Skip to main content Smithsonian Institution

Search Results

Collections Search Center
182797 documents - page 1 of 500Result pages are truncated to 500.

MS 7563 Stabilization of Kin Klizhin, Chaco Canyon National Monument, Fiscal Year 1938

Creator:
Vivian, Gordon  Search this
Extent:
13 Pages
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Pages
Date:
undated
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 7563
Local Note:
Carbon of typescript, bound, with photographs
Topic:
Kin Klizhin -- New Mexico -- Chaco Canyon -- stabilization  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 7563, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS7563
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms7563

MS 7523 The Lumbee petition for federal acknowledgement

Creator:
Lumbee River Legal Services  Search this
Pierce, Julian T.  Search this
Hunt-Locklear, Cynthia  Search this
Consultant:
Campisi, Jack  Search this
Taukchiray, Wes  Search this
Extent:
3 Volumes
260 Items (pages and 6 charts, 1 map, and 2 pages errata + 166 pages + 6 pages )
Culture:
Lumbee Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Volumes
Date:
1987
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 7523
Rights:
Under copyright
Topic:
Federal-Indian relations -- Lumbee recognition  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 7523, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS7523
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms7523

MS 7306 Miscellaneous material relating to the Southeast and to southeastern Indians, 1540-1711

Creator:
Higginbotham, Jay  Search this
Extent:
3 Inches
Culture:
American Indian -- Southeast  Search this
American Indian -- Southeast Indians  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Includes letters, copies of maps, copies of documents, notes, and printed material. Much of the material relates to the coasts of Alabama and Florida, particularly to Mobile. Some relates to the entire Southeast.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 7306
Topic:
Mobile -- Alabama -- 16th-18th centuries  Search this
Southeastern United States  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 7306, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS7306
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms7306

MS 7466 A map of that part of Georgia occupied by the Cherokee Indians

Creator:
Bethune, John  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (One sheet ca. 25 3/8 x 20 1/2 in. at neat line)
Culture:
Cherokee -- land -- Georgia  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Maps
Date:
1831
Scope and Contents:
Includes the northwestern corner of Georgia west and north of the Chattahoochie River. The scale is approximately 1 inch to 4 3/4 miles.
Biographical / Historical:
The complete title of the maps indicates that Bethune carried out a survey in 1831 in pursuance of an act of the George general assembly.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 7466
Local Note:
Printed document, hand colored
Topic:
Georgia -- Maps  Search this
Genre/Form:
Maps
Citation:
Manuscript 7466, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS7466
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms7466

MS 4853 Small Sites of the Chaco [Canyon, New Mexico]

Creator:
Amsden, Monroe  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Chaco Canyon (N.M.) -- Archeology
Date:
1925 or later
Scope and Contents:
Includes autograph document 41 pages; typescript document 28 pages; Ink sketches, 5 pages; Drawings of ground plans and sections on tracing cloth, 7 sheets 12" x 22" and under; Pottery type distribution charts on tracing cloth, 6 sheets 23" x 18" and under; Oversize drawings and charts (filed in Map Case): "Turkey House, a small ruin 9 miles from Pueblo Bonito,"; "Slab house cluster near proto-kiva. September, 1926."; "Ruin 13"; "Ruin 3"; "A small pueblo 9 miles east of Pueblo Bonito"; "Mesa Verde House, 9 1/2 miles east of Pueblo Bonito. September, 1926"; "Proto-kiva. September, 1926.";Pottery distribution charts: "Hachure C. B, A"; "Solid and Chaco San Juan"; "Polished Black Interior, Indian Red, and Transitional Red"; "Corrugated Ware and Banded-Neck Ware";
"Degenerate Ware and Transitional Ware"; "Undecorated Culinary Vessels and Painted Wares."
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 4853
Citation:
Manuscript 4853, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS4853
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms4853

MS 2205 Copies of Alexander von Humboldt collection of Mexican pictographic manuscripts

Collector:
Humboldt, Alexander von, 1769-1859  Search this
Illustrator:
Steinen, Karl von den, 1855-1929  Search this
Names:
Seler, Eduard, 1849-1922  Search this
Extent:
18 Prints
Culture:
Indians of Mexico  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Illustrations
Place:
Mexico
Date:
undated
Biographical / Historical:
Alexander von Humboldt was a Prussian naturalist and geographer who traveled extensively in Central and South America among other locations. The records and studies he made during his travels helped establish physical geography and geophysics as disciplines. His writings such as "Voyage de Humboldt et Bonpland" and "Kosmos" also contributed to make him one of the foremost scholars of the 19th century.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2205
General:
Information on manuscripts taken from Eduard Seler, "Mexican picture writing of Alexander von Humboldt", Bulletin of the Bureau of American Ethnology Number 28, 1904, and John B. Glass, "A Census of Native Middle American Pictorial Manuscripts," Handbook of Middle American Indians, 1975.
Other Archival Materials:
Tracings of Humboldt's original collection in British Museum, Great Russell Street, WC1B 3DG, United Kingdom, Humboldt Fragment 1.
Restrictions:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Picture-writing  Search this
hieroglyphics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Illustrations
Citation:
Manuscript 2205, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2205
See more items in:
MS 2205 Copies of Alexander von Humboldt collection of Mexican pictographic manuscripts
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2205
Online Media:

MS 7362 Invitation sent to Pierre Louis Jouy from Japanese Consul General, Maeda Kenkichi, November 1, 1884, announcing Emperor Meiji's birthday celebration

