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The quilts of Gee's Bend / Tinwood Media ; produced and directed by Vanessa Vadim and Matthew Arnett

Author:
Vadim, Vanessa  Search this
Arnett, Matthew  Search this
Tinwood Media (Firm)  Search this
Physical description:
1 videodisc (28 min.) : sound, color and black and white ; 4 3/4 in
Type:
Video recordings
Documentary films
Ethnographic films
Place:
Alabama
Gee's Bend
Date:
2006
©2006
Topic:
Quilts  Search this
African American quilts  Search this
African American quiltmakers  Search this
African American women  Search this
Call number:
video 001623
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1105011

Museum of Craft and Folk Art records

Creator:
Museum of Craft and Folk Art  Search this
Names:
Bean, Bennett, 1941-  Search this
Fasanella, Ralph  Search this
Graham, Bill, 1931-  Search this
Kovatch, Ron  Search this
MacKenzie, Warren  Search this
Moran, Mike, 1948-  Search this
Extent:
28.9 Linear feet
12.48 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Photographs
Transparencies
Video recordings
Scrapbooks
Interviews
Visitors' books
Date:
1970-2012
Summary:
The Museum of Craft and Folk Art records measure 28.9 linear feet and 12.48 GB and date from 1970 to 2012. The museum was established in 1982 in San Francisco, California and exhibited local and national craft and folk art collections until it closed in 2012. The collection includes administration records, extensive exhibition files, artists' files, museum publications, printed material, video recordings, born digital items, and photographic material.
Scope and Contents:
The Museum of Craft and Folk Art records measure 28.9 linear feet and 12.48 GB and date from 1970 to 2012. The museum was established in 1982 in San Francisco, California and exhibited local and national craft and folk art collections until it closed in 2012. The collection includes administration records, extensive exhibition files, artists' files, museum publications, printed material, video recordings, born digital items, and photographic material.

Administration records include museum bylaws, lists of early exhibitions, education program evaluations, documents related to public programs, and printed materials.

Exhibition files comprise the largest group of materials in the collection. Notable exhibitions documented include Who'd A Thought It: Improvisation in African-American Quiltmaking (1987-1988), MetalSpeaks: The Unexpected (1997), and Warren MacKenzie: Legacy of an American Potter (2009). There are also video recordings and born digital content scattered throughout the series. Though most of the material is related to the MOCFA exhibitions, there are a few files on exhibitions at other galleries and museums. The exhibition files contain a wide variety of correspondence, art inventories, price lists, printed and digital materials, guest registers, photographic materials, and video recordings, electronic discs, videodiscs, and floppy discs. Artists' files are found for a handful of artists, including Bennett Bean, Ralph Fasanella, Bill Graham, Ron Kovatch, Mike Moran, and Salvador V. Ricalde. The files contain primarily video recordings of artist performances and interviews, but also include resumes and inquiries.

Museum of Craft and Folk Art publications consist of exhibition catalogs, newsletters, reports, and announcements. There are several video recordings of events, such as fashion shows, that were held at the museum.

Printed materials and commercial video recordings include an oversize scrapbook, binders of exhibition press clippings, and folders of clippings on various topics, as well as documentaries and news coverage of the museum.

Photographic materials consist of slides, negatives, photographs, transparencies, and a photo album. The images are of artwork, exhibition installations, events, artists, and museum offices and staff.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 6 series.

