west, Cuba and Ecuador, from 1908 to 1928. He then joined the staff of the Southwest Museum as curator until his retirement in 1964. He died in San Fernando, California on June 30, 1971. Harrington is the author of many books and several hundred articles. A partial bibliography can be found in the Mark Raymond Harrington manuscript collection in the archives of the National Museum of the American Indian, Cultural Resource Center, Suitland, Maryland.
General note:
NMAItest
Restrictions:
Access restricted. For information on this collection consult the NMAI photo archivist at 301-238-1400 or NMAIphotos@si.edu.
Rights:
Copyright restrictions apply. Contact archives staff for information.
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Photographic prints
Lantern slides
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.035
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-001-035

Fred Harvey Company collection of Carl Moon Southwest photographs

Photographer:
Moon, Carl, 1878-1948  Search this
Publisher:
Fred Harvey (Firm)  Search this
Extent:
434 Photographs
Container:
Box 1
Culture:
Havasupai (Coconino)  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Tesuque Pueblo  Search this
San Felipe Pueblo (N.M.)  Search this
White Mountain Apache  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Hopi [Sipaulovi]  Search this
Kewa (Santo Domingo Pueblo)  Search this
K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo)  Search this
Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan Pueblo)  Search this
Laguna Pueblo  Search this
Taos Pueblo  Search this
San Ildefonso Pueblo  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Photographs
Place:
Arizona
New Mexico
Date:
1907-1914
Summary:
This collection contains photographs that were commissioned by Fred Harvey Co. and shot by Carl Moon circa 1907-1914. The photographs depict American Indian communities in the southwest including A:shiwi (Zuni), Acoma Pueblo, Diné (Navajo), Hopi, Laguna Pueblo, and Taos Pueblo among many others.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains 203 glass transparencies, 2 nitrate negatives, and 1 autochrome (plus 228 copy negatives and copy transparencies) that were commissioned by Fred Harvey Co. and shot by Carl moon circa 1905-1914. The photographs depict the southwest American Indian communities of A:shiwi (Zuni), Acoma Pueblo, Dine (Navajo), Havasupai (Coconino), Hopi Pueblo, Isleta Pueblo, K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo), Kewa (Santo Domingo Pueblo), Laguna Pueblo, Nambe Pueblo, Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan Pueblo), San Felipe Pueblo, San Ildefonso Pueblo, Taos Pueblo, Tesuque Pueblo, and White Mountain Apache. Some images were also shot in Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona. The photographs are a mix of portraits, posed action shots, and architecture shots. Some of the photographs appear to have been staged by the photographer. There are a few photographs in this collection that may have been shot by Moon prior to his employment with the Fred Harvey Company.

The copy negatives and transparencies were created by the Museum of the American Indian (NMAI's predecessor museum). There are sometimes multiple copy negatives and copy transparencies per glass plate transparency.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 17 series by culture group or location. Series 1: A:shiwi (Zuni), Series 2: Acoma Pueblo, Series 3: Diné (Navajo), Series 4: Havasupai (Coconino), Series 5: Hopi, Series 6: Isleta Pueblo, Series 7: K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo), Series 8: Kewa (Santa Domingo Pueblo), Series 9: Laguna Pueblo, Series 10: Nambe Pueblo, Series 11: Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan Pueblo), Series 12: San Felipe Pueblo, Series 13: San Ildefonso Pueblo, Series 14: Taos Pueblo, Series 15: Tesuque Pueblo, Series 16: White Mountain Apache, Series 17: Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona

The collection is physically arranged first by collection type (transparencies and negatives) and then in photo numeric order.
Biographical / Historical:
Born in 1878 in Wilmington, Ohio, Carl E. Moon (originally spelled Karl) took up photography after serving with the Ohio National Guard. He moved to Albuquerque, N.M. in 1903 and opened a photograph studio where he began photographing American Indians in the U.S. southwest region. After publishing and exhibiting many of his photographs nationally, he was commissioned by the Fred Harvey Company in 1907 to take photographs of American Indian communities in the southwest. The Fred Harvey Company was founded by Frederick Henry Harvey and consisted of a chain of successful gift shops, restaurants, and hotels know as Harvey Houses. Moon photographed individuals in his El Tovar Studio in the Grand Canyon, Ariz. and also traveled to communities in the region including A:shiwi (Zuni), Diné (Navajo), Hopi, and Laguna Pueblo, among many others. The Fred Harvey Company used these photographs in their postcards, brochures, and publications for the tourist industry. The Fred Harvey Company also partnered with the Sante Fe Railroad to help generate tourism to the southwest region and Moon became the official photographer for the railroad. Moon also took up drawing and painting and studied with American painter Thomas Moran. Moon stayed with the Fred Harvey Company until 1914.

