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Oral history interview with George Tsutakawa

Interviewee:
Tsutakawa, George  Search this
Interviewer:
Kingsbury, Martha, 1941-  Search this
Names:
Archipenko, Alexander, 1887-1964  Search this
Extent:
119 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1983 September 8-19
Scope and Contents:
An interview of George Tsutakawa conducted 1983 September 8-19, by Martha Kingsbury, for the Archives of American Art's Northwest Oral History Project, in Seattle, Washington.
Tsutakawa speaks of his youth in Japan and Seattle, and the importance of a bicultural family and education on his development; the influence of European art magazines and American movies in Japan; family members who were influential; his early sculpture; Alexander Archipenko; the Asian art community in Seattle; teaching at the University of Washington School of Architecture; Bauhaus philosophy; the Seattle Public Library fountain; his World War II experiences; art and World's Fairs; fountains he has sculpted and his feelings about them; and permanency in art.
Biographical / Historical:
George Tsutakawa (1910-1997) was a sculptor from Seattle, Washington.
General:
Originally recorded on 7 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 14 digital wav files. Duration is 6 hr., 43 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives' Northwest Oral History Project, begun in 1982 to document the Northwest artistic community through interviews with painters, sculptors, craftsmen, educators, curators, and others, in Oregon, Washington and Montana.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Artists -- Northwestern States -- Interviews  Search this
Asian American artists -- Interviews  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Sculptors -- Washington (State) -- Seattle -- Interviews  Search this
Sculpture -- Washington (State) -- Seattle  Search this
Art, Modern -- Northwestern States  Search this
Fountains -- Washington (State) -- Seattle  Search this
Art, American -- Northwestern States  Search this
Japanese American sculptors  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.tsutak83
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-tsutak83

Oral history interview with Katharine Kuh

Topic:
Saturday review
Interviewee:
Kuh, Katharine  Search this
Interviewer:
Berman, Avis  Search this
Creator:
Mark Rothko and His Times Oral History Project  Search this
Names:
Art Institute of Chicago  Search this
Black Mountain College (Black Mountain, N.C.)  Search this
First National Bank of Chicago -- Art collections  Search this
Katharine Kuh Gallery (Chicago, Ill.)  Search this
Mark Rothko and His Times Oral History Project  Search this
Vassar College. Art Gallery  Search this
Adams, Ansel, 1902-1984  Search this
Albers, Josef  Search this
Albright, Ivan, 1897-1983  Search this
Archipenko, Alexander, 1887-1964  Search this
Arensberg, Louise S. (Louise Stevenson), 1879-1953  Search this
Arensberg, Walter, 1878-1954  Search this
Avery, Milton, 1885-1965  Search this
Barr, Alfred H., Jr., 1902-1981  Search this
Berenson, Bernard, 1865-1959  Search this
Davis, Stuart, 1892-1964  Search this
De Kooning, Willem, 1904-1997  Search this
Duchamp, Marcel, 1887-1968  Search this
Ernst, Max, 1891-1976  Search this
Hofmann, Hans, 1880-1966  Search this
Kepes, Gyorgy, 1906-2001  Search this
Klee, Paul, 1879-1940  Search this
Léger, Fernand, 1881-1955  Search this
Mies van der Rohe, Ludwig, 1886-1969  Search this
Moholy-Nagy, László, 1895-1946  Search this
Mérida, Carlos, 1891-1984  Search this
Newman, Barnett, 1905-1970  Search this
Noguchi, Isamu, 1904-1988  Search this
Paepcke, Walter Paul, 1896-1960  Search this
Porter, Eliot, 1901-1990  Search this
Ray, Man, 1890-1976  Search this
Rich, Daniel Catton, 1904-1976  Search this
Rothko, Mark, 1903-1970  Search this
Smith, David, 1906-1965  Search this
Stamos, Theodoros, 1922-1997  Search this
Stieglitz, Alfred, 1864-1946  Search this
Still, Clyfford, 1904-1980  Search this
Tamayo, Rufino, 1899-  Search this
Tobey, Mark  Search this
Tworkov, Jack  Search this
Weston, Edward, 1886-1958  Search this
Extent:
313 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1982 Mar. 18-1983 Mar. 24
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Katharine Kuh conducted 1982 Mar. 18-1983 Mar. 24, by Avis Berman, for the Archives of American Art's Mark Rothko and His Times oral history project.
Kuh speaks of her invalid childhood in Chicago, the development of her interest in art, classes in art history at Vassar College, and her career as curator of modern art at the Art Institute of Chicago. She recalls in particular the "Sanity in Art" movement against modern art in Chicago. Kuh describes her relationship with Mark Rothko and Rothko's relationships with Mark Tobey, Clyfford Still, Kate Rothko, Theodoros Stamos, Milton Avery, Stanley Kunitz, and Hans Hofmann.
Kuh discusses her parents, the family silk business, travelling in Europe as a child, life in Chicago, the effects of polio and other illnesses on her interests, and her student years at Vassar College. She remembers visiting Bernard Berenson in Italy with her family and again with Daniel Catton Rich, with whom she worked very closely at the Art Institute of Chicago. She speaks of the Katharine Kuh Gallery, which she started in the mid-1930s and its place in the vanguard of the Chicago art scene.
Kuh remembers the effects of the stock market crash on her personal situation, her marriage to businessman George Kuh, distaste for life in the suburbs, and her divorce. She discusses the Katharine Kuh Gallery and the actions taken against her business by members of the reactionary "Sanity in Art" movement (including a very funny anecdote concerning Carlos Merida). She speaks of the classes in modern art that she taught at her gallery and of some of the artists she exhibited there, including the photographers Ansel Adams, Alfred Stieglitz, and Edward Weston.
Kuh remembers the McCarthy era and the political conservatism in Chicago, including her testimony on behalf of Bill Zimmerman, Acting Commissioner of Indian Affairs. She criticizes blockbuster exhibitions and the changes in the role of a museum curator. She reminisces about building the collection at the Art Institute of Chicago and the art education program she ran there, and recalls Stuart Davis, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, Gyorgy Kepes, and Ivan Albright.
Kuh remembers Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, and Marcel Duchamp, as well as the collectors Walter Paepcke and Walter and Louise Arensberg (whose collection she surveyed in their home for an exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago).
Kuh focuses on her memories of Mark Rothko, recalling when they met, their friendship, his manner of working, his feelings about his work, and his worries towards the end of his life. She talks about Clyfford Still, Barnett Newman, and Mark Tobey. Some parts of this tape repeat what she said earlier.
Kuh continues discussing Rothko, particularly his Houston chapel murals and the retrospective exhibition at MOMA in 1961. She remembers visiting Rothko's studio and describes his working methods. She relates Rothko's views on other artists, including Milton Avery, Clyfford Still, Turner, Robert Motherwell, and Adolf Gottlieb; parts repeat things said before. Kuh also discusses Rothko's wife and daughter.
Kuh recounts building the collection at the Art Institute of Chicago and speaks of the museum staff, trustees, and donors. She remembers Alfred Barr at MOMA.
Kuh continues speaking about the Art Institute of Chicago, describing the circumstances of her resignation and subsequent move to New York. She talks of knowing Peggy Guggenheim, Max Ernst, and Fernand Leger.
Kuh describes her work as a consultant to college museums and her writings. She discusses the field of art criticism and her career as art editor at Saturday Review. She recalls Clyfford Still's retrospective exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and his death.
Kuh describes her work as a collector for the First National Bank of Chicago.
Kuh recounts more about her work at Saturday Review and her resignation. She goes into great detail about her travels in Alaska and British Columbia surveying Northwest Indian art for a government report. She speaks again about the McCarthy era.
Kuh speaks again about the Katharine Kuh Gallery and the artists she exhibited there, including Josef Albers (and his Black Mountain College), Alexander Archipenko, Stuart Davis, Paul Klee, Alexander Calder, and Man Ray.
Kuh continues her discussion of artists she exhibited at the Katharine Kuh Gallery, including Mark Tobey, Paul Klee, and Isamu Noguchi.
Kuh continues talking about artists she exhibited at the Katharine Kuh Gallery, including David Smith, Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, Eliot Porter, Rufino Tamayo, and Jack Tworkov.
Biographical / Historical:
Katharine Kuh (1904-1994) was an art consultant, curator, and critic from Chicago and New York City.
General:
Originally recorded on 16 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 31 digital wav files. Duration is 21 hrs., 52 min.
Provenance:
This interview was conducted as part of the Archives of American Art's Mark Rothko and his Times oral history project, with funding provided by the Mark Rothko Foundation.
Others interviewed on the project (by various interviewers) include: Sonia Allen, Sally Avery, Ben-Zion, Bernard Braddon, Ernest Briggs, Rhys Caparn, Elaine de Kooning, Herbert Ferber, Esther Gottlieb, Juliette Hays, Sidney Janis, Buffie Johnson, Jacob Kainen, Louis Kaufman, Jack Kufeld, Stanley Kunitz, Joseph Liss, Dorothy Miller, Betty Parsons, Wallace Putnam, Rebecca Reis, Maurice Roth, Sidney Schectman, Aaron Siskind, Joseph Solman, Hedda Sterne, Jack Tworkov, Esteban Vicente and Ed Weinstein. Each has been cataloged separately.
Restrictions:
Transcript: Patrons must use microfilm copy.
Rights:
Authorization to publish, quote or reproduce must be obtained from name on file.
Occupation:
Artists -- United States  Search this
Topic:
Abstract expressionism  Search this
Art critics -- Interviews  Search this
Curators -- Interviews  Search this
Art museum curators -- Interviews  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- Illinois -- Chicago
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.kuh82
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-kuh82

Oral history interview with Rhys Caparn

Interviewee:
Caparn, Rhys, 1909-1997  Search this
Interviewer:
Wolf, Tom  Search this
Creator:
Mark Rothko and His Times Oral History Project  Search this
Names:
American Abstract Artists  Search this
Federation of Modern Painters and Sculptors  Search this
Mark Rothko and His Times Oral History Project  Search this
Archipenko, Alexander, 1887-1964  Search this
Rothko, Mark, 1903-1970  Search this
Extent:
46 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1983 November 23
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Rhys Caparn conducted 1983 November 23, by Tom Wolf, for the Archives of American Art's Mark Rothko and His Times oral history project.
Caparn describes her youth in New York and art study in France. She recalls her teacher Alexander Archipenko and the activities of the American Abstract Artists and the Federation of Modern Painters and Sculptors (of which she was president for a term). Caparn talks a lot about her own work. She does not recall much about Mark Rothko, who was only a distant acquaintance.
Biographical / Historical:
Rhys Caparn (1909-1997) was a sculptor from Connecticut.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 2 digital wav files. Duration is 1 hr., 29 min.
Provenance:
This interview was conducted as part of the Archives of American Art's Mark Rothko and his Times oral history project, with funding provided by the Mark Rothko Foundation.
Others interviewed on the project (by various interviewers) include: Sonia Allen, Sally Avery, Ben-Zion, Bernard Braddon, Ernest Briggs, Elaine de Kooning, Herbert Ferber, Esther Gottlieb, Juliette Hays, Sidney Janis, Buffie Johnson, Jacob Kainen, Louis Kaufman, Jack Kufeld, Katharine Kuh, Stanley Kunitz, Joseph Liss, Dorothy Miller, Betty Parsons, Wallace Putnam, Rebecca Reis, Maurice Roth, Sidney Schectman, Aaron Siskind, Joseph Solman, Hedda Sterne, Jack Tworkov, Esteban Vicente and Ed Weinstein. Each has been cataloged separately.
Topic:
Abstract expressionism  Search this
Sculptors -- Connecticut -- Interviews  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.caparn83
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-caparn83