Series 1: Administration Records, circa 1988-circa 2010 (0.5 linear feet; Box 1, 0.004 GB; ER01-ER02)

Series 2: Exhibition Files, 1976-2012 (22.7 linear feet; Boxes 1-24, 12.14 GB; ER03-ER50)

Series 3: Artists' Files and Video Recordings, 1983-2007 (0.6 linear feet; Box 24)

Series 4: Museum of Craft and Folk Art Publications, 1977-2012 (1.4 linear feet; Boxes 24-25, OV 31-32, 0.003 GB; ER51)

Series 5: Printed Materials and Commercial Video Recordings, 1983-2007 (2.7 linear feet; Boxes 26-28, OV 33-35, 0.050 GB; ER52)

Series 6: Photographic Materials, 1970-2011 (2 linear feet; Boxes 28-30, 0.282 GB; ER53)
Biographical / Historical:
The Museum of Craft and Folk Art was established in San Francisco, California by painter and sculptor Gertrud Parker in 1982. The museum was originally located in a house on Balboa Street and then moved to the Fort Mason Center where it operated for over twenty years before relocating to Yerba Buena Lane in 2006.

Notable exhibitions organized or held at the museum include Innerskins/Outerskins: Gut and Fishskin (1987), Who'd A Thought It: Improvisation in African-American Quiltmaking (1987-1988) which was a traveling exhibition, Folk Art of the Soviet Union (1990), MetalSpeaks: The Unexpected (1997), Emblems of Passage: Art of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas (2002), The Art of Gaman: Arts and Crafts From the Japanese Internment Camp 1942-1946 (2006), and Warren MacKenzie: Legacy of an American Potter (2009). The museum also worked with artists on commission and regularly offered public programs, workshops, and educational outreach events for visitors of all ages. They also partnered with the website Etsy on a popular monthly "Craft Bar" series where people could gather, socialize, and create something handmade.

The Museum of Craft and Folk Art closed in December of 2012. The final exhibition was Fiber Futures: Japan's Textile Pioneers.
Provenance:
The Museum of Craft and Folk Art records were donated by Jennifer McCabe, former executive director of the museum, in 2014.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Museum of Craft and Folk Art records are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Folk art  Search this
Handicraft  Search this
African American quilts  Search this
Art museums -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
African American quiltmakers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Transparencies
Video recordings
Scrapbooks
Interviews
Visitors' books
Citation:
Museum of Craft and Folk Art records, 1970-2012. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.musecraf
See more items in:
Museum of Craft and Folk Art records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-musecraf
Online Media:

Museum of Craft and Folk Art records, 1970-2012

Creator:
Museum of Craft and Folk Art  Search this
Subject:
MacKenzie, Warren  Search this
Kovatch, Ron  Search this
Graham, Bill  Search this
Fasanella, Ralph  Search this
Bean, Bennett  Search this
Moran, Mike  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Transparencies
Video recordings
Scrapbooks
Interviews
Visitors' books
Topic:
Folk art  Search this
Handicraft  Search this
African American quilts  Search this
Art museums -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
African American quiltmakers  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)16184
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)367139
AAA_collcode_musecraf
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_367139
Online Media:

Exhibition Records, 1967-1994

Creator:
National Museum of American Art (U.S.) Office of Design and Production  Search this
Subject:
Lewton, Val  Search this
Reed, Georgine S  Search this
Masterworks of Louis Comfort Tiffany (Exhibition) (1989-1990: Washington, D.C.)  Search this
West as America: Reinterpreting Images of the Frontier, 1820-1920 (Exhibition) (1991: Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Physical description:
13 oversize folders
Type:
Architectural drawings
Collection descriptions
Date:
1967
1967-1994
Topic:
Art museums  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 96-134
Restrictions & Rights:
Restricted for 15 years, until Jan-01-2010; Transferring office; Contact reference staff for details
See more items in:
Exhibition Records 1963-2000 [Smithsonian American Art Museum Office of Design and Production]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_252154

Schedule for traveling exhibition Who'd A Thought It: Improvisation in African-American Quiltmaking

Type:
Writings
Date:
circa 1988
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)18662
See more items in:
Museum of Craft and Folk Art records, 1970-2012
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_item_18662

Installation of Who'd A Thought It: Improvisation in African American Quiltmaking traveling exhibition at the Chicago Field Museum

Type:
Photographs
Date:
1990
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)18663
See more items in:
Museum of Craft and Folk Art records, 1970-2012
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_item_18663
Online Media:

Sarah Mary Taylor working on quilt

Subject:
Taylor, Sarah Mary  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Date:
circa 1980-2014
Topic:
African American folk art  Search this
African American quiltmakers  Search this
Artists at or with their work  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)18740
See more items in:
Jimmy Hedges papers and Rising Fawn Folk Art Gallery records, 1969-2016
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_item_18740

Photograph of quilt by Sarah Mary Taylor

Subject:
Taylor, Sarah Mary  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Date:
circa 1980-2014
Topic:
African American folk art  Search this
African American quiltmakers  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)18741
See more items in:
Jimmy Hedges papers and Rising Fawn Folk Art Gallery records, 1969-2016
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_item_18741

Oral history interview with Peggie L. Hartwell, 2002 June 3 and July 10

Interviewee:
Hartwell, Peggie L., 1939-  Search this
Interviewer:
Malarcher, Patricia  Search this
Subject:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
African American quilts  Search this
African American women artists -- South Carolina -- Interviews  Search this
African American quiltmakers -- South Carolina -- Interviews  Search this
Fiber artists -- South Carolina -- Interviews  Search this
Fiberwork  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)11503
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)237989
AAA_collcode_hartwe02
Theme:
African American
Craft
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_237989
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Carolyn Mazloomi, 2002 September 17-30

Interviewee:
Mazloomi, Carolyn, 1948-  Search this
Interviewer:
Cubbs, Joanne  Search this
Subject:
Adkins, Minnie  Search this
Benberry, Cuesta  Search this
Cargo, Robert T.  Search this
Connell, Martha Stamm  Search this
Freeman, Roland L.  Search this
Hill, Lauryn  Search this
Johnson, Nkosi  Search this
Miller, Edjohnetta  Search this
Sisto, Penny  Search this
Wilson, Marie  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Women of Colour Quilters Network  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
African American quiltmakers -- Interviews  Search this
Album quilts -- Maryland -- Baltimore  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Quilting -- Equipment and supplies  Search this
Quilting -- Study and teaching  Search this
Quilting -- Technique  Search this
Quiltmakers -- Ohio -- Interviews  Search this
Quilts -- Appalachian Region  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)11504
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)240143
AAA_collcode_mazloo02
Theme:
African American
Craft
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_240143
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Peggie L. Hartwell

Interviewee:
Hartwell, Peggie L., 1939-  Search this
Interviewer:
Malarcher, Patricia  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Extent:
80 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2002 June 3 and July 10
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Peggie Hartwell conducted 2002 June 3-July 10, by Patricia Malarcher, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, in the artist's apartment, on Central Park West, New York, N.Y.
Hartwell speaks of growing up on a farm with her extended family in Springfield, S.C.; female quiltmakers and male storytellers in her family; drawing in sand as a child; her mother's move to Brooklyn; joining her mother and father in New York; growing up in Brooklyn; her awareness of the many cultures in New York and being surrounded by art, including her mother's crocheting and her father's a cappella group; taking tap dancing lessons; experimenting with art in public school; working at various factory jobs after high school until "reconnecting" with art; studying with dancer Syvilla Fort at the Katherine Dunham School of Dance in New York; Fort encouraging her to draw on the studio walls and sew costumes; touring internationally with the theater group Harlem Rhythm USA from 1965 to 1972; her return to the U.S. and receiving a theater degree at Queens College; working at an insurance company to support her art; exhibiting her black and white, pen-and-ink drawings; the narratives and "oral histories" in her quilts; the meaning of various fabrics and colors; participating in "quilting communities" such as the Women of Color Quilters Network, Empire Quilters, and the American Quilter's Society; her lectures, workshops, and residencies; working with children;narratives inspired by childhood memories; her move back to South Carolina; themes in her quilts and "quilting styles" (improvisational, traditional, contemporary, and African American); serving on the board of the New York Chapter of the Women of Color Quilters Network; and planning the exhibition "Threads of Faith" for the New York Bible Association. She also comments on John Cage, Cuesta Benberry, Asadata Dafora, Francelise Dawkins, Carolyn Mazloomi, Edjohnetta Miller, Arthur Mitchell, Harriet Powers, Faith Ringgold, Marie Wilson, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Peggie L. Hartwell (1939- ) is a quiltmaker of Summerville, S.C. Patricia Malarcher is a fiber artist.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 8 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hr., 50 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
African American quilts  Search this
African American women artists -- South Carolina -- Interviews  Search this
African American quiltmakers -- South Carolina -- Interviews  Search this
Fiber artists -- South Carolina -- Interviews  Search this
Fiberwork  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.hartwe02
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-hartwe02

