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Untitled (Neil Armstrong)

Artist:
Robert McCurdy, born 1952  Search this
Sitter:
Neil Alden Armstrong, 5 Aug 1930 - 25 Aug 2012  Search this
Medium:
Oil on canvas
Dimensions:
Stretcher: 185.4 × 172.7 × 5.1 cm (73 × 68 × 2")
Type:
Painting
Date:
2012
Topic:
Costume\Dress Accessory\Eyeglasses  Search this
Painting  Search this
Neil Alden Armstrong: Male  Search this
Neil Alden Armstrong: Education\Educator\Professor  Search this
Neil Alden Armstrong: Science and Technology\Scientist\Astronaut  Search this
Neil Alden Armstrong: Military\Navy\Pilot  Search this
Neil Alden Armstrong: Science and Technology\Engineer\Aeronautical  Search this
Neil Alden Armstrong: Science and Technology\Engineer\Aerospace  Search this
Neil Alden Armstrong: Military\Navy  Search this
Neil Alden Armstrong: Presidential Medal of Freedom  Search this
Neil Alden Armstrong: Congressional Gold Medal  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; Gift of Ian M. and Annette P. Cumming
Object number:
NPG.2019.139
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Copyright:
© Robert McCurdy
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm48c8070db-6904-4481-b736-099a7f63067e
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.2019.139

Apollo Stowage Lists

Creator:
United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
National Air and Space Museum (U.S.). Division of Space History  Search this
Extent:
0.39 Cubic feet ((1 box))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Reports
Date:
bulk 1969-1972
2019
Summary:
This collection consists of a complete set of printed stowage lists, including revisions lists, from the Apollo 11, 12, 14, 15, 16, and 17 missions. The collection also includes fully searchable pdf files of the lists created in 2019 by a special project initiated by the National Air and Space Museum's Department of Space History and executed by the Smithsonian's Transcription Center.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of a complete set of printed stowage lists, including revisions lists, from the Apollo 11, 12, 14, 15, 16, and 17 missions. The collection also includes fully searchable pdf files of the lists created in 2019 by a special project initiated by the National Air and Space Museum's Department of Space History and executed by the Smithsonian's Transcription Center.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged by mission.
Biographical / Historical:
At the time of each Apollo mission launch, NASA prepared a set of printed "as flown" stowage lists to document what items were stored on the spacecraft (both the Command Module and Lunar Module), as well as which items were to be transferred from one spacecraft to another.
Provenance:
NASM's Space History Department, Transfer, 2015, NASM.2015.0018
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Manned space flight  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Apollo 17 Flight  Search this
Apollo 16 Flight  Search this
Apollo 15 Flight  Search this
Apollo 12 Flight  Search this
Apollo 11 Flight  Search this
Apollo 14 Flight  Search this
Genre/Form:
Reports
Citation:
Apollo Stowage Lists, NASM.2015.0018, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2015.0018
See more items in:
Apollo Stowage Lists
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2015-0018
Online Media:

Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) Documentation

Creator:
Goodyear Aerospace Corporation  Search this
Extent:
1.8 Cubic feet ((5 letter boxes))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Reports
Drawings
Manuscripts
Date:
bulk 1978-1986
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of two cubic feet of documentation (from 1978-1986) on the Massively Parallel Processor (MPP), including the following: Goodyear Aerospace Corporation reports, internal memorandums, project notes, correspondence, diagrams, a handwritten manuscript of a MPP manual, and progress reports.
Biographical / Historical:
The Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) is the 16,384-processor computer developed by Goodyear Aerospace for 1983 installation at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Earth and Space Data Computing Division (ESDCD) at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The MPP pioneered the linking together of a collection of computers to accomplish large tasks quickly via network. The MPP was retired from service with GSFC in 1991 and was donated to the National Air and Space Museum in 1995.
Provenance:
Carl Mickelson, Gift, Year received
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aerospace engineering  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Computer networks  Search this
Computers  Search this
Massively Parallel Processor (MPP)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Reports
Drawings
Manuscripts
Citation:
Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) Documentation, Accession number 2006-0017, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2006.0017
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2006-0017

Project Mercury "Big Joe" Installation Records (Eiband Collection)