Zabriskie Gallery records

Creator:
Zabriskie Gallery  Search this
Names:
Galerie Zabriskie  Search this
Archipenko, Alexander, 1887-1964  Search this
Baizerman, Saul, 1889-1957  Search this
Benglis, Lynda, 1941-  Search this
Christenberry, William, 1936-  Search this
Crawford, Ralston, 1906-1978  Search this
Davis, Stuart, 1892-1964  Search this
Frank, Mary, 1933-  Search this
Hartley, Marsden, 1877-1943  Search this
King, William, 1925-2015  Search this
Lozowick, Louis, 1892-1973  Search this
Nordfeldt, Bror Julius Olsson, 1878-1955  Search this
Siskind, Aaron  Search this
Snelson, Kenneth, 1927-2016  Search this
Stankiewicz, Richard, 1922-1983  Search this
Sugarman, George, 1912-1999  Search this
Tacha, Athena, 1936-  Search this
Tworkov, Jack  Search this
Vytlacil, Vaclav, 1892-1984  Search this
Wilmarth, Christopher  Search this
Yunkers, Adja, 1900-1983  Search this
Zabriskie, Virginia M., 1927-1991  Search this
Extent:
120.7 Linear feet
2 Items (rolled docs)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1951-2010
Scope and Contents:
Records of the New York and Paris locations of Zabriskie Gallery, including artist and subject files, financial records, and business records.
Artist files contain correspondence with artists, galleries and collectors, photographs of artists and their work, inventories, resumes, exhibition catalogs, press releases, and clippings. Artists include Ansel Adams, Pat Adams, Alexander Archipenko, Eugen Atget, George Ault, Saul Baizerman, Lynda Benglis, Isle Bing, Nell Blaine, Claude Cahun, Harry Callahan, William Christenberry, Ralston Crawford, Imogen Cunningham, Stuart Davis, Kiki de Montparnasse, Marcel Duchamp, Arnold Friedman, Joan Fontcuberta, Mary Frank, Lee Friedlander, Marsden Hartley, Geroges Hugnet, Allan Kaprow, William King, William Klein, Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Ellen Lanyon, Louis Lozowick, Man Ray, Elie Nadelman, Nicholas Nixon, B.J.O. Nordfeldt, Alfonso Ossorio,Albert Renger-Patzch, Jorge Ribalta,Theodore Roszak, Tomoko Sawada, Aaron Siskind, Kenneth Snelson, Ralph Steiner, Richard Stankiewicz, Alfred Stieglitz, George Sugarman, Athena Tacha, Dorothea Tanning, Jack Tworkov, Junko Uoda, Vaclav Vytlacil, Abraham Walkowotz, Christopher Wilmarth, Adja Yunkers and William Zorach, among others.
Gallery correspondence is between the Paris and New York galleries and with artists, dealers, clients, and other galleries. Financial records includes artists account statements, administrative files, Zabriskie transaction records, sales books, and price lists. Also included are signed guest books, floor plans, and inventory cards.
Also found are blueprints and line drawings by Richard Stankiewicz, with copies of designs and information relating to Stankiewicz's sculpture and studio building (0.2 linear ft.).
Biographical / Historical:
Art gallery, New York City and Paris (Galerie Zabriskie) owned by Virginia Zabriskie. The New York gallery opened in 1954; Galerie Zabriskie in Paris officially opened in January 1977, but work began there the previous year and closed in 1998.
Provenance:
Donated by Virginia Zabriskie, 1992-2011.
Restrictions:
Use requires an appointment.
Occupation:
Artists -- United States  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State) -- New York
Art galleries, Commercial -- France -- Paris
Identifier:
AAA.zabrgall
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-zabrgall

Waintrob-Budd photographs of American artists

Creator:
Waintrob-Budd (Firm : New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Names:
American Academy of Arts and Letters  Search this
Budd (Firm : New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Adrian, Barbara, 1931- -- Photographs  Search this
Archipenko, Alexander, 1887-1964 -- Photographs  Search this
Avery, Milton, 1885-1965 -- Photographs  Search this
Barnet, Will, 1911- -- Photographs  Search this
Benton, Thomas Hart, 1889-1975 -- Photographs  Search this
Biddle, George, 1885-1973 -- Photographs  Search this
Bosa, Louis, 1905- -- Photographs  Search this
Botkin, Henry, 1896-1983 -- Photographs  Search this
Browne, Byron, 1907-1961 -- Photographs  Search this
Carroll, John, 1892-1959 -- Photographs  Search this
Constant, George, 1892-1978 -- Photographs  Search this
De Creeft, José, 1884-1982 -- Photographs  Search this
De Diego, Julio, 1900- -- Photographs  Search this
Delaunay, Sonia -- Photographs  Search this
Dickinson, Edwin Walter, 1891- -- Photographs  Search this
Duchamp, Marcel, 1887-1968 -- Photographs  Search this
Evans, Walker, 1903-1975 -- Photographs  Search this
Floch, Joseph, 1895-1977 -- Photographs  Search this
Gablik, Suzi, 1934- -- Photographs  Search this
Goodrich, Lloyd, 1897-1987 -- Photographs  Search this
Gottlieb, Adolph, 1903-1974 -- Photographs  Search this
Goulet, Lorrie, 1925- -- Photographs  Search this
Grosz, George, 1893-1959 -- Photographs  Search this
Hare, David, 1917- -- Photographs  Search this
Harkavy, Minna, b. 1895 -- Photographs  Search this
Hayter, Stanley William, 1901- -- Photographs  Search this
Hofmann, Hans, 1880-1966 -- Photographs  Search this
Hopper, Edward, 1882-1967 -- Photographs  Search this
Hopper, Jo N. (Josephine Nivison), 1883-1968 -- Photographs  Search this
Jenkins, Paul, 1923-2012 -- Photographs  Search this
Kantor, Morris, 1896-1974 -- Photographs  Search this
Krasner, Lee, 1908-1984 -- Photographs  Search this
Kroll, Leon, 1884-1974 -- Photographs  Search this
Lawrence, Jacob, 1917-2000 -- Photographs  Search this
Levi, Julian E. (Julian Edwin), 1900-1982 -- Photographs  Search this
Levine, Jack, 1915-2010 -- Photographs  Search this
Levy, Ellen K -- Photographs  Search this
Lijn, Liliane, 1939- -- Photographs  Search this
Lipchitz, Jacques, 1891-1973  Search this
Lowry, W. McNeil (Wilson McNeil), 1913-1993 -- Photographs  Search this
Marsh, Reginald, 1898-1954 -- Photographs  Search this
Mayor, A. Hyatt (Alpheus Hyatt), 1901-1980 -- Photographs  Search this
Menkes, Sigmund, 1896-1986 -- Photographs  Search this
Motherwell, Robert -- Photographs  Search this
Root, Edwin -- Photographs  Search this
Rorimer, James J. (James Joseph), 1905-1966 -- Photographs  Search this
Shahn, Ben, 1898-1969  Search this
Sheerin, Jerry -- Photographs  Search this
Soyer, Moses, 1899-1974 -- Photographs  Search this
Soyer, Raphael, 1899-1987 -- Photographs  Search this
Speicher, Eugene E. (Eugene Edward), 1883-1962 -- Photographs  Search this
Speyer, Darthea -- Photographs  Search this
Steinberg, Saul -- Photographs  Search this
Sweeney, James Johnson, 1900- -- Photographs  Search this
Waintrob, A. L., 1908-  Search this
Waintrob, Sidney J., 1903-  Search this
Walker, Hudson D. (Hudson Dean), 1907-1976 -- Photographs  Search this
Walkowitz, Abraham, 1880-1965 -- Photographs  Search this
Zorach, William, 1887-1966 -- Photographs  Search this
Extent:
68 Items ((partially microfilmed on 2 reels))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1953-1980
Scope and Contents:
REEL 1817: Photographs of: Will Barnet, Jose de Creeft (2), Sonia Delaunay, Walker Evans, Joseph Floch, Suzi Gablik (2), Adolph Gottlieb (also filmed on reel 1886, fr. 33-34), Lorrie Goulet, Minna Harkavy, William Hayter (2), Paul Jenkins, Lee Krasner (2), Lilliane Lijn, Jerry Sheerin (2), and Darthea Speyer (2). Also included is a group photo of Jose de Creeft, Jacques Lipchitz, George Biddle, Thomas Benton, and Ben Shahn at the American Academy of Arts & Letters Ceremonial, May 20, 1964.
REEL 1886: Photographs of: Barbara Adrian, Alexander Archipenko, Milton Avery, Will Barnet, Isabel Bishop, Louis Bosa, Henry C. Botkin, Byron Browne, John Carroll, George Constant, Julio de Diego, Edwin Dickinson, Marcel Duchamp, Joseph Floch, Lloyd Goodrich, Adolph Gottlieb, Lorrie Goulet, George Grosz, David Hare, Minna Harkavy, Hans Hofmann, Edward Hopper, Josephine Hopper, Morris Kantor, Leon Kroll, Jacob Lawrence, Julian Levi, Jack Levine, Reginald Marsh, A. Hyatt Mayor, Sigmund Menkes, Robert Motherwell, Edwin Root, James Rorimer (a cropped version erroneously microfilmed as Sidney Waintrob appears on reel 1817, fr. 1193), Moses Soyer, Raphael Soyer, Eugene Speicher, Saul Steinberg, James Johnson Sweeney, Hudson Walker, Abraham Walker, and William Zorach.
UNMICROFILMED Two photographs: Ellen K. Levy and McNeil Lowry.
Arrangement:
REEL 1817: Microfilmed with AAA's Photographs of Artists Collection II, and appear on microfilm in alphabetical order under artist with other unrelated photographs.
Biographical / Historical:
Photographic studio; New York, N.Y. Sidney J. and his brother A. L. (Bud) Waintrob specialized in photographing artists, curators and other art world personalities. They worked under the name Budd [Studio] before using Waintrob-Budd.
Provenance:
Photographs on reel 1817 and unmicrofilmed photos donated 1974-1987 by Sidney J. Waintrob; photographs on reel 1886 donated 1979-1980 by Samuel I. Hoffberg, whose relationship to Waintrob-Budd is unclear.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
Authorization to publish quote, or reproduce must be obtained from David Stekert.
Topic:
Artists -- United States -- Photographs  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.wainbudd
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-wainbudd

Stendahl Art Galleries records

Creator:
Stendahl Art Galleries  Search this
Names:
Couvoisier Galleries  Search this
Demotte, inc. (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Thomas Gilcrease Institute of American History and Art  Search this
Wildenstein and Company (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Archipenko, Alexander, 1887-1964  Search this
Beltran-Masses, Federico, b. 1885  Search this
Calder, Alexander, 1898-1976  Search this
Cantú, Federico, 1908-1989  Search this
Charlot, Jean, 1898-1979  Search this
De Creeft, José, 1884-1982  Search this
Eddy, Jerome  Search this
Feshin, Nikolaĭ Ivanovich, 1881-1955  Search this
Gelhaar, Emil  Search this
Genth, Lillian Mathilde, 1876-1953  Search this
Gilbert, Arthur Hill, 1894-1970  Search this
Guthrie, George B.  Search this
Hansen, Armin C. (Armin-Carl), 1886-1957  Search this
Kandinsky, Wassily, 1866-1944  Search this
Kent, Rockwell, 1882-1971  Search this
Kleitsch, Joseph, 1885-1931  Search this
Knight, Aston, 1873-1948  Search this
Kronberg, Louis, 1872-1965  Search this
Laurence, Sydney, 1868-1940  Search this
Loeffler, Gisella, 1900-  Search this
Montenegro, Roberto  Search this
Mérida, Carlos, 1891-1984  Search this
Noguchi, Isamu, 1904-1988  Search this
Orozco, José Clemente, 1883-1949  Search this
Pach, Walter, 1883-1958  Search this
Payne, Edgar A. (Edgar Alwin), 1882-1947  Search this
Pearson, Ralph M., 1883-1958  Search this
Picasso, Pablo, 1881-1973  Search this
Ritschel, William, 1864-1949  Search this
Rivera, Diego, 1886-1957  Search this
Rose, Ethel Boardman, 1871-1946  Search this
Rose, Guy, 1867-1925  Search this
Schofield, Walter Elmer, 1867-1944  Search this
Siqueiros, David Alfaro  Search this
Stendahl, Earl L.  Search this
Szecsi, Ladislas  Search this
Wendt, William, 1865-1946  Search this
Zuloaga, Ignacio, 1870-1945  Search this
Extent:
7.5 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gallery records
Scrapbooks
Date:
1907-1971
Summary:
The records of the Los Angeles Stendahl Art Galleries measure 7.5 linear feet and date from 1907 to 1971. The collection is comprised of administrative and financial files, correspondence, exhibition files, and subject files on numerous artists, organizations, and other art-related topics. There is one scrapbook of clippings on the artist Edgar Payne.
Scope and Contents:
The records of the Los Angeles Stendahl Art Galleries measure 7.5 linear feet and date from 1907 to 1971. The collection is comprised of administrative and financial files, correspondence, exhibition files, and subject files on numerous artists, organizations, and other art-related topics. There is one scrapbook of clippings on the artist Edgar Payne.

