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Seattle -- The Merrill House

Landscape designer:
Platt, Charles A. (Charles Adams), 1861-1933  Search this
Architect:
Platt, Charles A. (Charles Adams), 1861-1933  Search this
Landscape architect:
Church, Thomas Dolliver  Search this
Shipman, Ellen  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
The Merrill House (Seattle, Washington)
United States of America -- Washington -- King County -- Seattle
Scope and Contents:
The folders include work sheets, narrative history by Mrs. Corydon (Eulalie) Wagner and copies of articles.
Reproduction Note:
Two slides copied from Washington State Historical Society collections, Tacoma, Washington; four from Mrs. Corydon Wagner collection; two from Treasury of American Gardens; one from The American Woman's Garden; and three from unknown sources. One photoprint is copy of original 1928 photoprint.
General:
According to Mrs. Corydon (Eulalie) Wagner, the one acre, European-style garden, was seen at its best when seen from above. A city garden enclosed by high cement walls, it consisted of formal pathways of white pebbles; eight flower beds outlined with dwarf box; and a round pool surrounded by a square qrass bed and parterres. The beds displayed various color schemes of tulips, followed by a "Mille Fleur" perennial garden in the summer. Tea roses were added during the 1920s. After the death of Mrs. Merrill in the 1930s, the family opened the house for charitable organizations, particularly those in which she took an active part. During World War II, Victory Garden vegetables filled in where lilies and holly-hocks grew. The perennial borders were slightly transformed by using annuals, and after the bay trees died in the wooden boxes, they were replaced with tree-tiered topiaries of Ficus. During the 1960s, the Merrill family visited Versailles and its box borders. In order to eliminate the upkeep of the "Mille Fleur" summer garden, Thomas Church designed a box parterre, a miniature version of those at Villandry--eliminating much of Shipman's perennial borders. Kevin Harvey currently plants strongly-shaped and colored perennials into the gravel beds to add year-round interest.
Persons associated with the garden include: Richard Dwight Merrill (former owner, 1910-1964); Eulalie Wagner (former owner, ?-1991); The Merrill Foundation (owners of 1/2 the original property); Charles A. Platt (architect, landscape designer, 1910); Ellen Biddle Shipman (landscape architect, 1915); Thomas Dolliver Church (landscape architect, 1960s); and Kevin Harvey (gardener and designer, 2004).
Related Materials:
The Merrill House related holdings consist of 1 folder (12 35 mm. slides and 4 photoprints)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Washington (State) -- Seattle  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File WA012
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Washington
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6f4404b30-75d0-43bb-bf3c-7eb08ef47549
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref11419

Seattle -- Miller Garden

Architect:
Lament, David  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Miller Garden (Seattle, Washington)
United States of America -- Washington -- King County -- Seattle
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, site plans, photo copies of articles about the project, and other information.
Varying Form:
Elisabeth C. Miller Botanical Garden.
General:
Located on a four-acre site purchased in 1948, this garden is situated on a bluff edging the Puget sound within view of the Olympic Mountain Range. The property descends two hundred feet from woodland to an open arid area at the top of the bluff. The garden was developed in 1950 as a collector's garden. In 1977, it held over 5,000 different species endemic to thirty-five countries from the arctic to subtropical region. Of interest are the ericaceae and evergreen oak collections and heavy use of Northwest native plantings. In 1994 the Elisabeth Carey Miller Trust was established to preserve and continue the Miller Garden, now referred to as the Elisabeth C. Miller Botanical Garden.
Elizabeth Carey Miller was born in Montana and attended the University of Washington. A word-renowned horticulturist, she was a member of twenty-five horticultural organizations and was instrumental in the creation of the Center for Urban Horticulture and the Elisabeth C. Miller Library at the University of Washington Botanical Gardens as well as the Seattle Chinese Garden. Miller was a founder of the Northwest Horticultural Society and an active member of the Garden Club of America and served on numerous boards and as a facilitator of civic projects.
Persons associated with the property include Elizabeth C. Miller (horticulturist and former owner, 1948-), John W. Fieker (sp?) (landscape designer, 1950-1907), Steven Blint (sp?) (landscape designer, 1958-1987), Daniel E. Lament (architect, date unknown).
Related Materials:
Miller Garden related holdings consist of 1 folder (31 photographs (slides))
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Washington (State) -- Seattle  Search this
Botanical gardens  Search this
Woodland gardens  Search this
Native plant gardens  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File WA013
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Washington
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb61f1902f0-c629-4bf2-9053-991f92ad32a1
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref11420