Creator:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Names:
Big Joe (Space capsule)  Search this
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Project Mercury (U.S.)  Search this
Extent:
2.18 Cubic feet ((2 records center boxes))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Correspondence
Notes
Drawings
Date:
1959
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains data on the Big Joe capsule and its operation. The material includes blueprints of the thermocouple, telemetry, cooling, instrument, intercom, and other systems. It also contains notes and information on operations, afterbody assembly, personnel assignments, and safety measures, as well as other aspects of the work performed with the capsule during the Big Joe project.
Biographical / Historical:
Soon after the organization of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in October 1959, that agency selected Project Mercury as the first United States manned space program. The project was planned to launch a single man into Earth orbit and return him to Earth. Before launching a manned flight NASA planned a series of unmanned launches with the Mercury spacecraft/launch vehicle combinations to insure the success of later manned flights. The first successful launch of an instrumented Mercury boiler plate capsule, dubbed 'Big Joe' occurred on 9 September 1959 on an Atlas-10D booster from Cape Canaveral. The capsule reached an altitude of 161km (100 miles)e successfully reentering the atmosphere.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
A. Martin Eibrand, Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA, Gift, unknown, XXXX-0189, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Manned space flight  Search this
Space flight  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Correspondence
Notes
Drawings
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0189
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0189

Charles Stuart Sheldon II Papers

Creator:
Sheldon, Charles Stuart, II, 1917-1981  Search this
Names:
Library of Congress. Congressional Research Service  Search this
National Aeronautics and Space Council (U.S.)  Search this
United States. Congress. House. Committee on Science and Astronautics  Search this
United States. Congress. House. Select Committee on Astronautics and Space Exploration  Search this
United States. Congress. Joint Economic Committee  Search this
Sheldon, Charles Stuart, II, 1917-1981  Search this
Extent:
13.08 Cubic feet ((12 records center boxes))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Notes
Publications
Photographs
Drawings
Manuscripts
Correspondence
Place:
Outer space -- Exploration -- Soviet Union
Outer space -- Exploration -- United States
Date:
1934-1980
bulk 1958-1972
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists mainly of Sheldon's research correspondence files from his tenure at CRS and NASC. The collection also reflects his activities as Staff Economist for the Joint Economics Committee (1955-57), Assistant Director, House Committee on Astronautics and Space Exploration (1958), and Technical Director, House Committee on Science and Astronautics (1959-61). The bulk of the material consists of papers and notes regarding U.S. and Soviet space programs (both manned and unmanned) in connection with various papers and speeches prepared by Dr. Sheldon, including original drawings of Soviet spacecraft, various photos of U.S. and Soviet craft, articles, and papers touching on various aerospace subjects, as well as notes of lectures given by Dr. Sheldon, and copies (both rough-draft and final) of speeches given by him in the 1960s.
Biographical / Historical:
Dr. Charles Stuart Sheldon II (1917-1981) was an economist, author, and advisor to Congress and the President on aerospace matters. Sheldon graduated from the University of Washington (BA, 1936; MA, 1938) and Harvard University (AM, 1939; Ph.D., 1942) and worked in several transportation and economics-related positions before World War II. During and after the war he served in the United States Navy (1943-1952) before transferring to the Naval Reserve. He spent several several years on the staff of the University of Washington Departments of Transportation (1940-48), including three years as Director (1946-48), and Economics (1949-55), before joining the Congressional Research Service of the Library of Congress (CRS) as Senior Specialist, Transportation and Communications (1955-58). At the same time he served as director of several congressional committees relating to astronautics. He joined the professional staff of the National Aeronautics and Space Council (1961-66), which advised the President on aerospace matters, before returning to CRS (1966-81).
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
C.S. Sheldon II, Gift, 1984, XXXX-0141, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
Periodicals  Search this
Genre/Form:
Notes
Publications
Photographs
Drawings
Manuscripts
Correspondence
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0141
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0141

Skylab (McDonnell-Douglas) Collection

Creator:
McDonnell Douglas Corp. McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Co.  Search this
Names:
McDonnell Douglas Corp. McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Co.  Search this
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Skylab Program  Search this
Extent:
1.53 Cubic feet ((1 records center box) (1 flatbox))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Drawings
Reports
Date:
1970-1974
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of McDonnell-Douglas Astronautics Co. documents relating to the construction of NASA's Skylab Orbital Workshop in 1970-1972. It contains still photographs covering the construction of the vehicle and its transportation to Kennedy Space Center, Florida, which were submitted to NASA every month during the project. Also included are daily status reports during the operating life of Skylab (29 May 1973 - 8 February 1974), as well as engineering drawings of the vehicle prepared by McDonnell-Douglas for the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum.
Biographical / Historical:
Skylab was a manned space station launched into Earth orbit by the United States in May 1973. It was made from the third stage of a Saturn V launch vehicle. A crew of three astronauts occupied Skylab during each of three missions. The longest mission, which ended in February 1974, lasted almost three months. The Skylab missions obtained vast amounts of scientific data, and they demonstrated to the American public that people could live and work productively in space for months at a time. The Orbital workshop (OWS) was a modified Saturn 4B stage that served as crew quarters. It could hold provisions for a three-man crew for up to 84 days each. Skylab crews lived and did most of their scientific research in the workshop.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
No donor information, Gift, unknown, XXXX-0090, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Manned space flight  Search this
Space vehicles  Search this
Skylab Orbital Workshop  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Drawings
Reports
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0090
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0090