Administrative and financial files concern advertising, publicity, consignments, inventory, purchases, sales, leases, and biographical information on Earl Stendahl.

The bulk of the correspondence is pre-World War II and is fairly extensive. It is with artists, organizations, collectors, art historians,and galleries. Signicant correspondents include Alexander Archipenko, Federico Beltran-Masses, Alexander Calder, Federico Cantú, Jean Charlot, Couvoisier Galleries, José de Creeft, Demotte Inc., Jerome Eddy, Lillian Genthe, Arthur Hill Gilbert, George B. Guthrie, Rockwell Kent, Louis Kronberg, Gisella Loeffler, Carlos Mérida, Isamu Noguchi, Walter Pach, Diego Rivera, Waler Elmer Schofield, David Alfaro Siquieros, Ladislas Szecsi, Wildenstein & Company, and many others.

Files are found for about ten exhibitions, including Etching and Engravings by the Old Masters (1921), Airview Paintings (1930), American Landscape Art (1930), Arts of New Guinea (1964), and for exhibitions of Emil Gelhaar, Wassily Kandinsky, Sydney Laurence, and Roberto Montenegro.

Subject files are found for numerous artists, art topics, galleries, and foundations. Most of the files consist of printed materials, but there is correspondence and additional primary source material found in files for Nicolai Ivanovich Feshin, the Thomas Gilcrease Foundation, Armin Hansen, Joseph Kleitsch, Aston Knight, José Clemente Orozco, Edgar Payne, Ralph M. Pearson, Pablo Picasso, William Ritschel, Diego Rivera, Ethel B. Rose, Guy Rose, Walter Elmer Schofield, David Alfaro Siquieros, Ladislas Szecsi, William Wendt, and Ignacio Zuloaga.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 4 series.

Series 1: Administrative and Financial Files, 1923-1957 (0.4 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1923-1968 (2.0 linear feet; Box 1-3)

Series 3: Exhibition Files, circa 1921-1967 (0.4 linear feet; Box 3)

Series 4: Subject Files, 1907-1971 (4.6 linear feet; Box 3-8, OV 9)
Biographical / Historical:
Earl Stendahl established Stendahl Art Galleries in 1911 in Los Angeles, California.

Earl Stendahl (1887-1966) came to Southern California from a small town in Wisconsin. He began showing young Los Angeles artists at his downtown restaurant, The Black Cat Café. He opened his gallery in The Ambassador Hotel on Wilshire Boulevard and organized shows focusing primarily on California Impressionists of the early twentieth century, including Edgar Payne, Guy Rose, William Wendt, Nicolai Fechin, and Joseph Kleitsch.

Stendahl Art Galleries also began to sell European and Latin American modern art. In 1939, Stendahl hosted one of only two non-museum exhibitions of Pablo Picasso's masterwork, Guernica, to benefit Spanish War orphans.

As early as 1935 Stendahl began promoting ancient artifacts from Mexico and Central America. Stendahl's first client for pre-Columbian art and artifacts was noted collector Walter Arensberg. Stendahl and the Arensburgs became friends and Stendahl helped the Arensburgs build one of the most significant collections in the U.S.

The galleries are currently owned by Ronald W. Dammann, Stendahl's grandson.
Provenance:
The Stendahl Art Galleries records were donated by Alfred Stendahl in 1976. An album of clippings was donated by Stendahl in 1995 via Nancy Moure.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Rights:
The Stendahl Art Galleries records are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Art -- New Guinea  Search this
Hispanic American art  Search this
Landscape painting  Search this
Prints  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Art galleries, Commercial -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Genre/Form:
Gallery records
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Stendahl Art Galleries Records, 1907-1971. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.stenartg
See more items in:
Stendahl Art Galleries records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-stenartg
Online Media:

Galka Scheyer papers

Creator:
Scheyer, Galka E.  Search this
Names:
Archipenko, Alexander, 1887-1964  Search this
Arp, Jean, 1887-1966  Search this
De Chirico, Giorgio, 1888-  Search this
Duchamp, Marcel, 1887-1968  Search this
Feininger, Julia  Search this
Feininger, Lyonel, 1871-1956  Search this
Jawlensky, Alexej von, 1864-1941  Search this
Kandinsky, Wassily, 1866-1944  Search this
Klee, Paul, 1879-1940  Search this
Le Corbusier, 1887-1965  Search this
Léger, Fernand, 1881-1955  Search this
Mies van der Rohe, Ludwig, 1886-1969  Search this
Moholy-Nagy, László, 1895-1946  Search this
Rivera, Diego, 1886-1957  Search this
Schmidt-Rottluff, Karl, 1884-1976  Search this
Schoenberg, Arnold, 1874-1951  Search this
Schwitters, Kurt, 1887-1948  Search this
Segal, Arthur, 1875-1944  Search this
Tamayo, Rufino, 1899-  Search this
Varèse, Edgard, 1883-1965  Search this
Weber, Max, 1881-1961  Search this
Weston, Edward, 1886-1958  Search this
Extent:
5 Reels (ca. 1200 items (on 5 partial microfilm reels))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Reels
Date:
1917-1945
Scope and Contents:
Papers relate mainly to the Blue Four and contain primarily correspondence; also business materials, photographs, essays, and printed materials.
REEL 1644: Correspondence with Lyonel Feininger and his wife Julia, mainly concerning personal matters, contemporary events in Europe and America, and Scheyer's efforts to establish the Blue Four's reputation on the west coast. Many letters are illustrated with Feininger block cuts.
REEL 1854: Letters from Feininger, Alexei Jawlensky, Wassily Kandinsky, and Paul Klee; typescripts of letters to members of the Blue Four; import declarations; a shipping invoice; a consular certificate for paintings; and price lists of works of art.
REEL 1905: Correpsondence documenting Scheyer's friendship with various artists associated with the Blue Four and her efforts to exhibit and sell their work. Important correpsondents include: Alexander Archipenko, Hans Arp, Giorgio de Chirico, Marcel Duchamp, Paul Klee, Le Corbusier, Fernand Leger, Carlos Merida, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, Diego Rivera, Arthur Segal, Karl Schmidt-Rottluff, Arnold Schoenberg, Kurt Schwitters, Rufino Tamayo, Mies van der Rohe, Edgar Varese, Max Weber, and Edward Weston. Also included are miscellaneous photographs, essays, notes, and financial and printed materials.
REEL 2031-2032: Correspondence with Alexei Jawlensky and Wassily Kandinsky, including several illustrated letters; two photographs of interiors; a published article by Kandindsky, "Abstrakte Kunst," ca. 1925-1926; and price lists for works of art by Kandkinsky. Some letters are typescripts.
Biographical / Historical:
Art collector, dealer; b. 1889; d. 1945; Los Angeles, Calif. Scheyer worked to introduce the art of the Blue Four (Blaue Vier), Wassily Kandinsky, Lyonel Feininger, Paul Klee, and Alexei Jawlensky, to American collectors.
Other Title:
Galka Scheyer Blue Four Archive.
Provenance:
Lent for microfilming by Norton Simon Museum of Art, 1979-1980.
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Painters -- United States  Search this
Art dealers -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Topic:
Blaue Vier (Group of artists)  Search this
Expressionism (Art) -- Germany  Search this
Painting, German -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- Germany -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.schegalk
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-schegalk

Oral history interview with Ludwig Sander

Interviewee:
Sander, Ludwig, 1906-  Search this
Interviewer:
Cummings, Paul  Search this
Names:
Club (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Museum of Modern Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Whitney Museum of American Art  Search this
Archipenko, Alexander, 1887-1964  Search this
Hofmann, Hans, 1880-1966  Search this
Extent:
78 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1969 February 4-12
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Ludwig Sander conducted 1969 February 4-12, by Paul Cummings, for the Archives of American Art. Sander speaks of his early exposure to art and music in New York; his travels in Europe; studying with Alexander Archipenko at the Art Students League; studying with Hans Hofmann in Munich and Positano; painting and teaching in Woodstock; his U.S. Army service; The Club and its factions; his experiences with the Whitney and with the Museum of Modern Art; his painting techniques; his exhibitions.
Biographical / Historical:
Ludwig Sander (1906-1975) was a painter from New York, N.Y.
General:
Originally recorded on 1 sound tape reel. Reformatted in 2010 as 4 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hr., 16 min.
Provenance:
These interviews are part of the Archives' Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Painters -- New York (State) -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.sander69
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-sander69

Oral history interview with Lilian Swann Saarinen

Interviewee:
Saarinen, Lilian Swann, 1912-1995  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Names:
Cranbrook Academy of Art  Search this
Archipenko, Alexander, 1887-1964  Search this
Warneke, Heinz (Heinrich), 1895-1983  Search this
Extent:
93 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1979-1981
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Lilian Swann Saarinen conducted in three installments between 1979-1981, by Robert F. Brown, for the Archives of American Art, in Cambridge, Mass.
Saarinen speaks of her childhood in New York; her training with Alexander Archipenko and Heinz Warneke; a ceramic relief for the Crow Island School, Winnetka, Ill.; ceramic and metal reliefs for architecture; the Cranbrook Academy of Art; her drawings and her sculpture.
Biographical / Historical:
Lilian Swann Saarinen (1912-1995) was a sculptor from Cambridge, Mass.
General:
Originally recorded on 3 sound tape reels. Reformatted in 2010 as 4 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hr., 40 min.
Audio quality varies greatly in this interview. Tape speed and volume are uneven.
Provenance:
These interviews are part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Sculptors -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.saarin79
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-saarin79

