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John Young

Alternate Title:
John Young in Snoopy Cap
Artist:
Henry C. Casselli, Jr., born 25 October 1946  Search this
Sitter:
John Watts Young, 24 Sep 1930 - 05 Jan 2018  Search this
Medium:
Watercolor and pencil sketch on paper
Dimensions:
Sheet: 41.2 x 34 cm (16 1/4 x 13 3/8")
Mat: 55.9 x 40.6 cm (22 x 16")
Type:
Drawing
Place:
United States\Florida\Brevard\Cape Canaveral
Date:
1981
Topic:
John Watts Young: Male  Search this
John Watts Young: Science and Technology\Scientist\Astronaut  Search this
John Watts Young: Military\Navy\Pilot  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; Gift of Taylor Energy Company LLC
Object number:
NPG.2008.49
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Copyright:
© Henry C. Casselli, Jr.
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Exhibition:
20th Century Americans: 1960-2000
On View:
NPG, South Gallery 341
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm45a6cc45c-07b2-4b84-97a5-4c3b7e65e817
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.2008.49

Neil Armstrong Dreams of the Moon

Artist:
Tina Mion, born 26 Aug 1960  Search this
Sitter:
Neil Alden Armstrong, 5 Aug 1930 - 25 Aug 2012  Search this
Medium:
Pastel on paper
Dimensions:
Sheet: 25.4 x 34.3 cm (10 x 13 1/2")
Frame: 45.7 x 55.9 x 8.9 cm (18 x 22 x 3 1/2")
Type:
Drawing
Date:
2007
Topic:
Neil Alden Armstrong: Male  Search this
Neil Alden Armstrong: Education\Educator\Professor  Search this
Neil Alden Armstrong: Science and Technology\Scientist\Astronaut  Search this
Neil Alden Armstrong: Military\Navy\Pilot  Search this
Neil Alden Armstrong: Science and Technology\Engineer\Aeronautical  Search this
Neil Alden Armstrong: Science and Technology\Engineer\Aerospace  Search this
Neil Alden Armstrong: Military\Navy  Search this
Neil Alden Armstrong: Presidential Medal of Freedom  Search this
Neil Alden Armstrong: Congressional Gold Medal  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Vicki Green and Robert Curry, Pat and Bill Kelley, Gerald Talansky and Cynthia Ratcliff, Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius Van Wesel
Object number:
NPG.2008.32
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm4da4c74bb-53f2-40f2-ac7f-532817294480
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.2008.32

Aeromarine Model 39 Drawings

Creator:
Aeromarine Plane & Motor Co.  Search this
Names:
Aeromarine Plane & Motor Co.  Search this
United States. Navy  Search this
Extent:
2 Cubic feet ((2 drawers))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Date:
1916-1917
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of various sized autopositive drawings of the Aeromarine Model 39.
Biographical / Historical:
In 1917, the Navy placed an order with the Aeromarine Plane and Motor Company for 50 Model 39-A and 150 Model 39-B trainers. They were conventional two-bay wood and fabric biplanes and could be fitted with either wheels or floats. On October 22, 1922, an Aeromarine 39-B made the first landing on an aircraft carrier, the USS Langley.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
Unknown, Unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Aeromarine 39 Family  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0505
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0505

Frederick K. Gampper, Jr. Airship Collection

Creator:
Gampper, Frederick K., Jr.  Search this
Names:
Commerical Airship Syndicate, Ltd.  Search this
Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company  Search this
Gampper, Frederick K., Jr.  Search this
Extent:
0.45 Cubic feet ((1 legal document box))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Manuals
Photographs
Clippings
Date:
1917-1925
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of blueprints, a manual, newspaper articles, brochures and photographs of airships and balloons during the early part of the 20th century, usually relating to Gampper's career. The airships included are the Roma, the Wingfoot Express, and the Pony Blimp at Commercial Air Syndicate.
Biographical / Historical:
Frederick K. Gampper, Jr., began his aviation career in 1917. During the late 1910s and early 1920s, Gampper worked for the dirigible department at Goodyear Rubber Company where he was a supervisor of dirigible construction in Key West, an airship pilot, and trained other pilots for Goodyear. After his stint at Goodyear, Gampper helped raise stock for the Commercial Airship Syndicate, LTD., which would have been the first commercial airship airline in the United States. The night before the commencement of the company's schedule began, however, a storm destroyed the airship. Gampper's dirigible balloon pilot's license was no. #53, his Spherical Balloon Aero Club of America license was no. #655.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
James M. Gampper and Frederick K. Gampper III, gift, 1993, 1993-0062, NASM
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Goodyear Wingfoot Express (Airship)  Search this
Goodyear Pony Blimp (Airship)  Search this
Roma (Italian SCA T.34) (Airship)  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial -- United States  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Airships  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Manuals
Photographs
Clippings
Identifier:
NASM.1993.0062
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1993-0062

North American XB-70-1

Creator:
North American Aviation, Inc.  Search this
Names:
American Supersonic Transport Program  Search this
North American Aviation, Inc.  Search this
Extent:
0.36 Cubic feet ((1 letter document box))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Reports
Date:
1970
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of drawings and reports relating to XB-70 Wind Tunnel Model, 1970.
Biographical / Historical:
The XB-70 was conceived in 1954 as a subsonic bomber capable of short supersonic dashes. In December of 1957, North American won a competition with Boeing for development of the new bomber. The government decided to build only two of this aircraft, and they were to be used purely for high-speed research. During the testing program, the second Valkyrie was lost in a midair collision. The first Valkyrie was then re-instrumented and served as a flying laboratory for the American Supersonic Transport program and in 1969 it was delivered to the US Air Force Museum.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
Found in collection, unknown, unknown, 1996-0059, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Wind tunnel models  Search this
Aircraft industry -- United States  Search this
Aircraft industry  Search this
Supersonic bombers  Search this
Supersonic transport planes  Search this
Supersonic planes  Search this
Aircraft industry -- United States  Search this
Airplanes -- Design and construction  Search this
North American XB-70A (RS-70) Valkyrie  Search this
North American XB-70A (RS-70) Valkyrie Wind Tunnel Model  Search this
Aeronautics, Military -- Research  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial -- United States  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautical laboratories  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Reports
Identifier:
NASM.1996.0059
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1996-0059