Lake Geneva -- Flowerside Inn

Former owner:
Chapin, Simeon B.  Search this
Trinke, William  Search this
Architect:
Marshall, Benjamin H.  Search this
Nagle, James  Search this
Landscape architect:
The Brickman Group, Ltd.  Search this
Provenance:
Lake Geneva Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Flowerside Inn (Lake Geneva, Wisconsin)
United States of America -- Wisconsin -- Walworth County -- Lake Geneva
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes a worksheet, garden plans, plant lists, and a photocopy of an article about the garden.
General:
Built in 1898 on the shores of Lake Geneva as a summer home for a New York City family, Flowerside Inn once employed up to 15 gardeners to maintain its extensive formal landscaping. The current owners purchased the property in 1976, and, after restoring the house, turned to the gardens, which had suffered from years of neglect. All that remained were the stately maples that shaded the home from the summer sun, while a weed-ridden lawn marched to the lakeside door and broken black asphalt greeted the drive door. With the help of a nationally renowned landscaping firm and the personal knowledge of the owner, who is active in the Lake Geneva Garden Club, the entire grounds have been landscaped with native species and more modern hybrids bred to withstand harsh winter winds and searing summer sun. The lake to the south is now fully exposed with a shoreline of flag iris, roses and daylilies combined with hosta and astilbe where the tree shade blocks the sun. A pier house, dragged one winter onto the shore, is now an attractive shoreside gazebo. The kitchen bay window looks out on a rose garden and birdbath.
The drive entrance on the north side of the home has been curved to lead gently to the front door and paved with bricks reflecting the brown tones of the landscaping. The edges have been planted with hawthornes, hosta, daylilies, coneflowers, hydrangeas, roses, liatris, daisies, peonies, azaleas, sedum, and other perennials, supplemented with annuals left over from the planting of window boxes that line the second story windows and the front entrance. An antique English garden wagon sits on the drive loaded with pots of annual flowers. There is variety in both color and green plant material throughout the growing season. A rambling perennial bed provides cut flowers, and the recently added "deer garden" provides a protected environment in which the owner can grow roses and lilies together with bellflowers, coreopsis, zinnias, sunflower, and vegetables without the fear of the deer. She built a "tennis court" which has a 10.5 foot black-clad chain link fence (too high for the deer to jump), and covered the fence with annual and perennial vines. Fencing continues underground for 18 inches, so even the little wild folk are denied the garden greens for their salad. Recent acquisitions include a 1900s gazing ball, marble statues of the four seasons, and a bench beneath an arbor.
Persons and firms associated with the garden include: Simeon B. Chapin (former owner, ca. 1896); William Trinke (former owner, ca. 1952); Benjamin H. Marshall (architect, 1896 and 1906); James Nagle (architect, 1999); and The Brickman Group (landscape designers, 1993-1997).
Related Materials:
Flowerside Inn related holdings consist of 1 folder (17 35 mm. slides)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Wisconsin -- Lake Geneva  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File WI028
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Wisconsin
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb606dbf1f8-f335-44c6-bde2-acdd1e171f83
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref11668

Upperville -- Edgewood

Former owner:
Oxnard, Marie Pichon  Search this
Oxnard, H. T. (Henry Thomas), 1860-1922  Search this
Provenance:
Fauquier and Loudoun Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Edgewood (Upperville, Virginia)
United States of America -- Virginia -- Fauquier County -- Upperville
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets.
General:
Edgewood was the home of Marie Pichon Oxnard and Henry T. Oxnard (1860-1922) who founded the American Beet Sugar Company. Oxnard, California was named after him. Oxnard made his home in Washington, D.C. as he maintained active interests in tariff legislation affecting the sugar industry. He also maintained a farm in Upperville as his country residence. He was well-known as a breeder of horses at Blue Ridge Farm in Upperville which he established in 1908. It is possible that Edgewood was located at or near Blue Ridge Farm, but that remains unclear.
At the time the garden was documented in the 1930s, it included a large swimming pool with a flagstone surround, lawns, hedges, shrubs, mature trees, and stone steps with urns alongside.
Persons associated with the garden include Henry T. Oxnard and Marie Pichon Oxnard (former owners, 1920s).
Related Materials:
Edgewood related holdings consist of 1 folder (4 3x4 in. lantern slides)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Virginia -- Upperville  Search this
Formal gardens  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File VA017
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Virginia
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb657e5513d-41ac-4885-ac68-60cc0f8b84c4
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref18914

Dallas -- Neels Garden

Landscape designer:
Neels, Carl  Search this
Provenance:
Founders Garden Club of Dallas  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Neels Garden (Dallas, Texas)
United States of America -- Texas -- Dallas
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets and articles.
General:
Established in 1974, this Highland Park garden was modeled after an eighteenth-century English cottage garden. A longtime landscaper and garden designer in Dallas, the Carl Neels transformed the small flat 60 by 129 foot plot beginning with no trace of a garden into a lush landscape offering colorful displays in every season. The addition of two feet to the soil level at one corner, and building steps up to an elliptical lawn gave greater dimension to the landscape, and the appearance of a larger garden was achieved by creating sight lines which run diagonally from corner to corner. Features include a parterre, a pond, a cloister, and a woodland area, as well as various focal points provided by garden sculptures and outdoor furniture. In addition to creating a serene retreat in the naturalistic garden rooms at the back of the residence, the owner maintains the beds at the front of the property and public easements around his home, offering lovely garden views to members of the local community to enjoy as they pass by on their daily activities.
Maximizing the respite from the heat of summer, the garden is design to be enjoyed particularly in winter. It features over twenty varieties of arborvitae, and chamaecyparis, Japanese maple, juniper, cedars and over fifteen other evergreens serve as a year-round backdrop and provide winter interest. Plantings such as violets, lavender, stock, cyclamen, and white heath offer additional color in cooler months. In summer impatiens and begonia thrive in the regions of the garden dominated by wet soil, and in drier parts of the garden marigolds, periwinkles, salvia, ageratum and blue haze provide quick carpets of color. The owner has a particular fondness for perennials and has found lythrums, Coreopsis verticillata, coneflowers, peachleaf bellflower, and Achillea ptarmica to consistently perform well in the Texan summer.
Persons associated with the garden include: Emmy Hill (former owner, 1952-1984); Carl Neels (landscape designer, 1974-present; and owner,1984- present).
Related Materials:
Neels Garden related holdings consist of 1 folder (9 35 mm slides (photographs); 3 photographic prints)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Texas -- Dallas  Search this
Cottage gardens  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File TX103
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Texas
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb650580e09-2fbe-4af9-91fc-ff62218805a4
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref13488
Online Media:

Middleburg -- The Hill School Arboretum

Former owner:
Clark, Stephen C. Jr.  Search this
Clark, Jane Forbes  Search this
Arboretum designer:
Rowley, Polly P.  Search this
Committee head:
Rowley, Polly P.  Search this
Landscape architect:
Starke, Barry W.  Search this
Tindall, Ian  Search this
Foster, Susie  Search this
Committee member:
Augenblick, Barbara  Search this
Morency, Mike  Search this
Hoovler, Karen  Search this
Gardener:
Vella, Matthew  Search this
Dornin, Bob  Search this
Looney, Greg  Search this
Faculty:
Dornin, Bob  Search this
Looney, Greg  Search this
Provenance:
Fauquier and Loudoun Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
The Hill School Arboretum (Middleburg, Virginia)
United States of America -- Virginia -- Loudoun -- Middleburg
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets and photocopies of articles and images.
General:
The arboretum was created on the 132-acre farm that was donated to the private pre-K through 8th grade Hill School in 1992. A landscaping committee decided that the mission of the arboretum would be to grow examples of both native and alien trees that have adapted to the region to be used as an environmental teaching facility for children and as a community resource. The initial plan was broken into stages, planting was done over several years, and the vision for the arboretum was that it would look like a country estate in 100 years. Eight distinct areas were identified that would be planted over time with more than 200 species of trees and shrubs in combinations that emphasize differing leaf shapes and bark textures for the children to study. Planning included respect for the instinctive pathways of children pursing daily activities while also promoting appreciation and respect for the natural environment. The arboretum provides habitat for birds and wildlife, another aspect that would be incorporated into the curriculum of the school.
When there was dissatisfaction with the contractors hired for the work members of the committee took charge themselves. There were drainage problems in some areas and the location of differing stands of trees had to be determined in part by soil conditions. Young trees were purchased that were easier to transplant successfully and less costly, although some of the specialty trees had to be kept in the chairwoman's nursery for three years until they were ready to be planted out. Community support included donations of tons of manure and humus from nearby farms.
Persons associated with the garden include Stephen C. Clark, Jr. and Jane Forbes Clark (former owners, 1945-1992); Polly P. Rowley (arboretum designer and committee head, 1992- ); Barry W. Starke (ASLA), Earth Design Associates (landscape architect, 1992-1993); Ian Tindall and Susie Foster, HOH Associates (landscape architects, 1992-1993); Barbara Augenblick, Mike Morency and Karen Hoovler (Hill School committee, 1992-1995); Matthew Vella (gardener, 1992-1998); Bob Dornin and Greg Looney (Hill School grounds supervisor and gardener, 1992-1998).
Related Materials:
The Hill School Arboretum related holdings consist of 1 folder (22 digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Virginia -- Middleburg  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File VA490
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Virginia
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb64e473e31-526b-47b6-8ca7-13b8b8f63f38
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref18854

Erie -- A Touch of Williamsburg

Former owner:
Griswold, Tracy  Search this
Griswold, Maryann  Search this
Sculptress:
Goodacre, Glenna  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
A Touch of Williamsburg (Erie, Pennsylvania)
United States of America -- Pennsylvania -- Erie -- Erie
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets and photocopies of articles.
General:
In 1970 the owners built their house on two and one-quarter acres in a new subdivision on land that had been agricultural, and their growing family played sports in the yard. In the late 1980s the owners began changing the landscape and house to reflect their interests, especially after studying English gardens at Cambridge University, England, and many visits to the recreated colonial gardens in Williamsburg and Monticello in Virginia. The property was planned and planted as a whole, with formal gardens including a kitchen garden replicating the Taliaferro-Cole garden in Williamsburg with its multi-level picket fence. The garden inside the fence is rectilinear with an armillary sphere in the center watched over by the sculpture "The Dog" by Glenna Goodacre. The straight-edged beds are planted in flowers and vegetables, espaliered apple and pear trees and pollarded linden trees along the fence. This part of the property is conceived on a short axis that ends in an obelisk. The long axis of the plan starts at the street and traverses through an alleĢe of crabapple trees towards a reproduction 18th century statue called "Taste." An outbuilding that is used for storage copies the design of a colonial kitchen. A tennis court is flanked by fruit orchards, and an alpine trough garden leads to the garage.
The paths in the fenced garden are comprised of silica and brick, which along with tall hedges, create a micro-climate in the courtyard that is ten degrees warmer than outside the fence. Thus the planting season starts earlier and last longer, and species such as southern magnolia can be grown. Although most of the construction and garden ornaments reflect the colonial style of this garden there are two Lutyens style benches inside the fenced garden from the Arts & Crafts period, and a brightly painted cottage Windsor chair for resting. Rose pots, painted red, are hoisted on top of poles add height and whimsy to the garden.
To keep the garden looking fresh big plants are replaced, especially with one that have sentimental value to the owners. The garden has been photographed, written about and studied by horticultural groups, and the owners are active in local gardening organizations.
Persons associated with the garden include: Tracy and Maryann Griswold (former owners, 1925-1967); Glenna Goodacre (sculptress, 1999).
Related Materials:
A Touch of Williamsburg related holdings consist of 1 folder (41 digital images; 1 photographic print)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Pennsylvania -- Erie  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File PA727
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Pennsylvania
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6b68f28a5-f731-4203-a28e-a2529043fa0d
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref16457