Thomas Prichard Rossiter and Rossiter Family papers

Creator:
Rossiter, Thomas Prichard, 1818-1871  Search this
Names:
Archipenko, Alexander, 1887-1964  Search this
Beaux, Cecilia, 1855-1942  Search this
Beckwith, J. Carroll (James Carroll), 1852-1917  Search this
Bevan, Edith Rossiter  Search this
Birch, Reginald Bathurst, 1856-1943  Search this
Cadwalader-Guild, Emma Marie, 1843-1911?  Search this
Castaigne, Andre  Search this
Coffin, William A. (William Anderson), 1855-1925  Search this
Cooper, James Fenimore, 1789-1851  Search this
Cory, Fanny Y.  Search this
Cox, Kenyon, 1856-1919  Search this
Craig, Frank, 1874-1918  Search this
French, Daniel Chester, 1850-1931  Search this
Gibson, Charles Dana, 1867-1944  Search this
Hambidge, Jay, 1867-1924  Search this
Hunt, William Morris, 1824-1879  Search this
Hutt, Henry, b. 1875  Search this
Jay, John, 1817-1894  Search this
Keller, A. J.  Search this
Kensett, John Frederick, 1816-1872  Search this
Kent, Rockwell, 1882-1971  Search this
Kimball, Fiske, 1888-1955  Search this
Low, Will Hicok, 1853-1932  Search this
Melchers, Gari, 1860-1932  Search this
Morris, William H., 1834-1896  Search this
Morse, Samuel Finley Breese, 1791-1872  Search this
Mowbray, H. Siddons (Harry Siddons), 1858-1928  Search this
Newell, Peter, 1862-1924  Search this
Nicholls, Rhoda Holmes  Search this
Peabody, George, 1795-1869  Search this
Pearson, Ralph M., 1883-1958  Search this
Remington, Frederic, 1861-1909  Search this
Rossiter, Ehrick Kensett, 1854-1941  Search this
Rossiter, Thomas Prichard, 1818-1871  Search this
Sartain, William, 1843-1924  Search this
Scott-Moncrieff, David  Search this
Soglow, Otto, 1900-1975  Search this
Tack, Augustus Vincent, 1870-1949  Search this
Tryon, Dwight William, 1849-1925  Search this
Whitmore, Elizabeth  Search this
Extent:
0.5 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketches
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Date:
1840-1961
Summary:
The Thomas Prichard Rossiter and Rossiter Family papers measure 0.5 linear feet and date from 1840 to 1961. Included are letters to painter Thomas Prichard Rossiter and letters to his son, architect Ehrick Kensett Rossiter, documenting their friendships with many artists and Thomas Prichard Rossiter's sketchbook and loose sketches. Edith Rossiter Bevan's papers include her writings on her grandfather, Thomas Prichard Rossiter; a scrapbook; photographs of the Rossiter family; notes by Bevan; news clippings; and other printed material. Also found is Bevan's collection of artists' letters.
Scope and Content Note:
The Thomas Prichard Rossiter and Rossiter Family papers measure 0.5 linear feet and date from 1840 to 1961. Included are letters to painter Thomas Prichard Rossiter and letters to his son, architect Ehrick Kensett Rossiter, documenting their friendships with many artists. Notable letters are from James Fenimore Cooper, William Morris Hunt, John Jay, J. F. Kensett, William H. Morris, Samuel F. B. Morse, George Peabody, Cecelia Beaux, William A. Coffin, Daniel Chester French, Will H. Low, Gari Melchers, William Sartain, Augustus Vincent Tack, Dwight Tryon, and many others.

The collection contains Thomas Prichard Rossiter's sketchbook drawn while living in Italy in 1943, and three other sketches including a portrait of his family.

Also found are letters to Edith Rossiter Bevan and her writings on her grandfather, Thomas Prichard Rossiter, including a biography and checklist of his paintings. Bevan also compiled a scrapbook on his career and family history which includes drawings by Rossiter, photographs of the Rossiter family and his artwork, notes by Bevan, news clippings, and other printed material.

A collection of Edith Rossiter Bevan's artists' letters is found within the papers. Letters are from Alexander Archipenko, J. Carroll Beckwith, Reginald Birch, Emma M. Cadwalader-Guild, Andre Castaigne, Fanny Cory, Kenyon Cox, Frank Craig, Charles Dana Gibson, Jay Hambridge, Henry Hutt, A. J. Keller, Rockwell Kent, Fiske Kimball, David Scott Moncrieff, H. Siddons Mowbray, Peter Newell, Rhoda Holmes Nicholls, Ralph M. Pearson, Frederic Remington, Otto Soglow, and Elizabeth Whitmore.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 2 series:

Series 1: Thomas Prichard Rossiter and Rossiter Family Papers, 1840-1961 (Box 1-2; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 2: Edith Rossiter Bevan Collection of Artists' Letters, circa 1891-1939, 1951 (Box 1; 2 folders)
Biographical Note:
Thomas Prichard Rossiter (1818-1871) was born in New Haven, Connecticut. He first learned painting as an apprentice for a Mr. John Boyd, and also studied with Nathaniel Jocelyn. In 1838 he exhibited two paintings at the National Academy of Design, and in 1939 moved to New York City and opened a studio.

In 1840, Rossiter traveled to Europe with Asher B. Durand, John Kensett, and John Casilaer, and while there visited Rome with Thomas Cole. He decided to stay in Italy until 1846 when he moved to New York City and shared a studio with Kensett and Louis Lang. During this period he relied on portrait painting for his income, but also painted historical and religious paintings.

In 1851 Rossiter married Anna Ehrick Parmly and they toured Europe in 1853. They settled in Paris where Anna gave birth to twins Ehrick Kensett and Charlotte. Rossiter exhibited at the Exposition Universelle in Paris in 1855. Anna died shortly after the birth of their daughter Anna, and the family moved back to New York.

For a brief period of time Rossiter had an art gallery, exhibiting his work and the work of his friends. In 1860 he married Mary (Mollie) Sterling and moved his family to Cold Spring, New York on the Hudson River. He continued to paint portraits, historical, and religious paintings, and exhibited at the National Academy of Design and the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, until his death in 1871.

Ehrick Kensett Rossiter (1854-1941), named after his father's friend John Frederick Kensett, attended Cornell University and became an architect in New York as part of the firm Rossiter & Muller. He was a member of the Architectural League, United States Public Architects' League, and trustee of the American Fine Arts Society. In 1877 he married Mary Heath and they had three sons and a daughter. Their daughter Edith Rossiter Bevan was a historian and avid collector of historical autographs.
Related Material:
Also found in the Archives of American Art is a Thomas Prichard Rossiter letter to Elias Beirs dated January 12, 1840.
Provenance:
A portion of the collection was donated in 1957 by Edith Rossiter Bevan, daughter of Ehrick Kensett Rossiter, and granddaughter of Thomas Prichard Rossiter. Additional material was donated in 2007 by Patti Rossiter Ravenscroft, Rossiter's Great Great Granddaughter.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Thomas Prichard Rossiter and Rossiter Family papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Painters -- New York (State)  Search this
Architects -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketches
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Thomas Prichard Rossiter and Rossiter Family papers, 1840-1957. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.rossthom
See more items in:
Thomas Prichard Rossiter and Rossiter Family papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-rossthom
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Viola Patterson

Interviewee:
Patterson, Viola, 1898-1984  Search this
Interviewer:
Kingsbury, Martha, 1941-  Search this
Names:
Archipenko, Alexander, 1887-1964  Search this
Orozco, José Clemente, 1883-1949  Search this
Patterson, Ambrose, 1877-1966  Search this
Rivera, Diego, 1886-1957  Search this
Extent:
57 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1982 Oct. 22-29
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Viola Patterson conducted 1982 Oct. 22-29, by Martha Kingsbury, for the Archives of American Art's Northwest Oral History Project, in the artist's home in Seattle, Wash.
Patterson speaks of her education; family background; her early interest in art; studying at the University of Washington art department; the influence of Japanese artists; teaching art to children; her husband, Ambrose Patterson, and his life and career; and working on murals with Jose Clement Orozco and Diego Rivera. She recalls Alexander Archipenko.
Biographical / Historical:
Viola Patterson (1898-1984) was a painter from Seattle, Wash.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 7 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hrs., 33 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives' Northwest Oral History Project, begun in 1982 to document the Northwest artistic community through interviews with painters, sculptors, craftsmen, educators, curators, and others, in Oregon, Washington and Montana.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Artists -- Northwestern States -- Interviews  Search this
Art, Modern -- Northwestern States  Search this
Art, American -- Northwestern States  Search this
Painters -- Washington (State) -- Seattle -- Interviews  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.patter82
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-patter82

National Collection of Fine Arts records relating to Alexander Archipenko

Creator:
National Collection of Fine Arts (U.S.)  Search this
Names:
Archipenko, Alexander, 1887-1964  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1964-1968
Scope and Contents:
Papers related to an exhibition of Archipenko's sculpture and graphic art organized by UCLA Art Galleries and exhibited at NCFA in 1968. Included are correspondence concerning the Archipenko estate and the exhibition; a monograph, ALEXANDER ARCHIPENKO; a copy of an article, "The Terra-Cottas of Alexander Archipenko;" a bibliography and list of his works; and seven photographs of groups of sculpture in the exhibition.
Biographical / Historical:
National Collection of Fine Arts is part of the Smithsonian Institution. It's name was changed by an act of Congress to National Museum of American Art in 1980.
Provenance:
William Walker of the NCFA Library transferred this material to the Archives.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Sculptors  Search this
Topic:
Sculpture, Modern -- 20th century -- Exhibitions  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.naticola
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-naticola

Harry Lowe papers

Creator:
Lowe, Harry, 1922-  Search this
Names:
Archipenko, Alexander, 1887-1964  Search this
Dahl-Wolfe, Louise  Search this
Edmondson, William, 1882?-1951  Search this
Flagg, James Montgomery, 1877-1960  Search this
Mabry, Thomas D.  Search this
Rockefeller, Nelson A. (Nelson Aldrich), 1908-1979  Search this
Extent:
0.4 Linear feet ((partially microfilmed on 1 reel))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1938-1982
Scope and Contents:
Letters, photographs, slides, and printed materials on art exhibits and subjects.
REEL 3134: Papers accumulated by Lowe while Director of the Tennessee Fine Arts Center regarding an exhibit on the work of African American sculptor William Edmondson, 1964. Included are 12 letters, 1961-1964, from Louise Dahl-Wolfe, Thomas D. Mabry and others concerning works loaned to the exhibit; a photograph of Edmondson and 12 of his sculpture; an undated exhibition announcement; and 10 clippings.
UNMICROFILMED: Letters and photocopies of letters; files, containing photographs, slides, and negatives relating to a Alexander Archipenko exhibition, Paris, France, 1969, exhibition of Mexican Folk Art from the Nelson A. Rockefeller Collection, Museum of Primative Art, 1969, and the Art Embassies Program, 1966; photos of Lowe; slides of Cranbrook Academy of Art installations; articles and photocopies of articles, regarding Nelson Rockefeller, and his art collection, James Montgomery Flagg, and others; printed material, including press releases and exhibition catalogs; and miscellany.
Biographical / Historical:
Arts administrator and designer; Washington, D.C. Worked at Cranbrook Academy of Art, 1951-1953; was Director of the Tennessee Fine Arts Center, 1959-1964; a curator, Department of Exhibitions & Design, National Collection of Fine Arts, 1964-1972.
Provenance:
Donated 1971 & 1984 by Harry Lowe.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Arts administrators -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Designers -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Topic:
African American sculpture -- Tennessee  Search this
Art -- Exhibitions  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.loweharr
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-loweharr