After Moon left the Fred Harvey Company, he opened a studio in Pasadena, California and continued his career as a photographer and painter. During this period, Moon painted and donated 26 works depicting Southwest American Indians to the Smithsonian Institution (now in the Smithsonian American Art Museum's collection). He also sold 24 oil paintings and 293 photographic prints to Henry E. Huntington that are now part of the Huntington Library in San Marino California. With his wife Grace Purdie Moon, he also produced and illustrated children's books of collected Native American stories and legends. Moon died in San Francisco, Calif. in 1948.
Related Materials:
The Huntington Library in San Marino California holds a large collection of Carl Moon works, including oil paintings and photographic prints. The University of Arizona Libraries, Special Collections also holds photographs shot by Carl Moon and the Smithsonian American Art Museum holds 26 Carl Moon paintings.
Separated Materials:
Two nitrate negatives are stored at an offsite storage facility.
Provenance:
Donated to the Museum of the American Indian by the Fred Harvey Company in 1963.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Some images restricted: Cultural Sensitivity.
Topic:
Indians of North America -- Arizona  Search this
Indians of North America -- New Mexico  Search this
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Fred Harvey Company collection of Carl Moon Southwest photographs, Box and Photo Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.090
See more items in:
Fred Harvey Company collection of Carl Moon Southwest photographs
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-090
Online Media:

Snake River Irrigation Project Photograph Album

Source:
Work and Industry, Division of, NMAH, SI  Search this
Mechanical and Civil Engineering, Division of [former name], NMAH, SI.  Search this
Creator:
Waddington's Antique Auction House (Toronto, Ontario, Canada).  Search this
Former owner:
Mechanical and Civil Engineering, Division of [former name], NMAH, SI.  Search this
Work and Industry, Division of, NMAH, SI  Search this
Extent:
0.15 Cubic feet (1 box)
Container:
Box 1
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Place:
Snake River
Arizona
Date:
1912
Scope and Contents note:
A photograph album documenting an irrigation project on the Snake River in Arizona, precise location unknown. The images depict a dam, construction camp, excavation, ferries, cranes, pumping stations, canals and personnel.
Arrangement:
1 series.
Provenance:
Collection purchased at Waddington's.,189 Queen Street East, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Unprotected photographs must be handled with gloves.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Irrigation  Search this
Canals  Search this
Pumping machinery  Search this
Citation:
Snake River Irrigation Project Photograph Album, 1912, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1031
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1031

William C. Orchard collection of photographs, lantern slides and negatives

Creator:
Orchard, William C.  Search this
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Names:
San Carlos Apache Tribe  Search this
Extent:
27 negatives (photographic) (black and white)
324 Photographic prints (black and white)
34 lantern slides (color)
Culture:
White Mountain Apache  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
San Carlos Apache  Search this
White Mountain Apache  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Ute  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Sac and Fox (Sauk & Fox)  Search this
Laguna Pueblo  Search this
Apatohsipipiikani (Northern Piegan)  Search this
Seminole  Search this
Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan Pueblo)  Search this
Kwakwaka'wakw (Kwakiutl)  Search this
Maidu  Search this
Wixarika (Huichol)  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Taos Pueblo  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Photographic prints
Lantern slides
Photographs
Black-and-white negatives
Place:
Colorado
San Juan Pueblo (N.M.)
New Mexico
Arizona
Date:
circa 1899-1937
bulk 1900-1902
Summary:
The majority of the images are individual and group portraits of Southwestern tribes, photographed between 1900-1902, including Laguna Pueblo, Hopi Pueblo, Zuni Pueblo, Taos Pueblo, San Juan Pueblo, White Mountain Apache, Ute, San Carlos Apache, and Navajo Indians.
Scope and Contents:
The Orchard collection consists overwhelmingly of informal single and group portraits made by Orchard in 1900 and 1902 of Diné (Navajo), Hopi Pueblo, Laguna Pueblo, A:shiwi (Zuni), and White Mountain Apache men and women. Among these are photographs of Native children standing before agency schools. In addition, there are informal single and group portraits of Jemez Pueblo, Isleta Pueblo, Ute, Uintah, San Carlos Apache, and Ohkey Owingeh (San Juan Pueblo) men and women; photographs of Walpi, Zuni, Toas, and Acoma villages; and a few landscape views made in the Rio Grande and Little Colorado River canyons. There are a few portraits of Mohawk men and Sac and Fox women. A few photographs date from 1926 and are of Seminole women performing household duties. There are also a few excavations photographs, including those taken of an 1918 excavation along Spuyten Duyvil Creek in New York. Orchard made the later photographs on behalf of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. Some of the negatives are glass plate negatives and others are copy negatives made of the photographs.
Arrangement:
Prints Arranged by print number (P01319, P01678-P01679, P02767-P03191, P03217-P03319, P03217-P03319, P04165, P08369-P08373, P12703-P12706, P28311)

Lantern slides Arranged by image number (L00353-L00354, L00356-L00363, L00367-L00369, L00371-L00376, L00379-L00384, L00386, L00388, L00390-L00392, L00397, L00401-L00402, L00404-L00406, L00408-L00409)