Creator:
Maeda, Kenkichi, 1835-1894  Search this
Collector:
Jouy, Pierre Louis  Search this
Extent:
1 Page
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
1884
Biographical / Historical:
In 1883, Pierre Louis Jouy, an associate of the United States National Museum, accompanied the Honorable Lucius H. Fotte, the first Minister to the United States Legation in Seoul, to Korea to implement formal diplomatic relations between the United States and Korea. Jouy subsequently joined the Korean civil service.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 7362
Local Note:
Manuscript document on mulberry bark paper
Citation:
Manuscript 7362, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS7362
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms7362

Marvin Harris papers

Creator:
Harris, Marvin, 1927-2001  Search this
Names:
Columbia University  Search this
University of Florida. Department of Anthropology  Search this
Extent:
42.27 Linear feet (85.5 document boxes, 1 oversize box, 4 record storage boxes, 90 computer disks, 19 cassette tapes, 1 7" sound reel, 3 vinyl records, and 1 map folder)
Note:
Boxes 88-91 (formerly designated off-site boxes 1-4) are stored off-site. Advanced notice must be given to view these materials.
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
New York (N.Y.)
Mozambique
Rio de Contas (Brazil)
Arembepe (Brazil)
Chimborazo (Ecuador)
Date:
1945-2001
Summary:
This collection contains the professional papers of anthropologist Marvin Harris. Harris was a prominent anthropologist, best known for developing the controversial paradigm of cultural materialism. He authored several important books in the field of anthropology and taught at Columbia University and The University of Florida. The papers include correspondence, research materials, his publications, unpublished manuscripts, conference papers, lectures, subject files, teaching files, computer files, and photographs.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains the professional papers of anthropologist Marvin Harris. The papers include correspondence, research materials, his publications, unpublished manuscripts, conference papers, lectures, subject files, teaching files, computer files, and photographs.

His research files document his ethnographic field work in Rio de Contas, Brazil, both for his dissertation and his racial categorization project; his research on forced labor in Mozambique; his videotape study in New York City households; and his India sacred cattle research. The collection also contains his research on food preferences and aversions, his files as a research consultant for the McKinsey Global Institute, and photos from his field work in Chimborazo, Ecuador and Arembepe, Brazil.

Over the course of his career, Harris also participated in several conferences and invited lectures. The collection contains some of the papers he presented as well as audio recordings of his lecture "Levi-Strauss and the Clam: An Open and Shut Case" and a recording of a radio interview. Also present in the collection are materials relating to conference sessions and symposiums that he organized, including the 1967 AAA session on Anthropology and War and his 1983 Wenner-Gren symposium on Food Preferences and Aversions.

Additional materials that may be of interest are materials documenting Harris' activism in the 1960s at Columbia University, which include his anti-Vietnam War activities, as well as his involvement in the student protests of 1968 at Columbia University. The collection also contains Harris' CIA, FBI, and Department of State records that he obtained through Freedom of Information Act requests, photographs from Harris' service in the army in the 1940s, and photos taken in Brazil by Pierre Verger.

Harris corresponded with several prominent anthropologists, many of whom were Latin American specialists. Some of his noteworthy correspondents include Napoleon Chagnon, Derek Freeman, Morton Fried, Conrad Kottak, Sidney Mintz, Anthony Leeds, Claude Levi-Strauss, Darcy Ribeiro, Anisio Teixeira, Charles Wagley, and Karl Wittfogel. Also of special interest is his correspondence with leading figures in the Mozambique and Portuguese liberation movements, including Antonio Figuereido, Eduardo Mondlane, and General Humberto Delgado.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in 10 series: (1) Correspondence, 1952-2001; (2) Research, 1949-1997; (3) Writings, 1955-2001; (4) Professional Activities, 1960-1999; (5) Name Subject Files, 1951-2001; (6) University, 1947-1999; (7) Biographical Files, 1954-1999; (8) Writings by Other People, 1961-2000; (9) Photographs, 1945-1996; (10) Computer Files, 1980-2000
Biographical Note:
Marvin Harris was a prominent anthropologist, best known for developing the controversial paradigm of cultural materialism. He authored several important books in the field of anthropology, most notably The Rise of Anthropological Theory (1968) and Cultural Materialism (1979) as well as books that reached a wider audience, such as Cows, Pigs, Wars and Witches (1974) and Cannibals and Kings (1977).

Harris was born in Brooklyn, New York on August 18, 1927. After serving in the U.S. Army Transportation Corps (1945-47), he received his B.A. (1948) and Ph.D. (1953) from Columbia University. His first anthropology course was taught by Charles Wagley, who was influential in Harris' decision to become an anthropologist. Harris joined the faculty at Columbia University after earning his doctorate and served as chair of the Department of Anthropology from 1963 to 1966. In 1980, he left Columbia for a position as Graduate Research Professor at University of Florida, where he stayed until his retirement in 2000.

It was in The Rise of Anthropological Theory that Harris coined the phrase "cultural materialism," a subject he further elaborated on in Cultural Materialism. Cultural materialism, Harris explains, is a scientific research strategy "based on the simple premise that human social life is a response to the practical problems of earthly existence" (1979, xv). Harris applied the paradigm to explain various cultural patterns, such as food preferences and taboos, changes in U.S. family structure, and the collapse of Soviet and East European state socialism. One of his most controversial theories was that the Hindu prohibition of slaughtering and consuming cows in India arose because it was more economically beneficial to use cattle as draft animals than as meat. He challenged Napoleon Chagnon's views that Yanomami men were inherently more aggressive and violent by explaining that it was the pursuit of animal protein that was the cause of Yanomami warfare. Harris similarly argued that protein deficiency was the reason why the Aztecs practiced cannibalism.