Katharine Kuh papers

Creator:
Kuh, Katharine  Search this
Names:
Albright-Knox Art Gallery  Search this
Art Institute of Chicago -- Faculty  Search this
Biennale di Venezia  Search this
Katharine Kuh Gallery (Chicago, Ill.)  Search this
Adams, Ansel, 1902-1984  Search this
Albers, Josef  Search this
Albright, Ivan, 1897-1983  Search this
Archipenko, Alexander, 1887-1964  Search this
Arensberg, Louise S. (Louise Stevenson), 1879-1953  Search this
Arensberg, Walter, 1878-1954  Search this
Arp, Jean, 1887-1966  Search this
Barnet, Will, 1911-  Search this
Barr, Alfred H., Jr., 1902-1981  Search this
Biddle, George, 1885-1973  Search this
Breuer, Marcel, 1902-  Search this
Calder, Alexander, 1898-1976  Search this
Campoli, Cosmo  Search this
Chagall, Marc, 1887-  Search this
Chavez Morado, José, 1909-2002  Search this
Chermayeff, Serge, 1900-  Search this
Cornell, Joseph  Search this
Cox, Richard  Search this
Davis, Stuart, 1892-1964  Search this
Day, Worden, 1916-1986  Search this
De Kooning, Willem, 1904-  Search this
Dickinson, Edwin Walter, 1891-  Search this
Dubuffet, Jean, 1901-  Search this
Duchamp, Marcel, 1887-1968  Search this
Elizabeth II, Queen of Great Britain, 1926-  Search this
Ernst, Jimmy, 1920-1984  Search this
Falkenstein, Claire, 1908-1997  Search this
Feitelson, Lorser, 1898-1978  Search this
Friendly, Fred W.  Search this
Giacometti, Alberto, 1901-1966  Search this
Golub, Leon, 1922-2004  Search this
Goto, Joseph, 1920-  Search this
Grabe, Klaus  Search this
Graves, Robert, 1895-1985  Search this
Guggenheim, Peggy, 1898-  Search this
Guston, Philip, 1913-1980  Search this
Hare, David, 1917-  Search this
Hare, Denise Browne  Search this
Hayter, Stanley William, 1901-1988  Search this
Hirshhorn, Joseph  Search this
Hofmann, Hans, 1880-1966  Search this
Hélion, Jean, 1904-1987  Search this
Inverarity, Robert Bruce, 1909-1999  Search this
Johns, Jasper, 1930-  Search this
Johnson, Philip, 1906-2005  Search this
Johnson, Ray, 1927-  Search this
Kandinsky, Wassily, 1866-1944  Search this
Kepes, Gyorgy, 1906-2001  Search this
Kepes, Juliet  Search this
Klee, Paul, 1879-1940  Search this
Kline, Franz, 1910-1962  Search this
Knox, Seymour H., 1898-1990  Search this
Le Corbusier, 1887-1965  Search this
Lundeberg, Helen, 1908-1999  Search this
Lye, Len, 1901-1980  Search this
Léger, Fernand, 1881-1955  Search this
Mies van der Rohe, Ludwig, 1886-1969  Search this
Millier, Arthur, 1893-  Search this
Moholy-Nagy, László, 1895-1946  Search this
Motherwell, Robert  Search this
Mérida, Carlos, 1891-1984  Search this
Nutting, Muriel Leone Tyler, b. 1892  Search this
Nutting, Myron Chester, 1890-1972  Search this
O'Higgins, Pablo, 1904-  Search this
Orozco, José Clemente, 1883-1949  Search this
Ozbekhan, Hasan, 1921-2007  Search this
Perkins, Frances  Search this
Picasso, Pablo, 1881-1973  Search this
Putnam, Wallace, 1899-1989  Search this
Ray, Man, 1890-1976  Search this
Rich, Daniel Catton, 1904-1976  Search this
Rothko, Mark, 1903-1970  Search this
Sandberg, Carl  Search this
Seligmann, Kurt, 1900-1962  Search this
Shackelford, Shelby  Search this
Shahn, Ben, 1898-1969  Search this
Spaeth, Otto, d. 1966  Search this
Sterne, Hedda, 1916-  Search this
Stevenson, Adlai E. (Adlai Ewing), 1900-1965  Search this
Still, Clyfford, 1904-  Search this
Tanning, Dorothea, 1910-2012  Search this
Tobey, Mark  Search this
Winston, Harry Lewis  Search this
Woolf, Olga  Search this
Young, Victor  Search this
Photographer:
Pollack, Peter, 1909-1978  Search this
Extent:
12 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Illustrated letters
Resumes
Travel diaries
Minutes
Calendars
Visitors' books
Photographs
Paintings
Awards
Drawings
Sound recordings
Collages
Scrapbooks
Lithographs
Prints
Wills
Watercolors
Poetry
Lecture notes
Lectures
Sales records
Date:
1875-1994
bulk 1930-1994
Summary:
The papers of art historian, dealer, critic, and curator Katharine Kuh measure 12 linear feet and date from 1875-1994, with the bulk of the material dating from 1930-1994. The collection documents Kuh's career as a pioneer modernist art historian and as the first woman curator of European Art and Sculpture at the Art Institute of Chicago. Found within the papers are biographical material; correspondence with family, friends and colleagues; personal business records; artwork by various artists; a travel journal; writings by Kuh and others; scrapbooks; printed material; photographs of Kuh and others; and audio recordings of Kuh's lectures and of Daniel Catton Rich reading poetry.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of art historian, dealer, critic, and curator Katharine Kuh measure 12 linear feet and date from 1875-1994, with the bulk of the material dating from 1930-1994. Found within the papers are biographical material; correspondence with family, friends and colleagues; personal business records; artwork by various artists; a travel journal; writings by Kuh and others; scrapbooks; printed material; photographs of Kuh and others; and audio recordings of Kuh's lectures and of Daniel Catton Rich reading poetry.

Biographical material consists of copies of Kuh's birth certificate, resumés, passports, award certificates, honorary diplomas, and address books listing information about several prominent artists and colleagues.

Four linear feet of correspondence offers excellent documentation of Kuh's interest in art history, her travels, her career at the Art Institute of Chicago, her work as a corporate art advisor, and as an author. There are letters from her mother Olga Woolf, friends, and colleagues. There is extensive correspondence with various staff members of the Art Institute of Chicago, the First National Bank of Chicago, and The Saturday Review. Also of interest are letters from artists and collectors, several of whom became life-long friends including Walter and Louise Arensberg, Cosmo Campoli, Serge Chermayeff, Richard Cox, Worden Day, Claire Falkenstein, Fred Friendly, Leon Golub, Joseph Goto, David Hare, Denise Brown Hare, Jean Hélion, Ray Johnson, Gyorgy and Juliet Kepes, Len Lye, Wallace Putnam, Kurt Seligmann, Shelby Shackelford, Hedda Sterne, and Clyfford Still. Many letters are illustrated with original artwork in various media.

There are also scattered letters from various artists and other prominent individuals including Josef Albers, George Biddle, Marcel Breuer, Joseph Cornell, Stuart Davis, Edwin Dickinson, Joseph Hirshhorn, Daniel Catton Rich, and Dorothea Tanning.

Personal business records include a list of artwork, Olga Woolf's will, inventories of Kuh's personal art collection, miscellaneous contracts and deeds of gift, receipts for the sale of artwork, files concerning business-related travel, and miscellaneous receipts.

Artwork in the collection represents a wide range of artist friends and media, such as drawings, watercolors, paintings, collages, and prints. Included are works by various artists including lithographs by David Hare and a watercolor set, Technics and Creativity, designed and autographed by Jasper Johns for the Museum of Modern Art, 1970.

Notes and writings include annotated engagement calendars, travel journals for Germany, a guest book for the Kuh Memorial gathering, and many writings and notes by Kuh for lectures and articles concerning art history topics. Of interest are minutes/notes from meetings for art festivals, conferences, and the "Conversations with Artists Program (1961). Also found are writings by others about Kuh and other art history topics.

Six scrapbooks contain clippings that document the height of Kuh's career as a gallery director and museum curator. Scrapbook 6 contains clippings about Fernand Léger, the subject of a retrospective exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago in 1953.

Additional printed material includes clippings about Kuh and her interests, a comprehensive collection of clippings of Kuh's articles for The Saturday Review, exhibition announcements and catalogs, calendars of events, programs, brochures, books including Poems by Kuh as a child, and reproductions of artwork. Of particular interest are the early and exhibition catalogs from the Katharine Kuh Gallery, and rare catalogs for artists including Jean Arp, Alexander Calder, Marc Chagall, Jean Dubuffet, Marcel Duchamp, Stanley William Hayter, Hans Hofmann, Wassily Kandinsky, Paul Klee, Franz Kline, Le Corbusier, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, and Pablo Picasso.

Photographs provide important documentation of the life and career of Katharine Kuh and are of Kuh, family members, friends, colleagues, events, residences, and artwork. Several of the photographs of Kuh were taken by Will Barnet and Marcel Breuer and there is a notable pair of photo booth portraits of Kuh and a young Ansel Adams. There are also group photographs showing Angelica Archipenko with Kuh; designer Klaus Grabe; painters José Chavez Morado and Pablo O'Higgins in San Miguel, Mexico; Kuh at the Venice Biennale with friends and colleagues including Peggy Guggenheim, Frances Perkins, Daniel Catton Rich, and Harry Winston; and "The Pre-Depressionists" including Lorser Feitelson, Robert Inverarity, Helen Lundeberg, Arthur Millier, Myron Chester Nutting, and Muriel Tyler Nutting.

Photographs of exhibition installations and openings include views of the Katharine Kuh Gallery; Fernand Léger, Man Ray, and László Moholy-Nagy at the Art Institute of Chicago; and Philip Guston, Jimmy Ernst, Seymour H. Knox, Franz Kline, Robert Motherwell, and Mark Rothko at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, New York. There are also photographs depicting three men posing as Léger's "Three Musicians" and the visit of Queen Elizabeth II to the Art Institute of Chicago. There is a photograph by Peter Pollack of an elk skull used as a model by Georgia O'Keeffe.

Additional photographs of friends and colleagues include Ivan Albright, Alfred Barr, Alexander Calder, Marc Chagall, Willem De Kooning, Edwin Dickinson, Marcel Duchamp, Claire Falkenstein, Alberto Giacometti, poet Robert Graves with Len Lye, Philip Johnson, Gyorgy and Juliet Kepes, Carlos Mérida, José Orozco, Hasan Ozbekhan, Pablo Picasso, Carl Sandberg, Ben Shahn, Otto Spaeth, Hedda Sterne, Adlai Stevenson, Clyfford Still, Mark Tobey, and composer Victor Young.

Photographs of artwork include totem poles in Alaska; work by various artists including Claire Falkenstein, Paul Klee, and Hedda Sterne; and work donated to the Guggenheim Museum.

Four audio recordings on cassette are of Katharine Kuh's lectures, including one about assembling corporate collections, and of Daniel Catton Rich reading his own poetry. There is also a recording of the Second Annual Dialogue between Broadcasters and Museum Educators.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 9 series. Undated correspondence, artwork, and photographs of individual artists are arranged alphabetically. Otherwise, each series is arranged chronologically.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1945-1992 (Box 1; 16 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1908-1994 (Boxes 1-5, 13-14, OV 15; 4.0 linear feet)

Series 3: Personal Business Records, 1941-1989 (Box 5; 19 folders)

Series 4: Artwork, 1931-1986 (Boxes 5, 13-14, OVs 15-23; 1.7 linear feet)

Series 5: Notes and Writings, 1914-1994 (Boxes 5-7; 1.7 linear feet)

Series 6: Scrapbooks, 1935-1953 (Box 7; 8 folders)

Series 7: Printed Material, 1916-1992 (Boxes 7-10, 13, OV 22; 3.0 linear feet)

Series 8: Photographs, 1875-1993 (Boxes 10-13; 1.2 linear feet)

Series 9: Audio Recordings, 1977 (Box 12; 1 folder)
Biographical Note:
Katharine Kuh (1904-1994) worked primarily in the Chicago area as an modern art historian, dealer, critic, curator, writer, and consultant. She operated the Katharine Kuh Gallery from 1935-1943 and was the first woman curator of European and Art and Sculpture at the Art Institute of Chicago.

