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A. Scott Crossfield Papers

Creator:
Crossfield, A. Scott (Albert Scott), 1921-  Search this
Names:
Eastern Air Lines  Search this
National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA)  Search this
North American Aviation, Inc.  Search this
Extent:
20.23 Cubic feet (42 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Audiotapes
Correspondence
Manuscripts
Date:
1940 - 2004
Summary:
This collection consists of over nine cubic feet of material documenting Scott Crossfield's aviation career, with emphasis on his involvement with the North American X-15. The following types of material are included: correspondence; reel to reel tapes; papers, manuscripts; newspaper and magazine clippings; aviation manuals; photographs; film; and Crossfield's notes and reports.
Scope and Content note:
This collection encompasses the entirety of Albert Scott "Scotty" Crossfield, Jr.'s career as an engineer, test pilot, airline executive, and speaker and advocate for aerospace education. Records in the collection date from Crossfield's time at college in the 1940s through his death in 2006. Crossfield's papers were donated to the National Air and Space Museum (NASM) Archives by the Crossfield family in 2006 and a second batch of material was received in 2008. The collection was received without any apparent organizational scheme, but some items were received in labeled folders and these folder titles were retained when the collection was processed. One group of material was loaned by the family for copying and these items were photocopied and placed within the appropriate folder in the case of documents, or were scanned and entered into the National Air and Space Museum (NASM) Archives image database in the case of photographs.

After his retirement from North American Aviation, Inc., Crossfield gave his papers to a former secretary, Marion Brown, so that she could organize them for his use in future writing projects. In February 1973, a U.S. Navy Vought A-7E Corsair II crashed into the apartment building where Brown lived and all of Crossfield's papers in her possession were destroyed. Due to this incident, the collection has more material from Crossfield's time with Eastern Air Lines and onwards, although the prior years are still well represented through records that were either retained in Crossfield's possession or copies that were gathered after the fact. There is correspondence from Crossfield relating to the crash in Box 11 of the collection.

The archival materials in this collection are organized into four series. The first series is composed of personal materials and includes school records, correspondence, personal photographs, records relating to various organizations in which Crossfield was active, information relating to the publication of Crossfield's autobiography, Always Another Dawn, other writings by Crossfield, financial records, subject files assembled by Crossfield, philatelic materials (Crossfield was an active collector and was a founding member and officer of The Aviation Historical Foundation, a philatelic organization), and news clippings. The material in this series is largely organized chronologically. Personal photographs and subject files are organized by topic first and chronologically within each folder and organizations are arranged alphabetically by name first and also chronologically within the individual folders.

The second series contains items relating to Crossfield's professional life, organized chronologically by place of employment. This series includes materials relating to Crossfield's work at Boeing, the U.S. Navy, the Kirsten Wind Tunnel at the University of Washington Aeronautical Laboratory, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), North American Aviation, Inc., Eastern Air Lines, Hawker Siddeley Aviation, Crossfield's work as an Independent Technical Advisor, Crossfield's application for the position of Director of the National Air and Space Museum, Crossfield's time as a member of the United States Organizing Committee, and his work with organizations such as the Scott Crossfield Foundation and The Wright Experience. During the later part of his life, Crossfield toured the country extensively giving speeches, presenting awards, etc. and there is a large amount of material relating to these appearances in this part of the collection. These materials arrived already organized chronologically by individual trip and this organizational scheme was retained. Specifically, the professional life series includes flight reports, manuals, drawings, business correspondence, administrative records, presentations and papers, travel itineraries, notebooks, calendars, speeches delivered by Crossfield, and career related photographs (which are broken out as their own subseries). The professional life series also includes a section of miscellaneous professional items including job seeking correspondence, information on the patent for a power wheel braking or driving unit designed by Crossfield, and a folder of Crossfield's résumés.

The third series consists of audiotapes and is organized first by tape format and then chronologically within each category. Subjects of the audiotapes include speeches, a large number of North American X-15 cockpit recordings and radio communications, tape produced for a television program, and autobiographical notes. A number of the audiotapes include no description. With a total of 65 examples in this series, the most common audiotape format in the collection is, by far, 7 inch reel to reel tapes. Other formats in this series include 5 inch reel to reel tapes, 3.125 by 3.5 inch metal audiotape cartridges, and Dictaphone recording belts. Please note that these audio recordings are unavailable to the researcher at the time of processing due to the format and fragility of the tapes.

The fourth series of this collection is comprised of oversized materials and additional materials including galley proofs, news clippings, drawings, charts, professional records, and photographs. The organization of this series mirrors the folder titles found in the rest of the collection.

The researcher should note that the collection also contains several motion picture films relating to the life and career of Albert Scott "Scotty" Crossfield, Jr. These films are not included in the container list but a NASM Archives staff person can assist you regarding access.
Arrangement:
The A. Scott Crossfield Papers are organized into the following series and subseries:

Series I: Personal Materials

1.1 School Records

1.2 Correspondence

1.3 Personal Photographs

1.4 Organizations

1.5 Information Related to the Publication of Always Another Dawn

1.6 Other Writings by Crossfield

1.7 Financial Records

1.8 Subject Files

1.9 Philatelic Materials

1.10 News Clippings

1.11 Miscellaneous Personal Records

Series II: Professional Life

2.1 Boeing

2.2 U.S. Navy

2.3 Kirsten Wind Tunnel, University of Washington Aeronautical Laboratory

2.4 National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA)

2.5 North American Aviation, Inc.

2.6 Eastern Air Lines

2.7 Hawker Siddeley Aviation

2.8 Independent Technical Advisor

2.9 Application for NASM Director Position

2.10 United States Organizing Committee

2.11 Scott Crossfield Foundation

2.12 The Wright Experience

2.13 Speaking Engagements and Professional Appearances

2.14 Career Related Photographs

2.14 Miscellaneous Professional Records

Series III: Audiotapes

Series IV: Oversized Materials
Biographical/Historical note:
Albert Scott "Scotty" Crossfield, Jr. was born on October 2, 1921, in California. As a young boy, Crossfield was often confined indoors due to health problems related to pneumonia and rheumatic fever. During this time, he dreamed of becoming a pilot and designed and constructed model airplanes. Crossfield took his first airplane ride in 1927, at six years old, in an Alexander Eaglerock A-1 piloted by family friend Charles "Carl" Lienesch. Lienesch also encouraged Crossfield to become an engineer as well as a pilot. Unbeknownst to Crossfield's parents, he began taking flying lessons at the age of 12 at Wilmington Airport under the tutelage of pilot Vaughn McNulty. The family later moved to Washington State and it was there, at the Chehalis Airport, that Crossfield made his first solo flight in a Curtiss Robin. It was not until the summer of 1941, however, that Crossfield officially soloed and earned his pilot's license under the Civil Aeronautics Authority (CAA), Civilian Pilot Training Program (CPTP).