Harris presented his theories beyond academic circles to a general audience by contributing a monthly column to Natural History Magazine. He also authored several popular books. In addition to Cows, Pigs, Wars and Witches and Cannibals and Kings, Harris also wrote America Now (1981), Good to Eat (1985), and Our Kind (1989). Harris also authored and edited several editions of two college-level introductory textbooks: Culture, People, Nature (first published as Culture, Man, and Nature in 1971) and Cultural Anthropology (first published in 1983, later editions coauthored with Orna Johnson). According to Harris, the 1975 edition of Culture, People, Nature "was the first anthropology textbook to be written cover to cover in a gender-neutral mode of discourse" (12/3/93 letter from Harris to Deborah S. Rubin, "Furlow - [The Teaching of Anthropology]", Series 3. Writings, Marvin Harris Papers).

Although Harris is primarily known for his work as a theoretician, he also conducted ethnographic fieldwork throughout his career. Harris traveled to Rio de Contas, Brazil in 1950-51 to conduct research for his dissertation, "Minas Velhas: A Study of Urbanism in the Mountains of Eastern Brazil." This research was also the subject of his book Town and Country in Brazil (1958) and his chapter, "Race Relations in Minas Velhas, a Community in the Mountain Region of Central Brazil" in Race and Class in Rural Brazil (Charles Wagley, 1952). He continued his research in Brazil in 1953-54 while serving as a research advisor for the Ministry of Education in Rio de Janeiro. As field leader of the Columbia-Cornell-Harvard-Illinois Summer Field Studies Program, Harris returned to Brazil in 1962 to study fishing villages in Arembepe. Prior to that, he also served as field leader for the program in Chimborazo, Ecuador in 1960.

In 1956-57, Harris conducted field research in Mozambique, at the time under Portuguese rule. He initially intended to study the influence of Portuguese rule on race relations, comparing the race relations in Brazil and Mozambique. He soon became aware, however, of the political brutalities that the Portuguese government was imposing on the people of Mozambique. Consequently, Harris decided to focus his research on labor exploitation in the colony. Antonio de Figueiredo, who later became an important figure in the Mozambique liberation movement, served as an informal assistant to Harris. Harris was also friends with Eduardo Mondlane, president of FRELIMO, the Mozambican Liberation Front. Because Harris was openly critical of the Portuguese government, he was forced to leave Mozambique before he completed his research. When he returned to the United States, Harris published Portugal's African "Wards" (1958), a critical evaluation of Portugal's colonialism. His publication was influential in eradicating the forced labor system in Mozambique a few years later.

Harris' activism extended to the social and political unrest at home during the 1960s. He was vice-chairman of Vietnam Facts, an organization of professors in the United States who were against the Vietnam War, and was one of the organizers of the Ad Hoc Teaching Committee on Vietnam. In 1967, he brought an academic focus to war by organizing a symposium on the subject with Morton Fried and Robert Murphy at the American Anthropological Association's (AAA) annual meeting. Together, they edited War: The Anthropology of Armed Conflict and Aggression (1968), a compilation of the papers presented at the conference. During the 1968 student uprising at Columbia University, Harris was one of the few faculty members that openly sided with the students. Harris criticized the actions of the university administrators in his article, "Big Busts on Morningside Heights" (1968).

Due to his experiences in Mozambique, Harris also began to think about the distinctions between emic and etic perspectives, which he discusses in his book, The Nature of Cultural Things (1964). During the 1960s-70s, Harris experimented with the use of video recordings as an etic approach to collecting ethnographic data. He collaborated with the Bronx State Hospital to videotape domestic life in two Puerto Rican and two African American families. He also videotaped and coded behavioral streams of two Caucasian and two African-American families in New York City for his NSF funded project, "Patterns of Authority and Subordination in Low-Income Urban Domiciles." In 1965 and 1992, Harris returned to Brazil to study racial categorizations and identifications, specifically the emic and etic differences in the perception of race. He published several papers on the subject, including "The Structural Significance of Brazilian Racial Categories" (1963), "Referential Ambiguity in the Calculus of Brazilian Racial Identity" (1970), and "Who are the Whites?" (1993).

During the 1980s, Harris was troubled by the rising popularity of postmodernist theory within anthropology. He believed that anthropology was a science and was concerned about the harmful consequences of postmodernist theory to the field. He organized a AAA session on postmodernism called "Anti-anti Science" in 1989 and participated in multiple conference sessions on the subject, including a 1993 session on "The Objectivity Crisis: Rethinking the Role of Science" at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) meeting. "Anthropology and Postmodernism," a revised version of his AAAS paper was published as a chapter in Science, Materialism, and the Study of Culture (Martin F. Murphey and Maxine L. Margolis, 1995). Harris also criticized postmodernist theory in his final book, Theories of Culture in Postmodern Times (1999).

While Harris thought that postmodernism was moving anthropology further away from science, behavior scientists began to see the relevancy of cultural materialism in their own research. In 1986, Harris was invited to give an address at the annual conference of the Association for Behavioral Analysis (ABA). His paper was titled, "Cultural Materialism and Behavior Analysis: Common Problems and Radical Solutions." He also participated in a symposium on "The Integration of Cultural Materialism and Behavior Analysis" at the 1991 ABA annual meeting.

From 1988-90, Harris served as president of the General Anthropology Division of AAA. In 1991, he was given the honor of presenting the Distinguished Lecture at the AAA annual meeting. His talk was titled, "Anthropology and the Theoretical and Paradigmatic Significance of the Collapse of Soviet and East European Communism." That same year, The Rise of Anthropological Theory was designated a Social Science Citation Classic.

Harris died at the age of 74 on October 25, 2001.

Sources Consulted

Margoline, Maxine L. and Conrad Phillip Kottak. "Marvin Harris (1927-2001)." American Anthropologist. 105(3) (2003): 685-688.

Curriculum Vitae. Series 7. Biographical Files. Marvin Harris papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

Harris, Marvin. "Cultural Materialism is Alive and Well and Won't Go Away Until Something Better Comes Along." In Assessing Anthropology,edited by Robert Borofsky, 62-76. New York: McGraw Hill, 1994.