Erie -- Stout/Bestoso Garden

Former owner:
Stout, Donald F.  Search this
Metcalf, John  Search this
Landscape designer:
Wayside Gardens  Search this
Provenance:
Carrie T. Watson Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Stout/Bestoso Garden (Erie, Pennsylvania)
United States of America -- Pennsylvania -- Erie -- Erie
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, garden plans, a planting list, historical images, and photocopies of garden tour directories.
General:
This six acre property had been farmland before it was purchased and developed by the Stout family, who built a ranch style house in 1956 and installed trees, shrubs, and foundation plantings. Circa 1962 a formal garden of French style was designed by Wayside Gardens, laid out symmetrically in four quadrants hedged in by privet and viburnum, and anchored by four blue spruce trees at the corners. The French garden remains today but two of the spruce trees and some of the privets were removed to open the formal garden to other parts of the property. Gardens that have been added over time include vegetable and herb gardens with boxwood hedges, a swimming pool and surrounding garden containing rosa rugosa, rhododendron, ornamental grasses and tropical plants, an all-white secret garden behind privet hedges, a 115-foot long perennial border, a vineyard, and a grove of bamboo.
The 1960s plan included an orchard, still existing but replanted with fruit trees, black walnut, chestnut and hazelnut trees, black raspberries, black currants and hundreds of naturalized daffodils. Originally four acres were left as field and brush-hogged twice each year; now there are three acres of field populated by redwing black birds, monarch butterflies, deer, turkeys and pheasants, designated an official Backyard Wildlife Habitat in 1994 by the National Wildlife Federation.
The Stout/Bestoso Garden has participated in the Garden Conservancy's Open Days, and the owner is active in the Carrie T. Watson chapter of the Garden Clubs.
Persons associated with the garden include: John Metcalf (former owner, -1955) and Donald F. Stout (former owner, 1955-1986).
Related Materials:
Stout/Bestoso Garden related holdings consist of 1 folder (19 digital images; 1 photographic print)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Pennsylvania -- Erie  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File PA732
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Pennsylvania
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb674f27350-4087-4296-81d1-164017cd6fe3
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref16459

Fairview -- Dunmovin

Provenance:
Carrie T. Watson Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Dunmovin (Fairview, Pennsylvania)
United States of America -- Pennsylvania -- Erie -- Fairview
Scope and Contents:
1 folder, 20 digital images and 23 digital prints. The folder includes worksheets and additional images.
General:
When purchased in 1973 Dunmovin comprised a house on a bluff overlooking Lake Erie surrounded by a blank slate of about two acres of grass enclosed by another seven acres of woodlands. The owners have created eight gardens, one for vegetables and the other seven for perennials, shrubs, evergreens, meandering stone walkways and statuary. Their first 15-foot-long perennial garden border planted in trucked in topsoil has expanded to be 100 feet along the circular driveway with another 80 foot garden border mirroring it across the lawn. A rose garden planted with hybrid teas has evolved to contain knockout roses, a weeping cherry, a flowering almond, rose of Sharon bushes, and a wisteria arbor. Raspberry and blackberry canes climb the fence of the vegetable garden, and there are fruit trees planted further out. A large shade garden has lady's mantle, ferns, a variegated willow tree and hemlocks. Dwarf conifers in a bed at the front of the house have outgrown their space and are being moved one at a time. A slightly raised bed outside the screened porch has hydrangeas, moon flowers, ageratum, and a view of a mature weeping willow, hostas and pachysandra. Beyond this garden there is an all-white memorial garden for a deceased member of the family. The transition from lawn to woodlands is softened by plantings of evergreens.
The lake and sandy beach are important features of the property for recreation and stunning sunsets. An 80 foot groin barrier and a seawall at the bottom of the bluff were built to mollify lake activity and control erosion. A circular stone patio with an inlaid compass rose was built on a spot overlooking the lake and furnished with Adirondack chairs and tables painted light blue. A 10-inch dawn redwood specimen found in a nursery years ago now towers over the house. A creek that feeds into Lake Erie marks the border of the property on one side and is tapped for water for the gardens. Other amenities include a rope swing and a hammock in the shade.
Persons associated with the garden include Tom Raines (former owner, 1919-1946); Paul Stephany (former owner, 1946-1960); D. Carlisle Brock (former owner, 1960-1969); Don Shannon (former owner, 1969-1972); Denny Ward (landscape designer, 1970's); Dan Dahlkemper (landscape architect, 1980's); Joseph Bonanti (gardener, 1970's); John Bananti and Sons (gardener, 1990's- ); Brett Maloney (landscape designer, 2017).
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Pennsylvania -- Fairview  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File PA833
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Pennsylvania
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6d0e91008-8131-45b9-af1c-327fc23dec4f
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref16465

