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MS 1992-12 Hudson-Meng site field notes and specimen bags

Extent:
5 Boxes (3.58 linear feet)
Culture:
Paleo-Indians -- North America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Field notes
Place:
Hudson-Meng Site (Neb.)
Nebraska -- Antiquities
Date:
circa 1971-1977
Scope and Contents:
This collection is comprised of field notes and original specimen bags from the Hudson-Meng Paleo-Indian site near Crawford, Sioux County, Nebraska. The site, on lands owned by Nebraska State Forest, was excavated between 1971 and 1977 under USDA permit by Chadron State College. The field notes are associated with a collection of approximately 2,500 lithic artifacts and faunal remains held by the Department of Anthropology.
Biographical / Historical:
The Hudson-Meng site is located in the Oglala National Grassland near Crawford, Nebraska. The remains of hundreds of bison were first exposed in the 1950s during the construction of a pond by local rancher Albert Meng. The site was first excavated by Larry Agenbroad of Chadron State College from 1971-1977. Agenbroad's investigations discovered the remains of some 120-125 bison directly associated with Paleoindian-aged Alberta projectile points. The bonebed was dated to about 9,820 Radiocarbon Years Before the Present (RCYBP) and was the first Alberta site to ever be directly dated. Later excavations were conducted by researchers from the University of Wyoming, Colorado State University and St. Cloud State University. In 1997 an enclosure was completed over a central portion of the bonebed and each summer, the site is open to the public for interpretive tours.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1992-12
Other Archival Materials:
The Department of Anthropology of the National Museum of Natural History holds 2,500 lithic artifacts and faunal remains from the Hudson-Meng site. Please see catalog numbers 533,627-534,821 and accession number 361,218.
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Citation:
Manuscript 1992-12, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NAA.MS1992-12
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1992-12

MS 7563 Stabilization of Kin Klizhin, Chaco Canyon National Monument, Fiscal Year 1938

Creator:
Vivian, Gordon  Search this
Extent:
13 Pages
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Pages
Date:
undated
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 7563
Local Note:
Carbon of typescript, bound, with photographs
Topic:
Kin Klizhin -- New Mexico -- Chaco Canyon -- stabilization  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 7563, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS7563
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms7563

To achieve these rights: the struggle for equality and self-determination in the District of Columbia, 1791–1978 exhibition records

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Extent:
13.04 Linear feet (18 boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Exhibit scripts
Exhibition records
Brochures
Photographic prints
Correspondence
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
1992-01 - 1992-07
Summary:
An exhibition on 187 years of civil rights activism in Washington, DC. The show was created by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and exhibited there from January 1992 to July 1992. These records document the planning, organizing, execution, and promotion of the exhibition. Materials include correspondence, research files, exhibit script, administrative records, brochures, press coverage, education packets, loan agreements, floor plans, and catalogues.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Museum exhibits  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Genre/Form:
Exhibit scripts
Exhibition records -- 1990-2004
Brochures
Photographic prints
Correspondence
Citation:
To achieve these rights: the struggle for equality and self-determination in the District of Columbia, 1791–1978 exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-033
See more items in:
To achieve these rights: the struggle for equality and self-determination in the District of Columbia, 1791–1978 exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-033
Additional Online Media:

Captain Max E. Malan USN Pilot Logs

Creator:
Malan, Max E.  Search this
Extent:
0.13 Cubic feet (one shoebox)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Date:
1945-1963
Summary:
This collection consists of Captain Max E. Malan's Navy pilot logs, 1945-1963.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of Captain Max E. Malan's Navy pilot logs, that span his career from 1945 to 1963.
Arrangement:
Three logbooks, arranged chronologically.
Biographical / Historical:
Captain Max E. Malan, USN (1922-2018) joined the United States Navy in 1944. Malan was a career Naval Officer and served his country for 31 years as a naval aviator.
Provenance:
Tammy Malan, Gift, 2019, NASM.2019.0014
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Korean War, 1950-1953 -- Aerial operations  Search this
logs  Search this
Naval aviation  Search this
Citation:
Captain Max E. Malan USN Pilot Logs, NASM.2019.0014, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2019.0014
See more items in:
Captain Max E. Malan USN Pilot Logs
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2019-0014

Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. Exhibition Records

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
21.6 Cubic feet (consisting of 17 cartons, 2 oversized boxes.)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Transcripts
Color slides
Exhibition records
Exhibit scripts
Contact sheets
Photographic prints
Correspondence
Place:
Washington Metropolitan Area
Date:
1942-1998
Summary:
These records document the planning, organizing, execution, and promotion of an exhibition exploring the immigration of people of African descent from Central and South America and the Caribbean to the Washington Metropolitan Area. The show was organized and hosted by the Anacostia Museum from August 21, 1994 through August 7, 1995. Materials include correspondence, research files, exhibit script, administrative records, brochures, press coverage, education packets, loan agreements, floor plans, and catalogues.
Scope and Contents:
The records of the Black Mosaic exhibition presented by the Anacostia Community Museum measure 21.6 cubic feet and date from 1942 to 1998, with the bulk of material dating from 1990 to 1995. The records include administrative records, publications, research files, floor plans, exhibit text drafts, oral history transcripts, and project files for programs coordinated for or tangentially with the Black Mosaic Exhibit.

Administrative records include advisory board member lists, meeting minutes, agendas, grant proposals, project reports and assessments, correspondence, training material for museum volunteers and docents, and assorted notes. Publications within the series directly relate to the Black Mosaic Exhibit and the Anacostia Community Museum. Correspondence includes both internal correspondence and those with local community members.

Writings and notes were previously scattered throughout the collection have been collocated within the Administrative Records series, and a majority are undated. The notes cover topics ranging from administrative activities to exhibit and research planning. Included are printed documents, scrap paper, and spiral-bound notebooks.

The research files contain background information about numerous immigrant communities within Washington D.C. The community research files were originally organized by country, continent, or region of origin, and then later by subjects that coordinated with the exhibit's designated themes. This organization method has largely been maintained. Research files include scholarly articles, news clippings, event programs, compiled bibliographies, and material related to the study of museology.

The exhibit files include floor plan layouts, photocopies of images, interview transcripts, exhibit literature, and extensive exhibit text drafts. Drafts of the exhibit's text include notes throughout multiple editing stages. Additionally, copies of flip books for different thematic sections of the Black Mosaic exhibit are included and are organized alphabetically by title. Other exhibit literature present is primarily in English with one French copy present.

The project files include training material for collecting oral histories and documenting community folklife, conference records, event records, and records pertaining to related projects at the Anacostia Community Museum. Concurrent projects supporting the exhibit include the Black Mosaic community newsletter and an educational curriculum project. Additional project records that thematically overlap with the Black Mosaic exhibit but extend beyond the timeframe of the formal exhibit are present also.
Arrangement:
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D.C. exhibition records are arranged in four series:

Series 1: Administrative Records

Series 2: Research Files

Series 3: Exhibit Files

Series 4: Project Files
Historical Note:
The exhibit Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D.C. was curated by the Anacostia Community Museum's supervisory curator Portia James, and was open at the Anacostia Community Museum from August 1994 to August 1995. The exhibition explored the immigration of people of African descent from South America, Central America, and the Caribbean to the Washington Metropolitan Area.

Topics addressed in the exhibition include migration, situations faced by Black immigrants, the maintenance of relationships with places of origin, community events and cultural performances, public and private expressions of culture, commodification of culture for economic support, and the expression of multiple identities. Some intentions of the exhibit were to provide forums for discussing culture and identity, provide resources for people learning about communities in the Washington Metro area, and to be a model to other museums and cultural institutions for understanding and interpreting similar immigration and settlement patterns.

The exhibit was designed to be experienced with broader cultural concepts being introduced towards the external part of the exhibit, while personal stories could be experienced further in. Over 100 oral history interviews featured prominently in the exhibit where interviewed individuals explained their immigration experience and how they've adapted to life in the area. The exhibit also included mounted photographs, artifacts, music, and conversations. Artifacts included passport photos, tickets, family photographs, and letters. The exhibit's text displayed in three languages: English, Spanish, and Haitian Creole. There were additional exhibition guides provided in Brazilian Portuguese, French, and the Ghanaian languages of Ga, Twi, Akan, and Ewe.