Chronology

1927 -- Born August 18 in Brooklyn, New York

1945-1947 -- Served in U.S. Army Transportation Corps

1948 -- B.A. from Columbia College

1950-1951 -- Field research in Brazil

1953 -- Ph.D. in Anthropology from Columbia University Field research in Brazil

1953-1954 -- Research Advisor, National Institute of Pedagogical Studies, Rio de Janeiro. Brazilian Ministry of Education

1953-1959 -- Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University

1956-1957 -- Field research in Mozambique

1959-1963 -- Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University

1960 -- Field leader of Columbia-Cornell-Harvard-Illinois Summer Field Studies Program in Chimborazo, Ecuador

1962 -- Field leader of Columbia-Cornell-Harvard-Illinois Summer Field Studies Program in Arembepe, Bahia, Brazil. NSF

1963-1980 -- Professor, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University

1963-1966 -- Chair, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University

1965 -- Field Research in Brazil

1965-1972 -- Video Tape Methodology and Etic Ethnography

1969-1974 -- Principle Investigator, Videotape Studies of Urban Domiciles

1968-1969 -- Visiting Distinguished Professor, Central Washington State College

1976 -- Field Research in India

1980-2000 -- Graduate Research Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Florida

1983-1984 -- Consultant, United Nations Fund for Population Activities

1984 -- McMurrin Professor, University of Utah, Fall

1991-1992 -- Consultant, McKinsey and Company Global Institute

1991 -- Presented AAA Distinguished Lecture, "Anthropology and the Theoretical and Paradigmatic Significance of the Collapse of Soviet and East European Communism" The Rise of Anthropological Theory designated Social Science Citation Classic

1992 -- Field Research in Brazil

2001 -- Died October 25

Selected Bibliography

1952 -- Harris, Marvin. "Race Relations in Minas Velhas." In Race and Class in Rural Brazil, edited by Charles Wagley, 51-55. Paris: UNESCO, 1952.

1956 -- Harris, Marvin. Town and Country in Brazil. New York: Columbia University Press, 1956.

1958 -- Harris, Marvin, and Charles Wagley. Minorities in the New World. New York: Columbia University, 1958. Harris, Marvin. Portugal's African "Wards". New York: The American Committee on Africa, 1958.

1959 -- Harris, Marvin. "The Economy Has No Surplus?" American Anthropologist 51 (1959): 189-199. Harris, Marvin. "Labor Emigration Among the Mozambique Thonga: Cultural and Political Factors." Africa 29 (1959): 50-56.

1963 -- Harris, Marvin, and Conrad Kottack. "The Structural Significance of Brazilian Racial Categories." Sociologia 25 (1963): 203-209.

1964 -- Harris, Marvin. "Racial Identity in Brazil." Luso-Brazilian Review 1 (1964): 21-28. Harris, Marvin. The Nature of Cultural Things. New York: Random House, 1964. Harris, Marvin. Patterns of Race in the Americas. New York: Walker and Company, 1964.

1965 -- Harris, Marvin. "The Myth of the Sacred Cow." In Man, Culture and Animals, edited by A. Vayda and A. Leeds, 217-228. Washington: American Association for the Advancement of Science, 1965.

1966 -- Harris, Marvin. "The Cultural Ecology of India's Sacred Cattle." Current Anthropology 7 (1966): 51-66. Harris, Marvin, and George Morren. "The Limitations of the Principle of Limited Possibilities." American Anthropologist 58 (1966): 122-127.

1967 -- Harris, Marvin, Morton Fried, and Robert Murphy, eds. "The Anthropology of War and Aggression." Special Supplement, Natural History (December 1967): 30-70.

1968 -- Harris, Marvin. "Big Bust on Morningside Heights." The Nation 206 (1968): 757-763. Harris, Marvin. The Rise of Anthropological Theory. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell, 1968. Harris, Marvin, Morton Fried, and Robert Murphy, eds. War: The Anthropology of Armed Conflict and Aggression. New York: Natural History Press, 1968.

1970 -- Harris, Marvin. "Referential Ambiguity in the Calculus of Brazilian Racial Identity." Southwestern Journal of Anthropology 26 (1970): 1-14.

1971 -- Harris, Marvin. Culture, Man and Nature: An Introduction to General Anthropology. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell, 1971.

1974 -- Harris, Marvin. Cows, Pigs, Wars and Witches: The Riddles of Culture. New York: Random House, 1974.

1976 -- Harris, Marvin, and William Divale. "Population, Warfare, and the Male Supremacist Complex." American Anthropologist 78 (1976): 521-538.

1977 -- Harris, Marvin. Cannibals and Kings: The Origins of Cultures. New York: Random House, 1977.

1979 -- Harris, Marvin. Cultural Materialism: The Struggle for a Science of Culture. New York: Random House, 1979.

1981 -- Harris, Marvin. America Now: The Anthropology of a Changing Culture. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1981.

1982 -- Harris, Marvin, A. Vaidynathan, and K.N. Nair. "Bovine Sex and Species Ratios in India." Current Anthropology 23 (1982): 365-383.

1983 -- Harris, Marvin. Cultural Anthropology. New York: Harper and Row, 1983.

1984 -- Harris, Marvin. "Animal Capture and Yanomamo Warfare: Retrospect and New Evidence." Journal of Anthropological Research 40 (1984): 183-201.

1985 -- Harris, Marvin. Good to Eat: Riddles of Food and Culture. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1985.