Katharine Kuh (née Woolf) was born on July 15, 1904 in St. Louis, Missouri, the youngest of the three daughters of Olga Weiner and Morris Woolf, a silk importer. In 1909, the family moved to Chicago, Illinois. While traveling with her family in Europe in 1914, Katharine contracted polio, causing her to spend the next decade in a body brace. During this time of restricted movement, she developed an interest in art history through the collecting of old master prints.

After her recovery, Katharine Woolf attended Vassar College where one of her professors, Alfred Barr, encouraged her to study modern art. She graduated from Vassar in 1925 and received a master's degree in art history from the University of Chicago in 1929. Later that year, she moved to New York to pursue a Ph.D. in Renaissance and medieval art at New York University.

In 1930, Katharine Woolf returned to Chicago and married businessman George Kuh and began to teach art history courses in the suburbs of Chicago. After divorcing George Kuh in 1935, she opened the Katharine Kuh Gallery, the first gallery devoted to avant-garde art in Chicago. It was also the first gallery to exhibit photography and typographical design as art forms, and featured the work of Ansel Adams, Josef Albers, Alexander Calder, Wassily Kandinsky, Fernand Léger, and Man Ray, among others. From 1938 to1940, Kuh was the Visiting Professor of Art at the University School of Fine Arts, San Miguel, Mexico.

After the Katharine Kuh Gallery closed in 1943, Kuh was hired by museum director Daniel Catton Rich to fill a position in public relations at the Art Institute of Chicago. During the following years, Kuh edited the museum's Quarterly publication, took charge of the museum's Gallery of Interpretive Art, and began a long term relationship with Rich. In 1946, Kuh was sent on a special mission for the U. S. Office of Indian Affairs to make a detailed study of Native American totemic carvings in Alaska.

In 1949, Kuh persuaded Mr. and Mrs. Walter Arensberg of Los Angeles to exhibit their collection of modern art, creating the first post-war exhibition of modern art in Chicago. She published her first book Art Has Many Faces in 1951, and in the following year, she began writing art criticism for The Saturday Review. In 1954, Kuh was appointed the first woman curator of European Art and Sculpture at the Art Institute. She assembled the American contribution for the Venice Biennale in 1956 and during these years, Kuh helped acquire many of the works of modern art currently in the museum's collection.

A year following Daniel Catton Rich's 1958 resignation from the Art Institute of Chicago, Kuh also resigned and pursued a career in New York as an art collection advisor, most notably for the First National Bank of Chicago. In 1959, Kuh was made art critic for The Saturday Review, and she continued to publish books, including The Artist's Voice in 1962, Break-Up: The Core of Modern Art in 1965, and The Open Eye: In Pursuit of Art in 1971.

Katharine Kuh died on January 10, 1994 in New York City.
Provenance:
The Katharine Kuh papers were donated in several installments from 1971 to 1989 by Katharine Kuh and in 1994 by her estate. Artwork was donated in 1995 by Kuh's former employer, the Art Institute of Chicago.
Restrictions:
Authorization to quote, publish or reproduce requires written permission until 2019. Contact the Archives of American Art Reference Services department for additional information.
Rights:
The Katharine Kuh papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Art, Abstract -- United States  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Art festivals  Search this
Women museum curators -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Women art critics -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Authors -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Art galleries, Commercial -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Women art historians -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Women art dealers -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Women art dealers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Women art critics -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Genre/Form:
Illustrated letters
Resumes
Travel diaries
Minutes
Calendars
Visitors' books
Photographs
Paintings
Awards
Drawings
Sound recordings
Collages
Scrapbooks
Lithographs
Prints
Wills
Watercolors
Poetry
Lecture notes
Lectures
Sales records
Citation:
Katharine Kuh papers, 1875-1994, bulk 1930-1994. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.kuhkath
See more items in:
Katharine Kuh papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-kuhkath

Donald H. Karshan papers relating to Alexander Archipenko

Creator:
Karshan, Donald H.  Search this
Names:
Archipenko, Alexander, 1887-1964  Search this
Survage, Leopold  Search this
Extent:
1.8 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1920-1973
Summary:
The Donald H. Karshan papers relating to Alexander Achipenko measure 1.8 linear feet and date from 1920 to 1973, (bulk dates 1966-1970). Karshan, a print expert and collector, served as Curator of the Archipenko Collection and Director of the Archipenko Archive from circa 1966 until circa 1973. Exhibition files include records concerning University of California, Los Angeles's Alexander Archipenko Memorial Exhibition, 1967-1969, that traveled throughout the United States; an expanded version of the show was circulated in Europe by the Smithsonian Institution. The collection also contains general correspondence relating to the administration of the Archipenko Collection and Archipenko Archive, Leopold Survage, and writings on Archipenko's work and life by Karshan with related correspondence.
Scope and Content Note:
The Donald H. Karshan papers relating to Alexander Achipenko measure 1.8 linear feet and date from 1960 to 1973, (bulk dates 1966-1970). Exhibition files consist of records concerning UCLA's Alexander Archipenko Memorial Exhibition, 1967-1969, that traveled throughout the United States; an expanded version of the show that circulated in Europe by the Smithsonian Institution. The collection also contains general correspondence relating to the administration of the Archipenko Collection and Archipenko Archive, and writings on Archipenko's work and life by Karshan with related correspondence. Records pre-dating 1960 are printed matter and photocopies of Archipenko's correspondence with Leopold Survage gathered for reference purposes.

Exhibition files, 1960-1972, include correspondence, photographs, and printed matter relating to UCLA's Alexander Archipenko Memorial Exhibition, 1967-1969 at its various venues in the United States and its European tour sponsored by International Art Program of the Smithsonian Institution. There are similar records for Archipenko: The Parisian Years, an exhibition organized by the Museum of Modern Art.

General Correspondence, 1966-1973, relates to the Archipenko Collection and the Archipenko Archive, administered by Karshan and includes loan and reference requests, publication permissions, and sales information. Of particular interest is a file on Leopold Survage compiled in 1969 and documenting an attempt to purchase a Survage painting for Mrs. Arhcipenko to donate to the Museum of Modern Art; included is reference material consisting of photocopies of Archipenko's letters to Survage and a letter from Theodore Doesburg, printed matter, and photographs.

Writings by Donald H. Karshan, 1966-1968, consist of research notes and correspondence concerning his catalogue raisonné of Archipenko prints (1974). Also included are manuscripts of published articles and correspondence with editors.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into three series:

Series 1: Exhibition Files, 1960-1972 (Boxes 1-2; 1.5 linear feet)

Series 2: General Correspondence, 1920-1973 (Box 3; 0.25 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings by Donald H. Karshan, 1966-1968 (Box 3; 0.25 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Donald H. Karshan (b. 1929) is a print expert and collector who in 1964 established the Museum of Graphic Art, New York City. He was Curator of the Archipenko Collection and Director of the Archipenko Archive from circa 1966 until circa 1973. During this time, Karshan cataloged the estate collection and organized the archives. He was closely involved with the Archipenko memorial exhibition organized by UCLA in 1967 that traveled widely in the United States and an expanded version of the same show that was circulated Europe by the International Art Program of the Smithsonian Institution. Karshan wrote extensively on Archipenko and his oeuvre, including a catalogue raisonné of Archipenko's prints. His book, Alexander Archipenko: International Visionary, was published by the Smithsonian Institution to accompany the European tour of the memorial exhibition, 1969-1970.
Provenance:
Gift of Frances Archipenko Gray, widow of Alexander Archipenko, 1982. Karshan's files were among the Alexander Archipenko Papers, and have been separated and arranged as a distinct collection.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. research facility.
Rights:
The Donald H. Karshan papers relating to Alexander Archipenko are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Cubism  Search this
Citation:
The Donald H. Karshan papers relating to Alexander Archipenko, 1920-1973. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.karsdona
See more items in:
Donald H. Karshan papers relating to Alexander Archipenko
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-karsdona

Ellen Hulda Johnson papers

Creator:
Johnson, Ellen H.  Search this
Names:
Allen Memorial Art Museum  Search this
American-Scandinavian Foundation  Search this
College Art Association (U.S.)  Search this
Oberlin College -- Faculty  Search this
Archipenko, Alexander, 1887-1964  Search this
Cézanne, Paul, 1839-1906  Search this
Dine, Jim, 1935-  Search this
Hesse, Eva, 1936-1970  Search this
Kensett, John Frederick, 1816-1872  Search this
Milles, Carl, 1875-1955  Search this
Oldenburg, Claes, 1929-  Search this
Picasso, Pablo, 1881-1973  Search this
Saunders, David  Search this
Stieglitz, Alfred, 1864-1946  Search this
Tacha, Athena, 1936-  Search this
Tworkov, Jack  Search this
Venturi, Robert  Search this
Wilke, Wendell  Search this
Extent:
60.3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Place:
Ossabaw Island (Ga.)
Date:
1872-1994
bulk 1921-1992
Summary:
The papers of art historian, art critic, author, librarian and educator Ellen Hulda Johnson measure 60.3 linear feet and date from 1872-1994, with the bulk of the material dating from 1921-1992. The papers include biographical materials; personal and family files; personal, professional, and business correspondence; extensive research and writing files; teaching files; subject files; professional and curatorial files; and artists' files. Johnson's papers reflect the full range of her career, interests, and close relationships with many artists. There is a 5.0 linear foot addition to this collection donated in 2019. Included are biographical material; correspondence; teaching and lecture files; financial and legal records; photographs of artists, events, and travels; sketchbooks; and video cassette tapes of events.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of art historian, art critic, author, librarian and educator Ellen Hulda Johnson measure 55.3 linear feet and date from 1872-1994, with the bulk of the material dating from 1921-1992. The papers include biographical materials; personal and family files; personal, professional, and business correspondence; extensive research and writing files; teaching files; subject files; professional and curatorial files; and artists' files. Johnson's papers reflect the full range of her career, interests, and close relationships with many artists.

Personal papers consist of biographical materials and personal and family files, including "memorabilia" files compiled by Johnson. Correspondence is a mix of personal, business, and professional correspondence. Significant correspondents include David Saunders (who painted a portrait of Johnson), Claes Oldenburg, Jack Tworkov, Robert Venturi, the American Scandinavian Foundation. A folder of correspondence compiled for the Archives includes letters from Alfred Stieglitz, Wendell Wilkie, Carl Milles, Jim Dine, and Alexander Archipenko.

Extensive and comprehensive writing and research project files include articles, lectures, presentations, manuscripts, notes and notebooks, including her class notebooks from courses she attended in Paris in 1935, and additional notes and notebooks on a wide variety of subjects. The numerous articles, lectures, papers, and drafts were written primarily by Johnson for the College Art Association, the Allen Memorial Art Museum bulletin, and numerous additional publications and presentations; but there are also writings by others included in the research files. Major writing projects and related research files cover Scandinavian art, the Ossabaw Island artist's colony, Cezanne, Eva Hesse, John Frederick Kensett, Claes Oldenburg, Picasso, David Saunders, Athena Tacha, Pop Art, and many other topics. Johnson's research files, manuscripts, correspondence, and photographs for major exhibitions, including one on Eva Hesse (1982) and for her published books including American Artists on Art from 1940-1980 (1982), Claes Oldenburg (1971), Fragments Recalled at 80: The Art Memoirs of Ellen H. Johnson (1993), and Modern Art and Object (1976) are arranged with the writing project files. Johnson's bibliographic index cards are found here as well.

The collection contains extensive teaching files for courses taught by Johnson at Oberlin and as a visiting professor at other institutions; professional and curatorial files reflecting her curatorial career at Allen Memorial Art Museum, as a consultant, jury member, and continuing education courses she later attended, including the Baldwin Lecture Series; and 18 linear feet of artist's files assembled by Johnson.