Coupled with the exhibit, the museum coordinated an extensive series of programs to engage various communities in the exploration of issues and traditions. These programs included creating newsletters and a photograph exhibit to keep the community up to date about the progression of the exhibit, working with performance groups, creating multi-institutional partnerships in order to develop more effective methods of collecting oral histories, and collaborating and modeling for the CFPCS African Immigrant Communities project.
Provenance:
Records of Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity Among Black Immigrants in Washington, D.C. Exhibition were created by the Anacostia Community Museum.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Immigrants -- United States -- Exhibitions  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Transcripts
Color slides
Exhibition records -- 1990-2004
Exhibit scripts
Contact sheets
Photographic prints
Correspondence
Citation:
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. Exhibition Records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-027
See more items in:
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. Exhibition Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-027
Additional Online Media:

The Renaissance: Black arts of the Twenties exhibition records

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Extent:
10.55 Linear feet (16 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Exhibition records
Catalogs
Exhibit scripts
Correspondence
Place:
Harlem (New York, N.Y.)
Date:
1985-09 - 1986-12
Summary:
An exhibition on the history and art of the Harlem Renaissance. The exhibition, held at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum, ran from September 1985-December 1986. These records document the planning, organizing, execution, and promotion of the exhibition. Materials include correspondence, research files, exhibit scripts, administrative records, brochures, press coverage, education packets, loan agreements, floor plans, and catalogues.
Related Archival Materials note:
Audiovisual materials related to this exhibition located in Anacostia Community Museum Archives.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Harlem Renaissance  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Exhibition records -- 1967-1989
Catalogs
Exhibit scripts
Correspondence
Citation:
The Renaissance: Black arts of the Twenties exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-024
See more items in:
The Renaissance: Black arts of the Twenties exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-024

English and French Caribbean Music in Washington, D.C.

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Binder
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Binders
Exhibition records
Brochures
Correspondence
Contact sheets
Exhibit scripts
Photocopies
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
1996
Scope and Contents:
This show explored the history of English and French Caribbean music in the District of Columba and surrounding areas from the 1940s to the 1990s. Curated by Kimberly Freeman, the exhibition sought to broaden the general public's understanding of the role music plays in maintaining cultural identity for Caribbean immigrant communities in the metropolitan Washington, D.C., area.
These records document the planning, organizing, execution, and promotion of the exhibition. Materials include correspondence, exhibit scripts, administrative records, exhibit layouts and brochures.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Emigration and immigration  Search this
Music  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Exhibition records -- 1990-2004
Brochures
Correspondence
Contact sheets
Exhibit scripts
Photocopies
Identifier:
ACMA.03-080
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-080

Black women: achievements against the odds exhibition records

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Traveling Exhibition Service  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Extent:
7.92 Linear feet (3 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Brochures
Correspondence
Exhibit scripts
Exhibition records
Photographic prints
Date:
1976-02 - 1976-12
Summary:
An exhibition on two-hundred years of achievements by black women. The show was created and circulated by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service. It was exhibited at the Anacostia Museum from February 1976 to December 1976. These records document the planning, organizing, execution, and promotion of the exhibition. Materials include correspondence, research files, exhibit scripts, administrative records, brochures, press coverage, education packets, loan agreements, and floor plans.
Related Archival Materials note:
Catherine Burt vertical file on black women in the Anacostia Community Museum Archives.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American women -- History  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Traveling exhibitions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Brochures
Correspondence
Exhibit scripts
Exhibition records -- 1967-1989
Photographic prints
Citation:
Black women: achievements against the odds exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-028
See more items in:
Black women: achievements against the odds exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-028
Additional Online Media:

ACM 25th Anniversary Oral History Project

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
ACM 25th Anniversary Oral History Project  Search this
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Extent:
110 Sound cassettes
1.25 Linear feet (3 boxes)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Oral history
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1991-1992
bulk 1992
Scope and Contents note:
In 1992, The Anacostia Cmmunity Museum celebrated its 25th anniversary. In the year leading up to that event, oral history interviews with individuals engaged in the community and museum activities were gathered to document the workings of the Museum and help prepare for the 25th anniversary exhibition. All interviews were recorded on audiocassettes, which are currently stored at ACMA.
Related Archival Materials note:
The Anacostia Community Museum Archives also houses other oral histories of the area, including the Anacostia Oral History Project.
Provenance:
Materials were created as part of the Museum's 25th Anniversary exhibition and celebration.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Genre/Form:
Oral history
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
ACM 25th Anniversary Oral History Project, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.09-034
See more items in:
ACM 25th Anniversary Oral History Project
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-09-034

Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Extent:
2.26 Cubic feet (1 box, 1 oversized box.)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Exhibition catalogs
Contact sheets
Correspondence
Clippings
Photographic prints
Negatives
Exhibition records
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1898-1988
Scope and Contents:
The records of the Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition presented by the Anacostia Community Museum measure 2.26 cubic feet and date from 1898 to 1988. Included are exhibit administrative files, lists of images, press releases for the promotion of the exhibit, oral history transcripts and permission forms, and extensive research files into the Anacostia community in southeast Washington D.C.