1987 -- Harris, Marvin. "Cultural Materialism: Alarums and Excursions." In Waymarks: The Notre Dame Inaugural Lectures in Anthropology, edited by Kenneth Morre, 107-126. Notre Dame: Notre Dame Press, 1987. Harris, Marvin, and Eric Ross, eds. Food and Evolution: Toward a Theory of Human Food Habits. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1987. Harris, Marvin, and Eric Ross. Death, Sex and Fertility: Population Regulation in Preindustrial and Developing Societies. New York: Columbia University Press, 1987.

1988 -- Harris, Marvin. Why Nothing Works: The Anthropology of Daily Life. New York: Touchstone, 1988.

1989 -- Harris, Marvin. Our Kind: Who We Are, Where We Came From, and Where We're Going. New York: Harper and Row, 1989.

1991 -- Harris, Marvin. "Anthropology: Ships that Crash in the Night." In Perspectives on Social Science: The Colorado Lectures, edited by Richard Jessor, 70-114. Boulder, CO.: Westview, 1991. Harris, Marvin, Thomas Headland, and Kenneth Pike, eds. Emics and Etics: The Insider/Outsider Debate. Newbury Park, CA: Sage, 1991. Harris, Marvin. "The Evolution of Human Gender Hierarchies: A Trial Formulation." In Sex and Gender Hierarchies, edited by Barbara Miller, 57-79. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1991.

1992 -- Harris, Marvin. "Distinguished Lecture: Anthropology and the Theoretical and Paradigmatic Significance of the collapse of Soviet and East European Communism." American Anthropologist 94 (1992): 295-305.

1993 -- Harris, Marvin, Josildeth Gomes Consorte, Joseph Lang, and Bryan Byrne. "Who are the White? Imposed Census Categories and the Racial Demography of Brazil." Social Forces 72 (1993): 451-462.

1994 -- Harris, Marvin. "Cultural Materialism is Alive and Well and Won't Go Away Until Something Better Comes Along." In Assessing Anthropology, edited by Robert Borofsky, 62-76. New York: McGraw Hill, 1994.

1995 -- Harris, Marvin. "Anthropology and Postmodernism." In Science, Materialism, and the Study of Culture, edited by Martin Murphy and Maxine Margolis, 62-77. Gainsville, FL: University Press of Florida, 1995.

1999 -- Harris, Marvin. Theories of Culture in Postmodern Times. Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira Press, 1999.
Related Materials:
More of Marvin Harris' correspondence can be found in the papers of William Duncan Strong. Researchers may also want to consult the Human Studies Film Archives, which holds video oral histories of Charles Wagley (HSFA 89.10.5) and Lambros Comitas (HSFA 89.10.20), both of whom discuss Harris in their interviews.
Separated Materials:
An open reel video from the collection was transferred to the Human Studies Film Archives (HSFA 2011.10.1). The video relates to Series 2: Research; Sub-series 2.6: Videotape Research--"[Macy's Santa Claus study]"
Provenance:
The papers of Marvin Harris were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by his daughter, Susan Harris.
Restrictions:
Access to student records (consisting of graded materials and student recommendation letters), grant proposals sent to Harris for review by grant agencies, and part of his faculty recruitment files are restricted until 2081. Series 10. Computer Files are also restricted due to preservation concerns.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Food habits  Search this
Race  Search this
Anthropology  Search this
Cattle -- India  Search this
Citation:
Marvin Harris papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NAA.2009-27
See more items in:
Marvin Harris papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2009-27

MS 4150 Alabama linguistic material

Creator:
Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958  Search this
Extent:
67 Pages
Culture:
Alibamu  Search this
Alibamu  Search this
Alabama Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Vocabulary
Linguistic texts
Alphabets
Date:
1907-1913?
Scope and Contents:
Contents: vocabulary and phrases, 54 pages in Swanton's handwriting. Text with interlinear English (12 pages) and alphabet (1 page) in another handwriting, possibly Harden Sylestine's. Marked, "The only Alabama material not incorporated into my card catalogue or gone over for such incorporation. J. R. S., May 27, 1922." (Refers to Manuscript number 2435.)
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 4150
Local Note:
Swanton worked with the Alibamu in Oklahoma and Texas in 1907-1913, according to BAE-AR 28, page 12; AR 30, page 18; AR 32, page 18; AR 33, page 18; and AR 34 page 12-13.
Manuscript document
Place:
Oklahoma
Texas
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Vocabulary
Linguistic texts
Alphabets
Citation:
Manuscript 4150, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS4150
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms4150

Miscellaneous collection of Indian pictures

Collector:
Fenton, William N. (William Nelson), 1908-2005  Search this
Extent:
63 Tintypes
Culture:
Iroquois  Search this
Iroquois -- Seneca  Search this
Iroquois -- Oneida  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Oneida Indians  Search this
Seneca Indians  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Tintypes
Ambrotypes
Date:
1870-1880
Scope and Contents:
The material includes 4 tintypes and ambrotypes (on glass) in daguerreotype cases. 1 album containing 34 tintypes and small cardboard pictures. 1 album containing 25 tintypes and small cardboard pictures. Subjects unidentified (no names.) The pictures are mainly by Caledonia, Ontario photographers.
One of the pictures in one of the albums resembles a picture of John Brant Sero, in the Bureau of American Ethnology collection (Mohawk Number 963-a-b).
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 4391
Local Note:
Filed: Iroquois Original Photos.
Topic:
Photographs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Tintypes
Ambrotypes
Citation:
Manuscript 4391, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS4391
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms4391

MS 4843 Winslow M. Walker files on archaeological explorations in Arkansas and Louisiana