Negatives Arranged by negative number (N03368-N03373, N03762, N11617, N13457-N13460, N13481, N14935, N14939, N14941, N21574, N21600, N35151-N35158, N35162, N37725, N37879)
Biographical/Historical note:
Born in England in the early 1860s, William C. Orchard moved to the United States around 1885. Before working privately for George G. Heye, he briefly held a position at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. After the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation was established in 1916, Orchard became a museum preparator. In this position, he used his considerable artistic gifts to repair and restore specimens and to create models and dioramas for the Museum's exhibits. Orchard also published several books on porcupine-quill and beading techniques. He died in 1948.
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment.
Rights:
Copyright: National Museum of the American Indian
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Lantern slides
Photographs
Black-and-white negatives
Citation:
William C. Orchard collection of photographs, lantern slides and negatives, circa 1899-1937, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or catalog number).
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.020
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-001-020

John K. Hillers photographs of a village near Oraibi, Arizona

Creator:
Hillers, John K., 1843-1925  Search this
Extent:
9 mounted prints (albumen)
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Hopi Indians  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Mounted prints
Photographs
Place:
Oraibi (Ariz.)
Arizona
Date:
circa 1872-1873
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs depicting a village, people, and rock formations in or near the Hopi village of Oraibi. The small albumen prints are the same as those normally used to make stereographs.
Biographical/Historical note:
John K. Hillers (1843-1925) immigrated to the United States from Germany in 1852. He spent almost twenty years photographing American Indians and the landscape of the Indian Territories, California, the Southwest, and the Southeast, largely for the Bureau of American Ethnology and the United States Geological Survey. He began work on the Survey as a boatman on John Wesley Powell's second expedition down the Colorado River in 1871. He soon became the assistant, and then the main photographer (1872) for the expedition. From 1879 to 1900, Hillers served as the first staff photographer of Powell's Bureau of Ethnology, and in 1881 he took pictures for the United States Geological Survey.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 83-18
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Additional photographs by John K. Hillers can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in Photo Lot 14, Photo Lot 24, Photo Lot 28, Photo Lot 40, Photo Lot 143, Photo Lot 87-2N, Photo Lot 90-1, Photo Lot 92-46, and the BAE historical negatives.
The National Anthropological Archives holds Powell's inventory of photographs made on expeditions 1871-1875 (MS 1795-c).
The National Anthropological Archives holds Hillers's diary from 1871-1872 and 1874, 1875 (MS 4410).
The National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian American Art Museum, National Portrait Gallery, National Archives, Duke University, Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology at University of California at Berkeley, University of Oregon, Bancroft Library at the University of California at Berkeley, and Southern Methodist University also hold photographs by Hillers.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo lot 83-18, John K. Hillers photographs of a village near Oraibi, Arizona, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.83-18
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-83-18

Laurence R. Blair and Mary Ellen Blair photographs relating to Nampeyo and Thomas V. Keam

Creator:
Blair, Laurence R. (collector and photographer)  Search this
Photographer:
Hood Museum of Art  Search this
Collector:
Blair, Mary Ellen  Search this
Names:
Keam, Thomas V.  Search this
Nampeyo, ca. 1856-1942  Search this
Stephen, Alexander MacGregor, d. 1894  Search this
Extent:
5 copy prints
5 color prints
4 color slides
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Hopi Indians  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Copy prints
Color prints
Color slides
Photographs
Place:
England
Hopi Indian Reservation (Ariz.)
Arizona
Date:
circa 1915, 1984-1986
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs relating to Nampeyo and her pottery, and Thomas V. Keam's life. Includes photographs made by Laurence Blair in the church graveyard at Truro, England, where Keam was buried; the house in Truro where he died; and a copy of a portrait, possibly the last made of Keam. The collection also includes images of the birthplace of A. M. Stephen in Edinburgh and his grave in Keams Canyon, Arizona. Two photographs show pottery made by Nampeyo, which is now in the Hood Museum of Art at Dartmouth College, and an additional photograph depicts Nampeyo with members of the Polacca family at the Tom Polacca Memorial on the Hopi Indian Reservation. There is also an image of Nampeyo's eldest daughter Annie Lesou Healing with three other women (Rachel Healing Namingha, Priscilla Namingha Shamie, and Lydia Healing).
Biographical/Historical note:
Laurence and Mary Ellen Blair were historical researchers and authors. In 1999, they published a book on Nampeyo, entitled The Legacy of a Master Potter: Nampeyo and Her Descendants. The book detailed the life and work of Iris Nampeyo (ca. 1860-1942), a potter who lived on the Hopi Reservation in Arizona. During the 1870s and 1880s, she sold her work at a local trading post operated by Thomas Keam, an English-born trader who worked with both Hopi and Navajo craftspeople.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 87-35
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Photographs of Nampeyo can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in Photo Lot 24, Photo Lot 59, and the BAE historical negatives.
The Smithsonian American Art Museum, National Museum of the American Indian, and Department of Anthropology hold examples of Nampeyo pottery.
The Smithsonian Institution Archives holds correspondence from Thomas Keam regarding his pottery collection (SIA RU000189).
The Peabody Museum at Harvard University and the Cline Library at Northern Arizona University hold photographs and artifacts donated by Keam.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Copy prints of photographs held by Royal Cornwall Art Institute and Dartmouth College's Hood Museum of Art cannot be copied. Copies may be obtained from these repositories.
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 87-35, Laurence R. Blair and Mary Ellen Blair photographs relating to Nampeyo and Thomas V. Keam, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.87-35
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-87-35