Crossfield enrolled in the University of Washington in 1940 and worked at the Boeing plant in Seattle, beginning in the fall of 1941, while still pursuing his studies. Crossfield's first assignment at Boeing was as an assembly page clerk. He was later promoted to the position of production expediter and shop salvage engineer. After the bombing of Pearl Harbor in December 1941, Crossfield enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps and continued to work at Boeing while he waited for an opening in a cadet class. In February 1942, tired of waiting on the Air Corps and eager to get into combat, Crossfield enlisted in the U.S. Navy instead where he joined the cadet class of May 7, 1942. Crossfield first trained in Seattle, Washington, and later was sent to the Naval Air Training Center in Corpus Christi, Texas, where he earned his Naval Aviator's wings in 1942. During his time in the Navy, Crossfield never fulfilled his ambition to see combat because he was selected instead to remain at Corpus Christi as a flight and gunnery instructor. Crossfield eventually was sent to Hawaii to prepare and train for an invasion of Japan but the war ended before this became necessary. During his time in the U.S. Navy, Crossfield flew the Grumman F6F Hellcat, Vought F4U Corsair, and the North American SNJ Texan, among other aircraft. After he separated from active duty with the Service, Crossfield remained active in the Naval Reserves and was part of an aerobatic team at Sand Point Naval Air Station that flew Goodyear FG-1D Corsairs.

Crossfield returned to his studies at the University of Washington in 1946 and was employed doing tests at the Kirsten Wind Tunnel at the University's Aeronautical Laboratory. Crossfield earned his Bachelor of Science degree in aeronautical engineering in 1949 and his master's degree in aeronautical science in 1950. After obtaining his degrees, Crossfield joined the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) as a research pilot. During his time with NACA, Crossfield flew many aircraft including the Convair XF-92A, Bell X-1, Northrop X-4 Bantam, Douglas D-558-1 Skystreak, Bell X-5, Republic F-84F Thunderstreak, Convair F-102 Delta Dagger, North American F-86 Sabre, and the North American F-100A Super Sabre. Crossfield made history in the Douglas D-558-2 Skyrocket on November 20, 1953, as the first pilot to exceed Mach 2 (twice the speed of sound).

In 1955, Crossfield left NACA and joined North American Aviation, Inc. to work on the X-15 program where he would not only serve as the X-15 Project Pilot but also as a Design Specialist, a role in which he was an integral part of the design of both the aircraft and the pressure suit developed by the David Clark Company for the X-15 program. The suit served as a prototype for the spacesuits later worn by astronauts. Crossfield helped to develop the X-15's cockpit, control, and engine systems; structural design; propulsion system; engineered its escape system; and contributed to its handling quality requirements. He also developed the ground control test methodology that would later become standard on the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo space programs. Crossfield piloted the North American X-15 on its first captive flight in March 1959, first glide flight in June 1959, and the first powered flight in September 1959, as well as numerous other test flights, before the X-15 was delivered to the U.S. Air Force (USAF) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in February 1960. Crossfield also served as Chief Engineering Test Pilot at North American from 1955-1961 before moving to the Space and Information Systems Division first as the Director of Systems Test (1961) then as the Division Director of Test and Quality Assurance (1961-1966) where he was responsible for quality control in all North American projects including the Hounddog Missile (AGM-28, GAM-77), Paragliders for the Gemini program, Apollo Command and Service Module, and the Saturn V launch vehicles, second stage. Crossfield's final position with North American was as the Technical Director, Research, Engineering and Test from 1966-1967.

Crossfield joined Eastern Air Lines in Miami, Florida, as Division Vice President, Flight, Research, and Development, Flight Operations in 1967, a position he held until 1971 when he moved to Washington, DC, to serve as Staff Vice President, Transportation Systems Development (1971-1973). From 1974 to 1975, Crossfield served as Senior Vice President at Hawker Siddeley Aviation's U.S. subsidiary branch, an office he helped to establish. After leaving Hawker Siddeley, Crossfield served for many years as an independent technical advisor to the U.S. Congress. Crossfield also served on the United States Organizing Committee to plan the Air and Space Bicentennial. In the later part of his life, Crossfield traveled extensively to give talks, attend events, and make various professional appearances and it was on a return flight home from one such trip in 2006 that Crossfield was killed when the plane he was piloting was caught in a thunderstorm.

Crossfield was active in various organizations including the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), the National Aeronautic Association (NAA), and the Society of Experimental Test Pilots (SETP), a group in which he was a founding member. Crossfield also created the Scott Crossfield Foundation to support aerospace education. Crossfield was the recipient of numerous awards and honors including the Sperry (Lawrence B.) Memorial Award (1954) and Chanute (Octave) Award (AIAA, 1958), Kincheloe Award (SETP, 1960), Harmon Trophy (1960), Collier (Robert J.) Trophy (1961), NASA Distinguished Service Medal (1993), and the National Air and Space Museum (NASM) Trophy for Lifetime Achievement (2000).

Crossfield published his autobiography, Always Another Dawn, in 1960 with Clay Blair, Jr. and is the author of numerous other publications, articles, and technical papers.
Provenance:
Alice Crossfield, Gift, 2006
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
North American X-15  Search this
Air pilots  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics -- Records  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Audiotapes
Correspondence
Manuscripts
Citation:
A. Scott Crossfield Papers, Accession number 2006-0041, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
A. Scott Crossfield Papers, Acc. 2006-0041, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2006.0041
See more items in:
A. Scott Crossfield Papers
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg28d41031c-4569-4e2e-b114-8a32f81be51e
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2006-0041
Online Media:

United States Army Around the World Trip (Leslie Arnold) Collection

Creator:
Arnold, Leslie P.  Search this
Names:
United States. Army. Air Service  Search this
Arnold, Leslie P.  Search this
Extent:
1.32 Cubic feet (2 legal document boxes and 1 flatbox)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Maps
Diaries
Date:
1924
Summary:
In 1924, as a lieutenant in the Army Air Service, Leslie P. Arnold was a crew member in one of the three Army planes that flew 27,000 miles around the world in 175 days. This collection consists of Leslie Arnold's handwritten diary and annotated navigational charts of the journey as well as a scrapbook with images of the trip including the aircraft, gasoline tanks, pilot crew, and air-to air shots.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of Leslie Arnold's handwritten diary and annotated navigational charts of the journey. The collection also contains the following: an autographed photograph; a Signal Corps message; an advertisement for Mobil oil; a page from 'Illustrated Current News;' and a black scrapbook with images of the trip including the aircraft, gasoline tanks, pilot crew, and air-to air shots. Some of the photographs in the scrapbook are snapshots while others were taken by news agencies.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged by type of material.
Biographical / Historical:
In 1924, as a lieutenant in the Army Air Service, Leslie P. Arnold was a crew member in one of the three Army planes that flew 27,000 miles around the world in 175 days. Arnold joined the Army in 1917 where he served for eleven years. During his service, he spent time in France during World War I and was part of General William Mitchell's group that conducted tests to prove that battleships could be sunk by aerial bombardment. After the 1924 trip, Arnold worked for a variety of airlines: Transcontinental Air Transport; Pennsylvania Central Airlines and Eastern Air Lines.
Provenance:
Leslie Arnold?, Gift?, unknown, NASM.XXXX.0518.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Douglas World Cruiser (DWC)  Search this
Endurance flights  Search this
Aeronautics -- Records  Search this
Aeronautics -- Flights  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Flights around the world  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Maps
Diaries
Citation:
United States Army Around the World Trip (Leslie Arnold) Collection, NASM.XXXX.0518, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0518
See more items in:
United States Army Around the World Trip (Leslie Arnold) Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg2072b2989-cfb2-4f1d-9fdf-c4456d8010b7
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0518
Online Media:

Mary Billy Cline Quinn Collection

Creator:
Quinn, Mary Billy Cline, 1902 (date of birth)  Search this
Extent:
0.1 Cubic feet (2 folders)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Publications
Date:
1929-1963
Summary:
This collection documents the flying career of Mary Billy Cline Quinn.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of the following types of material: aviator licenses, correspondence, pilot's logs, certificates, photographs, and newspaper clippings.
Arrangement:
The two folders in this collection are arranged by format. Folder 1 includes paper materials; folder 2, photographs.
Biographical / Historical:
Mary Billy Cline Quinn was born May 5, 1902, in Erie, Kansas. She studied law at the University of Kansas and graduated from the Kansas State Teachers College before making her career in aviation. She held Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI)/National Aeronautic Association (NAA) license #7580 and transport pilot license #12647, as well as sporting and foreign licenses. On July 2, 1930, Quinn set a brief world altitude record for a woman in a light plane, reaching 17,500 feet.
General:
The Aeronautics Department holds several artifacts relating to this collection:

1. A20030022000 - Jacket, Flying, Civilian

2. A20030023000 - Helmet, Cap, Flying, Civilian

3. A20030024000 - Gloves, Flying, Civilian

4. A20030025000 - Boots, Flying, Civilian

5. A20030026000 - Goggles, Flying Civilian

6. A20030027000 - Bracelet, Civilian

7. A20030028000 - Letter Opener, Civilian
Provenance:
Beth Q. Vaughn, Gift, October 2002, NASM.2003.0002
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Women in aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics -- Records  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Publications
Citation:
Mary Billy Cline Quinn Collection, Acc. NASM.2003.0002, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2003.0002
See more items in:
Mary Billy Cline Quinn Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg22366f8c5-ccb4-48f2-aa7e-2d2a812035bb
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2003-0002
Online Media:

Admiral Albert C. Read, USN (Curtiss NC-4) Collection

Creator:
Read, A. C. (Albert Cushing), 1887-1967  Search this
Names:
Read, A. C. (Albert Cushing), 1887-1967  Search this
Extent:
1.74 Cubic feet (1 legal document box, three oversized boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Biographies
Clippings
Reports
Scrapbooks
Logs (records)
Correspondence
Photographs
Date:
1919-1946
bulk May 1919 to June 1919
Summary:
Rear Admiral Albert C. Read (1887-1967) graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1907 and became Naval Aviator #24 in July 1915. In 1919, Read was the commander of the Curtiss NC-4, the first aircraft to fly across the Atlantic. The NC-4 covered 2150 nautical miles, from Nova Scotia to the Azores. The NC-4 was joined in the flight by the Curtiss NC-1 and Curtiss NC-3, but both the NC-1 and NC-3 were forced to land in the open sea.

This collection consists of the following: black scrapbook containing photographs with US Navy numbers; newspaper front pages; reports; cable grams; signals and dispatches; the NC-4 log; biography of Read; and correspondence.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of the following: black scrapbook containing photographs with US Navy numbers; newspaper front pages; reports; cable grams; signals and dispatches; the NC-4 log; biography of Read; and correspondence in both Portuguese (with English translations) and English.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged chronologically.
Biographical/Historical note:
Rear Admiral Albert C. Read (1887-1967) graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1907 and became Naval Aviator #24 in July 1915. In 1919, Read was the commander of the Curtiss NC-4, the first aircraft to fly across the Atlantic. The NC-4 covered 2150 nautical miles, from Nova Scotia to the Azores. The NC-4 was joined in the flight by the Curtiss NC-1 and Curtiss NC-3, but both the NC-1 and NC-3 were forced to land in the open sea.
Provenance:
Rear Admiral Albert C. Read, gift, 1962, XXXX.0391, NASM
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Transatlantic flights  Search this
Curtiss NC-1 (P2N-1)  Search this
Aeronautics -- Records  Search this
Seaplanes  Search this
Curtiss NC-4 (P2N-1)  Search this
Curtiss NC-Boat Family  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Air pilots  Search this
Genre/Form:
Biographies
Clippings
Reports
Scrapbooks
Logs (records)
Correspondence
Photographs
Citation:
Admiral Albert C. Read, USN (Curtiss NC-4) Collection, Acc. XXXX.0391, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0391
See more items in:
Admiral Albert C. Read, USN (Curtiss NC-4) Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg2ce1304a3-88a7-4658-9393-867d4846274e
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0391
Online Media:

1924 World Flight Glass Slide Collection

Names:
United States. Army. Air Service  Search this
Extent:
0.58 Cubic feet (2 shoeboxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Glass slides
Lantern slides
Date:
1924
Summary:
Between 6 April and 28 September 1924 a flight of specially designed Douglas aircraft operated by the United States Army Air Service completed the first aerial circumnavigation of the globe. Two of the four Douglas World Cruisers completed the 27,000 mile trip in 371 hours, 11 minutes flying time. This collection of sixty-nine 3 by 4 inch glass lantern slides appears to be a prepared set chronicling the flight.
Scope and Contents:
This collection of sixty-nine 3 by 4 inch glass lantern slides appears to be a prepared set chronicling the flight of the Douglas World Cruisers and the first World Flight by the United States Army Air Corps in 1924.
Arrangement:
The lantern slides are presented in original order.
Biographical / Historical:
Between 6 April and 28 September 1924 a flight of specially designed Douglas aircraft operated by the United States Army Air Service completed the first aerial circumnavigation of the globe. Two of the four Douglas World Cruisers completed the 27,000 mile trip in 371 hours, 11 minutes flying time.
Provenance:
Collections Department, NASM, Transfer, 1999, NASM.1999.0061
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Aeronautics -- Records  Search this
Douglas World Cruiser (DWC)  Search this
Flights around the world  Search this
Genre/Form:
Glass slides
Lantern slides -- 1900-1950
Citation:
1924 World Flight Glass Slide Collection, Acc. NASM.1999.0061, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.1999.0061
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg254f2481d-708f-4d7e-83de-8169df562b16
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1999-0061
Online Media:

Ernest Smith/Emory Bronte Flight Scrapbook

Creator:
Smith, Ernest  Search this
Bronte, Emory  Search this
Names:
Bronte, Emory  Search this
Smith, Ernest  Search this
Extent:
1.11 Cubic feet (1 flatbox, 1 folder, and 1 oversized folder)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Clippings
Photographs
Correspondence
Scrapbooks
Date:
1917-1975
bulk 1927
Summary:
On July 14-15, 1927, Ernest Smith and Emory Bronte made the first civilian transpacific flight from California to Hawaii. This collection includes a scrapbook that chronicles their flight, a map of the Hawaiian islands, and a letter from President Franklin D. Roosevelt to Emory Bronte.
Scope and Contents:
This scrapbook, covered with Tahitian tapa cloth, chronicles the Smith-Bronte historic flight and consists of the following: including 30 letters; 23 telegrams; 197 photographs; 357 news articles; and 20 miscellaneous items. The collection also includes a map of the Hawaiian islands, dated August 1917, that was used by Smith and Bronte on their flight; and a letter from President Franklin D. Roosevelt presenting Emory B. Bronte with the honor of the "Distinguished Flying Cross," dated 6 September 1934.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged by type of material.
Biographical / Historical:
On July 14-15, 1927, Ernest Smith and Emory Bronte made the first civilian transpacific flight from California to Hawaii in their Travelair City of Oakland. Although they planned to land in Honolulu, problems with the gasoline pump and radio receiving apparatus forced them to crash-land in Molakai.
Provenance:
Unknown, Gift?, unknown, NASM.XXXX.0389.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Travel Air aircraft family  Search this
Aeronautics -- Records  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Transpacific flights  Search this
Genre/Form:
Clippings
Photographs
Correspondence
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Ernest Smith/Emory Bronte Flight Scrapbook, NASM.XXXX.0389, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0389
See more items in:
Ernest Smith/Emory Bronte Flight Scrapbook
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg27570d2d3-7823-4880-bc69-dcf8e5a25e76
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0389
Online Media:

Fokker T-2 Photograph

Names:
Kelly, Oakley G.  Search this
Macready, John  Search this
Extent:
0.1 Cubic feet (2 items (1 photograph, 1 letter))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Correspondence
Date:
May 3, 1923
May 31, 1945
Summary:
Photograph of the U. S. Army Air Service Fokker T-2 on the ground at Rockwell Field, North Island, San Diego, California, probably on (or not long after) May 3, 1923, following the conclusion of the first non-stop transcontinental flight. Pilots Lieutenant Oakley G. Kelly and Lieutenant John A. Macready had departed from Long Island, New York, the previous day. Collection also includes a letter dated May 31, 1945, from Captain A. B. Mason, San Diego County Sheriff's Office, San Diego, California, refering to the photograph.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of an 8 x 10 inch black and white photograph of the Fokker T-2 taken at North Island Naval Air Station. Accompanying the photograph is a transmittal letter dated May 31, 1945, from Captain A. B. Mason of the San Diego County sheriff's office.
Biographical / Historical:
On May 2-3, 1923, two United States Army Air Service test pilots, Lieutenants Oakley G. Kelly and John A. Macready, flew the Fokker T-2 aircraft from Long Island, New York, to San Diego, California, in the country's first nonstop transcontinental flight.
Provenance:
Mrs. Daryl Ferguson, gift, 1986, NASM.1986.0123
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Fokker T-2 (F.IV)  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Aeronautics -- Records  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Correspondence
Citation:
Fokker T-2 Photograph, Acc. NASM.1986.0123, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.1986.0123
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg25d962b25-0e71-49cd-aeaf-dc17d1de91aa
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1986-0123
Online Media:

Russell L. Maughan Scrapbook Photo Album

Creator:
Maughan, Russell L., 1893-1958  Search this
Names:
1919 Great Transcontinental Air Race  Search this
Pulitzer Trophy Race  Search this
United States. Army. Air Corps  Search this
United States. Army. Air Service. 2d Pursuit Group. 139th Aero Squadron  Search this
Extent:
0.18 Cubic feet ((1 flatbox))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Date:
1917-1929
Summary:
This collection consists of a photograph album relating to Russell L. Maughan, covering the period from 1917 through 1929. There are images detailing his World War I experience, aerial photos of cities in upstate New York, and photos relating to air races Maughan participated in.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of a photograph album relating to Russell L. Maughan, covering the period from 1917 through 1929. There are images detailing his World War I experience, including a photo of the 139th Squadron personnel in France, individual photos of 139th pilots in front of their SPAD aircraft, as well as aerial photos of front lines in France in 1917 or 1918. There are also a number of aerial photos of cities in upstate New York, and photos relating to air races Maughan participated in including: the 1919 Transcontinental Air Race; 1922 Pulitzer Trophy race at Selfridge Field. Michigan; and the 1924 "Dawn to Dusk" transcontinental flight. There are also a substantial number of the photographs that are not related to his aviation career, but show his familial events.
Arrangement:
Collection is in original order.
Biographical / Historical:
Russell L. Maughan (1893-1958) graduated from the Utah Agricultural College in 1917 and was a command pilot and combat observer for the United States Army Air Corps. Maughan served in the 139th Aero Squadron in France during World War I, and after the war participated in a number of air races and events, including the 1922 Pulitzer Trophy Race, which he won flying a Curtiss R-6 Army Racer. In 1924, Maughan flew a Curtiss PW-8 Hawk on the historic "Dawn to Dusk" transcontinental flight when he left Mitchel Field, Long Island, New York in the morning and reached Crissy Field, San Francisco, California, by that evening.
Provenance:
Russell L. Maughan, gift, unknown, NASM.XXXX.0228
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial  Search this
Aeronautics -- Records  Search this
Aeronautics -- Exhibitions  Search this
Aeronautics -- Competitions  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Russell L. Maughan Scrapbook Photo Album, NASM.XXXX.0228, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0228
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg2ac4ed2d1-f2f2-4c5f-8f24-3c99acd76903
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0228
Online Media:

Thomas G. W. "Tex" Settle Collection

Creator:
Settle, Thomas G. W.  Search this
Names:
National Aeronautic Association (U.S.)  Search this
United States. Navy  Search this
ZR-3 Los Angeles (Airship)  Search this
Extent:
0.5 Cubic feet ((2 boxes))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Articles
Correspondence
Date:
bulk 1932-1998
Summary:
This collection consists articles, correspondence, photographs, logs and scrapbooks chronicling Tex Settles' historic balloon flights.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of the official National Aeronautics Association (NAA) log of the 1933 Gordon Bennett International Balloon Race in which T. G. W. Settle, flying with C. H. Kendall, placed second; correspondence with the NAA regarding records set by Settle; two articles by Settle, "Winning a Balloon Race" and "The Gordon Bennett Race, 1932;" a binder of Settle Flight Reports, 1927-1933; thirteen black and white photographs of Settle, his family, officers of the USS Los Angeles (ZR-3), Roland Mayer, Dr. Karl Arnstein, Wilfred Bushnell, and Ward T. Van Orman at such events as the 1932 and 1933 Gordon Bennett Races and Settle's flight, in a Lippisch Prüfling (Examination) glider, from the USS Los Angeles to Anacostia, Washington, DC. Also included are several photocopies relating to Settle's illustrious career, part of an article on the 1998 Naval Aviation Hall of Honor inductees (of which Settle was one); an article by J. Gordon Vaeth entitled, "When the Race for Space Began;" and two green 16 by 11.5 inch scrapbooks, entitled Stratosphere Flight Scrapbook, First and Second Campaign, that contain newspaper articles, correspondence, photographs and telegrams relating to Settle's historic stratospheric balloon flight.
Arrangement:
Arrangement by type.
Biographical / Historical:
Vice Admiral Thomas Greenhow Williams "Tex" Settle, US Navy, became world famous in the Golden Age of Flight (the nineteen twenties and thirties) after becoming the first person of his time qualified to pilot a free balloon, blimp, glider, and airplane, and to command a rigid airship. Winner of many races and holder of a number of aeronautical records in endurance and altitude, he was also the first American to fly a pressurized cabin into the stratosphere. He served aboard both the USS Shenandoah (ZR-1) and the USS Los Angeles (ZR-3). Tex Settle twice received the Harmon Trophy for Aeronautics and, for his service in World War II, was awarded the Navy Cross, Legion of Merit and Bronze Star.
Provenance:
J. Gordon Vaeth, Gift, 2006, NASM.2006.0014
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Balloons  Search this
Airships  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics -- Exhibitions  Search this
Aeronautics -- Records  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Articles
Correspondence
Citation:
Thomas G. W. "Tex" Settle Collection, NASM.2006.0014, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2006.0014
See more items in:
Thomas G. W. "Tex" Settle Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg27f78a24a-095f-4a70-a751-049fa4c9d822
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2006-0014
Online Media:

Albert Willibald Seypelt Collection

Creator:
Seypelt, Albert Willibald, -1966  Search this
Names:
Fitzmaurice, James C., 1898-  Search this
Kern, George William  Search this
Seypelt, Albert Willibald, -1966  Search this
von Huenefeld, Guenther  Search this
Extent:
0.9 Cubic feet ((2 legal document boxes))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Certificates
Motion pictures (visual works)
Photographs
Clippings
Correspondence
Date:
1892-1941
Summary:
This collection consists of correspondence, newspaper clippings, photographs, and motion picture film documenting the Seypelt-Kern flight. The material also includes Seypelt's aviation licenses and certificates, as well as photographs documenting his enlistment in the German army during World War I. The collection also contains material on the first westward transatlantic flight (1928), from Ireland to Labrador by 'Bremen', a Junkers W-33 monoplane piloted by Hermann Koehl, Baron Guenther von Huenefeld, and James Fitzmaurice. The collection also contains one 16mm film on the flight of the "Yankee Doodle."
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of correspondence, newspaper clippings, photographs, and motion picture film documenting the Seypelt-Kern flight. The material also includes Seypelt's aviation licenses and certificates, as well as photographs documenting his enlistment in the German army during World War I. The collection also contains material on the first westward transatlantic flight (1928), from Ireland to Labrador by 'Bremen', a Junkers W-33 monoplane piloted by Hermann Koehl, Baron Guenther von Huenefeld, and James Fitzmaurice.

Note: The digital images in this finding aid were repurposed from scans made by an outside contractor for a commercial product and may show irregular cropping and orientation in addition to color variations resulting from damage to and deterioration of the original objects.
Arrangement:
Arrangement: 1 - Correspondence; 2 - Newspaper clippings on the flight of the Yankee Doodle; 3 - Aviation certificates, licenses, and other memorabilia; 4 - Photographs; 5 - Clippings and photographs on the flight of the Bremen.
Biographical / Historical:
On October 21, 1927, Albert Willibald [William] Seypelt (d.1966) and George William Kern began a tour of Europe in a lightweight Klemm-Daimler L-20 dubbed the 'Yankee Doodle.' Leaving from Stuttgart, Germany, the duo travelled over 6,000 miles visiting Belgium, France, Italy and Austria before returing to Stuttgart on January 20, 1928.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
Gisela S. Enchelmayer, Gift, 1985, 1985-0011, NASM
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
World War, 1914-1918  Search this
Klemm L-20 "Yankee Doodle"  Search this
Junkers W 33 Family  Search this
Junkers W 33b "Bremen"  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial  Search this
Aeronautics -- Records  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Transatlantic flights  Search this
Genre/Form:
Certificates
Motion pictures (visual works)
Photographs
Clippings
Correspondence
Citation:
Albert Willibald Seypelt Collection, Acc. NASM.1985.0011####, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.1985.0011
See more items in:
Albert Willibald Seypelt Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg2935c1452-c34a-4c92-83f0-8d40a30ae578
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1985-0011
Online Media:

Dwight. S. "Barney" Zimmerley Collection

Creator:
Zimmerley, Dwight S. "Barney"  Search this
Names:
National Air Races  Search this
Nicholas-Beazley Airplane Co, Inc. (Marshall, MO)  Search this
Extent:
1.32 Cubic feet ((2 boxes))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Correspondence
Video recordings
Maps
Newspapers
Date:
bulk 1930s
Summary:
This collection includes photographs, publications, and ephemera from the career of pioneer aviator Dwight S. "Barney" Zimmerley (1898?-1994).
Scope and Contents:
Included in this collection are: eight black and white 8 by 10 inch photographs relating to Barney Zimmerley's aviation career; printouts of digital images taken from a scrapbook on early aviation; certificate of appreciation from Braniff Airways, Inc.; article series on the "The Nicholas-Beazley Airplane Company: The Garage that Grew Wings!" by Jack Kennedy, originally published in the American Aviation Historical Society Journal; compilation of "Parts & Crafts: Aeronautical Briefings 1917-1931, Nicholas Beazley;" National Air Pilots Association membership card; 1931 National Air Races Contesting Pilot pass; 1932 Omaha Air Races and National Balloon Races Guest pass; videotape entitled "Central Missouri Focus #203;" roster for event number 33 in the 1930 National Air Races official bulletin, The Power Dive; 11 by 17 inch illustration relating to the OX-5 engine, published by the OX-5 Club of America; and three annotated strip maps. Also included is a CD about D. S. "Barney" Zimmerley and his aviation career.
In October 2006, the Archives received a 20 by 18 inch scrapbook chronicling Zimmerley's aviation career, which included the following types of material: newspaper articles; NAA Certificates; an Aero Club of Washington Ball invitation; a short snorter; barograph records; a Link Trainer Certificate; passport and other official documentation; and correspondence. Also donated at this time were the following: photographs; newspaper and periodical articles;a Marshall Flying School Brochure; an Airways Map; 1930 National Races material; and one eleven by seven inch photo album containing black and white vintage prints of Curtiss aircraft and personalities and images of Zimmerley, his aircraft, and his family and friends.

Note: The digital images in this finding aid were repurposed from scans made by an outside contractor for a commercial product and may show irregular cropping and orientation in addition to color variations resulting from damage to and deterioration of the original objects.
Biographical / Historical:
Dwight S. "Barney" Zimmerley (1898?-1994) achieved success in a wide assortment of endeavors during his pioneering aviation career. Zimmerley was taught to fly by Tony Jannus in 1914, and served in the 24th Aero Squadron at Kelly Field, Texas, during World War I. After the war, Zimmerley began barnstorming, and then became a test pilot for the Nicholas-Beazley Co., and in the Nicholas-Beazley Barling NB-3 he set an altitude and a distance record for the light plane class in 1929. Zimmerley flew as a commercial airline pilot for Braniff Airways, Inc., and later became a charter pilot. He flew everything from Stearmans to Douglas DC-7s and was a member of the Quiet Birdman and the OX-5 Club of America.
Provenance:
Norman and Virginia Zimmerley Stewart, Gift, 2004.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics -- Records  Search this
Nicholas-Beazley (Barling) NB-3  Search this
Air pilots  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Correspondence
Video recordings
Maps
Newspapers
Citation:
Dwight S. "Barney" Zimmerley Collection, Accession number 2004-0047, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2004.0047
See more items in:
Dwight. S. "Barney" Zimmerley Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg258208b76-c3ec-4d85-bd61-8486b58497a3
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2004-0047
Online Media:

Ingrid Pedersen Scrapbook

Topic:
Perfume and Motoroil (Monograph)
Creator:
Pedersen, Ingrid, 1933-  Search this
Names:
Norsk polarinstitutt  Search this
Pedersen, Ingrid, 1933-  Search this
Extent:
0.35 Cubic feet (1 flat box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Maps
Clippings
Correspondence
Photographs
Place:
Arctic regions -- Discovery and exploration
Arctic regions -- Aerial Exploration
Date:
1960s-1990s
Summary:
Ingrid Pedersen was a commercial pilot and flight instructor who became the first woman to pilot an aircraft over the North Pole in 1963. This collection consists of a scrapbook chronicling the aviation career of Ingrid Pedersen.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of a scrapbook chronicling the aviation career of Ingrid Pedersen. The scrapbook contains the following types of material: photographs (black and white, color); correspondence; newspaper articles; programs; and maps. The collection also contains a small amount of loose material including photographs, news clippings, and other documents.
Arrangement:
Collection is in original order.
Biographical / Historical:
Ingrid Pedersen (1933--2012) was born in Stockholm, Sweden, and became a United States citizen in 1985. Pedersen obtained her Private Pilot license in 1957 and continued on to receive her Commercial, Instrument, and Airline Transport Ratings. In 1963, Pedersen become the first woman to pilot an aircraft over the North Pole, with her husband, Einar, as the navigator. Her aircraft on this historic flight was a Cessna 205, the Snow Goose. The flight originated in Fairbanks, Alaska, and was completed in Bodo, Norway. Between 1965 and 1987 Pedersen flew single engine Cessnas from Wichita, Kansas and Anchorage, Alaska, over arctic Canada, Greenland and Iceland, to Norway. As a commercial pilot in the Spitzbergen Islands from 1974-1975, she made successful landings on drift ice in the Arctic Ocean. During 1976-1977, Pedersen was on commission by the Norwegian Polar Institute and made seven landings on drift ice in the Arctic Ocean in order to place meteorological buoys between Spitzbergen, Greenland, and the North Pole. Beginning in 1979 she was a commercial pilot and flight instructor in Alaska and in 1992 she started work at the Alaska Aviation Heritage Museum, where she served as Associate Director. In 1963 she received the Amelia Earhart Medal from the Alaska Chapter of the 99's and she was awarded the Gold Plaque by the Royal Swedish Aero Club in 1964. In 1995 she published a book about her Arctic flying experiences, entitled Perfume and Motoroil.
Provenance:
Ingrid Pederson, Gift, 2000, NASM.2000.0042.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Women in aeronautics  Search this
Women air pilots  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial -- United States  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial  Search this
Aeronautics -- Records  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Cessna 205  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Maps
Clippings
Correspondence
Photographs
Citation:
Ingrid Pedersen Scrapbook, NASM.2000.0042, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2000.0042
See more items in:
Ingrid Pedersen Scrapbook
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg20af038cf-0676-4ceb-8bff-272d4dc152fa
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2000-0042
Online Media:

Geraldine L. "Jerrie" Mock Route Map

Creator:
Mock, Geraldine L. "Jerrie"  Search this
Extent:
0.05 Cubic feet (1 folder)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Maps
Date:
1964
Summary:
Flying the Spirit of Columbus, Geraldine L. "Jerrie" Mock became the first woman to pilot an aircraft around the world. This collection consists of a partial world map that has Geraldine L. "Jerrie" Mock's around the world flight route marked in red ink.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of a partial world map that has Geraldine L. "Jerrie" Mock's around the world flight route marked in red ink. The map is printed in color and measures 25 x 10 inches.
Arrangement:
Collection is in original order.
Biographical / Historical:
Flying the Spirit of Columbus, Geraldine L. "Jerrie" Mock became the first woman to pilot an aircraft around the world. She departed from Columbus, Ohio, on March 19, 1964, and arrived back home on April 17, 1964, after flying 36,964 kilometers (23,103 miles) in 29 days, 11 hours, and 59 minutes. Mock wrote about her exceptional solo flight in Three Eight Charlie.
Provenance:
Unknown, NASM.XXXX.1011
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics -- Records  Search this
Aeronautics -- Flights  Search this
Women air pilots  Search this
Genre/Form:
Maps
Citation:
Geraldine L. "Jerrie" Mock Route Map, NASM.XXXX.1011, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.1011
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg209d66673-eb85-4a85-abe8-39b1d214c66a
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-1011
Online Media:

Helen Richey Pilot Log and Collection [Suskalo]

Creator:
Richey, Helen, 1909-1947  Search this
Names:
Bendix Air Races  Search this
Central Airlines  Search this
Great Britain. Air Transport Authority  Search this
United States. Bureau of Air Commerce  Search this
United States. Bureau of Air Commerce. National Air Marking Program  Search this
Women Airforce Service Pilots (U.S.)  Search this
Richey, Helen, 1909-1947  Search this
Extent:
0.1 Cubic feet (2 folders)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Clippings
Logs (records)
Date:
1933-1944
Summary:
This collection consists of Helen Richey's pilot log for 1944-1945, newspaper clippings covering the period from 1933 to 1944 and seven photographs of Ms. RIchey.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of Helen Richey's pilot log for 1944-1945, newspaper clippings covering the period from 1933 to 1944 and seven photographs of Ms. Richey.
Arrangement:
This collection is in original order.
Biographical / Historical:
Helen Richey (1909 - 1947) was an aviation pioneer who made headlines as a stunt pilot, a racing champion, a holder of speed and altitude records, a flight instructor, an Air Transport Auxiliary (ATA) and Womens Air Service Pilot (WASP) during WWII, the first women to pilot a commercial airliner on a regular scheduled run, and as the first woman to ever fly the United States mail. In April of 1930, Richey enrolled as a student pilot at Bettis Field's Curtiss-Wright flying school and on June 28, 1930, she earned her pilot's license. In December 1930, Richey was granted a limited commercial pilot's license bythe Department of Commerce. During the 1930s, Richey set a number of records and placed in several races, including as a co-pilot to Amelia Earhart in the 1936 Bendix Race. In 1934 Richey applied for a pilot's job with Central Airlines. She was hired and flew Central's route between Washington and Detroit. However, the Bureau of Air Commerce warned Centeral management to keep her on the ground in bad weather and the pilot's union rejected her application for membership. Due to these restrictions, Richey resigned from Central in October 1935. The Bureau of Air Commerce then offered Helen a new job as an air marking pilot for the government. She stayed with the air marking service until 1937 when the job was completed. In 1940 Richey was the first woman to earn an instructor's license and she was appointed an instructor for air cadets at Pittsburgh - Butler Airport. In 1942, she joined the American wing of the British Air Transport Auxiliary (ATA), where she ferried aicraft and needed materials thoughout the British Isles. Richey headed the ATA's American Group from 1942 until April 1943, when she returned to the States and joined the WASPs. Unable to find aviation employment after the WASPs disbanded in 1944, she committed suicide in 1947.
Provenance:
Gene Suskalo, Gift, 1998, NASM.1999.0006
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Women air pilots  Search this
Women in aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial -- United States  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial  Search this
Aeronautics -- Competitions  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Airports  Search this
Airports -- Location  Search this
Aeronautics -- Records  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Flight training  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Clippings
Logs (records)
Citation:
Helen Richey Pilot Log and Collection [Suskalo], NASM.1999.0006, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.1999.0006
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg21127adc8-3836-4deb-b62c-e8cb2e4d0a56
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1999-0006
Online Media:

David G. Simons Record Diploma

Creator:
International Aeronautic Federation  Search this
Names:
Simons, David G.  Search this
Extent:
0.05 Cubic feet (1 folder)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Certificates
Date:
1957
Summary:
David G. Simons was a doctor who worked on aerospace medical research with the United States Air Force. On August 19, 1957, Simons ascended from Crosby, Minnesota to achieve a world altitude balloon record. This collection consists of Simons' record diploma from the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI).
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of a 9 by 12 inch record diploma from the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI) certifying that Major David G. Simons of the United States Air Force achieved a balloon altitude record of 30,942 meters (102,000 feet) on August 19--20, 1957.
Arrangement:
Collection is a single item.
Biographical / Historical:
Dr. David G. Simons completed medical school at Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1946. In 1947, he entered the United States Air Force (USAF) and began work at the USAF Aeromedical Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. There, Simons headed a project studying the effects of high altitude V-2 (A-4) missile flights on animals. Simons worked as Chief of Space Biology at the Air Force Missile Development Center at Holloman Air Force Base from 1953--1959. During this time, he worked on a project involving high altitude balloon flights. On August 19, 1957, Simons ascended from Crosby, Minnesota to achieve a world altitude balloon record. Simons was inducted into the International Space Hall of Fame at the New Mexico Museum of Space History in 1987.
Provenance:
Otto C. Winzen, Gift, 1958, NASM.XXXX.0787
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Aeronautics -- Records  Search this
Balloons  Search this
Genre/Form:
Certificates
Citation:
David G. Simons Record Diploma, NASM.XXXX.0787, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0787
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg235ad0bfb-8048-4db4-8ae2-0709ddda34c0
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0787
Online Media:

50th Anniversary of the NC-4 Transatlantic Flight Collection [Richard K. Smith]

Creator:
Smith, Richard K.  Search this
Names:
Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company  Search this
United States. Navy  Search this
Extent:
1.9 Cubic feet (5 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Maps
Correspondence
Photographs
Diaries
Manuscripts
Microfilms
Publications
Date:
circa 1918-1969
Summary:
The 50th Anniversary of the NC-4 Transatlantic Flight Collection [Smith] Collection contains photocopies of correspondence, published materials, maps, and photographs. The collection also includes photocopies of aircraft logs, naval ship logs, weather reports, progress reports, biographies of the participants, information on the construction of the NC Aircraft and the general planning for the flight, and original material on the thirtieth and fiftieth anniversaries of the flight.
Scope and Content Note:
This collection was gathered by Dr. Richard K. Smith of the National Air and Space Museum, in preparation for the fiftieth anniversary of the NC-4's transatlantic flight. It contains photocopies from microfilm of documents found in the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) Record Group 24, Records of the Bureau of Naval Personnel, and Record Group 72, Records of the Bureau of Aeronautics. The researcher will find photocopies of correspondence, published materials, maps, and photographs. The collection also includes photocopies of aircraft logs, naval ship logs, weather reports, progress reports, biographies of the participants, information on the construction of the NC Aircraft and general planning for the flight, and original material on the thirtieth and fiftieth anniversaries of the flight.