V-2 Power Plant and Rocket Engine Drawings

Names:
Von Braun, Wernher, 1912-1977  Search this
Extent:
1.09 Cubic feet ((1 records center box))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Blueprints
Date:
1943-1945
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of engineering drawings for the V-2. The material consists of a complete set of production blueprints for the V-2 rocket powerplant and directly related accessories. The drawings are identified as 'Engineering Records File Copy' (in English).
Biographical / Historical:
The V-2 was a short-range ballistic missile designed by Germany for use against Southern England in 1944-45. The missile carried a 2000 lb. (910 kg) conventional warhead at supersonic speeds. The vehicle was fueled with sufficient alcohol and liquid oxygen for c.65 seconds of powered flight, giving a maximum range, including unpowered ballistic trajectory, of c.220 miles (352 km). A number of V-2s were captured intact by the Allies and used for rocketry experiments in the late 1940s. In addition, the V-2 design team, headed by Werner on Braun, was captured by the United States Army and returned to the United States, where it formed the core of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency and National Aeronautics and Space Administration launch vehicle design teams.
General:
Access note: Only eight of the drawings have been translated.
NASMrev
Provenance:
NASM SS&E, Transfer, 1987, 1987-0089, not NASM
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Ballistic missiles  Search this
V-2 rocket  Search this
Rocketry  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Rockets (Aeronautics)  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Blueprints
Identifier:
NASM.1987.0089
See more items in:
V-2 Power Plant and Rocket Engine Drawings
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1987-0089

Lawrance Aero-Engine Corporation Collection

Creator:
Lawrance Aero-Engine Corporation  Search this
Names:
Curtiss-Wright Corporation  Search this
Lawrance Engineering and Research Corp  Search this
Wright Aeronautical Corp  Search this
Lawrance, Charles Lanier, 1882-  Search this
Extent:
0.45 Cubic feet ((1 legal document box))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Reports
Notes
Clippings
Correspondence
Photographs
Drawings
Date:
[ca. 1910s-1920s]
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains the following: documentation pertaining to the production and endurance test results of the J-1 Engine; engineering data for the Model Z-5 and the Model B engine; five engineering drawings for various parts; photographs;correspondence; price listings; lists of engines by serial number; service notes; calculations; and an obituary on C.L. Lawrance.
Biographical / Historical:
Lawrance Engines was established by Charles L. Lawrance in the late 1910s. Lawrance built the first air cooled radial engine, which evolved into the 200 horse power Wright Whirlwind engine. In 1924, Lawrance merged with the Wright Aeronautical Corporation. After serving as president of the Wright Aeronautical Corporation and vice president of the Curtiss-Wright Corporation, he founded the Lawrance Engineering and Research Corporation in Linden, New Jersey (1930). Lawrance engines are associated with the aircraft flown by Charles Lindbergh, Rear Admiral Byrd and Amelia Earhart.
Provenance:
Joseph Worth, gift, 1972, XXXX-0579
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Lawrance J-1 9-cyl radial engine  Search this
Lawrance Model B 3-cyl radial engine  Search this
Airplanes -- Motors  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial -- United States  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Reports
Notes
Clippings
Correspondence
Photographs
Drawings
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0579
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0579

Waco Aircraft Company records

Creator:
Waco Aircraft Company  Search this
Names:
Waco Aircraft Company  Search this
Weaver Aircraft Company  Search this
Brukner, Clayton J., 1896-1977  Search this
Junkin, Elwood J. (Elwood James), 1897-1926  Search this
Weaver, George E. "Buck", 1895-1924  Search this
Extent:
184.1 Cubic feet (168 Legal document boxes; 35 drawers)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Financial records
Drawings
Reports
Date:
1930-1950
Summary:
This collection consists of the records of the Waco Aircraft Company. The material includes office files of the company, marketing and sales information, and design data. Also included are original engineering drawings and report files.
Scope and Contents note:
In 1920 Clayton J. Bruckner, Elwood "Sam" Junkin and George "Buck" Weaver formed Weaver Aircraft Co. In April of 1923, they renamed the company Advanced Aircraft Co. and, in May of 1929, Waco Aircraft Co. By the 1930s the company was a leader in the design of wood and fabric aircraft. At their most widespread use, Waco aircraft were operated by public, private, military and corporate owners in thirty-five countries. During World War II, Waco devoted itself entirely to war production, manufacturing large numbers of troop- and cargo-carrying gliders. Following the war Waco attempted to market a wholly new design, but the post- war slump in the private aviation market and the high development costs of the aircraft forced Waco to withdraw from aircraft manufacture in June 1947. During its twenty-seven year existence Waco produced sixty-two different aircraft models and led all its competitors in the number of aircraft registered.

The Waco collection is divided into two parts. Part One comprises 24,855 drawings. The locations and descriptive information of these drawings are listed on an electronic database entitled the Waco Aircraft Engineering Drawings Data Base. The drawings vary greatly in size from small drawings of 4x5" to large sheets of over 150" in length. The majority of the drawings included in Part One are numbered, but many of the drawings are unnumbered. These drawings span most of the Company's existence and depict many of its powered and glider aircraft. There are several smaller sets of drawings which include layout drawings, tool drawings and stress analyses. Production charts and data charts are also among these drawings.

Part Two includes the business records of the Waco Aircraft Company. These documents can be generally divided between the engineering and sales departments. Most of the drawings within Part Two are from sub-contractors and U.S. Government agencies.

Waco aircraft company designations are confusing. Many variations exist regarding the practice of assigning model designations. Despite these exceptions, some basic rules serve as a guideline. Prior to 1930, Waco models were designated by a single number, 1 through 10. The last aircraft designated in this manner, the Waco 10, became the Waco Model O under the new scheme of designation.

Waco early models were additionally referred to by their horsepower. This may have been a practice of distributors and salesmen.