Creator:
Walker, Winslow M. (Winslow Metcalf), 1903-1996  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (inch )
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Field notes
Photographs
Writings
Place:
Arkansas
Louisiana
Date:
1931 and undated
Scope and Contents:
Contains typescript drafts of "Cave Culture of Arkansas" and "A Reconnaissance of North Louisiana Mounds" and associated field notes, drawings, and photographs.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 4843
Other Archival Materials:
Related collections
Topic:
Archaeology  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology) -- Arkansas  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology) -- Louisiana  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Photographs
Writings
Citation:
Manuscript 4843, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NAA.MS4843
See more items in:
MS 4843 Winslow M. Walker files on archaeological explorations in Arkansas and Louisiana
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms4843

MS 4972 Letter to W. C. Sturtevant, giving account of the funeral of Edward P. Dozier

Creator:
Fontana, Bernard L.  Search this
Addressee:
Sturtevant, William C.  Search this
Names:
Dozier, Edward P.  Search this
Extent:
4 Pages
Culture:
Tewa Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
May 10, 1971
Scope and Contents:
Letter states that Fontana wishes to have a record of the event in the Smithsonian.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 4972
Local Note:
Typescript letter signed
Citation:
Manuscript 4972, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS4972
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms4972

MS 7326 Material relating to Peruvian plant names

Creator:
Cook, O. F. (Orator Fuller), 1867-1949  Search this
Names:
Peruvian Expeditions (1912-1915)  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (foot )
Culture:
Quichua -- Plant names  Search this
Polynesian -- Plant names  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Notes
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Some of the material is in notebook binders. One notebook relates to the National Geographic Society and Yale Peruvian Expedition of 1914-1915 and includes general orders of the expedition. Another notebook has to do with economic plants, and the others relate to cultivated plants. A group of notes have to do with comparisons of Quichua and Polynesian plant names. The rest of the material are note slips. Much of the data appears to come from published sources.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 7326
Topic:
Plant names -- Peru  Search this
Genre/Form:
Notes
Citation:
Manuscript 7326, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS7326
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms7326

MS 7527 Program for ground-breaking for the Southwest Museum

Creator:
Southwest Society  Search this
Southwest Museum (Los Angeles, Calif.)  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (leaf , 8.5 x 14.25 inches)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1912
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 7527
Topic:
Museums -- Southwest Museum, Los Angeles  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 7527, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS7527
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms7527

Smithsonian Institution Office of Printing and Photographic Services photographs of reception for repatriation of Henry Lookout's manuscripts

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Office of Printing and Photographic Services  Search this
Names:
National Museum of American History (U.S.)  Search this
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.)  Search this
Evelyn, Douglas E., 1941-  Search this
Glenn, James R.  Search this
Goddard, Ives, 1941-  Search this
Smith, Bruce D. (Bruce David), 1946-  Search this
Zeder, Melinda A.  Search this
Extent:
33 contact prints (33 contact prints (contact sheets))
Culture:
Osage Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Contact prints
Photographs
Date:
1990
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs documenting presentation of Henry Lookout's manuscripts to his descendants, made in the Director's office of the National Museum of Natural History on September 27, 1990. Depicted individuals include George Big Eagle, Olivia Mashunkashey Bristow (daughter of Henry Lookout), Tom E. Fugate, Michele Easley, Anita West, Frank Talbot, Ives Goddard, Douglas Evelyn (Deputy Director, NMAH), Peggy Anderson (Talbot's assistant), Melinda Zeder (Deputy Chairman, Anthropology), James R. Glenn (National Anthropological Archives), Cory Gilliland (Numismatics, NMAH), Elvira Stefanelli (Director, National Numismatics Center), and Bruce Smith (Acting Chairman, Anthropology).
Biographical/Historical note:
Henry Lookout, an Osage Indian, made an indefinite loan of documents (NAA MS 4405 and 4406) and a Jefferson Peace Medal (NAA MS 4407) to the Bureau of American Ethnology in 1952. His descendents later requested the return of the material and all items except the peace medal were repatriated in the Director's office of the National Museum of Natural History on September 27, 1990. The medal was purchased by the National Museum of American History and remains in its collection.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 93-9
Location of Other Archival Materials:
A photograph of Lookout holding Jefferson Peace Medal held in National Anthropological Archives Photo Lot 24.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Cultural property -- Repatriation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 93-9, Smithsonian Institution Office of Printing and Photographic Services photographs of reception for repatriation of Henry Lookout's manuscripts, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.93-9
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-93-9