There is a 5.0 linear foot addition to this collection donated in 2019. Included are biographical material; correspondence; teaching and lecture files; financial and legal records; photographs of artists, events, and travels; sketchbooks; and video cassette tapes of events.
Arrangement:
The Ellen Hulda Johnson papers are arranged into eight series:

Series 1: Personal Papers, 1910-1994 (2 linear feet; Boxes 1-2, 56)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1937-1992 (4.5 linear feet; Boxes 3-7)

Series 3: Writing and Research Projects, 1872, 1932-1994 (13.5 linear feet; Boxes 7-20, 56)

Series 4: Subject Files, 1930-1993 (5 linear feet; Boxes 21-25)

Series 5: Teaching Files, 1928-1989 (6 linear feet; Boxes 26-31)

Series 6: Professional and Curatorial Files, 1936-1991 (6 linear feet; Boxes 32-37, 56)

Series 7: Artists Files, 1935-1992 (18.3 linear feet; Boxes 37-55)

Series 8: Unprocessed Addition, circa 1930-1990 (5 linear feet; Boxes 57-61)
Biographical / Historical:
Ellen Hulda Johnson (1910-1992) was an art historian, critic, and professor who worked and taught at Oberlin College in Ohio for most of her career.

Ellen Hulda Johnson was born in 1910 in Warren, Pennsylvania. She received her Bachelor's and Master's degrees in art history at Oberlin in 1933 and 1935. She worked briefly at the Toledo Museum of Art before returning to Oberlin as the art librarian. In 1940 she started Oberlin's art rental program, the first of its kind in the country. She was appointed to the faculty in 1948 and taught nineteenth and twentieth century art, American art from colonial times to the present, contemporary art, and Scandinavian art. She was a member of the Allen Memorial Art Museum's acquisition committee and appointed honorary curator of modern art in 1973. She remained at Oberlin her entire career, retiring from teaching in 1977.

Johnson was a scholar of Cézanne, Claes Oldenburg, Eva Hesse, Pablo Picasso, Edvard Munch, John F. Kensett and other modern masters, as well as Scandinavian art. In 1962 she wrote the first important article on Claes Oldenburg and, in 1970, assisted curator Athena Tacha commission his first permanent large sculpture (3-Way Plug) for the grounds of the Allen Memorial Art Museum. She was the first to show the black-striped paintings that established Frank Stella's reputation. Her efforts in promoting acquisitions of young contemporary artists helped make the Allen Memorial Art Museum a leading institution in contemporary art. Her Oberlin lectures on modern art became so popular that they had to be held in the college's largest auditorium and influenced generations of students, many of whom went on to signficant positions in the field. A new wing of the museum designed by Robert Venturi opened in 1977 and was named in honor of Johnson.

Johnson was the author of numerous articles, books, and exhibition catalogs including Cezanne (Penquin, 1967); Claes Oldenburg (Penquin, 1971); American Artists on Art from 1940-1980 (Harper and Row, 1982); and Modern Art and the Object (Thames and Hudson, 1976).

In 1968, Johnson purchased the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Weltzheimer house in Oberlin, and spent a considerable part of her time and money restoring the building where she lived the rest of her life. She bequethed the house and her significant art collection to Oberlin upon her death in 1992.
Separated Materials:
Shortly after aquisition, the Archives transferred Ellen Hulda Johnson's vertical file (16 linear feet) of clippings, press releases, and exhibition announcements to the library of the Smithsonian American Art Museum and National Portrait Gallery.
Provenance:
The Ellen Hulda Johnson papers were donated in 1994, 1998, and 2019 by the estate of Ellen Hulda Johnson via exectutor Athena Tacha.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington D.C. Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Ellen Hulda Johnson papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Occupation:
Educators -- Ohio -- Oberlin  Search this
Librarians -- Ohio  Search this
Authors -- Ohio  Search this
Art historians -- Ohio -- Oberlin  Search this
Art critics -- Ohio  Search this
Topic:
Pop art  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- Study and teaching  Search this
Art, Scandinavian  Search this
Art, Modern -- 19th century -- Study and teaching  Search this
Artist colonies -- Georgia  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Ellen Hulda Johnson papers, 1872-1994, bulk 1921-1992. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.johnelle
See more items in:
Ellen Hulda Johnson papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-johnelle
Online Media:

Godfrey O. Gaston correspondence

Creator:
Gaston, Godfrey O., 1928-  Search this
Names:
Archipenko, Alexander, 1887-1964  Search this
Armstrong, Rodney  Search this
Brumbaugh, Thomas B. (Thomas Brendle), 1921-  Search this
Chamberlain, Elwyn M.  Search this
Curtis, George A.  Search this
Fischer, Katrina Sigsbee.  Search this
Graham, Nan Wood  Search this
Jauss, Anne Marie  Search this
Kuhn, Brenda, 1911-  Search this
Kuhn, Walt, 1877-1949  Search this
Kup, Karl, 1903-1981  Search this
McKibbin, David Milton Kendall, 1906-1978  Search this
Mount, Charles Merrill  Search this
Sargent, John Singer, 1856-1925  Search this
Wood, Grant, 1891-1942  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1964-1991
Scope and Contents:
Correspondence with and/or relating to artists John Singer Sargent, Walt Kuhn, Grant Wood, George A. Curtis, Anne Marie Jauss, and others. Approximately 300 items.
The Sargent related correspondence (77 items) is between Gaston, Director of Research at Kennedy Galleries and Knoedler Gallery, and David McKibbin, art librarian at the Boston Athenaeum and authority on John Singer Sargent. The letters deal with McKibbin's catalogue raisonné on Sargent, specific works, authenticity, and the Charles M. Mount controversy regarding fake Sargent paintings. Four of the letters are from Rodney Armstrong, Director of the Athenaeum, regarding McKibbin's death and his work on Sargent.
Relating to Kuhn are 29 letters from Brenda Kuhn, daughter of Walt Kuhn, 1971-1980, primarily dealing with Gaston's articles on the vandalization of her father's "Little Nugget" club car which he designed and built in 1937 for the streamliner "City of Los Angeles" and which traveled from Chicago to Los Angeles; ca. 50 letters from George A. Curtis and several articles and catalogs about him; ca. 60 letters from Anne Marie Jauss, mostly from N.J., 1971-1989, along with photos of her work, and an obituary, 1991. Other letters include: one from Grant Wood's sister, Nan Wood Graham, referring to Grant Wood's portrait of Henry Wallace for the cover of Time magazine (1940); several from historian Thomas B. Brumbaugh; two from Wynn Chamberlain from the Edwin Hewitt Gallery; two from Alexander Archipenko, one from Vivian Nichols regarding the Virginia Steele Scott Foundation, one from Katrina Fischer, daughter of Anton Otto Fischer, and one from Karl Kup.
Biographical / Historical:
Gallery director, art historian; New York, N.Y. and Los Angeles, Calif. Born 1928. Died 2002.
Provenance:
Donated by Godfrey O. Gaston.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Artists -- United States  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.gastgodf
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-gastgodf

Kathleen Blackshear and Ethel Spears papers

Creator:
Blackshear, Kathleen, 1897-1988  Search this
Spears, Ethel, 1903-1974  Search this
Names:
Art Institute of Chicago  Search this
Art Institute of Chicago. School  Search this
Abercrombie, Gertrude, 1909-1977  Search this
Archipenko, Alexander, 1887-1964  Search this
Arquin, Florence  Search this
Aubin, Barbara, 1928-2014  Search this
Biesel, Fred, 1893-1954  Search this
Foy, Frances M., 1890-1963  Search this
Gardner, Helen, d. 1946  Search this
Halstead, Whitney  Search this
Kapsalis, Thomas Harry, 1925-  Search this
Kent, Rockwell, 1882-1971  Search this
Yoshida, Ray  Search this
Extent:
8.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1920-1990
Scope and Contents:
Spears papers (ca. 0.5 ft.) include photographs of Spears and her work; writings about Spears; letters, 1935-1967; a file on the WPA; and travel notes. Blackshear's papers include: writings by and about Blackshear, including an unpublished manuscript by Blackshear, SURVEY OF ART, 1926, and an editor's proof of Helen Gardner's ART THROUGH THE AGES (3rd ed.); photographs of Blackshear and her work; travel diaries, 1920 and undated; ca. 80 sketches; a sketchbook; letters, 1925-1986; address books, 1947-1963 and undated; clippings, 1926-1967; exhibition announcements, 1929-1965; files on Gertrude Abercrombie, Alexander Archipenko, Florence Arquin, Helen Gardner, Whitney Halstead, Tom Kapsalis, Ray Yoshida, and others, containing letters, printed material, photographs of works of art, and personal photographs; and 2.0 ft. of notebooks on art.
Also included are 2.0 ft. of handmade Christmas cards to both Blackshear and Spears from Barbara Aubin, Fred Biesel, Frances Foy, Rockwell Kent, Ray Yoshida, and many others.
Biographical / Historical:
Painter, lecturer, writer, educator; Chicago, Ill. As a graduate student at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Blackshear worked as a teaching assistant under Helen Gardner and then continued to teach there for 35 years. She had a lifetime friendship with painter and instructor Ethel Spears.
Provenance:
Donated 1990 by William Terrell, Blackshears' nephew and executor.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Art teachers -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Painters -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Women painters -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.blackath
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-blackath

Alexander Archipenko papers

Creator:
Archipenko, Alexander, 1887-1964  Search this
Names:
Archipenko Art School (Woodstock, N.Y.)  Search this
Archipenko, Angelica  Search this
Archipenko, Frances  Search this
Spies, Walter  Search this
Extent:
19.5 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Transcripts
Sound recordings
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Date:
1904-1986
bulk 1930-1964
Summary:
The Alexander Archipenko papers measure 19.5 linear feet and date from 1904 to 1986, with the bulk of materials dating from 1930 to 1964. The sculptor's personal and professional life is documented by correspondence, financial records, scrapbooks, printed matter, and photographs documenting his art, exhibitions, travel, teaching activities, and the Archipenko Art School. Archipenko wrote and lectured extensively about his philosophies of art and the relationship between art and nature. The papers include drafts, notes, and final manuscripts of published and unpublished writings, and notes, outlines, transcripts, and audio recordings of some of his lectures.
Scope and Content Note:
The Alexander Archipenko papers measure 19.5 linear feet and date from 1904 to 1986, with the bulk of materials dating from 1930 to 1964. The sculptor's personal and professional life is documented by correspondence, financial records, scrapbooks, printed matter, and photographs documenting his art, exhibitions, travel, teaching activities, and the Archipenko Art School. Archipenko wrote and lectured extensively about his philosophies of art and the relationship between art and nature. The papers include drafts, notes, and final manuscripts of published and unpublished writings, and notes, outlines, transcripts, and audio recordings of some of his lectures.

Correspondence concerns both personal and professional matters. Among Archipenko's personal correspondents are relatives and friends in the Ukraine, his wife Angelica during her extended stays in Mexico and California, and other women. Professional correspondence is with dealers, curators, scholars, collectors, colleges and universities concerning exhibitions, sales and commissions, loans, and teaching and lecture engagements.

Archipenko wrote and lectured extensively about his philosophy of art, art in nature, and theories concerning creativity and the universe. His papers include manuscripts, drafts, notes and supporting materials for his book published in 1960, Archipenko: Fifty Creative Years, 1908-1958. Similar documentation of unpublished writings, as well as notes, outlines, and some transcripts of lectures and talks are also in the series.