Geoffrey N. O'Grady Papers

Creator:
O'Grady, G. N. (Geoffrey N.)  Search this
Extent:
Plus 3 oversize boxes, 4 record storage boxes, and 3 map folders
11.8 Linear feet (24 document boxes and 3 card file boxes)
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Aranda (Australian people)  Search this
Australian Aborigines  Search this
Hopi Indians  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Field notes
Photographs
Sound recordings
Correspondence
Place:
Arizona
Australia
Vancouver (British Columbia)
Date:
1949-2007
bulk 1957-1998
Scope and Contents:
This collection is comprised of the professional papers of linguistic anthropologist Geoffrey O'Grady. Included are research materials consisting of field notes and notebooks, correspondence, published and unpublished writings, annotated copies of other scholars' work, photographs, and sound recordings.

The materials in this collection document O'Grady's career as a linguistic scholar from his days as a jackaroo in the Australian outback to his time at the University of Victoria. The majority of the collection is made up of field research, which contains detailed vocabularies and linguistic analysis for aboriginal peoples of Australia and First Nation communities of Canada. O'Grady's sound recordings represent his work with the Arizona Tewa language among the Hopi as well as various Australian aboriginal languages; they supplement the Field Research series.
Arrangement:
The O'Grady collection is arranged into 7 series: (1) Field Research; (2) Writings; (3) Professional Activities; (4) Correspondence; (5) Writings by Others; (6) Photographs; (7) Sound recordings.
Biographical/Historical note:
Anthropological linguist Geoffrey N. O'Grady was born on January 1, 1928 in southern Australia. He first became interested in languages in high school when he took classes in Latin, German, Russian, and Hungarian. O'Grady became immersed in Australian aboriginal languages during his six years as a jackaroo on a sheep station at Wallal Downs in the Australian Outback. There he spent time with aboriginal peoples and was adopted into the Nyangumarta tribe where he learned to speak their language.

O'Grady was offered a research assistantship at the University of Sydney in 1956. This allowed him to take field research trips into the Outback where he recorded various indigenous languages. During this time he undertook a project to alphabetize the Nyangumarta language. As a result, a literacy program and a Nyangumarta newspaper, which is still published, were established.

In 1960, after completing his BA at the University of Sydney, O'Grady received a Fulbright Scholarship to attend Indiana University. During three summers at Indiana, he travelled to Arizona to conduct field research in Hopi Tewa. After he completed his PhD he accepted a position at the University of Alberta, Edmonton in 1963. While at the University of Alberta he began to study northern Canadian First Nations languages. In 1965 he moved on to the Linguistics Department at the University of Victoria, where he began to study indigenous languages on Vancouver Island and taught courses on phonetics and historical sound change. When O'Grady retired from the University of Victoria in 1993, the Australian National University honored him with a Festschrift entitled "Boundary Rider."

Geoffrey O' Grady passed away on December 28, 2008 after a long struggle with Parkinson's.

Sources Consulted

2009. Geoffrey O'Grady Obituary. Victoria Times Colonist. January 3. http://web.uvic.ca/ling/information/index.htm, accessed April 4, 2012.

John Esling. 2009. In Memoriam: Dr. Geoffrey N. O'Grady. http://ring.uvic.ca/people/memoriam-dr-geoffrey-n-o%E2%80%99grady, accessed April 4, 2012.

1928 -- Born January 1

1956 -- Accepted research assistantship at the University of Sydney and began undergraduate studies

1957 -- Married wife Alix

1959 -- Received BA from the University of Sydney

1960 -- Fulbright scholarship at Indiana University where he finished his PhD

1960-1963 -- Summer field studies of Hopi Tewa in Arizona

1963 -- Completed dissertation on grammar of Nyangumarta under the supervision of C.F. and F.M. Voegelin

1963 -- Began work at University of Alberta, Edmonton

1965 -- Joined the Linguistics Department at University of Victoria in BC Canada

1966 -- Project to outline the relationships among all of the Aboriginal languages of Australia

1993 -- Retired from University of Victoria

2008 -- Died December 28
Related Materials:
For more of O'Grady's language material from Western Australia and sound recordings from his fieldwork among the aborigines in the 1950s and 1960s, consult the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS) located in Lawson Cres, Canberra ACT, Australia.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by O'Grady's wife Alix O'Grady.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Linguistics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Photographs
Sound recordings
Correspondence
Citation:
Geoffrey N. O'Grady Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2010-30
See more items in:
Geoffrey N. O'Grady Papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2010-30
Online Media:

Grace F. Thorpe Collection

Creator:
Thorpe, Grace F.  Search this
Names:
National Congress of American Indians  Search this
United States Indian School (Carlisle, Pa.)  Search this
Abourezk, James G., 1931-  Search this
Seely, Dagmar  Search this
Thorpe, Charlotte  Search this
Thorpe, Jim, 1887-1953  Search this
Extent:
3.5 Linear feet
2,175 Photographic prints
166 negatives (photographic)
27 nitrate negatives
113 slides (photographs)
5 contact sheets
Culture:
Sac and Fox (Sauk & Fox)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Negatives (photographic)
Nitrate negatives
Slides (photographs)
Contact sheets
Place:
Oklahoma
Arizona
Japan -- 1940-1950
Pearl River (N.Y.)
Jim Thorpe (Pa.)
Date:
1900-2008
Scope and Contents:
The Grace F. Thorpe Collection (1900-2008) includes documents, photographic prints, slides, negatives and other materials that encapsulate the breadth of Grace Thorpe's life and work as a WWII veteran, Native rights activist, and dedicated daughter, mother and family member. This includes material from her personal, military and professional life. Series 1: Early Life and Family History (1921-1940) includes materials related to the Thorpe family including photographs of Grace's parents, Jim and Iva at the Carlisle Indian School as well as letters and photographs from Grace as a young girl. Series 2: Military Career and Life in Japan (1943-1950) includes documents, photographic prints and negatives from Grace's time as a Corporal in the Women's Army Corps and her life as a wife and mother in Japan following the war. This series also includes the medals Grace received for her service in WWII. Series 3: Pearl River, New York and Business (1950-1967) contains documents and photographs from Grace's time as a mother and business woman in Pearl River, New York. Series 4: Working on Behalf of Native Americans and Activism (1968-1977) includes documents, photographic prints and negatives from Grace's work with various Native American organizations on economic and civil rights issues following her move to Arizona in 1967. Series 5: Jim Thorpe and His Legacy (1912-1984) includes documents, photographic prints and negatives regarding Jim Thorpe and the work by the Thorpe family to restore Jim's Olympic record and keep his legacy alive. Series 6: Later Years (1979-2007) includes documents, photographic prints and negatives from Grace's life in Oklahoma, her work as an environmental activist, and other activities later in her life.
Arrangement:
This collection has been arranged in six series chronologically based on how the collection was received with minor changes. The Series' include--Series 1: Early Life and Family History (1921-1940), Series 2: Military Career and Life in Japan (1943-1950), Series 3: Pearl River, New York and Business (1950-1967), Series 4: Working on Behalf of Native Americans and Activism (1968-1977), Series 5: Jim Thorpe and His Legacy (1912-1984), and Series 6: Later Years (1979-2007). There is some chronological crossover between Series 5: Jim Thorpe and His Legacy and the rest of the collection.

The physical arrangement of the materials was determined by storage needs.
Biographical / Historical:
Grace Frances Thorpe was born in Yale, Oklahoma on December 10, 1921 to parents James (Jim) Francis Thorpe (Sac and Fox (Sauk)) and Iva Margaret Miller Thorpe. Jim, already a famed athelete and olympic medalist, had met Iva as students at Carlisle Indian School and were married in 1913. Grace was the youngest of four, Gail Margaret, James and Charlotte Marie though her brother James died from polio at a young age. When Iva and Jim divorced in 1923, Iva and the girls moved to Chicago while Jim moved to California to pursue work in the movies. For school, Grace attended St. Mary's Academy, Sacred Heart, in Oklahoma and Haskell Institute in Kansas, which was where her father had attended school.

In 1943 Grace worked briefly at the Ford Motor Company before enlisting in the Women's Army Corps (WAC) during WWII. After attending training and graduating from the WAAC Training Center in Ft. Oglethorpe, Georgia, Thorpe attained the rank of Corporal, and served as a Recruiter for the Women's Army Corps stationed in Tucson and Camp White in Oregon before being assigned overseas to the New Guinea Campaign. From 1944-1945 Corporal Thorpe was stationed in New Guinea, Philippines and Japan. Following an Honorable Discharge in 1945, Grace remained in Japan during the occupation with her husband Lieutenant Fred W. Seely (1918-2008) whom she married in June 1946. She became employed at General MacArthur Headquarters as Chief of the Recruitment Section, Department of Army Civilians, Tokyo, Japan. Both of her children, Dagmar (1946-) and Paul Thorpe (1948-1964) were born during this time in Japan.