Philadelphia -- Las Parcelas

Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Las Parcelas (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
United States of America -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia County -- Philadelphia
Scope and Contents:
The folders include worksheets, detailed descriptions of the garden and its history and evolution, garden plans, and other information.
General:
This 6,468 square-foot garden was begun on vacant land in the Kensington section of Philadelphia by the Norris Square Neighborhood Project (NSNP), with assistance from the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society in what was a drug-infested neighborhood. The garden's name, Las Parcelas, refers to the unique combination of more than 40 attractive plots, or parcels, each with its own special feature. Wood-trimmed beds contain vegetables, flowers, and herbs. Neighbors built "La Casita" (the little house), a reproduction of housing that existed in Puerto Rico before World War II that with its kitchen is a tool to teach children about traditional ways of living. Market stands enable the sale of produce from the garden, while an "environmental park" includes many trees and shrubs. Brightly painted garden structures (including "La Casita"), furnishings, and murals enliven the scene. Las Parcelas is the result of the determined and cooperative nature of the entire community.
Las Parcelas is only one of many community greening projects in Norris Square Greene Countrie Towne which dramatize the efforts of the entire neighborhood. Neighborhood leadership has formed a group of community garden activists known as Groupo Motivos to help maintain gardens, parks and street trees for the good of the community. All ages are represented in the garden, with the dominant group being in their late 40's and 50's. Heavy youth involvement in the garden comes from close association with the youth programs of NSNP. In addition to Philadelphia Green and NSNP, Las Parcelas has benefitted from the Weed and Seed Program of the Department of Justice, which aids in taking back neighborhoods from drug dealers. NSNP also coordinates programs with Swarthmore College, Pennsylvania State University, and four other state universities that give voluntary support to the garden. All of this activity is directly facilitated by NSNP.
Related Materials:
Las Parcelas related holdings consist of 2 folders (22 35 mm. slides)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File PA354
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Pennsylvania
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6a6b99162-e750-49b5-9957-0614a56e7a29
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref16526

Asheville -- French Broad River Garden Club Foundation Gardens

Landscape architect:
Ogden, Doan R.  Search this
Former owner:
Ruland, Julia M.  Search this
Hess, E. A., Mrs.  Search this
Hess, E. A.  Search this
Coston, J. A.  Search this
Dean, S. C.  Search this
Coston, J. A., Mrs.  Search this
Designer:
Godfrey, Charles E., Jr.  Search this
Griffin, Robert S.  Search this
Gardener:
Alexander, Kirk  Search this
The French Broad River Garden Club Foundation  Search this
Horticuturist:
Towe, Alex  Search this
Owner:
The French Broad River Garden Club Foundation  Search this
Provenance:
The French Broad River Garden Club Foundation  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
French Broad River Garden Club Foundation Gardens (Asheville, North Carolina)
United States of America -- North Carolina -- Buncombe County -- Asheville
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes a work sheet, site plans, landscape plan, plan list, and brochures.
General:
The French Broad River Garden Club sponsored a project to help women with limited incomes conserve and utilize native plant materials to create and market Christmas decorations. Because of its charitable and educational activities, the Club won "foundation" status. Land was purchased in 1958, and an old log cabin was re-erected on the property to house this expanding industry. A small log cabin was added to the property in 1960. A tool shed and green house were added in 1965 and 1967; and a large log cabin was added as a meeting space in 1971. In 1990, the gardens were torn up and re designed and the buildings were moved because the adjacent highway was widened. "Theme" herb gardens were created by club members as a part of this new design. Themes include medicinal, Biblical, fragrance, industrial and dye garden, and Cherokee. The gardens are maintained in a cooperative effort by the club members.They are now used to share ideas and techniques for gardening as well as to demonstrate the many uses of plants. The gardens continue to support the Foundation in its endeavor charitable contributions through sales of plants and plant material.
Persons and organizations associated with the site include: Julia M. Ruland (former owner, ? to 1910); E. A. Hess and wife (former owners, 1910-1956); J. A. Coston and wife (former owners, 1956-1958); S. C. Dean (former owner, May 1958-August 1958); French Broad River Garden Club Foundation, Inc. (present owners, 1958-present); Doan Ogden (landscape architect, 1959); Charles Godfrey, Jr., ASLA (garden designer, 1991); Kirk Alexander (planter of foundation plantings, 1992); Alex Towe (boxwood horticulturist, 1991); and Robert Griffin, AIA (designer, 1990).
Related Materials:
French Broad River Garden Club Foundation Gardens related holdings consist of 1 folder (8 35 mm. slides)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- North Carolina -- Asheville  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File NC054
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / North Carolina
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6d85772ed-3d8c-4156-9e6c-1b4d5794a2d2
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref12951