Records concerning the Archipenko Art School are sparse, with only one photograph of students in Berlin, 1921. Surviving records include printed matter, a cashbook, student roster, and scrapbook containing photographs, printed matter, and a typescript copy of a statement by Archipenko, "How I Teach." Most of this material focuses on the New York and Woodstock schools, with only a few items concerning Chicago. In addition, files regarding Archipenko's teaching activities at schools other than his own include course descriptions, student rosters, grades, and printed matter.

Financial records consist of banking records, paid bills, and miscellaneous items. Paid bills include invoices and receipts for art supplies, shipping, and storage. Among the miscellaneous items are price lists, royalties paid by the Museum of Modern Art for Woman Combing Her Hair, and sales records.

Nine scrapbooks contain clippings, exhibition announcements and catalogs, lecture notices, advertisements and brochures of the Archipenko Art School, and a small number of photographs. Printed matter consists primarily of clippings about Archipenko and exhibition catalogs with related announcements and invitations. Miscellaneous items include books about Archipenko, catalogs of museum collections containing works by Archipenko, and reproductions. Of special interest is a brochure about the Multiplex Advertising Machine that bears a similarity to the Archipentura, an "apparatus for displaying Changeable Pictures" Archipenko invented circa 1924 and patented in 1927.

Photographs are of people, Archipenko's travels and miscellaneous places, exhibitions, works of art, events, and miscellaneous subjects. Five photograph albums mainly document travels. Slides and transparencies include black and white lantern slides probably used to illustrate lectures.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 10 series. Lantern slides and glass plates are housed separately and closed to researchers, but listed where they fall intellectually within the collection.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1908-1964 (0.5 linear feet; Box 1, OV 28)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1922-1970 (4.1 linear feet; Boxes 1-5)

Series 3: Subject Files, 1940-1958 (6 folders; Box 5)

Series 4: Writings, 1923-1971 (3.2 linear feet; Boxes 5-8, Film can FC 30)

Series 5: Teaching, 1921-1952 (0.8 linear feet; Box 9, Film cans FC 31-33)

Series 6: Financial Records, 1923-1971 (1.5 linear feet; Box 9-10)

Series 7: Scrapbooks, 1910-1961 (1.2 linear feet; Boxes 22-25)

Series 8: Printed Material, 1913-1987 (3.7 linear feet; Boxes 11-14, 26, OV 29)

Series 9: Miscellaneous, 1916-1966 (0.5 linear feet; Box 14, 16, Film can FC 34)

Series 10: Photographic Material, 1904-1964 (3.6 linear feet; Boxes 14-15, 17-21, 26-27)
Biographical Note:
Alexander Archipenko (1887-1964) was the son of an engineer/inventor and grandson of an icon painter. Among the first modern sculptors of the 20th century to be associated with the Cubist movement, Archipenko was known for his innovative use of concave space. His major contribution was the realization of negative form through use of a hole to create a contrast of solid and void. His sculpto-paintings united form and color; begun in 1912, these polychromed constructions are among the earliest mixed-media works known, and sometimes incorporated objects. Eventually, his Cubist-inspired work evolved into the simplified, abstract shapes for which he is best known. Although known primarily as a sculptor, Archipenko produced paintings, drawings, and prints as well.

At age 15, Archipenko began studying art at the University of Kiev in his native city; he was expelled three years later for criticizing the teachers. He then went to Moscow where he worked on his own and exhibited in several group shows; his first solo exhibition was held in the Ukraine in 1906.

Archipenko made Paris his home from 1908 until the outbreak of World War I. Soon after his arrival, he enrolled in the Ecole des Beaux-Arts; this association lasted but two weeks, and marked the end of Archipenko's formal training. He continued to study art by spending large amounts of time visiting art museums and painting on his own. During this period, he began exhibiting in the Salon des Independents with the Cubists, and as a member of the "Section d'Or" participated in that group's exhibitions. His first one-man exhibition in Germany was held at the Folkwant Museum (1912) and his work was featured in the Armory Show (1913).

In 1912, at the age of 25, Archipenko established his first art school in Paris. He spent the war years working quietly outside of Nice, and soon afterwards circulated an extensive exhibition of his works throughout Europe. In 1921, Archipenko settled in Berlin, opened an art school there, and married sculptor Angelica Bruno-Schmitz, who was known professionally as Gela Forster.

Archipenko's reputation was solidly established and the majority of his ground-breaking work - adaptation of Cubist ideas to sculpture, sculpto-paintings and incorporation of negative space in sculpture - was accomplished prior to his 1923 arrival in the United States. One of his most innovative works executed in America was the Archipentura, invented circa 1924 and patented in 1927, a machine with rolling cylinders that displayed "animated paintings" using motion and light. Other creations of note are carved Lucite sculptures, illuminated from within, that were executed in the mid-1940s.

Upon settling in the United States in 1923, Archipenko opened his art school in New York City; a summer school was established in Woodstock, New York the following year. Within a few years, Archipenko purchased land near Woodstock and began construction of a home, personal studio, and buildings for the school. At various times during the 1930s, Archipenko resided in Chicago and Los Angeles, and operated schools while living in those cities. For many years during the 1940s, Angelica served on the sculpture faculty at the Escuela de Belles Artes in San Miguel Allende, Mexico.

In addition to running his own schools, Archipenko taught at a number of colleges and universities, where he ran workshops, and served as a visiting professor. He wrote and lectured extensively about his philosophy of art and theories of creativity, publishing several articles and a book, Archipenko: Fifty Creative Years, 1908-1958 (1960).

Angelica Archipenko died in 1957. Three years later Archipenko married sculptor Frances Gray, a former student. During the early 1960s, the couple traveled extensively on a lecture tour that accompanied a solo exhibition to several German cities. Archipenko died in New York City, February 25, 1964.

The following chronology is excerpted from Alexander Archipenko: A Centennial Tribute by Katherine Janszky Michaelsen and Nehama Guralnik (National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, 1986) and Archipenko: The Sculpture and Graphic art, Including a Print Catalogue Raisonne by Donald Karshan, Ernst Wasmuth Verlag (Tubingen, Germany, 1974).

1887 -- Born to Porfiry Antonovich and Poroskovia Wassilievna Machova Archipenko in Kiev, Ukraine, Russia. Father a mechanical engineer, professor of engineering, and inventor; grandfather an icon painter.

1900 -- Studied and copied Michelangelo drawings from a book given him by his grandfather during a long confinement following a leg injury.

1902-1905 -- Painting and sculpture student in Kiev art school; expelled for criticizing his teachers.

1906 -- First one-man show in the Ukraine. Worked in Moscow and exhibited in several group shows.

1908 -- Moved to Paris and enrolled in the Ecole des Beaux-Arts. Quit formal art instruction after two weeks, continued to study art on his own by visiting museums.

1910 -- Exhibited in the Salon des Independants with the cubists (also in 1911-1914 and 1919).

1912 -- Opened art school in Paris. "Section d'Or" formed in Paris with Archipenko among its members. The group exhibited until 1914, and briefly after World War I. First solo exhibition in Germany, Folkwant Museum, Hagen.

1913 -- Represented in the Armory Show. Executed first prints (lithographs).

1914 -- Began making sculpto-paintings.

1914-1918 -- Spent the war years working near Nice.

1919-1920 -- Began extensive tour exhibiting his works in various European cities (Geneva, Zurich, Paris, London, Brussels, Athens, Berlin, Munich, etc.).

1920 -- One-man exhibition in the Venice Biennale.

1921 -- First solo exhibition in the United States at the Societe Anonyme, Inc., New York; a symposium, Psychology of Modern Art and Archipenko, was held during the course of the show. Moved to Berlin and opened art school. Married sculptor Angelica Bruno-Schmitz [known professionally as Gela Forster]. First print commission.

1923 -- Moved to the United States and opened art school in New York City.

1924 -- Established a summer school at Woodstock, New York.

1927 -- "Archipentura" patented ("Apparatus for displaying Changeable Pictures and methods for Decorating Changeable Display Apparatus," nos. 1,626, 946 and 1,626,497).

1928 -- Became an American citizen.

1929 -- Bought land near Woodstock, New York, and began construction of school and studio buildings.

1932 -- Lectured on his theories of creativeness at colleges and universities throughout the United States.

1933 -- Taught summer session at Mills College, Oakland, California, and Chouinard School, Los Angeles.

1935 -- Moved to Los Angeles and opened art school.

1935-1936 -- Taught summer sessions at the University of Washington, Seattle.

1936 -- Moved to Chicago and opened art school. Associate instructor at New Bauhaus School, Chicago.

1938 -- Returned to New York; reopened art school and Woodstock summer school.

1944 -- Taught at the Dalton School, New York City.

1946-1947 -- Returned to Chicago; taught at the Institute of Design.

1947 -- Began making carved plastic sculptures with internal illumination.

1950 -- Taught at University of Kansas City, Missouri.

1950-1951 -- Lecture tour of the southern cities of the United States.

1951 -- Taught at Carmel Institute of Art, California, University of Oregon, and University of Washington, Seattle.

1952 -- Taught at University of Delaware, Newark.

1953 -- Elected Associate Member of International Institute of Arts and Letters.

1955-1956 -- One-man exhibition tours in Germany (Dusseldorf, Darmstadt, Mannheim, and Recklinghausen).

1956 -- Taught at University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.

1957 -- Death of Angelica.

1959 -- Awarded gold medal, XIII Biennale de'Arte Triveneta, III Concorso Internationale del Bronzetto, Padua, Italy.

1960 -- Archipenko: Fifty Creative Years, 1908-1958 by Alexander Archipenko and Fifty Art Historians published by Tekhne (a company established by Archipenko for the purpose). Married Frances Gray, a sculptor and former student. Recovered plasters of early work stored by French friends since the end of World War I. Traveling exhibition in Germany (Hagen, Münster, and Dusseldorf).

1962 -- Elected to the Department of Art, National Institute of Arts and Letters.

1964 -- Dies in New York City.
Related Material:
Among the holdings of the Archives are the Donald H. Karshan papers relating to Alexander Archipenko, originally accessioned as part of the Alexander Archipenko papers, but later separated to form a distinct collection.

The Archives also has the National Collection of Fine Arts records relating to Alexander Archipenko.
Separated Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds microfilm of material lent for microfilming (reels NA11-NA12, NA16-NA18, and NA 20-NA22) including biographical material, correspondence, exhibition records, writings, printed material and photographs. Loaned materials were returned to the lender and are not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
In 1967, the Alexander Archipenko papers, previously on deposit at Syracuse University, were loaned to the Archives of American Art for microfilming by his widow Frances Archipenko Gray. In 1982, Ms. Gray donated most of the material previously loaned and microfilmed to the Archives of American Art, along with additional items.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. research facility. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice. Lantern slides and glass plate negatives are housed separately and closed to researchers.
Rights:
The Alexander Archipenko papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Art -- Philosophy  Search this
Sculpture, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Sculpture -- Technique  Search this
Sculptors  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Cubism  Search this
Genre/Form:
Transcripts
Sound recordings
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Citation:
Alexander Archipenko papers, 1904-1986, bulk 1930-1964. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.archalex
See more items in:
Alexander Archipenko papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-archalex
Online Media:

Lecture, "Archipenko: Materials and Color" by Katherine Michaelsen at National Gallery of Art

Collection Creator:
Archipenko, Alexander, 1887-1964  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound cassette
Container:
Box 7, Folder 22
Type:
Archival materials
Audio [31027000537486]
Sound cassettes
Date:
1986
Series Restrictions:
Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Collection Rights:
The Alexander Archipenko papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Alexander Archipenko papers, 1904-1986, bulk 1930-1964. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Alexander Archipenko papers
Alexander Archipenko papers / Series 4: Writings / 4.1: By Archipenko / Lectures and Talks
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-archalex-ref805

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