George Paul Sutton Collection

Creator:
Sutton, George Paul, 1920-  Search this
Names:
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  Search this
North American Aviation, Inc.. Rocketdyne Division  Search this
Sutton, George Paul, 1920-  Search this
Extent:
0.45 Cubic feet ((1 legal document box))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Drawings
Articles
Publications
Correspondence
Date:
1945-1958
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains numerous articles and papers on rocketry, as well as drawings and photographs of rockets and rocket systems. The material was collected by Sutton in the course of this work.
Biographical / Historical:
George Paul Sutton (1920- ) was an aerospace engineer and manager. He received degrees from Los Angeles City College (AA, 1940) and the California Institute of Technology (BS, 1942; MS (ME), 1943) before going to work as a development engineer for the Rocketdyne Division of North American Aviation [now Rockwell International]. He remained at Rocketdyne into the late 1960s, while also sitting as Hunsaker Professor of Aeronautical Engineering at MIT (1958-59) and serving as Chief Scientist, Advanced Research Projects Agency and Division Director, Institute of Defense Analysis for the Department of Defense (1959-60). Following his work at Rocketdyne he joined the technical staff at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
No donor information, gift, unknown, XXXX-0009, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Rockets (Aeronautics)  Search this
Rocketry  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Rocket engines  Search this
Aerospace engineers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Drawings
Articles
Publications
Correspondence
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0009
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0009

Charles W. Chillson Collection

Creator:
Chillson, Charles W., 1910-  Search this
Names:
American Rocket Society  Search this
Chillson, Charles W., 1910-  Search this
Goddard, Esther C.  Search this
Von Braun, Wernher, 1912-1977  Search this
Extent:
3.12 Linear feet
3.5 Cubic feet (8 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Correspondence
Manuscripts
Drawings
Publications
Date:
1950-1956
Summary:
This collection largely documents Chillson's affiliation with the ARS, particularly his presidency in the early 1950s, and includes correspondence with ARS members, aerospace companies, and organizations such as the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the British Interplanetary Society, the International Astronautical Federation, and the Institute of Aeronautical Sciences. There is also correspondence with Wernher von Braun and Esther C. Goddard. The collection also includes papers presented to or published by the ARS, some diagrams and photographs highlighting rocket plans or capabilities, and some pamphlets and articles on rockets.
Scope and Contents:
This collection largely contains documents of Chillson's affiliation with the American Rocket Society (ARS), particularly his presidency in the early 1950s. The collection includes ARS organizational documents, correspondence regarding arrangements for National and Regional meetings, copies of technical papers presented at conventions and a few photographs. The collection is arranged as follows:
Arrangement:
Series I:

ARS National Meetings ARS Regional Meetings Director Correspondence Conventions Meetings Committees

Series II:

Joint Meetings Technical Papers Publications

Each series was listed in chronological order. The ARS Regional Meetings are listed alphabetically by state and then in chronological order.
Biographical/Historical note:
Charles W. Chillson (1910 - ) was an expert in air and rocket propulsion. Chillson received his B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University in 1931 and went to work in Chemical Engineering at the California Institute of Technology from 1931 until 1936. During those years, Chillson worked with C. K. Greene on a mechanical controllable-pitch propeller which progressed through whirl-testing at the Army Air Force Engineering Division at Wright Field, OH. Chillson then moved to Curtiss-Wright's Curtiss Propeller Division as an engineer and project designer (1936-1940) and was later promoted to chief researcher for the years 1940 to 1947. In 1947, Chillson won the Collier Trophy for his propeller work and became chief engineer of the newly formed Rocket Department at Curtiss-Wright. In 1950, he became program chairman of the American Rocket Society (ARS) Board of Directors and was later elected vice president (1951) and president (1952-1955), before being made a fellow of the ARS in 1956.
Provenance:
Charles W. Tillson, Gift, 1971, XXXX-0008
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Topic:
Periodicals  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Jet propulsion  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Correspondence
Manuscripts
Drawings
Publications
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0008
See more items in:
Charles W. Chillson Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0008
Online Media:

Litton Industries Space Suit Collection

Creator:
Litton Industries  Search this
Extent:
0.36 Cubic feet ((1 box))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Newsclippings
Drawings
Reports
Date:
bulk 1960-1969
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of approximately 0.36 cubic feet of material relating to the development of space suits at Litton Industries. Materials included in the collection include a copy of the Litton Industries publication, The Extravehicular and Lunar Surface Suit Progress Report; copies of papers authored by Litton Industries staff on the development of a self-contained, articulated undersea suit; Litton Industries, Space Sciences Laboratories presentation, "UX Self-Contained One-Atmosphere Diving Suit"; a news-clipping and National Aeronautics and Space Administration press release on the Litton space suits; copies of drawings of various aspects of the Litton suits and their equipment; a hand-painted insignia (signed, W. Suitor '67) showing an astronaut wearing a Litton suit on the Moon; and numerous photographs of the Litton suits, their development, and testing. There is caption information for some of the images. Also included in the collection is a signed photograph of astronaut Eugene A. Cernan and a lithograph print showing the flight insignia and astronauts' signatures from Gemini missions.
Biographical / Historical:
In 1954, the United States Air Force was looking for solutions to problems with vacuum tubes in electronics which were prone to overheating and were unreliable. Dr. Siegfried Hansen was working with vacuum tubes at Litton Industries and realized that working in a vacuum would facilitate his research. The U.S. Air Force built a vacuum chamber at Litton Industries to further Dr. Hansen's research and Hansen began to develop a special suit to wear in the chamber that would be flexible enough to work in but that could be fully pressurized. The suit that Hansen developed, completed in 1957, eventually became known as the Litton Mark I suit. In 1963, NASA contracted with Litton Industries to develop and build a protective "hard" suit that could be pressurized for extravehicular activity and Litton introduced the RX-1 suit in 1964. Over the next several years, Litton Industries developed a series of these suits, all given the RX designation.
Provenance:
Carol Haislip, Gift, 2010
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
Manned space flight  Search this
Space suits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Newsclippings
Drawings
Reports
Citation:
Litton Industries Space Suit Collection, Accession 2010-0015, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2010.0015
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2010-0015

Space Acceleration Measurement Unit System (SAMS) Collection

Creator:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Names:
Mir (Space station)  Search this
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Extent:
2.18 Cubic feet ((3 legal document boxes) (1 flatbox))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Optical disks
Correspondence
Logs (records)
Drawings
Reports
Date:
[ca. 1990s]
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of the following types of documentation relating to SAMS: test plans and reports; drawings; maintenance logs; and memorandums and correspondence. This collection also contains optical discs from the SAMS/MIR project, which contain the raw data.
Biographical / Historical:
The Space Acceleration Measurement Unit System (SAMS) is an acceleration measurement and data acquisition instrument, not a classical micro gravity research experiment. SAMS consists of a main unit and up to three remotely positioned triaxial sensor heads. The data is used to provide investigators with a time history of this environment to improve for future experiment design. This instrument was flown on the Space Shuttle and Mir Space Station, from 1994 to 1998.
General:
Additional materials: The actual artifact, project decals and official SAMS log books are housed in the National Air and Space Museum Depart of Space History.
NASMrev
Provenance:
NASA Glenn Research Center, Transfer, 2000, 2000-0040, Public Domain
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
Space Acceleration Measurement Unit System (SAMS)  Search this
Reduced gravity environments  Search this
Space shuttles  Search this
Genre/Form:
Optical disks
Correspondence
Logs (records)
Drawings
Reports
Identifier:
NASM.2000.0040
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2000-0040

Skylab Food Heating / Serving Tray Collection

Creator:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Names:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Skylab Program  Search this
Extent:
0.45 Cubic feet ((1 legal document box))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Reports
Drawings
Date:
[ca. 1970s]
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of the NASA Acceptance Data Packages and drawings for Skylab Food Heating / Serving Trays Serial Numbers 4904, 4913 and 4914, as well as material relating to tray Serial Number 4912.
Biographical / Historical:
Skylab was a manned space station launched into Earth orbit by the United States in May 1973. To prepare meals, the Skylab crew placed desired food packages into the food warmer tray. This was the first device capable of heating foods (by means of conduction) during space flight. Foods consisted of products such as ham, chili, mashed potatoes, ice cream, steak, and asparagus.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
Collections Management, NASM, Transfer, 1999, 1999-0019, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Manned space flight  Search this
Space vehicles  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Space vehicles -- Equipment and supplies  Search this
Genre/Form:
Reports
Drawings
Identifier:
NASM.1999.0019
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1999-0019