Since 1930, The Waco Aircraft Company used a combination of three letters with which to name its models. An example would be the Model ASO. The letters are best read from right to left. The letter on the right represents the fuselage, i.e. Model O. The middle letter represents a modification to the basic model, i.e. CSO for straight wing or CTO for tapered wing. The letter on the left represents the engine, i.e. CSO for Wright J-6, 225 horse power engine. Additionally, Waco models were often followed by a number indicating the year in which the aircraft was built. A YPF-6, for example, was manufactured in 1936.

Waco World War II gliders, designed for the U.S.A.A.F, were designated by an alpha-numeric combination. The four unpowered gliders produced shared the same letter prefixes of CG, which stood for cargo glider. The numeric suffix distinguishes the aircraft. They were the Models CG-3A, CG-4A, CG-13A and CG-15A. An X preceding the designation denotes experimental, i.e. XCG-4A. An addition of two letters denotes the manufacturer, i.e. CG-4A- TI for Timm Aircraft Co. Many of the Waco designed gliders were constructed by various companies. Powered versions of the gliders were referred to by the prefix PG for powered gliders.
Arrangement note:
Series 1: Numbered Engineering Reports

Series 2: Model Engineering Reports

Series 3: Engineering Documents

Series 4: Government Contracts

Series 5: Contractor Reports

Series 6: Correspondence

Series 7: Publications

Series 8: Sales

Series 9: Blueprints & Drawings

Series 10: Drawings Lists

Series 11: Model Indexes

Series 12: Contractor Drawings
Biographical/Historical note:
In 1920 Clayton J. Bruckner, Elmwood "Sam" Junkin, and Buck Weaver formed an aircraft company known as the Weaver Aircraft Company in Troy, OH. By the 1930s the company, known as Waco Aircraft Co. since 1929, was a leader in the design of wood and fabric aircraft, with Waco aircraft being operated by public, private, and corporate owners in thirty-five countries. During World War II Waco devoted itself entirely to war production, manufacturing large numbers of troop- and cargo-carrying gliders. Following the war Waco attempted to market a wholly new design but the postwar slump in the private aviation market and the high development costs of the aircraft forced Waco to withdraw from aircraft manufacture in June 1947. During its twenty-eight year existence Waco produced sixty-two different aircraft models and led all its competitors in number of aircraft registered.
Related Archival Materials note:
Other collections within the Archives Division of the National Air and Space Museum which are relevant to Waco are as follows:

The Hattie Meyers Junkin Papers(1906-1982), Accession #XXXX-0171. Junkin was married first to George Weaver and later to Elwood Junkin, both founders of the Waco Aircraft Company.

The A. Francis Arcier(1890-1969) Collection, Accession #XXX-0072. Arcier was one of the leading engineers with the Waco Aircraft Company.

The National Air and Space Museum Archival Video Discs. Included in this collection are three blocks of Waco Aircraft photographs; prints listed by model type under the Company name in the Aircraft Finding Aid, prints listed under "Glider Aircraft" in the U.S. Air Force Collection finding aid and prints listed under the Company name in the "General Subjects" of the U.S. Air Force Collection Finding Aid.

The NASM Archives Technical Files. The documents filed under "Waco" include mostly photographs and newspaper articles. Information about some of the individual Waco employees, including Hattie Junkin and George Weaver, can be found filed under the individual's name in the biographical section of the Technical Files.
Provenance:
Ray Brandley, gift, 1970-1971, XXXX-0151
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Topic:
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial -- United States  Search this
Waco Aircraft Family  Search this
Genre/Form:
Financial records
Drawings
Reports
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0151
See more items in:
Waco Aircraft Company records
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0151
Online Media:

United States Navy World War II Aircraft Recognition Model Plans

Creator:
United States. Navy  Search this
Names:
United States. Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare  Search this
United States. Navy  Search this
United States. Navy. Bureau of Aeronautics [BuAer]  Search this
Extent:
0.45 Cubic feet ((1 legal document box))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pamphlets
Drawings
Date:
1942
Scope and Contents:
This collection consisits of the complete set of the Navy WWII model drawings and a booklet explaining the project.
Biographical / Historical:
Accurate scale model aircraft have often been helpful in training recognition of aircraft, range estimation and determination of cones of fire. In December 1941, the Secretary of the Navy asked the US Commissioner of Education for the schools to make 500,000 scale model airplanes. This alliance resulted in a joint project between the US Navy, Bureau of Aeronautics, who supplied the authoritative drawings and plans, and the US Office of Education, who perepared educational and informational material.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
Paul E. Garber, Gift, unknown, XXXX-0438, Public Domain
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Airplanes -- Recognition  Search this
Airplanes -- Models  Search this
Airplanes  Search this
Naval aviation  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Aeronautics and state -- United States  Search this
Aeronautics -- History  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Aerial operations  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Genre/Form:
Pamphlets
Drawings
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0438
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0438

William Carl Diehl Collection

Creator:
Diehl, William Carl, 1891-1974  Search this
Names:
Army Air Corps  Search this
Early Birds of Aviation (Organization).  Search this
Pathe News  Search this
United Eastern Airplane Company  Search this
Wright Aeronautical Corp  Search this
Diehl, William Carl, 1891-1974  Search this
Extent:
2.7 Cubic feet ((6 legal document boxes) (1 20x24x3 flatbox))
2.52 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Diaries
Manuscripts
Drawings
Photographs
Publications
Maps
Financial records
Audiotapes
Audiocassettes
Motion pictures (visual works)
Date:
1912-1972
bulk 1945-1972
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of biographical information, business records, information on the aviation organizations with which Diehl was involved, aviation material collected by Diehl, and information on flight, events, and aviation accidents.
Biographical / Historical:
William Carl Diehl (1891-1974) was an aviation pioneer and a member of the Early Birds organization. In 1914 he built and flew a monoplane and in 1915 he helped establish two flying schools, an unsuccessful school in Chicago and a school on Long Island. During the time he was working at Long Island, he helped to organize the United Eastern Airplane Company which manufactured airplanes. During World War I, Diehl was a civilian instructor for the Army Air Corps. In the late 1910s and early 1920s, Diehl established a commercial flying taxi service, performed stunts for movie production and for Pathe News, and barnstormed around the nation. He began work in 1926 on patents for aircraft mufflers and values. Diehl worked during 1927-1930 at the Wright Aeronautical Corporation at Paterson, New Jersey as an engine flight test pilot. Diehl returned to his original occupation of plumbing but continued flying until 1945, and continued his patent work until the early 1970s.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
No donor information, gift, XXXX-0469, Unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial -- United States  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Periodicals  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Diaries
Manuscripts
Drawings
Photographs
Publications
Maps
Financial records
Audiotapes
Audiocassettes
Motion pictures (visual works)
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0469
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0469