Oral history interview with Carolyn Mazloomi

Interviewee:
Mazloomi, Carolyn  Search this
Interviewer:
Cubbs, Joanne  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Women of Colour Quilters Network  Search this
Adkins, Minnie, 1934-  Search this
Benberry, Cuesta  Search this
Cargo, Robert T.  Search this
Connell, Martha Stamm  Search this
Freeman, Roland L., 1936-  Search this
Hill, Lauryn  Search this
Johnson, Nkosi, 1989-2001  Search this
Miller, Edjohnetta  Search this
Sisto, Penny  Search this
Wilson, Marie  Search this
Extent:
16 Items (Sound recording: 16 sound files (4 hr., 33 min.), digital, wav)
56 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2002 September 17-30
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Carolyn Mazloomi conducted 2002 September 17 and 30, by Joanne Cubbs, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, in West Chester, Ohio. Mazloomi speaks of growing up in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, with a family of self-taught artists; the positive influence of her aunt and teacher Dr. Carter; the generation of African-American quilt-makers who followed a gap in quilt-making post-slavery; she describes her previous career as an aeronautical engineer and her transition to quilt-making; how she identifies herself as a craftsperson, not an artist; her experience with Baltimore album and Appalachian quilts; learning to quilt; the Women of Color Quilter's Network and its economic and social development programs; her book, "Spirits of the Cloth"; the positive and negative aspects of travel; the false generalizations of African-American quilts in academic circles; the importance of gender, race, and ethnicity in her work; her connection to "praise songs"; she discusses functional vs. nonfunctional quilts; the market for "hand-crafted" quilts; agents and galleries; she describes her working environment; adopting the use of a sewing machine in her work; the importance of community; her technique; her accomplishment of placing African-American quilts in the Renwick Gallery; the influence of magazines, including "Raw Vision;" her aversion to commissions; expanding her use of materials and technology; her exhibitions; her role as an advocate and dealer; finding inspiration in black and white linocuts and her use of color in quilts; and making a connection with her audience. Mazloomi also recalls Marie Wilson, Cuesta Benberry, Edjohnetta Miller, Roland Freeman, Robert Cargo, Martha Connell, Penny Sisto, Minnie Adkins, Nkosi Johnson, and Lauryn Hill.
Biographical / Historical:
Carolyn Mazloomi (1948- ) is a quilt maker from West Chester, Ohio.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 16 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hrs., 33 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Self-taught artists  Search this
Topic:
African American quiltmakers -- Interviews  Search this
Album quilts -- Maryland -- Baltimore  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Quilting -- Equipment and supplies  Search this
Quilting -- Study and teaching  Search this
Quilting -- Technique  Search this
Quiltmakers -- Ohio -- Interviews  Search this
Quilts -- Appalachian Region  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.mazloo02
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-mazloo02