Dennis Hasson Collection

Creator:
Hasson, Dennis F.  Search this
Names:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Langley Research Center  Search this
Project Mercury (U.S.)  Search this
United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Extent:
0.36 Cubic feet ((1 letter box))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Newsletters
Correspondence
Notes
Charts
Photographs
Motion pictures (visual works)
Reports
Drawings
Articles
Place:
Outer space -- Exploration -- United States
Date:
bulk 1959-1970
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of material chronicling the NACA/NASA career of Dennis Hasson, notably his work on Project Mercury, his work with a lenticular manned reentry vehicle for planned lunar missions; and his work with deep-space probes. The following type of material is included: Langley NASA newsletters; memos and correspondence; phone lists and organizational charts; newspaper articles; photographs; one 16 mm film of wind tunnel testing; reports; and drawings.
Biographical / Historical:
Dennis Hasson received his Mechanical Engineering BES from The John Hopkins University, his Aerospace Engineering MS from Virginia Polytechnic Institute, and his Engineering Material Ph.D. from the University of Maryland. Hasson worked at NACA-NASA at Langley Research Center, as well as the Goddard Space Flight Center. Hasson's work started with experimental aerodynamic studies on advanced aircraft, such as the X-15 and Mach 3 transport. In March 1959, Hasson was assigned to the Aerodynamics Group at Langley Field. That group was responsible for the aerodynamic performance of the manned space vehicle in the earth's atmosphere. Hasson was responsible for the wind-tunnel program for the Mercury project and he and two coworkers received a patent for a manned reentry vehicle for planned lunar missions. In 1961, he became involved in advanced control thruster and power systems for deep-space probes, using advanced materials including fabricators and metallic, polymeric and ceramic materials. He is a Fellow of both ASM international and ASME Internal. He received the Meritorious Civilian Service Medal, and was Pi Tau Sigma USNA Chapter Teacher of the Year. He is currently a Professor at the US Naval Academy in the Mechanical Engineering Department.
Provenance:
Dennis F. Hasson, Gift, 2004
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Space flight to the moon  Search this
Astronautics -- 1990-2000  Search this
Outer space Exploration -- 1960-1970  Search this
Genre/Form:
Newsletters
Correspondence
Notes
Charts
Photographs
Motion pictures (visual works)
Reports
Drawings
Articles
Citation:
Dennis Hasson Collection, Accession 2004-0064, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2004.0064
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2004-0064

Caldwell C. Johnson Papers

Creator:
Johnson, Caldwell C.  Search this
Names:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Project Apollo (U.S.)  Search this
Project Apollo-Soyuz (U.S.)  Search this
Project Mercury (U.S.)  Search this
Johnson, Caldwell C.  Search this
Extent:
0.45 Cubic feet ((1 legal document box))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Reports
Drawings
Publications
Photographs
Date:
[ca. 1950s-1970s]
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of 34 items of manned space flight memorabilia, circa 1950s-1970s, including pencil and ink drawings by Caldwell Johnson from the Mercury, Apollo, and the Apollo-Soyuz programs. This collection also contains papers, reports, and brochures on these three projects, along with design studies for other spacecraft and related equipment.
Biographical / Historical:
Caldwell C. Johnson was a manned spacecraft designer for NASA and contributed majorly to the Mercury, Apollo, and Apollo-Soyuz projects. Johnson began his aeronautical engineering career in 1937, when at the age of eighteen he was hired by NACA as a model builder. By 1958, Johnson was the top engineering designer for the Pilotless Aircraft Research Division (PARD). He was at that point recruited for the Mercury program where his job was to put the first design of the Mercury capsule on paper. Johnson is a co-holder of the Mercury spacecraft patent and was the principal architect of the Apollo spacecraft. Johnson was also a member of the Space Task Group (STG), and was the Chief of Spacecraft Design at the Manned Spacecraft Center (now Johnson Spacecraft Center) during the early 1970s. His last project before his retirement from NASA in 1974, was the Apollo-Soyuz Project.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
Caldwell C. Johnson, gift, 2000, 2000-0019, Public Domain?
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
Manned space flight  Search this
Aeronautical engineers  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Reports
Drawings
Publications
Photographs
Identifier:
NASM.2000.0019
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2000-0019