The final box of the collection (Box 5) contains 6 reels of microfilm from the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) Record Groups 24 and 72 relating to the Trans Atlantic flight of the NC-4. As the processing archivist reviewed the microfilm, it appeared that many of the documents in boxes 1-4 were copied from the microfilm. These reels of microfilm are available for review upon request.
Arrangement:
Materials are arranged by subject and then chronologically.
Historical Note:
In 1917, the United States Navy developed specifications for a flying boat of sufficient range to cross the Atlantic to England. The Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company, in conjunction with the Navy, developed a three-engine aircraft. The Navy intended that the flying boat would serve as an anti-submarine patrol aircraft. The first of the new aircraft, the NC-1, flew on October 4, 1918, followed by the NC-2 on April 12, 1919. Even though World War I had ended, the Navy decided to continue the program in an effort to make the first transatlantic crossing by air. As the program progressed, the NC-2 was dismantled for parts for the other NC aircraft. On May 16, 1919, the NC-1, the NC-3, and the NC-4 assembled at Trepassey Bay, Newfoundland, to begin the 1200 nautical-mile flight to the Azores. The NC-1 was forced down short of the islands and sank, but the Greek vessel, Ionia, rescued the crew. The NC-3 landed two hundred miles short and taxied the remaining distance to the islands. The NC-4 completed the flight successfully, reaching Plymouth, England via Lisbon, Portugal, on May 31, 1919. Following publicity tours of the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the United States, the NC-4 was given to the Smithsonian Institution and is a part of the National Air and Space Museum collection.
Provenance:
Aeronautics Division, NASM, transfer, unknown, XXXX-0418, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.

Reels of microfilm are available for review upon request.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to ue NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Curtiss NC-1 (P2N-1)  Search this
Curtiss NC-4 (P2N-1)  Search this
Aeronautics -- Records  Search this
Transatlantic flights  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Seaplanes  Search this
Curtiss NC-Boat Family  Search this
Genre/Form:
Maps
Correspondence
Photographs
Diaries
Manuscripts
Microfilms
Publications
Citation:
50th Anniversary of the NC-4 Transatlantic Flight Collection [Smith], Acc. XXXX-0418, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0418
See more items in:
50th Anniversary of the NC-4 Transatlantic Flight Collection [Richard K. Smith]
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg2dfad6aa6-04c1-4530-8943-391b287eb2cc
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0418
Online Media:

Geraldine Mock Collection

Creator:
Mock, Geraldine L. "Jerrie"  Search this
Extent:
0.25 Cubic feet (1 box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Logbooks
Photographs
Correspondence
Date:
1963-1964
Summary:
Geraldine L. "Jerrie" Mock was the first woman to fly solo around the world and the holder of 21 world records overall. This collection consists of materials pertaining to Mock's flight around the world.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of materials from Geraldine Mock's record setting flight around the world. Documents in this collection include requests for sponsorship; correspondence with foreign dignitaries; pilot's daily log; documentation of the record set; aircraft modifications; maps of Hawaii, the Philippines, and Europe; an insurance statement; menus; receipts for gas; photographs; permissions to land from foreign countries; weather forecasts; and flight plans.

Note: Images shown represent a portion of the collection. The entire collection has not been scanned.
Arrangement:
This collection is organized chronologically.
Biographical / Historical:
Geraldine L. "Jerrie" Mock was born November 22, 1925 in Newark, Ohio. She studied aeronautical engineering at Ohio State University. She was nicknamed "the flying housewife" when she became the first woman to circle the globe. She left Columbus, Ohio on March 19, 1964. Her airplane, the "Spirit of Columbus" was a 1953 single-engine Cessna 180 monoplane. Mock landed April 18, 1964 having taken 29 days, 11 hours, and 59 minutes to fly around the world. The trip also made her the first woman to cross the Atlantic and the Pacific. She was named the Vice-Chairman of the Women's Advisory Committee on Aviation to the FAA. On May 4, 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson gave her the FAA's Gold Medal for Exceptional Service. In 1966, she set a straight line distance record for a flight between Honolulu, Hawaii and Columbus, Ohio. Overall, Mock set twenty-one world records, seven of which were set flying around the world. She wrote about her experience in Three Eight Charlie.
Provenance:
Geraldine Mock, Gift, Unknown, Deed signed in 2007, NASM.XXXX.0833
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Women air pilots  Search this
Aeronautics -- Flights  Search this
Aeronautics -- Records  Search this
Genre/Form:
Logbooks
Photographs
Correspondence
Citation:
Geraldine Mock Collection, NASM.XXXX.0833, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0833
See more items in:
Geraldine Mock Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg245e0cbb0-f763-4b1c-a6e2-8c1657e89243
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0833
Online Media:

Aviation firsts : 336 questions and answers / Joshua Stoff

Author:
Stoff, Joshua  Search this
Physical description:
iii, 57 p. ; 22 cm
Type:
Miscellanea
Date:
2000
Topic:
Aeronautics--Records  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_921280

The Daily Mail flying prizes : 1907-1919 / compiled by Paul Wittreich

Author:
Wittreich, Paul  Search this
Physical description:
400 p. : ill., ports. ; 23 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
2006
C2006
Topic:
Aeronautics--Awards  Search this
Aeronautics--Competitions--History  Search this
Aeronautics--Records  Search this
Call number:
TL537 .D35 2006
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_896367

Magnificent failure : free fall from the edge of space / Craig Ryan

Author:
Ryan, Craig 1953-  Search this
Subject:
Piantanida, Nicholas John 1932-1966  Search this
Physical description:
xvi, 301 p. : ill. ; 24 cm
Type:
Biography
Place:
United States
Date:
2003
C2003
Topic:
Balloonists  Search this
Parachuting--History  Search this
Aeronautics--Records  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_726684

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