Asheville -- Gussie's Garden Garden

Provenance:
The French Broad River Garden Club Foundation  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Gussie's Garden (Asheville, North Carolina)
United States of America -- North Carolina -- Buncombe County -- Asheville
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes a work sheet and feature plans.
General:
From the street, privacy is attained with a wooded hollow full of ferns at the entry. The garden itself is primarily located in the rear of the house on a natural berm with a backdrop of tall trees bordering the Blue Ridge Parkway. The native area supports a wide variety of plant material and is a true sound buffer for the traffic beyond. It is a "perennial border' about 100 feet long and about 30 feet deep. On one end, the lawn drops to woods and a creek. On the other side, the lawn ends in woods with an informal wood post pagoda used for dining or for relaxing in a hammock. Quite removed from the house, the shelter affords a place to survey the activities of children on the lawn and driveway. The depth of the bed is divided by a gravel and flagstone walkway providing access to the beds. An outstanding feature of the garden is the great clumps of perennials that have reached substantial size in the ten years of its existence. The garden is best viewed across a rather wide lawn from the long deck on the rear of the house where the family eats and entertains. No neighboring houses can be seen from the house or yard. The whole yard surrounding the 3,500 square foot house maintains an informality complementing the gray shingled mountain home.
Persons and organizations associated with the property include: John Rogers, AIA (architect, 1992); and Kerney McNeil (builder, 1992).
Related Materials:
Gussie's Garden Garden related holdings consist of 1 folder (6 35 mm. slides)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- North Carolina -- Asheville  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File NC063
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / North Carolina
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6cc56ab7c-fe85-47f3-ba48-aef10c5014ea
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref12957

Asheville -- "Kinkaku-Ji" Garden

Former owner:
Graniere, Bobby  Search this
McCall, Cary Lawson  Search this
Architect:
Samsel, Jim  Search this
Turner, Deborah  Search this
Landscaper:
Hoots, Mark  Search this
Provenance:
The French Broad River Garden Club Foundation  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
"Kinkaku-Ji" Garden (Asheville, North Carolina)
United States of America -- North Carolina -- Buncombe -- Asheville
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, garden plans, and photocopies of articles.
General:
Created in 2010, this Asian dry-landscape garden features more than 200 bonsai and overlooks a stone house and woodlands within a one and one-quarter acre hillside property in North Carolina. The owners named their garden after the Temple of the Golden Pavilion in Kyoto, Japan, and installed a pavilion used for entertaining, winter storage of some of the bonsai collections, and for storing gardening supplies. The rectangular garden and adjacent lawn are enclosed by low stone walls where the smaller bonsai containers are displayed, each sitting on a revolving stone to facilitate watering and sun exposure. The surface of the garden is brown crushed gravel, with islands of mondo grass and stonecrop planted with Japanese maples, boxwood, dwarf hostas, rockwork, and two large boulders echoing Tenryuji's boulder arrangement in Kyoto. A statue of the Buddha overlooks a small pond and a Burmese brass gong hangs at the pavilion.
The owners became interested in bonsai and Asian design while living in New York, and have been active in the National Bonsai Friendship Foundation, the National Bonsai and Penjing Museum at the U.S. National Arboretum in Washington DC, and the World Bonsai Federation. Two ancient trees in their collection were gifts for service to the federation.
Persons associated with the garden include: Bobby Graniere and Cary Lawson McCall (former owners, 2006-2010); Jim Samsel and Deborah Turner (architects); Mark Hoots (landscaper).
Related Materials:
"Kinkaku-Ji" Garden related holdings consist of 1 folder (12 digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- North Carolina -- Asheville  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File NC081
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / North Carolina
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6121df320-3e07-466b-abf0-59f5005c25ca
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref12963

Summit -- Summit Free Public Library

Former landowners:
Bonnel Family  Search this
Philanthropist:
Carnegie, Andrew, 1835-1919  Search this
Architect:
Lyall, Earl Harvey  Search this
Provenance:
The Summit Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Summit Free Public Library (Summit, New Jersey)
United States of America -- New Jersey -- Union -- Summit
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets and other information.
General:
Summit, New Jersey's first library opened on New England Avenue in 1891. The facility was run by the Summit Library Association, a private, nonprofit organization created by a group of Summit residents who felt the town needed a library. The library did not put books on loan to residents for free. Instead, those interested in borrowing had to pay a subscription fee. It was in 1911 that the city's first free public library opened. The building was constructed on land donated by the Bonnel family and funded by the estate of philanthropist Andrew Carnegie. The Summit Library is one of the 36 Carnegie libraries in New Jersey. In 1964, a new library was constructed at 75 Maple Street and the domed building was torn down. By 1996, it was determined that additional space was needed and a capital campaign for funding was initiated, which raised $1.3 million from activities including a community production of "The Music Man." Construction on the addition began in October 1997 and was completed in March 1999.
The lantern slides feature beautification efforts for the Summit Free Public Library.
Persons associated with the property include the Bonnel Family (former landowners, -1910s?); Andrew Carnegie (philanthropist, 1910s); Earl Harvey Hall (architect, 1910s-?).
Related Materials:
Summit Free Public Library related holdings consist of 1 folder (8 lantern slides)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- New Jersey -- Summit  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File NJ660
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New Jersey
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb69d7d4dae-7547-48a3-a7fb-64b69786023a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref20270