John Canfield Ewers Papers

Correspondent:
Hanson, James A.  Search this
Conner, Stuart W.  Search this
Dempsey, Hugh A.  Search this
Brasser, Ted J.  Search this
DeMallie, Raymond  Search this
Schaeffer, Claude E.  Search this
Taylor, Colin F.  Search this
Creator:
Ewers, John C. (John Canfield), 1909-1997  Search this
Names:
National Museum of American History (U.S.)  Search this
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.)  Search this
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
United States. National Park Service  Search this
Catlin, George, 1796-1872  Search this
Denig, Edwin Thompson, 1812-1858  Search this
Taylor, James E. ((Artist))  Search this
Extent:
97 Linear feet
Culture:
Chippewa  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Cree Indians  Search this
Ojibwa Indians  Search this
Assiniboine Indians  Search this
Kiowa Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Blackfoot  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1945-1993
Scope and Contents:
The John Canfield Ewers Papers document his wide ranging anthropological interests from early White depictions of Native Americans to the material culture of the Plains tribes through correspondence, exhibit catalogs, field notes, illustrations, lectures, maps, photocopies of archival materials, photographs, and writings. The collection includes materials relating to his numerous research projects and publications such as his books on plains sculpture and Jean Louis Berlandier as well as his field research among the Assiniboin and Blackfoot tribes. Ewers' career as an ethnologist based in a museum is amply documented through correspondence, exhibit plans and scripts, notes, and reports showcasing his work for the National Park Service and his fifty plus years at the Smithsonian. The voluminous correspondence file highlights his close collaboration with individuals such as Stu Conner, Hugh Dempsey, Claude Schaeffer, and Colin Taylor. Ewers' graduate studies and his family are featured in Series XI. One special category of materials in this collection is Series XIV, the card files. Ewers pulled information from his field notes and other sources, classified them, and typed or wrote them up on 3x5 or 5x7 inch index cards. He then organized these files alphabetically by subject within large categories such as "Collecting Alpha by Collectors Name" or "Fur Trade and Trade Goods." The card files include correspondence and photographs and closely relate to materials throughout the rest of the collection. Though Ewers' papers are primarily textual in nature, there are graphic materials throughout his files. Series XIII features the graphic materials that Ewers kept separate from his files such as the contents of his slide cabinets. There is overlap within this series as Ewers kept multiple copies of his slides in various locations. This series also includes audiotapes of conferences and symposia at which Ewers spoke and three scrapbooks. Of note are original pencil and ink drawings from his book, The Horse in Blackfoot Culture, in Series XV. Transcripts of oral history interviews with John Canfield Ewers are also available at the Smithsonian Institution Archives.
Arrangement note:
This collection was organized into 15 series - Correspondence, Research & Subject Files, Research Projects, Trips and Presentations, Artists of the Old West, North American Indian Art, Plains Sculpture Book, Berlandier Project, Smithsonian Institution, National Park Service, Personal, Writings by Ewers, Audiovisual Materials, Card Files, and Art Work.
Biographical/Historical note:
John Canfield Ewers (1909-1997) earned a B.A. from Dartmouth College in 1931 and an M.A. in Anthropology from Yale University in 1934. Ewers began his career in museums as a Field Curator for the National Park Service. He helped design exhibits at Vicksburg National Battlefield and Ocmulgee National Monument among others. In 1941, the Bureau of Indian Affairs hired Ewers to design and establish the Museum of the Plains Indian in Browning, Montana. After a short stint in the Navy during World War II, Ewers joined the Department of Anthropology at the Smithsonian Institution. He worked at the Smithsonian for over fifty years in numerous capacities including Director of the National Museum of History and Technology (now called the National Museum of American History). Ewers' research dealt with the Plains Indians and the Blackfoot tribe in particular. Ewers wrote several books on a wide variety of topics including White artists depictions of Native Americans, Plains Indian sculpture, and the horse in Blackfoot Indian culture.
Restrictions:
The John Canfield Ewers papers are open for research.
Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Ethnohistory  Search this
Carving  Search this
American Indians -- Plains  Search this
Artists -- United States -- West -- Biography  Search this
American Indians -- Clothing  Search this
American Indians -- arts and crafts  Search this
Museums -- History -- Exhibitions  Search this
Museums -- Collection management  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Repatriation  Search this
Artists  Search this
Citation:
John Canfield Ewers papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.1998-35
See more items in:
John Canfield Ewers Papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-1998-35

MS 7252 First day issue postage stamps with Pueblo pottery

Creator:
United States Postal Service  Search this
Extent:
1 Envelope
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Envelopes
Postage stamps
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
The stamps are on an envelope postmarked Santa Fe, New Mexico, dated April 13, 1977, and addressed to William C. Sturtevant. The pottery on the stamps is from Acoma, San Ildefonso, Hopi, and Sia.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 7252
Topic:
Acoma Indians  Search this
Pottery -- San Ildefonso -- Hopi -- Sia  Search this
Genre/Form:
Postage stamps
Citation:
Manuscript 7252, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS7252
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms7252

Illustrations used in Bureau of American Ethnology and United States National Museum publications

Collector:
Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. United States National Museum  Search this
Names:
Bourke, John Gregory, 1846-1896  Search this
Culin, Stewart, 1858-1929  Search this
Fewkes, Jesse Walter, 1850-1930  Search this
Hoffman, Walter James, 1846-1899  Search this
Mason, Otis T., 1838-1908  Search this
McGee, W J, 1853-1912  Search this
Mooney, James, 1861-1921  Search this
Moore, Clarence B. (Clarence Bloomfield), 1852-1936  Search this
Nelson, Edward William, 1855-1934  Search this
Artist:
Chapman, Mary Beth  Search this
Gill, Mary W.  Search this
Hildebrant, Mary M.  Search this
Hough, Walter, 1859-1935  Search this
J. T. G.  Search this
Nichols, Spencer Baird, 1875-1950  Search this
Shindler, Antonio Zeno  Search this
Extent:
2,000 Items (circa 2000 paintings, drawings, and photographs)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Paintings
Photographs
Illustrations
Date:
circa 1879-1929
Scope and Contents note:
Artwork and some photographs used to illustrate articles published in the annual reports and bulletins of the Bureau of American Ethnology and the United States National Museum. There are unidentified illustrations of Near Eastern costumes, prayer positions and Mexican funerary vessels, perhaps sketched by Walter Hough. The material includes artwork by Mary Beth Chapman, Mary Wright Gill, Mary M. Hildebrant, Spencer Baird Nichols, and Antonio Zeno Shindler. There is also a drawing, signed "J. T. G.", of a memorial to the daughter of Chief Spotted Tail.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 133
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Additional illustrations are held in National Anthropological Archives Photo Lot 78-51, the records of the Bureau of American Ethnology, and the Department of Anthropology records (Manuscript and Pamphlet File).
See others in:
Illustrations used in Bureau of American Ethnology and United States National Museum publications, 1875-1929
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Paintings
Photographs
Illustrations
Citation:
Photo lot 133, Illustrations used in Bureau of American Ethnology and United States National Museum publications, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.133
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-133