Curtiss-Wright Corporation Records

Creator:
Curtiss-Wright Corporation  Search this
Names:
Curtiss-Wright Airports Corporation  Search this
Keystone Aircraft Corp  Search this
Extent:
146 Cubic feet (228 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Motion pictures (visual works)
Reports
Drawings
Financial records
Date:
1868-1972
bulk 1925-1949
Summary:
This collection consists of the corporate records of the Curtiss-Wright Corporation. Included in the collection are technical and engineering reports of Curtiss-Wright Airplane Division's operations in St. Louis (Robertson), MO (1935-1945) and Buffalo, NY, (1932-1945), as well as AAS Material Division and AAF Air Technical Services Command memorandum reports collected by Curtiss-Wright's St. Louis and Buffalo technical reference libraries. The collection also contains the files of Curtiss-Wright's Patent Department, which hold records of patents filed by Curtiss-Wright and patent-infringement cases involving Curtiss-Wright. Also included in the collection are specifications issued by and photos commissioned by the Keystone Aircraft Corporation (Huff-Daland Airplanes, Inc. until March 1927), which had been acquired by Wright in 1928 along with Loening Aeronautical Engineering Corp., and formed the Keystone Division of Curtiss-Wright until 1932 when Keystone's Bristol, PA factory closed its doors. The collection also contains financial records of the Curtiss-Wright Airports Corporation, which was liquidated in 1936, as well as an extensive negative collection featuring Curtiss-Wright aircraft from the 1930s and 1940s, concentrated especially on the war years.
Scope and Contents:
The Curtiss-Wright Corporation Records collection contains approximately 146 cubic feet of material. The collection contains the following material:

Army Air Service Material Division & Army Air Force Technical Services Command Memo

Reports & Technical Reports which include testing of various Curtiss-Wright models of aircraft and/or various parts of aircraft

Technical & Engineering Reports from the St. Louis, MO plant [Robertson] & Buffalo, NY plant

Patents, Patent Dockets, Patent Serial numbers, Suits, License Agreements, Patents filed by Curtiss-Wright & Patent Infringement Cases [1800s to 1940s]

Miscellaneous Research Files

Corporate & Financial Records [1923 to 1972]

Correspondence

Blueprint Drawings

Advertisements from Newspapers & Magazines in Scrapbooks

Engine Decals

Photographs

Negatives & Glass Plates
Arrangement:
This collection was arranged into Series and Subseries:

Series I: Curtiss-Wright Corporation Records

Subseries I: Corporation Reports\Records Subseries II: Patents Subseries III: Patent Serial Numbers Subseries IV: Patent Application/Dockets Subseries V: Patent Litigation Subseries VI: Aircraft & Engine Designations arranged by Designation Subseries VII: Photographs Subseries VIII: Keystone Aircraft Corporation Subseries IX: Oversize Scrapbooks of Advertising Material, Newspaper Clippings

Series II: Technical Reports

Subseries I: Air Corps Materiel Division, Reports [ACMR] Subseries II: Buffalo Reports Subseries III: St. Louis

Series III: Glass Plates [this part of the collection has not been processed]

Series IV: 1969 Accretion - Listing of Archival Material

Series V: Master Print Books [this part of the collection has not been processed]
Historical note:
An historic event in aviation occurred on June 26, 1929 when two major aircraft companies: the Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company merged with the Wright Aeronautical Corporation to form the Curtiss-Wright Corporation. After this merger, the former Wright organization took over all of the engine and propeller manufacture while Curtiss concentrated on airplanes. This merger was completed by organizing two major divisions under their original names, but under the direction of a corporate headquarters located in New York City. However, there was a recognized separation of spirit as well as specialized facilities that was never completely resolved in succeeding years. The election of former Wright personnel to key corporate positions soon led to Wright becoming the dominant division. At the height of the Lindbergh Boom during the 1920s and 1930s, the Curtiss-Wright Corporation was made up of the following identified organizations: The Curtiss Aeroplane & Motor Company; The Curtiss-Caproni Corporation; The Curtiss-Robertson Airplane Manufacturing Company; The Keystone Aircraft Corporation; The Moth Aircraft Corporation; The Travel Air Manufacturing Company; The Wright Aeronautical Corporation; Curtiss-Wright Flying Service; The Curtiss-Wright Sales Corporation; The Curtiss-Wright Export Corporation. Curtiss-Wright was quickly becoming the 'General Motors of the Air' until the great depression in October 1929. Sales dropped and Curtiss-Wright was forced to close certain satellite plants and transfer some of their product lines to the St. Louis facility. It looked like even the Buffalo plants would also have to close when Curtiss-Wright received an order from Colombia, South America for Hawks and Falcons. This was the largest military order to Curtiss since the war. The Colombia sale saved the Curtiss-Wright organization at this low point in its history. This order kept the production lines going until new military and civil markets began to open up as the depression waned and the build-up for World War II began. During the U.S. military build-up prior to the attack on Pearl Harbor, all existing Curtiss-Wright plants were expanded and new aircraft factories were built at Columbus, Ohio and Louisville, Kentucky. The dropping of the two atomic bombs on Japan resulted in an unexpected early end to World War II. All of the major U.S. airplane builders including Curtiss-Wright were hit by massive contract cancellations because of the Japanese surrender. In 1946 Curtiss-Wright had only two experimental military models at hand for postwar delivery and no assurance of production orders. Curtiss-Wright was forced to shut down all airplane plants and transfer all units of the Aeroplane Division to their Columbus Plant. The eventual sale of the Airplane Division to North American included design rights to the former Curtiss-Wright airplanes. The Curtiss-Wright Airplane Division, which manufactured airframes, finally closed down in 1951.
Provenance:
Curtiss-Wright Corporation, gift, XXXX, 1969
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Curtiss, General, Aircraft  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial -- United States  Search this
Curtiss-Wright aircraft  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Genre/Form:
Motion pictures (visual works)
Reports
Drawings
Financial records
Citation:
Curtiss-Wright Corporation Records, Acc. XXXX-0067, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0067
See more items in:
Curtiss-Wright Corporation Records
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0067
Online Media:

Albatros D. Va Drawings

Creator:
Waugh, Bob  Search this
Names:
Waugh, Bob  Search this
Extent:
0.1 Cubic feet ((1 oversized folder))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
This collection of six Albatros D. Va drawings (and corresponding autopositives) were drawn by the donor, Bob Waugh.
Biographical / Historical:
The Albatros D. Va was a single-seat fighting scout used by the Germans during World War I, 1917-1918. The Albatros D. Va is similar to the Albatros D. V, the only certain means of distinguishing between the two being the location of the aileron control wires. Manufacture of the Albatros D. Va was discontinued in 1918 in favor of the Fokker D. VII, but the Albatros D. Va remained in action until the end of hostilities.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
Bob Waugh, gift, 1994-0042, NASM
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Albatros D.Va (L24)  Search this
World War, 1914-1918  Search this
World War, 1914-1918 -- Aircraft  Search this
Aeronautics -- Germany  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Identifier:
NASM.1994.0042
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1994-0042

Apollo Milton Olin (A. M. O.) Smith Papers

Creator:
Smith, Apollo Milton Olin (A. M. O.), 1911-1997  Search this
Names:
Smith, Apollo Milton Olin (A. M. O.), 1911-1997  Search this
Extent:
1.09 Cubic feet ((1 records center box))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Drawings
Photographs
Publications
Date:
1935-1981
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of the significant writings of Smith, including writings relating to his contributions to boundary layer theory. The collection also includes Smith's notebooks and related photographs of his post-World War II on-site appraisal of Nazi aeronautical developments.
Biographical / Historical:
Apollo Milton Olin Smith (1911-1997), an aircraft designer and engineer known as 'AMO' for most of his life, was born in Columbia, Missouri. He began constructing gliders in high school and earned Masters Degrees in both Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering from Caltech in 1938. After graduation, he began work for Douglas Aircraft, where he was to be employed until his retirement in 1975. His work for Douglas included wind tunnel testing of the A-20 bomber, performance analysis of the DC-5 and aerodynamic design of the A-26 light bomber. During a leave of absence from Douglas, he served as first chief engineer of the Aerojet Co. Smith's work in aerodynamics led to his participation in an important post-World War II mission to Germany, which revealed that country's developments in swept-wing design. AMO Smith's subsequent research would make him a leader in aerodynamics, especially regarding his contributions to boundary layer theory. He was the recipient of many honors and awards during his lifetime and was responsible for advances in research involving the use of rocket motors to assist takeoff (JATO) and the design of the D-558 Phase 1 airplane and the F4D Skyray.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
Elisazbeth Krost Smith, Gift, 2000, 2000-0014, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aerodynamics  Search this
Airplanes -- Wings, Swept-back  Search this
Airplanes -- Jet propulsion  Search this
Airplanes -- Assisted take-off  Search this
Boundary layer  Search this
Airplanes -- Motors  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Airplanes -- Germany  Search this
Douglas F4D (F-6) Skyray Family  Search this
Douglas D-558 Family  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Drawings
Photographs
Publications
Identifier:
NASM.2000.0014
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2000-0014

Volkenrode Institute Photographs

Creator:
Wolfsohn, Robert S.  Search this
Names:
Volkenrode Institute  Search this
Wolfsohn, Robert S.  Search this
Extent:
0.05 Cubic feet ((1 folder))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Drawings
Date:
1999-0027
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of the following material collected by Wolfsohn during his role in Operation Lusty: oversized drawing plan of the Volkenrode Institute; photographs of Volkenrode, especially with its camouflage; paper copies of photographs of Wolfsohn's time at Volkenrode; a detailed letter by Wolfsohn describing his work; and a set of small prints relating to the Junker 004 turbojet engine.
Biographical / Historical:
At the end of World War II, Robert S. Wolfsohn was assigned to Operation Lusty, which was a program to ascertain what the Germans had been doing towards winning the war. Wolfsohn was stationed at Volkenrode, which was just outside of Braunshweig, Germany. The Volkenrode Institute had many laboratories working on developments in aeronautics, engines, and armament.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
Jack Neufeld, unknown, 1999, 1999-0027, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
World War, 1939-1945 -- Aerial operations  Search this
Aeronautics, Military -- Research  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Aeronautics -- Research  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics -- Germany  Search this
Military intelligence  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Operation Lusty, 1945  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Drawings
Identifier:
NASM.1999.0027
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1999-0027

Aircraft Propulsion Collection [Mikel]

Names:
United Aircraft Corporation. Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Division  Search this
Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Company  Search this
Extent:
0.41 Cubic feet ((2 boxes and 2)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Technical manuals
Photographic prints
Drawings
Brochures
Date:
bulk 1917-1985
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of manuals, reports, photographs, drawings, brochures, and other material relating to aircraft propulsion. The following companies are represented: Pratt & Whitney, Armstrong Siddeley, Bristol, Napier, Westinghouse, and Rolls Royce Engines. Besides material on engines and propellers, the collection also contains U.S. Navy Department Power Plant Memorandums and color slides of 1962 and 1964 British air shows.
Provenance:
Ulrika Mikel, Gift, 1994
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Propulsion systems  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Aeronautics -- Exhibitions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Technical manuals -- 20th century
Photographic prints
Drawings
Brochures
Citation:
Aircraft Propulsion Collection [Mikel], Acc. 1994-0018, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.1994.0018
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1994-0018
Online Media:

Colonel Alexis B. McMullen Collection

Creator:
McMullen, Alexis B.  Search this
Names:
National Association of State Aviation Officials  Search this
United States. Army Air Forces. Air Transport Command. North African Division  Search this
Cody, Mabel  Search this
McMullen, Alexis B.  Search this
Extent:
28.15 Cubic feet (25 records center boxes; 2 legal document boxes; 1 flatbox)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Clippings
Maps
Publications
Photographs
Drawings
Manuscripts
Diaries
Correspondence
Date:
1915-1983
Scope and Contents:
This collection spans A.B. McMullen's aviation career and interests, from his involvement in WWI until his death. This collection includes correspondence, both personal and business, reports/material from his aviation corporations/distributorships and stint as Director of Florida Aviation and career in the NASAO. Also included are photographs, articles and newspaper clippings of his career as a barnstormer and of his military career.
Biographical / Historical:
Colonel Alexis B. McMullen participated in American aviation activities at the local, state and national level over a period of some 50 years, as well as international activities during two world wars. A.B. McMullen learned to fly during WWI, and he became an Aerobatic Flight Instructor and Base Engineering Officer. After the war, he barnstormed with Mabel Cody and owned/operated flying schools, aviation corporations and distributorships. In 1933 he became Florida's first State Director of Aviation. Under his leadership in this position, 84 new airports and flight strips were constructed and the first comprehensive state aviation map was published. From 1936-1942 McMullen served as Chief, Airports Section Bureau of Air Division. During WWII he actively served as Deputy Commander North African Division of Air Transport Command (ATC), stationed in Morocco. After the war he established the Washington, D.C. Headquarters of the National Association of State Aviation Officials (NASAO) which he continued to serve with until his retirement.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
Sarah Ann Lindsey, gift, 1990, 1990-0060, NASM
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aeroanutics -- Florida  Search this
Aeronautics -- Law and legislation  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial -- United States  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial  Search this
Aeronautics -- Exhibitions  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Flight training  Search this
Periodicals  Search this
Genre/Form:
Clippings
Maps
Publications
Photographs
Drawings
Manuscripts
Diaries
Correspondence
Identifier:
NASM.1990.0060
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1990-0060

George W. Beatty Collection

Creator:
Beatty, George W., -1955  Search this
Names:
Early Birds of Aviation (Organization).  Search this
Wright Flying School  Search this
Beatty, George W., -1955  Search this
Page, Handley  Search this
Wright, Orville, 1871-1948  Search this
Extent:
0.63 Linear feet
0.68 Cubic feet (1 legal document box; 1 20 x 24 x 3 flatbox; 1 slim legal document box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Publications
Correspondence
Photographs
Drawings
Date:
1910-1955
bulk 1910-1912
Summary:
George W. Beatty (-1955) was an Early Bird, aviator, and instructor.
Scope and Contents:
The George W. Beatty Collection (accessions 1989-0013 and 1991-0069) contains approximately one cubic foot of material relating to the career of this pioneering aviator. The bulk of the material dates from 1910 to 1912 and includes an Early Birds plaque, several small banners from flying meets, and a 1928 letter from Orville Wright. The collection also includes correspondence, a great deal of photographic material, and scrapbooks.
Arrangement note:
Original order, when identified, has been maintained.

SERIES Series in the collection are as follows:

Series I: Documentary Material Series II: Photographic Material Series III: Oversized Materials
Biographical/Historical note:
Born in 1887 or 1888 in Whitehouse, New Jersey, George W. Beatty was employed as a young man as a linotype operator. He was shortly to enter the field that would define much of his life. In June of 1911 he enrolled at the Wright School at Nassau to be taught by Al Welsh. Soloing on July 23 of that year, he set a new two-man American altitude record on the same day. Throughout that summer, Beatty would set several more records, in altitude, weight-carrying and duration. On August 6, 1911, Beatty obtained license number 41 and subsequently attended meets where he was to break several American and world records. Also in that year, he would become the first to fly a plane in which air to ground communication was maintained throughout the flight.

Early in 1912, Beatty established a school on Long Island. Its proximity to New York allowed Beatty to become the first person to land on Manhattan when he flew over the city and into Central Park. He would soon need to take his skills elsewhere, however. After the unfortunate death of Al Welsh, Beatty took the place of his former instructor at College Park, Maryland, testing aircraft for the government.

The next year, Beatty shipped his Wright plane to England. The aircraft had by now been equipped with a GYRO seven-cylinder rotary motor. He formed a partnership with Handly-Page to establish a flying school at the Hendon Aerodrome, outside of London. This venture was highly successful and was to produce over one thousand fliers for the Royal Air Force. After the war, Beatty worked for a Parisian motorcycle manufacturer and remained in Europe for nineteen years.

In later life, Beatty was to return to the field of his youth, working for the Hughes Printing Company. On February 21, 1955, George W. Beatty, a member of the Early Birds and an outstanding figure in early aviation, passed away at 67.

George W. Beatty (-1955) was an Early Bird, aviator and instructor. After finishing school, Beatty became a mechanic and linotype operator. In 1909 he became interested in a New York gliding club and assisted in the construction of an unsuccessful home-built Santos-Dumont Demoiselle. In 1911 he entered the Wright Flying School and received his license in July of that year. He spent much of the remaining years before World War I carrying passengers, flying exhibitions, and instructing, both in England and the United States. In February 1914 he established a flying school at Hendon, near London, in cooperation with Handley Page and instructed military pilots during the war. Following the war he returned to the US and became superintendent of the Hughes Printing Company, where he remained until his death.
General note:
Other materials: Artifacts from this collection were transferred to the NASM Aeronautics Division; books were transferred to the NASM branch Library.
Provenance:
The National Air and Space Museum (NASM) received these materials in 1988, a donation from Louise Beatty.