Bedford -- Marble Garden

Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Biographical / Historical:
Delia West Marble (1868-1951) was active in many civic projects through women's clubs such as The Garden Club of America and Bedford Garden Club. She teamed up with Dr. Ida Ogilvie of Barnard College in 1917 to open the Women's Agricultural Camp on Marble's family farm, also located in New Bedford, New York. Together, Marble and Ogilvie recruited and trained women during World War I to work on farms, drive tractors and plow fields to prevent food shortages as more and more male farm laborers enlisted to fight overseas. The training camp became the model for the Women's Land Army which developed into a national movement, mobilizing 20,000 rural and city 'farmerettes' between 1917 and 1919. These farmerettes broke the societal expectations for women at the time and proved that women could do the same job that a man could do.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File NY061
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New York
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6d32f8019-4261-4c7c-9fdb-f20e5ffa7937
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref26718

Cooperstown -- Fernleigh

Owners:
Clark family  Search this
Landscape architect:
Reynolds, Marcus T.  Search this
Architect:
Van Dyke, James  Search this
Hardenburgh, Henry  Search this
Landscape designer:
Fleming, Bryant  Search this
Provenance:
Lake & Valley Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Fernleigh (Cooperstown, New York)
United States of America -- New York -- Otsego County -- Otsego -- Cooperstown
Scope and Contents:
The file includes 9 35mm slides, worksheets, photocopies of printed information about the garden, and photocopies of photographs of the garden from the New York State Historical Association library.
General:
Fernleigh, the country home of the Clark family since the 19th century, is situated along both sides of the Susquehanna River, linked by a footbridge. The house, only part of which remains, was a Second Empire stone mansion designed by New Jersey architect James Van Dyke and built in 1869. The original garden was located to the south of the mansion and included a servants' house and Turkish bath. In 1923 Stephen Clark commissioned Marcus T. Reynolds to design new gardens for Fernleigh. Reynolds incorporated his love for Italian villas into the plans. When they were completed in 1929, the new Fernleigh gardens had terraces, balustrades, a fountain, and a swimming pool, which was placed on the site of the original garden. The garden architecture included a wrought-iron casino, pavilions, iron trellises, and bird cages. Reynolds' design centered the mansion, servants' house, and Turkish bath around the swimming pool and terraces. Period photographs show that the property was used extensively for lawn parties, fairs, and other recreational activities. Reynolds was reponsible for the terraced plan for the garden, while Bryant Fleming, a landscape design professor at Cornell, drew up the planting plans. Planted beds are evident in the period photographs. Today, only a portion of the Fernleigh mansion remains. The Turkish bath is gone and the swimming pool has been replaced with grass. The wrought-iron casino and fountain still stand. Containers of large topiaries are placed in the garden during the summer months. Planted beds are not used, although some permanent plantings exist.
Persons associated with the garden include: the Clark family (owners, 1869 to date); James Van Dyke (architect, 1868); Henry Hardenburgh (architect, 1870s); Marcus T. Reynolds (architect and landscape architect, 1923-1929); Bryant Fleming (landscape designer, 1920s); and Christi Vadnais (artist od mural in pavilion, 1995).
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- New York -- Cooperstown.  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File NY650
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New York
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6980a5660-fcb9-4a1a-bdfa-c04f1eafbd95
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref26977

Chestnut Hill -- Saltonstall Garden

Former owner:
Saltonstall, Leverett  Search this
Provenance:
Chestnut Hill Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Saltonstall Garden (Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts)
United States of America -- Massachusetts -- Chestnut Hill
Scope and Contents:
Saltonstall Garden related holdings consist of 2 folders, 13 35mm. slides and 18 digital images.
General:
Active development of this 2.5-acre garden site dates to 1974, although the property has been associated with the Saltonstall family since 1857. White birch trees border the curved driveway entering this intensively planted property, which is home to many very old, large trees, such as oak, hemlock, white birch, tulip, and horse chestnut. The driveway is lined with rhododendrons and a mix of evergreen and deciduous shrubs with shade gardens on either side. In the 1990s, a woodland garden was established at the top of the drive. Nearby a shade garden sweeps up an embankment planted with a variety of material. A wooden fence with arbor contains a rose garden, cutting garden, and herb garden and is surrounded by a large, mixed, spring-through-summer display of perennials. A private, walled brick terrace provides comfortable outdoor living. It is lined with container plants and beds of roses, perennials, a spiral juniper, evergreen shrubs, and espaliered weeping cedars, giving texture to the stone wall.
Persons associated with the property include: Leverett Saltonstall (former owner).
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Massachusetts -- Chestnut Hill  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File MA157
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Massachusetts
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb672a1e770-c467-4fd1-8467-a46bfbe3575d
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref17588