Interview with Maria Goodwin

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 video recording (MiniDV)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2011
Scope and Contents:
Maria Goodwin - member of the Daughters of Dorcas and Sons quilt guild - discusses her quilting experience, the evolution of quilt making, and the Washington, D.C. based quilting group - Daughters of Dorcas and Sons. Goodwin recalls her early memories of cutting out triangles and sewing them together with her mother, who was a seamstress; she states her mother taught her an appreciation for fabric. She explains she was not interested in clothes making, and decided to explore quilting because she found quilt making less confining. Goodwin explains how the members of Daughters of Dorcas and Sons interact with one another, and describes the various styles the members employ in their quilt making. She talks about how the quilt has evolved from a functional piece to a piece of artwork displayed on the wall; the development and evolution of art quilt; use of technology in quilting; the increase in pricing of quilting and sewing machines; the evolution of fabric house; special quilting fabric lines; the various types of quilting; and working with colors in quilting. Goodwin explains the debate and development of categories in quilt competition shows; use of other media, in addition to fabric, in quilting; the intersection between quilting, family history, and scrapbooking; the growth of quilting communities; the importance of a foundation for beginner quilters; and how quilters build their skills over time. Goodwin talks about her creative style, her creative process, how she designs her quilt, where she finds inspiration, and how her interest in quilting grew. She loves the challenge of designing and incorporating ancient history, including illuminated manuscripts, into her quilts. Goodwin talks about the future of quilting, including children learning to quilt; the importance of preserving old quilts because they document family and quilting heritage; and the importance of documenting the creation of the quilts through video and photographs so the creation process is preserved.
Interview. Dated 20110131.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Quiltmakers  Search this
African American quiltmakers  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Communities  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Interview with Maria Goodwin, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.01-007.16, Item ACMA AV005219
See more items in:
Community and Creativity Project Records
Community and Creativity Project Records / Series 2: Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-01-007-16-ref102

Man Made: African-American Men and Quilting Traditions exhibition records

Creator:
Fry, Gladys-Marie, 1931-  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
0.05 Linear feet (1 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Color slides
Exhibit scripts
Exhibition records
Correspondence
Transparencies
Photographic prints
Brochures
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
1998-01 - 1998-03
Summary:
An exhibition on African American male quilt makers organized by Dr. Gladys-Marie Fry and exhibited at Anacostia Community Museum from January 1998 --March 1998. Quilters included: Elroy Atkins, Paul Buford, Charles Carter, Thomas Covington, Raymond Dobard, David Driskell, Benjamin Jackson, Dennis Jones, Thomas Mack, Jeff Martin, Herbert Munn, Charles Palmer, Joe Washington, and Warren Wise. These records document the planning, organizing, execution, and promotion of the exhibition. Materials include correspondence, research files, exhibit scripts, administrative records, brochures, press coverage, education packets, loan agreements, floor plans, and catalogues.
Scope and Contents note:
These records document the planning, organizing, execution, and promotion of the exhibition. Materials include correspondence, research files, exhibit scripts, administrative records, brochures, education packets, floor plans, and catalogues.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Quiltmakers  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
African American quiltmakers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Exhibit scripts
Exhibition records -- 1990-2004
Correspondence
Transparencies
Photographic prints
Brochures
Citation:
Man made: African-American men and quilting traditions exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-013
See more items in:
Man Made: African-American Men and Quilting Traditions exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-013

Man Made: Gallery tour with Curator Dr. Gladys-Marie Fry

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Fry, Gladys-Marie, 1931-  Search this
Collection Creator:
Fry, Gladys-Marie, 1931-  Search this
Extent:
1 video recording (VHS)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
Curator Dr. Gladys-Marie Fry led a gallery walk of the exhibition 'Man Made: African-American Men and Quilting Traditions.'
Exhibition tour. Related to exhibition 'Man Made: African-American Men and Quilting Traditions.' Dated 19980117.
Biographical / Historical:
Man Made: African-American Men and Quilting Traditions featured quilts made by members of the least represented group among all American quilt makers, African American men. The quilts shown had their origins in both the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and included both utilitarian bed quilts to purely decorative ones. The quilt makers represented ranged from the 9-year-old Herbert Munn to the 105-year-old Benjamin Jackson. The quilts came from four different areas of the country: the Deep South, the Atlantic Seaboard, the Midwest, and the Far West. The exhibition was developed by guest curator Dr. Gladys-Marie Fry at the University of Maryland in 1996.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Quilts  Search this
Quiltmakers  Search this
Male quiltmakers  Search this
African American quiltmakers  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
Man Made: Gallery Walk with Curator Dr. Gladys-Marie Fry, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-013, Item ACMA AV002236
See more items in:
Man Made: African-American Men and Quilting Traditions exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-013-ref506