Grace and her children left Japan and arrived in San Francisco on April 20, 1950. They lived in Pearl River, New York from late 1950 to the mid 1960s. She first became employed as a Hostess with Welcome Wagon upon completing training in July of 1951 and later became a supervisor, business machine salesperson, and territorial account executive for the Yellow Pages with the Reuben H. Donnelly Corp. earning recognition in Distinguished Sales Performance. She completed a course in effective speaking and human relations conducted by the Dale Carnegie Institute and won a Best Speech Award. In 1967, Grace moved to Arizona where she became involved with American Indian tribes. Grace was appointed Economic Development Conference Coordinator for the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI)'s 1968 and 1969 conferences. In 1969-1970, Grace joined Native American Activists at the occupation of Alcatraz Island for three months and managed their publicity. She then served as a Congressional Intern from 1974-1975 for Senator James Abourezk. Grace was later appointed Legislative Assistant with the Senate Select Committee on Indian Affairs and as a Task Force Program and Planning Analyst for the American Indian Policy Review Commission. During this time period she attended—The Antioch School of Law, Washington DC; Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Research Fellow), Boston, Massachusetts; University of Tennessee, Knoxville and Northeastern University, Tahlequah, Oklahoma. During this time she also began working on the restoration of her father's 1912 Olympic titles as well as other projects to recognize and honor her father.

After returning to her tribal homeland in Oklahoma she became active in tribal affairs and in 1983 successfully restored her father's Olympic record. She also conducted genealogical research on the Thorpe family. Her article "The Jim Thorpe Family' was published as a two-part series in the Chronicles of Oklahoma in 1981. In later years, Grace served her tribe as a tribal judge, health commissioner, and became an environmental activist opposing nuclear waste on tribal lands. She remained active in Native American issues, a matriarch of the Thorpe family, and involved with her granddaughter, Tena Malotte, and her great-grandchildren, Aspen and Huna.

Biographical note provided by Dagmar Seely, daughter to Grace Thorpe, with additions by Rachel Menyuk, Processing Archivist.
Separated Materials:
27 nitrate negatives have been moved offsite and are being housed at the National Anthropological Archives.
Provenance:
Donated by Dr. Dagmar Seely and Tena Malotte, 2015.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited users to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not changed, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian.
Topic:
Yellow pages  Search this
United States. Army. Women's Army Corps  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- New Guinea.  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Japan.  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Philippines.  Search this
Alcatraz Island (Calif.) -- History -- Indian occupation, 1969-1971.  Search this
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Grace F. Thorpe Collection, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.085
See more items in:
Grace F. Thorpe Collection
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-085
Online Media:

Ralph Aspaas collection

Creator:
Aspaas, Hans  Search this
Aspaas, Ralph  Search this
Names:
Aspaas, Allie Ward  Search this
Aspaas, Carl Henry  Search this
Aspaas, Ellanette  Search this
Aspaas, Max Herndon  Search this
Aspaas, Ralph  Search this
Aspaas, Ralph Ward  Search this
Wirt, Emmet  Search this
Wirt, Emmet  Search this
Extent:
26 Photographic prints
181 negatives (photographic)
Culture:
Jicarilla Apache  Search this
Tohono O'odham (Papago)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Negatives (photographic)
Correspondence
Marriage certificates
Place:
Tohono O'odham Reservation (Ariz.)
Jicarilla Indian Reservation (N.M.)
Arizona
Dulce (N.M.)
New Mexico
Date:
1900-1915
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains 207 photographs documenting U.S. Allotting Agent Ralph Aspaas (1876-1939), his work, his family, and his travels around the United States southwest circa 1900-1915. The bulk of the materials in this collection depict scenes from the Jicarilla Apache Reservation in New Mexico and the Tohono O'odham (Papago) in Arizona. The photographs may have been shot by Aspaas or his brother Hans Aspaas (1873-1968).
Arrangement:
This collection is organized into three series: Jicarilla Apache Reservation, Tohono O'odham (Papago) Reservation, and Colorado, Utah, and unidentified locations.
Biographical / Historical:
Ralph Aspaas served as an Allotting Agent for the United States Indian Service (now the Bureau of Indian Affairs). He was first assigned to the Jicarilla Apache reservation from circa 1900 to 1910 and then to the Tohono O'odham reservation from circa 1912 to 1915. As an Agent, he allotted land within these reservations to individual tribal members and for tribal community use. Born in 1876, Aspaas married schoolteacher Allie Maud Ward (1881-1959) on July 15, 1905. Together they had six children- Ralph Ward Aspaas (1906-1972), Carl Henry Aspaas (1908-1975), Max Herndon Aspaas (1911-1971), Ellanette Aspaas (b. 1913), Helen Marie Aspaas (1920-2012), and Ruth Louise Aspaas (1922- 1966). By 1920 Ralph was working as a farmer and rancher in Breen, La Plata County, Colorado. He died on September 30, 1939 in Colorado.
Separated Materials:
The nitrate negatives are stored at the National Anthropological Archives.
Provenance:
Gift of Helen R. Aspaas, 2006.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Thursday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Indians of North America -- Southwest -- Photographs  Search this
Indians of North America -- Arizona -- Photographs  Search this
Indians of North America -- New Mexico -- Photographs  Search this
Indians of North America -- Social life and customs  Search this
Indian land transfers -- New Mexico  Search this
Indian land transfers -- Arizona  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence -- 1910-1920
Marriage certificates
Photographic prints
Negatives (photographic)
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Ralph Aspaas collection, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.086
See more items in:
Ralph Aspaas collection
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-086
Online Media:

Toba Tucker photographs

Creator:
Tucker, Toba  Search this
Extent:
23 Photographic prints (Cibachrome)
Culture:
K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo)  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Cibachrome (tm)
Photographs
Place:
New Mexico
Arizona
Date:
1981, 1995-1997
Summary:
This collection contains 23 prints that were shot by photographer Toba Tucker of Diné (Navajo) portraits and landscapes from 1981 and Pueblo portraits from 1995-1997.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains 23 prints by photographer, Toba Tucker. Of these prints, 21 were taken during the summer of 1981 in the Joint Use Area (Jeddito Island, White Cone, and Teesto) on the Navajo Reservation. These photographs were made with a 6x6-cm (2 ¼-sq.) SLR, 120-mm lens, and Koda-color II color-print film, and were taken in the local Chapter Houses using only natural lighting. Tucker primarily works in black-and-white but chose to process and print these photographs in color resulting in her first experiences with colored work.

Of these prints, two portraits were taken from 1995 to 1997 during a two-and-a-half-year project funded by the Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation which allowed Tucker to photograph traditional and contemporary Pueblo artists in New Mexico and Arizona. During this project Tucker explored the relationships between traditional, centuries-old techniques and the emerging vision of contemporary artists. This project led to the 1998 publication of Pueblo Artists: Portraits by the Museum of the New Mexico Press.
Arrangement note:
Prints: organized in boxes; arranged by print number.
Biographical/Historical note:
Toba Pato Tucker is a self-taught American professional photographer from New York City. Tucker started working in photography in the 1970s through teachings from photographers, Harold Feinstein and Toby Old. With their assistance she became proficient in developing negatives and printing in black and white prints. In 1980, she received a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) which allowed her to live on the Navajo reservation and work with the Navajo-Hopi Land Dispute Commission of the Navajo Nation. This began her quest of photographing Native Americans. In addition to the grant from the NEA, she has been awarded many other grants, is published in several magazines and publications, has works in various museum collections, and has taught at New York's International Center of Photography. Tucker currently resides in Santa Fe, New Mexico.
Provenance:
P28392-P28393- Gift of Robert Menschel, 2000; P28414- Gift of Dr. Roland Force, 1986; P28394-P28414- Gift of Toba Tucker, 1983.
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment.
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Cibachrome (TM)
Photographs
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Toba Tucker Photographs, Collection NMAI.AC.030; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.030
See more items in:
Toba Tucker photographs
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-030
Online Media:

Timothy H. O'Sullivan and William Bell photographs from the U.S. Geographical Surveys West of the 100th Meridian

Photographer:
O'Sullivan, Timothy H., 1840-1882  Search this
Bell, William, 1830-1910  Search this
Creator:
Geographical Surveys West of the 100th Meridian (U.S.)  Search this
Extent:
54 albumen prints
7 copy negatives
Culture:
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Cochiti Pueblo  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Jicarilla Apache  Search this
Laguna Pueblo  Search this
Mojave (Mohave)  Search this
San Felipe Pueblo  Search this
Taos Pueblo  Search this
Ute  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Albumen prints
Copy negatives
Place:
Chelly, Canyon de (Ariz.)
Arizona
Colorado
New Mexico
Idaho
Date:
1871-1874
Summary:
This collection contains photographs documenting American Indian communities and landscape scenes in the Southwest photographed by Timothy O'Sullivan and William Bell for U.S. geographical surveys circa 1971-1974.
Scope and Contents:
P01730, P01731, P01733, P01735, P01743-P01792 (copy negatives: N34849-N34851, N34853- N34855, N35051)

This collection contains 54 photographs (plus 7 copy negatives) that were shot by photographer Timothy O'Sullivan 1871, 1873, and 1874 and William Bell in 1872 for the U.S. Geographical Surveys West of the 100th Meridian, under Lieutenant George M. Wheeler, War Department, Corps of Engineers, U.S.A. The survey was commonly referred to as the "Wheeler Surveys."

The photographs depict American Indian Pueblos in the Southwest including Apache; A:shiwi (Zuni); Diné (Navajo); Hopi; Jicarilla Apache; Laguna Pueblo; Mohave; San Felipe Pueblo; Taos Pueblo; and Ute, among other communities. In addition, the collection contains landscape and scenic shot in the same region.