Burnley Mahr Space Projects Collection

Creator:
Mahr, Burnley  Search this
Names:
Project Apollo (U.S.)  Search this
Rockwell International. Space and Information Systems  Search this
Skylab Program  Search this
Mahr, Burnley  Search this
Extent:
1.09 Cubic feet ((1 records center box))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Date:
1953-1994
bulk [ca. 1960s-1970s]
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains materials from Mahr's work on the following projects: EOS Landsat, Orbiter, LST Hubble, Navaho, Skylab, Apollo, and the Shuttle Robot Retrieval Arm. In addition, there are also promotional materials from Rockwell International's Space Division pertaining to various spacecraft.
Biographical / Historical:
Burnley Mahr's career as an aerospace designer began at the University of Minnesota, where he studied engineering in the 1950s. Following employment with Boeing, North American Aviation, and North American Rockwell, he worked for Rockwell International's Space & Information Systems in Downey, California. Throughout the span of his career, Mahr worked on the following projects: Navaho, Gemini, Apollo, Orbiter, LST Hubble, the Shuttle, satellite systems, and the Space Station (Skylab). His most important contribution was the design of the Shuttle Robot Retrieval Arm for the deployment and plucking of satellites in outer space.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
Douglas Mahr, gift, 1996, 1996-0031, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Artificial satellites  Search this
Landsat satellites -- EOS Landsat  Search this
Manned space flight  Search this
Space flight  Search this
Rockets (Aeronautics)  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Aerospace engineers  Search this
Space Shuttle Orbiter  Search this
Hubble (Large) Space Telescope  Search this
Navaho missile (SM-64)  Search this
Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator Arm  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Identifier:
NASM.1996.0031
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1996-0031

Space Suit Android Drawings

Creator:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
International Telephone and Telegraph Corporation  Search this
Names:
International Telephone and Telegraph Corporation  Search this
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Extent:
3.1 Cubic feet (1 24 x 38 x 2 drawer)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Date:
1964
Summary:
This collection consists of engineering drawings for the android and related gear.
Scope and Content:
This collection consists of engineering drawings for the android and related gear.
Arrangement:
Alphabetical Order.
Biographical/Historical note:
The Space Suit Android was built by ITT under contract to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). NASA's Manned Spaceflight Center, Crew Systems Division, used the android to test and evaluate space suit designs and related equipment for mobility and operational stress. The android was later considered by the United States Air Force for use in its bionics program.
Provenance:
National Air and Space Museum, Division of Space History, transfer, 1989, 1989-0062, Unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Permissions Requests
Topic:
Androids  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Space suits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Citation:
Space Suit Android Drawings, Acc. 1989-0062, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.1989.0062
See more items in:
Space Suit Android Drawings
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1989-0062
Online Media:

S. Fred Singer Papers

Creator:
Singer, S. Fred (Siegfried Fred), 1924-  Search this
Names:
National Environmental Satellite Center (U.S.)  Search this
United States. Department of Commerce  Search this
United States. Department of Transportation  Search this
United States. Department of the Interior  Search this
United States. Office of Naval Research  Search this
University of Maryland at College Park  Search this
University of Miami. School of Environmental and Planetary Science  Search this
University of Virginia  Search this
Singer, S. Fred (Siegfried Fred), 1924-  Search this
Extent:
54.5 Cubic feet ((50 records center boxes))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Publications
Photographs
Drawings
Financial records
Notes
Correspondence
Place:
Outer space -- Exploration -- United States
Outer space -- Exploration
Date:
1953-1989
bulk 1960-1980
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of Singer's personal papers. The material consists of correspondence and research files, as well as financial records. The collection covers Singer's career beginning with his tenure at Maryland and continued through his retirement in 1989.
Biographical / Historical:
Dr. Siegfried Fred Singer (1924- ) is a professor, physicist, and administrator. Singer emigrated to the United States from Vienna in 1940 (naturalized 1944) and attended Ohio State University (BEE 1943; D.Sc. (honorary) 1970) and Princeton (AM 1944, Ph.D. (physics) 1948). He taught briefly as a doctoral candidate at Princeton (1943-44) before joining the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory as a physicist (1946-50). He acted as the Office of Naval Research Scientific Liaison Officer at the US Embassy in London (1950-53), then joined the faculty of the University of Maryland (assoc. professor, physics 1953-59; professor 1959-62). He continued to alternate between public and academic positions, working at the National Weather Satellite Center, Department of Commerce (Director, 1962-64); School of Environmental and Planetary Science, University of Miami (Dean, 1964-67); Department of the Interior (Deputy Assistant Secretary for Water Quality and Research, 1967-70); University of Virginia (Professor, Environmental Science, 1971-87); and the Department of Transportation (Chief Scientist, 1987-89). Singer authored a number of papers and articles on astrophysics, space exploration, and environmental issues and was involved in formulating public policies on these topics.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
S. Fred Singer, gift, 1989, 1989-0130, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Astrophysics  Search this
Environmental sciences  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial  Search this
Aeronautics and state  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Astronautics and state  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Periodicals  Search this
Genre/Form:
Publications
Photographs
Drawings
Financial records
Notes
Correspondence
Identifier:
NASM.1989.0130
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1989-0130