Will the Circle be Unbroken: Four Generations of African-American Quiltmakers (2006)

Collection Creator:
Museum of Craft and Folk Art  Search this
Container:
Box 21, Folder 21
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
2006
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Collection Rights:
The Museum of Craft and Folk Art records are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Museum of Craft and Folk Art records, 1970-2012. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Museum of Craft and Folk Art records
Museum of Craft and Folk Art records / Series 2: Exhibition Files
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-musecraf-ref320

Exhibition Files

Collection Creator:
Museum of Craft and Folk Art  Search this
Extent:
22.7 Linear feet (Boxes 1-24)
12.14 Gigabytes (ER03-ER50)
Type:
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Date:
1976-2012
Scope and Contents:
The bulk of this series is comprised of Museum of Craft and Folk Art exhibitions, but there are also a few exhibitions at other art venues. The series includes correspondence, shipping notices, art inventories, price lists, printed materials, guest registers, and photographic materials. Notable exhibitions include Innerskins/Outerskins: Gut and Fishskin (1987), Who'd A Thought It: Improvisation in African-American Quiltmaking (1987-1988) which was a traveling exhibition, Folk Art of the Soviet Union (1990), MetalSpeaks: The Unexpected (1997), Emblems of Passage: Art of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas (2002), The Art of Gaman: Arts and Crafts From the Japanese Internment Camp 1942-1946 (2006), and Warren MacKenzie: Legacy of an American Potter (2009). There are also 46 videocassettes, and born digital materials of exhibition events, artist interviews, performances, and general documentation.
Arrangement:
The exhibitions are arranged chronologically by year, then alphabetically by title within each year.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Collection Rights:
The Museum of Craft and Folk Art records are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Museum of Craft and Folk Art records, 1970-2012. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.musecraf, Series 2
See more items in:
Museum of Craft and Folk Art records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-musecraf-ref36

Who'd A Thought It: Improvisation in African-American Quiltmaking (1987-1988)

Collection Creator:
Museum of Craft and Folk Art  Search this
Container:
Box 4
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Collection Rights:
The Museum of Craft and Folk Art records are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Museum of Craft and Folk Art records, 1970-2012. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Museum of Craft and Folk Art records
Museum of Craft and Folk Art records / Series 2: Exhibition Files
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-musecraf-ref83

General Exhibition Information

Collection Creator:
Museum of Craft and Folk Art  Search this
Container:
Box 4, Folder 7
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1987-1988
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Collection Rights:
The Museum of Craft and Folk Art records are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Museum of Craft and Folk Art records, 1970-2012. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Museum of Craft and Folk Art records
Museum of Craft and Folk Art records / Series 2: Exhibition Files / Who'd A Thought It: Improvisation in African-American Quiltmaking (1987-1988)
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-musecraf-ref84

Traveling Exhibition Agreements

Collection Creator:
Museum of Craft and Folk Art  Search this
Container:
Box 4, Folder 8-11
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1988-1994
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Collection Rights:
The Museum of Craft and Folk Art records are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Museum of Craft and Folk Art records, 1970-2012. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Museum of Craft and Folk Art records
Museum of Craft and Folk Art records / Series 2: Exhibition Files / Who'd A Thought It: Improvisation in African-American Quiltmaking (1987-1988)
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-musecraf-ref85

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