The bulk of the photos in this collection are one half of a stereoscope photograph that was never pasted onto a stereoscope card. The copy negatives in this collection were created by the Museum of the American Indian in the late 1960s.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged by year and subject matter.
Biographical / Historical:
The geographical surveys west of the 100th meridian were operated under the United States Army Corps of Engineers and supervised by First Lieutenant (later Captain) George Montague Wheeler from 1869 through 1879. They were intended to document the geography in order to make accurate maps, record locations of American Indian tribes in the region, select possible sites for military installations and rail or common roads, and note resources in the area. In total, the surveys analyzed the region now covered by Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, California, Nevada, Utah, Colorado, Wyoming, Idaho, and Oregon, and the expeditions produced 164 maps, 41 publications, and a series of stereoviews. Timothy H. O'Sullivan began photographing geographical surveys in 1867-1869 when he was the official photographer for Clarence King's United States Geological Exploration of the 40th Parallel. He served as the official photographer for the Wheeler surveys in 1871, 1873, and 1874, with William Bell taking over in 1872. O'Sullivan later became the United States Geological Survey's first photographer in Washington, D.C.

[History note from the National Anthropological Archives collection record NAA.PhotoLot.167 with edits made by NMAI]
Provenance:
It is unclear when most of these photographs were obtained by the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Collection of Timothy H. O'Sullivan photographs, image #, NMAI.AC.229, National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.229
See more items in:
Timothy H. O'Sullivan and William Bell photographs from the U.S. Geographical Surveys West of the 100th Meridian
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-229
Online Media:

Susan Makov and Patrick Eddington photographs of Southwest artists

Photographer:
Makov, Susan  Search this
Eddington, Patrick  Search this
Extent:
10 gelatin silver prints
Culture:
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Cochiti Pueblo  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gelatin silver prints
Photographs
Place:
Arizona
New Mexico
Date:
1992-1994
Summary:
This collection contains 10 gelatin silver prints depicting A:shiwi (Zuni), Cochiti Pueblo , Diné (Navajo), and Hopi Pueblo artists that were photographed from 1992 to 1994 by Susan Makov and Patrick Eddington for the publication, The Trading Post Guidebook: Where to Find the Trading Posts, Galleries, Auctions, Artists, and Museums of the Four Corners Region.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains 10 gelatin silver prints depicting American Indian artists in the U.S. Southwest circa 1992-1994. The photographs were shot by Susan Makov and Patrick Eddington for the publication The Trading Post Guidebook: Where to Find the Trading Posts, Galleries, Auctions, Artists, and Museums of the Four Corners Region written by Makov and Eddington and published in 1995.

The photographs depict portraits of artists Janice Day (Hopi Pueblo); Edna Leki [A:shiwi (Zuni)]; Seferina Ortiz (Cochiti Pueblo); Ida Sahmie [Diné (Navajo)]; Hannah Smith [Diné (Navajo)]; Lowell Talashoma (Hopi Pueblo); Nancy Thomas [Diné (Navajo)]; Andrew Tsihnahjinnie [Diné (Navajo)]; and Brenda Spencer [Diné (Navajo)].
Arrangement:
Arranged by catalog number in oversize boxes.
Biographical / Historical:
Susan Makov (BFA, Syracuse University, MFA, SUNY at Buffalo) is Professor of Art at Weber State University, where she teaches printmaking and studio art.

Patrick Eddington was born in Pennsylvania and received his Bachelors of Fine Arts and Masters of Education at the University of Utah. He was an artist, teacher, and an art collector. He died in March 2016.
Provenance:
Gift of Susan Makov and Patrick Eddington, 1997.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Susan Makov and Patrick Eddington photographs of Southwest artists, image #, NMAI.AC.335; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.335
See more items in:
Susan Makov and Patrick Eddington photographs of Southwest artists
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-335
Online Media:

Emry Kopta collection

Creator:
Kopta, Emry  Search this
Extent:
413 Photographic prints (black and white)
103 negatives (photographic) (black and white)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Negatives (photographic)
Photographs
Black-and-white negatives
Place:
Arizona
Date:
1907-1924
Summary:
The Emry collection contains images of Hopi ceremonies, including the Soyaluna Ceremony, the Niman Ceremony, Katsina dances, the Snake Dance, the Butterfly Dance and the Buffalo Dance.
Arrangement note:
Negatives: organized in envelopes; arranged by image number

Prints: organized in folders; arranged by image number
Biographical/Historical note:
Artist Emry Kopta lived and worked for more than twelve years at First Mesa with a Hopi family that adopted him. While living as part of the community, he made more than two hundred photographs of the Hopi, ranging from scenes of everyday life to religious ceremonies.
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment.
Rights:
Restricted: Cultural Sensitivity
Topic:
Hopi Indians -- Rites and ceremonies  Search this
Snake dance  Search this
Hopi Indians  Search this
Hopi dance  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Photographic prints
Black-and-white negatives
Citation:
Emry Kopta collection, 1907-1924, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or catalog number).
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.036
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-036

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