Louise Beatty, gift, 1988, 1991, 1989-0013, 1991-0069, NASM
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit and Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial -- United States  Search this
Flight training  Search this
Aeronautics -- 1903-1916  Search this
Aeronautics -- Exhibitions  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Genre/Form:
Publications
Correspondence
Photographs
Drawings
Citation:
George W. Beatty Collection, Acc. 1989-0013, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.1989.0013
See more items in:
George W. Beatty Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1989-0013
Online Media:

Fairchild KS-25 High Acuity Camera System Collection

Creator:
Fairchild Camera and Instrument Corporation  Search this
Names:
Fairchild Camera and Instrument Corporation  Search this
Baker, James G.  Search this
Extent:
2.57 Cubic feet (2 record center boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Photographs
Correspondence
Date:
1956-1967
Summary:
This collection documents the development and testing of the f/4 achromatic lens system. The material includes test data, photographs, and drawings, as well as correspondence detailing Baker's successful fight to secure a patent on the lens system.
Scope and Contents:
This collection documents the development and testing of the f/4 achromatic lens system. The material includes test data, photographs, and drawings, as well as correspondence detailing Baker's successful fight to secure a patent on the lens system.
Arrangement:
Arrangement: (by type of material) 1) Contract specifications 2) Purchase orders and receipts 3) Correspondence 4) Patent applications 5) Camera operations manual 6) Performance and environmental tests final report 7) Lens drawings 8) Performance analysis printouts and calculations
Biographical / Historical:
In the mid-1950s the Defense Department requested a system for achieving better quality photographic intelligence using smaller and lighter cameras on high-speed aircraft at high altitudes. In response Fairchild Camera and Instrument Corporation designed the KS-25 High Acuity Camera System, an integrated camera/lens system using a wide-angle 24' focal length lens capable of producing transparencies with resolutions of 140 lines/mm on a high contrast target or 90 lines/mm on a low contrast target. The lens for the KS-25 was designed by Dr. James G. Baker of Spica, Inc. and represented new optics technology to allow wide-angle viewing at daylight illumination on high speed cameras, yet capable of producing a resolution that was effectively diffraction limited.
Provenance:
Don Welzenbach, Gift, 1986, NASM.1986.0028.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Fairchild KS-25 High Acuity Camera System  Search this
Aerial photography  Search this
Photographic reconnaissance systems  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Photographs
Correspondence
Citation:
Fairchild KS-25 High Acuity Camera System Collection, NASM.1986.0028, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.1986.0028
See more items in:
Fairchild KS-25 High Acuity Camera System Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1986-0028

Arthur Raymond Brooks Collection

Creator:
Brooks, Arthur Raymond, 1895-1991  Search this
Names:
Bell Telephone Laboratories  Search this
Florida Airways Corp  Search this
United States. Army. Air Service. 22nd Pursuit Group  Search this
United States. Department of Commerce. Aeronautics Branch  Search this
Brooks, Arthur Raymond, 1895-1991  Search this
Extent:
13.72 Cubic feet (31 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Financial records
Diaries
Drawings
Publications
Photographs
Videotapes
Date:
1910-1988
Summary:
This collection consists of the personal papers and memorabilia of Arthur Raymond Brooks. It includes photographs, correspondence, documents, and certificates relating to Brooks' aviation career, as well as personal correspondence, photographs, and diaries (1907-87).
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of the personal papers of Arthur Raymond Brooks. These papers relate to his military career with the U.S. Army Air Service (1917-22), his years in both civilian government service and the private sector (1923-60), as well as a lifetime's involvement in numerous military, academic, aeronautical, and professional associations and organizations. Additionally, there are examples of correspondence and autographed photographs from such aerospace notables as Eddie Rickenbacker, Jimmy Doolittle, Billy Mitchell, Clayton Bissell, Reed Chambers, and Michael Collins.

The collection is arranged into two broad series. First, is the material relating to his professional life. This includes Brooks' official military documents (U.S. Army commission, discharge papers, etc.), correspondence, reports, photographs (mostly from his time spent as an Air Service officer in France and the U.S.), handbooks, manuals, brochures, programs, speeches, magazines, newsletters, newspaper clippings, and articles. The second series contains items pertaining mainly to his personal life. Included here are personal documents such as income tax receipts, last will and testament, correspondence, photographs (both largely from and of family and friends), diaries, biographical notes, transcripts from audio tape cassettes, logbooks, travel guides, and books. Miscellaneous materials retained by Brooks such as a commemorative medallion, prints, posters, publications, a stamp album, photograph albums, newspapers, and address books are also found in this series.

Brooks' papers are arranged both chronologically and alphabetically. Official military and personal documents, correspondence, reports, photographs, brochures, programs, newspaper clippings and articles, diaries and day timers, biographical notes, transcriptions, logbooks, travel guides, maps, atlases, timetables, and newspapers are organized by the former method. Handbooks, instructions, manuals, magazines, and newsletters are grouped alphabetically by title. The books are arranged alphabetically by author.
Arrangement:
Series 1: Professional material

1.1 Official military documents

1.2 Correspondence

1.3 Reports

1.4 Handbooks, instructions, and manuals

1.5 Photographs

1.6 Brochures

1.7 Programs

1.8 Magazines

1.9 Newsletters

1.10 Newspaper clippings and articles

Series 2: Personal materials

2.1 Personal documents

2.2 Correspondence

2.3 Diaries and day-timers

2.4 Photographs

2.5 Biographical notes

2.6 Transcripts

2.7 Logbooks

2.8 Travel guides, maps, atlases, and train/airline timetables

2.9 Books

2.10 Miscellaneous materials

2.11 Oversized materials

2.12 Posters, prints and maps

2.13 Newspapers and newspaper supplements
Biographical/Historical note:
Arthur Raymond Brooks (1895-1991) was a fighter pilot for the U.S. Army Air Service during World War I and later, a civil aviation pioneer. Born in Framingham, Massachusetts on November 1, 1895, Brooks graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1917 with a Bachelor of Science degree in electrochemical engineering. In July of that year, he enlisted in the Aviation Section of the U.S. Army Signal Corps. His flight training was provided by the Royal Flying Corps' School of Military Aeronautics in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. He was then sent for further flight training to Fort Worth, Texas where he flew with the 139th Squadron, 2nd Pursuit Group. In March 1918, Brooks left for France and completed pursuit training at the 3rd Aviation Instruction Center, American Expeditionary Force (AEF), at Issoudun. The 139th was placed at the Vaucouleurs Aerodrome, Toul sector, where the squadron was equipped with SPAD VII aircraft. Brooks was eventually made its flight commander. By early August, he was assigned as flight commander of the 22nd Aero Squadron, 2nd Pursuit Group. His new squadron was supplied with SPAD XIII pursuit craft. Altogether, he flew 120 missions in four different aircraft. He named each of the aircraft Smith in honor of his fiancée (Ruth Connery) who was attending Smith College in Massachusetts. The final plane he flew in combat, the Smith IV, is on display at the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum.