Space Suit Component and Survival Rucksack Collection

Creator:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Names:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Project Apollo (U.S.)  Search this
Project Gemini (U.S.)  Search this
Skylab Program  Search this
Extent:
3.36 Cubic feet ((2 Records center boxes) (2 flatboxes))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Logs (records)
Reports
Date:
1966-1977
Scope and Contents:
This collection documents the development of space suits and accessories for post-Mercury manned missions. The material includes acceptance data packages and test papers for the suits, life support systems, and survival rucksack which chart the testing and development of these systems.
Arrangement:
Arrangement: The papers are arranged chronologically by program, beginning with the Gemini mission in Folder One of Box One (S-1C-1). The papers continue chronologically until concluding with the Skylab and Shuttle missions in Folder 28 of Box Two. Box Three contains binders from the Blue David Clark Co., Inc. These binders include operational logs from NASA and the field, malfunction reports, maintenance logs and serialization control records. Blue prints of the systems tested are also included. Box Four includes two computer printouts. Printout number one contains the summary of hardware located at the Smithsonian as of 3-27-1973. Number two contains the summary of hardware located at the Smithsonian as of 9-10-1973.
Biographical / Historical:
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) was inaugurated on 1 October 1958 with the intent of conducting a manned space program. NASA took over the rocketry and propulsion work previously performed by the United States Air Force, Navy, and National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. Unmanned launches began during the International Geophysical Year (1957-58) under Air Force auspices and have continued to the present with a wide variety of payloads, including space science, weather, communications, and earth observation satellites. The manned program progressed through Projects Mercury (1959-63; launches 1961-63), Gemini (1962-67; launches 1965-66), Apollo (1960-72; launches 1968-72), and Skylab (1969-74; launches 1973-74). After a hiatus following the Skylab program, the manned program focused on the Space Shuttle, a reusable spacecraft. The manned program was supported by a number of unmanned exploration vehicles in the Ranger, Lunar Orbiter, and Surveyor series throughout the 1960s, as well as research into a number of related areas.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
NASA, Transfer, 1988, 1988-0114, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Space shuttles  Search this
Space suits  Search this
Manned space flight  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Logs (records)
Reports
Identifier:
NASM.1988.0114
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1988-0114

John Young

Alternate Title:
John Young in Snoopy Cap
Artist:
Henry C. Casselli, Jr., born 25 October 1946  Search this
Sitter:
John Watts Young, 24 Sep 1930 - 05 Jan 2018  Search this
Medium:
Watercolor and pencil sketch on paper
Dimensions:
Sheet: 41.2 x 34 cm (16 1/4 x 13 3/8")
Mat: 55.9 x 40.6 cm (22 x 16")
Type:
Drawing
Place:
United States\Florida\Brevard\Cape Canaveral
Date:
1981
Topic:
John Watts Young: Male  Search this
John Watts Young: Science and Technology\Scientist\Astronaut  Search this
John Watts Young: Military\Navy\Pilot  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; Gift of Taylor Energy Company LLC
Object number:
NPG.2008.49
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Copyright:
© Henry C. Casselli, Jr.
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Exhibition:
20th Century Americans: 1960-2000
On View:
NPG, South Gallery 342
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm45a6cc45c-07b2-4b84-97a5-4c3b7e65e817
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.2008.49