Jesse Walter Fewkes photograph collection related to archeology

Creator:
Fewkes, Jesse Walter, 1850-1930  Search this
Photographer:
Beam, George L. (George Lytle), 1868-1935  Search this
Gill, De Lancey, 1859-1940  Search this
Higley, Elmer Ellsworth  Search this
McKee, Thomas M., 1854-1939  Search this
Poley, H. S. (Horace Swartley)  Search this
Rowland, Wesley R.  Search this
Wittick, Ben, 1845-1903  Search this
Artist:
Gill, Mary W.  Search this
Mullett, G. M.  Search this
Extent:
9 Prints (cromolithograph)
40 Prints (circa, halftone)
77 Prints (circa, albumen)
84 Drawings (circa 84 drawings (some mechanically produced))
1,655 Prints (circa, silver gelatin)
71 copy negatives
43 copy prints
363 Negatives (circa, nitrate)
7 Paintings
1 Print (cyanotype)
1 Print (photogravure)
1 Postcard (collotype)
Culture:
Navajo Indians  Search this
Zuni Indians  Search this
Hopi Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Huastec Indians  Search this
Piegan Indians  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Drawings
Copy negatives
Copy prints
Negatives
Paintings
Postcards
Photographs
Place:
Tennessee -- Antiquities
Stikine River (B.C. and Alaska)
South Carolina -- Antiquities
New Mexico -- Antiquities
Huasteca Region (Mexico)
Maryland -- Antiquities
Louisiana -- Antiquities
Alabama -- Antiquities
Arizona -- Antiquities
Colorado -- Antiquities
Cahokia Mounds State Historic Park (Ill.)
Florida -- Antiquities
Mexico -- Antiquities
Hovenweep National Monument (Utah and Colo.)
Utah -- Antiquities
Mesa Verde National Park (Colo.)
Navajo National Monument
Casa Grande (Ariz.)
Date:
circa 1890-1928
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs and drawings mostly relating to archeological subjects, collected and arranged by Jesse Walter Fewkes for his reference. Subjects include burial mounds, excavations, drawn maps, as well as urns, implements, idols, pottery, and other artifacts found in excavations, and Hopi, Zuni, and Piegan ceremonies and dances. Many of the photographs and drawings were probably made by Fewkes. Publication information is noted on some. The collection also includes newspaper clippings and correspondence.

Photographs were taken in Alabama, Arizona (including Casa Grande, Elden Pueblo, Navajo National Monument, and Wupatki National Monument), Colorado (including Mesa Verde and Montezuma Valley), Florida (including Weeden Island), Illinois (Cahokia Mound), Louisiana, Maryland, Mexico (including La Huasteca Region), Mississippi Valley, New Mexico (including Chaco Canyon, Hawikuh, and Mimbres Valley), South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah (including Hill Canyon, McElmo Canyon, and McLean Basin Ruins), Hovenweep National Monument, the West Indies (including Puerto Rico, Santo Domingo, and Cuba), and West Virginia.
Biographical/Historical note:
Jesse Walter Fewkes (1850-1930) was a naturalist, anthropologist, and archeologist, and chief of the Bureau of American Ethnology from 1918 to his death in 1928. Fewkes received a Ph.D. in marine zoology from Harvard in 1877, and acted as curator of lower invertebrates at the Museum of Comparative Zoology until 1887. While on a collecting trip in the western United States, he developed an interest in the culture and history of the Pueblo Indians. In 1891, Fewkes became director of the Hemenway Southwestern Archeological Expedition and editor of the Journal of American Archeology and Ethnology, studying and recording Hopi ceremonials. In 1895, he embarked on various archeological explorations for the Bureau of American Ethnology, excavating ruins in the Southwest, the West Indies, and Florida. He was appointed chief of the Bureau in 1918, and played an important role in the creation of Hovenweep National Monument in Colorado and Wupatki National Monument in Arizona.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 4321
Location of Other Archival Materials:
The National Anthropological Archives also holds the Jesse Walter Fewkes Papers (MS 4408), his photographs of excavations in Mesa Verde (Photo Lot 30), his negatives (Photo Lot 86), and other manuscript collections by and related to Fewkes' ethnological research and archeology and his work with the Bureau of American Ethnology.
Correspondence from Fewkes held in the National Anthropological Archives in the George L. Beam papers (MS 4517), the Henry Bascom Collins, Jr. papers, the Anthropological Society of Washington records (MS 4821), the Herbert William Krieger papers, the J.C. Pilling papers, the Walter Hough Papers (in the records of the Department of Anthropology), and the records of the Bureau of American Ethnology.
The Department of Anthropology collections holds several accessions of artifacts collected by Fewkes, including USNM ACC 048761 (relating to Casa Grande excavations) and USNM ACC 050765 (relating to Mesa Verde excavations).
Contained in:
Numbered manuscripts 1850s-1980s (some earlier)
See others in:
Jesse Walter Fewkes photograph collection related to archeology circa 1890-1928
Restrictions:
Original nitrate negatives are in cold storage and require advanced notice for viewing.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Excavations (Archaeology)  Search this
Burial  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 4321, Jesse Walter Fewkes photograph collection related to archeology, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.4321
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-4321

MS 3716 Letter to Professor Henry

Creator:
Gibbon, Lardner  Search this
Addressee:
Henry, Joseph, 1797-1878  Search this
Culture:
Muskogee (Creek)  Search this
Cherokee  Search this
Chickasaw Indians  Search this
Creek Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Place:
Saluda River -- Archeology
South Carolina -- Archeology
Date:
November 30, 1871
Scope and Contents:
Incloses sketches of arrowheads found on the Saluda River, South Carolina. Also historical notes relating to the above tribes, reference to the various tribes, of South Carolina, etc.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3716
Topic:
Tools and implements -- arrowheads  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Citation:
Manuscript 3716, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3716
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3716

Modify Your Search







or


Narrow By
  • National Anthropological Archives