On July 29, 1918, Brooks achieved his first confirmed aerial victory by downing a German Fokker aircraft. Later, he destroyed two more Fokkers while flying over enemy lines on September 14. On that day, Brooks single-handedly engaged eight enemy aircraft in combat thus, earning him the Distinguished Service Cross. By the war's end, he had six confirmed kills to his credit.

Following the armistice of November 11, 1918, Brooks remained in France as the 22nd Squadron's commanding officer. His squadron was kept in reserve for possible German occupation duty. Upon his return to the United States in July 1919, Brooks was promoted to Captain. He decided to stay in the Air Service and was subsequently assigned as commanding officer for the 95th Pursuit Squadron, stationed at Kelly Field, Texas. From May 1920 to August 1921, he was put in charge of the 1st Pursuit Group at Ellington Field, Texas. Following that assignment, Brooks attended Air Service Field Officer's School, Langley Field, Virginia. After graduation, he stayed on duty at Langley Field until his resignation from the U.S. Army Air Service in December 1922. This action was spurred both by Brooks' frustration with being on the Army's stagnant promotion list and an interest in entering the private sector. During 1920-21, while in the service, he was involved in a failed Framingham-based commercial aviation business called the Brooks, Banks and Smith Corporation. Also in 1920, Brooks married Ruth. Their only child, Peter, was born in 1929.

Brooks' first job after his honorable discharge from the Air Service was as secretary for the National Automobile Association during 1923-24. During 1924-25, he worked in advertising sales for the financial magazine, United States Investor. Once again, his desire to be engaged in commercial aviation compelled him to become involved in establishing and organizing the Florida Airways Corporation from late 1925 into 1926. In time, Florida Airways became Eastern Airways. Brooks left this financially struggling enterprise and joined the Department of Commerce's Aeronautics Branch in August 1926. For the next seventeen months, he worked as an airway extension superintendent and associate airways engineer. His main task with the Aeronautics Branch was to survey air routes and supervise the installation of beacons to assist air mail pilots navigate the Appalachian Mountains from Virginia to Pennsylvania. He left government service in early 1928 and was hired by Bell Telephone Laboratories. He spent the next few decades working as a scientist, engineer and chief pilot for the company at Hadley Field, New Jersey. There, Brooks and his staff conducted pioneering research on ground-to-air radiotelephone communications and electronic aviation navigation equipment. During much of this period, he piloted a Fairchild FC2-W Wasp and a Ford Tri-Motor that operated as flying laboratories for the team's communications research. He was Bell's publications manager for New Jersey operations at the time of his retirement in 1960.

Brooks stayed active in aviation for the remainder of his life. Even in his nineties, he enjoyed flying all sorts of aircraft, including ultralights, gliders and hot-air balloons. He belonged to many aviation-related and professional associations and organizations such as the American Legion, Military Order of the World Wars, Combat Pilots Association, Order of Daedalians, OX-5 Aviation Pioneers Association, Telephone Pioneers of America, Cross and Cockade, Associate Fellow of the American Institute for Aeronautics and Astronautics, Quiet Birdmen, WWI Overseas Flyers and the American Fighter Aces Association. Brooks also remained involved with the alumni affairs of his alma mater – MIT. He attended numerous air shows and reunions, including the sixty-fifth, and final reunion, held for the Lafayette Flying Corps in Paris, France in 1983. In 1980, he was inducted into the Aviation Hall of Fame of New Jersey. Brooks lived long enough to see his Smith IV restored by the National Air and Space Museum during the 1980s. Brooks, the last surviving American World War I ace, died in Summit, New Jersey, on July 17, 1991.
General note:
Other materials: medals and memorabilia transferred to NASM Aeronautics Division.
Provenance:
A. Raymond Brooks, Gift, 1989, NASM.1989.0104
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Fighter pilots  Search this
Works of art  Search this
SPAD XIII (S.13) "Smith IV"  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Periodicals  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Financial records
Diaries
Drawings
Publications
Photographs
Videotapes
Citation:
Arthur Raymond Brooks Collection, NASM.1989.0104, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.1989.0104
See more items in:
Arthur Raymond Brooks Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1989-0104
Online Media:

Adlershof R-Plane Drawings

Extent:
0.1 Cubic feet ((1 oversized folder))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Drawings
Date:
[ca. 1918]
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of ten linen drawings and two microfilm drawings of the Adlershof R-Planes. Six of the drawings depict a twin fuselage configuration. The drawings originated at Adlershof, Germany, but there is no other information on these drawings.
Biographical / Historical:
The R-planes of World War I were German giant bombers - the largest aircraft of World War I. The 'R' was an abbreviation for 'Riesenflugzeug,' which meant 'giant aircraft.' The R-plane was conceived as a long-range strategic weapon for attacking objectives deep within enemy territory. The aircraft were only produced in small numbers.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
Unknown, possibly USAF Museum, unknown, XXXX-0541, Unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Zeppelin-Staaken R-Plane Projects  Search this
Siemens-Schuckert Steffen R-Planes  Search this
Adlershof R-plane projects  Search this
Riesenflugzeug  Search this
World War, 1914-1918  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Aircraft drafting  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0541
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0541

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