Apollo 11 Crew

Alternate Title:
Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins
Artist:
Ronald Carl Anderson, 1927 - 1981  Search this
Sitter:
Neil Alden Armstrong, 5 Aug 1930 - 25 Aug 2012  Search this
Edwin Eugene Aldrin, Jr., born 20 Jan 1930  Search this
Michael Collins, born 31 Oct 1930  Search this
Medium:
Oil on board
Dimensions:
Board: 102.2 x 81.3 x 2.5cm (40 1/4 x 32 x 1")
Frame: 118.1 x 97.8 x 6.4cm (46 1/2 x 38 1/2 x 2 1/2")
Type:
Painting
Date:
1969
Topic:
Nature & Environment\Water\Ocean  Search this
Nature & Environment\Water\Ocean  Search this
Symbols & Motifs\Flag\National\United States  Search this
Symbols & Motifs\Flag\National\United States  Search this
Vehicle\Spacecraft\Rocket  Search this
Exterior\Landscape\Moonscape  Search this
Vehicle\Lunar module  Search this
Nature & Environment\Planet\Earth  Search this
Neil Alden Armstrong: Male  Search this
Neil Alden Armstrong: Education\Educator\Professor  Search this
Neil Alden Armstrong: Science and Technology\Scientist\Astronaut  Search this
Neil Alden Armstrong: Military\Navy\Pilot  Search this
Neil Alden Armstrong: Science and Technology\Engineer\Aeronautical  Search this
Neil Alden Armstrong: Science and Technology\Engineer\Aerospace  Search this
Neil Alden Armstrong: Military\Navy  Search this
Neil Alden Armstrong: Presidential Medal of Freedom  Search this
Neil Alden Armstrong: Congressional Gold Medal  Search this
Edwin Eugene Aldrin, Jr.: Male  Search this
Edwin Eugene Aldrin, Jr.: Science and Technology\Scientist\Astronaut  Search this
Edwin Eugene Aldrin, Jr.: Presidential Medal of Freedom  Search this
Edwin Eugene Aldrin, Jr.: Congressional Gold Medal  Search this
Michael Collins: Male  Search this
Michael Collins: Science and Technology\Scientist\Astronaut  Search this
Michael Collins: Military\Air Force\Officer\Pilot  Search this
Michael Collins: Society and Social Change\Administrator\Museum\Director  Search this
Michael Collins: Society and Social Change\Administrator\Smithsonian Institution  Search this
Michael Collins: Congressional Gold Medal  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Mr. and Mrs. William D. Blakemore, Midland, Texas; Mr. and Mrs. Omar Harvey, Dallas, Texas; Mr. and Mrs. R.K. Keitz, Dallas, Texas; Col. and Mrs. Thomas A.P. Krock, Dallas, Texas; Mr. and Mrs. W.R. Lloyd, Jr., Houston, Texas; Dr. and Mrs. J.R. Maxfield, Dallas, Texas; Mr. and Mrs. Wesley Nagorny, Jr., Houston, Texas; Dr. and Mrs. H.B. Renfrow, Dallas, Texas; Mr. and Mrs. J.W. Taylor, Dallas, Texas; Dr. and Mrs. J. Robert Terry, Miami, Florida; Mr. and Mrs. Thomas B. Young, Dallas, Texas; and an anonymous donor
Object number:
NPG.70.36
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Exhibition:
20th Century Americans: 1960-2000
On View:
NPG, South Gallery 342
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm46b0fcaba-7371-4ffe-b700-675acf5af350
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.70.36

George Carruthers Innovative Lives Presentation

Creator:
Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation.  Search this
Carruthers, George R.  Search this
Names:
Naval Research Laboratory (U.S.)  Search this
Extent:
0.25 Cubic feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Lectures
Videotapes
Slides
Date:
1996-02-22
Summary:
This video history consists of original, master and reference videos documenting a children's lecture program by George R. Carruthers, a physicist and inventor. Carruthers invented the Far Ultra-Violet Camera (FUVCAM).
Scope and Contents note:
This collection contains original, master, and reference videos documenting Dr. George Carruthers. Dr. Carruthers discusses his invention, the Far Ultra-Violet Camera (FUVCAM), as well his background, and experience working with the space program.
Arrangement:
Divided into 3 series: 1) Original Videos; 2) Master Videos; 3) Reference Videos.
Biographical / Historical:
Dr. George Carruthers was born in 1939 and grew up in Milford, Ohio and Chicago's South Side. Carruthers received his B.S. in Physics from the University of Illinois in 1961, M.S. Physics in 1962, and his Ph.D in aeronautical and astronomical engineering in 1964. After receiving his Ph.D in 1964, Carruthers joined the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), Space Science Division where he is now Senior Astrophysicist. Along with William Conway, another scientist, Carruthers developed the lunar surface ultraviolet camera and spectrograph used on the moon by Apollo 16 in 1972. The camera was used to take ultraviolet pictures of the Earth during the Apollo 16 space mission. It was the first camera to take pictures of the upper levels of the earth's atmosphere and to show that hydrogen exists in outer space.
Provenance:
This videohistory was created by the Innovative Lives Program of The Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation on February 22, 1996. The Innovative Lives series brings young people and American inventors together to discuss inventions and the creative process and to experiment and play with hands-on activities related to each inventor's product.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Space photography  Search this
Physics -- 20th century  Search this
Inventions -- 20th century  Search this
Inventors -- 20th century  Search this
Cameras -- 20th century  Search this
Engineering -- 20th century  Search this
Astronomy -- 20th century  Search this
Astrophysics -- 20th century  Search this
Astronautics in astronomy -- 20th century  Search this
Astronomical photography -- 20th century  Search this
Aeronautics -- 20th century  Search this
Astronautical instruments -- 20th century  Search this
Ultraviolet spectrometry  Search this
Spectrography -- 20th century  Search this
Photographs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Lectures -- 1990-2000
Videotapes -- 1990-2000
Slides
Citation:
George Carruthers Innovative Lives Presentation, February 22, 1996, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0597
See more items in:
George Carruthers Innovative Lives Presentation
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0597

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