South Dartmouth -- Apponagansett Bay Vineyard

Stonemason:
Farias, David  Search this
Creator:
Gulf Hill Dairy.  Search this
Provenance:
Garden Club of Buzzards Bay  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Apponagansett Bay Vineyard (South Dartmouth, Massachusetts)
United States of America -- Massachusetts -- Bristol County -- South Dartmouth
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes a worksheet and abbreviated garden plan.
General:
This garden site lies within a house lot of 16 acres, adjacent to a 110-acre vineyard. The land was once part of the Gulf Hill Dairy, but was purchased by the current owner in 1980. It is now an active vineyard producing 70-80 tons of grapes per year. In 1992 the 1802 farmhouse was moved to the sloping house site, which required extensive stone terracing. Huge granite slabs and steps were designed and constructed to form a sunny terrace. Sunny groundcovers, herbs, heaths, heathers, and bearberry combine with specimen plants to create an easily maintained landscape.
Persons associated with the garden include David Farias (stonemason, 1994-1996)
Related Materials:
Apponagansett Bay Vineyard related holdings consist of 1 folder (8 35 mm. slides)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Massachusetts -- South Dartmouth  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File MA248
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Massachusetts
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb638f83a5c-b364-490a-8f36-640b3e05dd36
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref17661

Millburn -- Wallbridge Garden

Former owner:
Taylor, John, Mrs.  Search this
Gazebo architect:
Heintz, Robert B.  Search this
Owner:
Township of Millburn, New Jersey  Search this
Garden designer:
Short Hills Garden Club  Search this
Planter:
Short Hills Garden Club  Search this
Gardener:
Short Hills Garden Club  Search this
Provenance:
Short Hills Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Wallbridge Garden (Millburn, New Jersey)
United States of America -- New Jersey -- Essex County -- Millburn
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, photocopies of articles, and write-ups of the property's history.
General:
The Wallbridge Garden, approximately one acre, is located at the entrance to Taylor Park in Millburn, New Jersey. The garden is an ongoing community project of the Short Hills Garden Club. The garden features hybrid tea and grandiflora roses planted in concentric rings in wedge-shaped beds hedged with boxwood. At the center is a gazebo, with paths radiating out between and around the beds. Naturalized plantings of spring bulbs, ferns and sweet woodruff, specimen trees, yew hedges and lawns comprise the rest of Wallbridge Garden.
The garden is named for Mr. and Mrs. William K. Wallbridge, whose bequest provided the initial funds for the garden club's renovation. Planning for the garden began circa 1980 during a drought that limited water use, and a trickle hose system was installed in the rose beds that uses non-potable water stored in a tank. The rose beds are mulched with shredded leaves collected in the park.
An earlier garden at that location centered on a bandstand that had become derelict and was removed. Dead trees, deteriorating plants and wire waste baskets were removed, and sturdy wooden benches and trash receptacles were installed. Paths that had been blacktopped were revived with a covering of pea gravel set with hot oil. The original Wallbridge bequest has been supplemented through fund-raising activities of the garden club.
Persons associated with the garden include Mr. and Mrs. John Taylor (former owners prior to 1924); Township of Millburn, New Jersey (owner, May 1924 to present); Robert B. Heintz (architect of the gazebo, February 1981); Short Hills Garden Club (garden designers, planters and maintainers, 1981 to present).
Related Materials:
Wallbridge Garden related holdings consist of 2 folders (2 35 mm. slides (photographs) and 14 digital images)
See others in:
Maida Babson Adams American Garden Collection, ca. 1960-1994.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- New Jersey -- Millburn  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File NJ180
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New Jersey
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb611a8c353-9071-4da2-9b6e-34150f76e584
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref20126

Grosse Pointe -- FitzSimons Garden

Former owner:
Allington, Courtenay D. , Mrs.  Search this
Allington, Courtenay D.  Search this
Clark, William R.  Search this
Clark, William R., Mrs.  Search this
Smith, Hal H., Jr.  Search this
Smith, Hal H., Mrs., Jr.  Search this
Landscape architect:
Shipman, Ellen  Search this
Landscape restoration advisor:
Burton, Barry  Search this
Provenance:
Garden Club of Michigan  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
FitzSimons Garden (Grosse Pointe, Michigan)
United States of America -- Michigan -- Wayne County -- Grosse Pointe
Scope and Contents:
The folders include worksheets and a garden plan.
General:
This two-thirds of an acre garden site was established in 1929 and was originally designed by Ellen Biddle Shipman. Over 70 years later, the garden (often called the Allington Garden after its original owners), still retains many of her original design elements, as well as some early plants and other material. The rear garden, surrounded by brick walls, creates an outdoor room characteristic of Shipman's designs. The central feature is a pair of perennial borders on either side of a brick walk, framed with a boxwood hedge. The current owners are actively restoring the garden and utilize plant material that was commonly used by Shipman in other gardens she designed for the same plant zone and climate.
Persons associated with the garden include: Ellen Biddle Shipman (landscape architect, 1930); Barry Burton (landscape restoration advisor, 1997-1998); Mr. and Mrs. Courtenay D. Allington (former owners, 1929-1939); Mr. and Mrs. William R. Clark (former owners, 1939-1951); and Mr. and Mrs. Hal H. Smith, Jr. (former owners, 1951-1986).
Related Materials:
FitzSimons Garden related holdings consist of 2 folders (13 35 mm. slides; 4 glass lantern slides)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Michigan -- Grosse Pointe.  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File MI003
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Michigan
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6dd113721-ecf6-4b5a-8f93-a0631659d1f9
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref8581

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