Exhibit Records include an outline for exhibit themes and proposed layouts, administrative files that include work plans and meeting notes, lists of exhibit images, promotional press releases, and related correspondence. Subjects relate to project management and community engagement.

Oral History of Anacostia Project Files include transcripts of the audio collected from the Oral History of Anacostia Project. This includes a list of interviewees and their interviewers.

Neighborhood Background Research Files represent two-thirds of the collection. Research files include news clippings, publications, unpublished articles, project files, and research material. Subjects include local figures and the Barry's Farm neighborhood, unpublished historical narratives, and project records related to archaeological investigations and neighborhood development programs.
Arrangement:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records is arranged in 3 series.

Series 1: Exhibit Records

Series 2: Oral History of Anacostia Project Files

Series 3: Neighborhood Background Research Files
Historical Note:
An exhibition on history of the Anacostia neighborhood of Washington D.C. post-World War II. The show was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum (now the Anacostia Community Museum) and held there from January 1, 1972 to December 31, 1972.
Related Materials:
Anacostia Story: 1608-1930 Exhibition Records, M03-039.
Provenance:
Records of the Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition were created by the Anacostia Community Museum.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Museum exhibits  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Genre/Form:
Exhibition catalogs
Contact sheets
Correspondence
Clippings
Photographic prints
Negatives
Exhibition records -- 1967-1989
Citation:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-040
See more items in:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-040
Additional Online Media:

Norman Davis Photograph Collection

Creator:
Davis, Norman  Search this
Extent:
0.06 Linear feet (1 box)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
circa 1930 - 1977
Scope and Contents:
The collection, which dates from circa 1930 to 1977 and measures .17 linear feet, includes images of African American baseball players from the Anacostia community, as well as documents the youth activities organized by the Metropolitan Police Boys Club #11 in the neighborhood. The collection is comprised of photographic prints.
Restrictions:
The Norman Davis photograph collection is the physical property of the Anacostia Community Museum. Literary and copyright belong to the author/creator or their legal heirs and assigns. For further information, and to obtain permission to publish or reproduce, contact the Museum Archives.
Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from Anacostia Community Museum Archives must be obtained in advance. For information on photo services and research appointments, please contact the archivist: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American baseball players  Search this
African American boys  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Normam Davis photograph collection, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Norman B. Davis
Identifier:
ACMA.06-070
See more items in:
Norman Davis Photograph Collection
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-070
Additional Online Media:

Locating the Spirit: Religion and Spirituality in African American Art exhibition records

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Willis, Deborah, 1948-  Search this
Extent:
0.9 Linear feet (2 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Exhibition records
Brochures
Correspondence
Slides
Negatives
Photocopies
Date:
1999
Summary:
An exhibition exploring and examining religious imagery in African American art curated by Deborah Willis. The show was organized by the Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture and held at the Anacostia Gallery February 14, 1999 through June 15, 1999. This exhibit featured over 60 artists including David C. Driskell, Leslie King-Hammond, Radcliffe Bailey, Chester Higgins, Jr., and Valerie Maynard.
Scope and Contents note:
These records document the planning, organizing, execution, and promotion of the exhibition. Materials include correspondence, artist files, administrative records, education packages and brochures.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American photographers  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Art and religion  Search this
Genre/Form:
Exhibition records -- 1990-2004
Brochures
Correspondence
Slides
Negatives
Photocopies
Citation:
Locating the Spirit: Religion and Spirituality in African American Art exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-011
See more items in:
Locating the Spirit: Religion and Spirituality in African American Art exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-011
Additional Online Media:

Hattie Meyers Junkin Papers

Creator:
Junkin, Hattie Meyers, 1896-1985  Search this
Names:
Advance Aircraft Company  Search this
Waco Aircraft Company  Search this
Weaver Aircraft Company  Search this
Barnaby, Ralph S. (Ralph Stanton), 1893-1986  Search this
Brukner, Clayton J., 1896-1977  Search this
Junkin, Elwood J. (Elwood James), 1897-1926  Search this
Weaver, George E. "Buck", 1895-1924  Search this
Extent:
3.3 Cubic feet (12 Boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Diaries
Publications
Photographs
Correspondence
Date:
1906-1982
bulk 1920-1933
Summary:
This collection consists of the personal papers of Hattie Meyers Junkin. The material consists of correspondence, scrapbooks, and manuscripts, as well as material on Junkin's husbands and Weaver Aircraft Co.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains the personal papers of Hattie Meyers Junkin. The material consists of correspondence, scrapbooks, photographs, periodical articles and manuscripts, including material about her three husbands and about the history of the Waco Aircraft Company. This collection could very easily be called the Hattie and George "Buck" Weaver collection since much of the collection material revolves around her life with him and his Weaver/Waco Aircraft Company legacy.
Arrangement note:
The collection has been divided into nine series. These series are described below.

Series 1: General correspondence

Series 2: Soaring and gliding

Series 3: General materials of Hattie Meyers Junkin

Series 4: Waco Company History

Series 5: George "Buck" Weaver materials

Series 6: Scrapbooks

Series 7: Miscellaneous

Series 8: General Photographs

Series 9: Negatives

Series 1: General Correspondence.

This series is divided into two sub-series, personal and business correspondence. The personal correspondence materials consists primarily of letters written by George "Buck" Weaver to Hattie between 1917 to 1923. It also includes letters from family members, friends and acquaintances including Charles Meyers (Hattie's brother), Katherine Stinson, and "Matty" Emil Laird. There are also invitations, christmas cards and special occasion announcements. The business sub-series is comprised of mostly letters to publishers, but also includes letters to women's organizations, business associates, news media and other formal correspondence. Materials have been arranged chronologically.

Series 2: Soaring and Gliding.

This series contains primarily newspaper articles and photographs related directly to Ms. Junkin's soaring activities. There is also correspondence related directly to the topic of soaring, contest programs, bulletins and miscellaneous materials.

Series 3: General materials Hattie Meyers Junkin.

This series contains primarily her writings in major periodical publications, but also contains periodical articles about her children and her personal activities, club correspondence, Early Bird Dinner materials and other general materials.

Series 4: Waco Company History.

This series contains materials directly related to the Waco company and the activities of its founders including, early drafts of Hattie's history of the Waco Company--The Human Investment in Waco Aircraft, Elwood "Sam" Junkin biography, materials related to the Bruckner litigation for control of the Waco Aircraft Company, photographs of early Waco aircraft, and publicity materials including a Waco $0.13 stamp.

Series 5: George "Buck" Weaver materials.

This series contains materials related directly to George "Buck" Weaver. Much of the material in this series pertains to Weaver's activities as a civilian aviation instructor, in Waco, Texas during World War I. Most of the materials found in this series were found together when processing began.

Series 6: Scrapbooks.

This series contains six scrapbooks dating primarily between the years 1914-1926. Much of the material pertains to George "Buck" Weaver's activities at Waco, Texas, his barnstorming activities, promotional activities for the Weaver Aircraft Company and his marriage to Hattie and their family life. Some of the more recent materials deals with Hattie's soaring activities. PLEASE NOTE: Most of the pages in these scrapbooks are loose and the materials fragile. PLEASE HANDLE WITH EXTREME CARE.

Series 7: Miscellaneous materials.

This series contains materials that were organized by Ms. Junkin in a specific fashion or did not fit logically into any of the series listed. In most cases materials in this series are duplications, but their organization offers a researcher insight into materials she thought most important.

Series 8: General Photographs.

This series contains general photographs which did not fit into any of the series above. Many of these photos are publicity shots or photos of family and friends.

Series 9: Negatives.

This series contains 72 negatives found in the collection. These have been separated out and rehoused as a preservation measure. Some of the negatives have prints, but most do not. These associations have been noted in the list below. They are described first by item number (i.e. #27), general topic (i.e Soaring and Gliding), subject and date if known, and if a print is available. They have been arranged by general topic groups. Please request assistance from a staff member when handling these negatives. The staff member will also be able to inform you of ordering procedures if you wish to order copies of these negatives and prints.
Biographical/Historical note:
Hattie Meyers Junkin (1896-1985) was an aviator and observer of a number of historical events. Always interested in aviation, in 1917 she married George "Buck" Weaver ( -1924), a civilian flying instructor at the military training center at Waco, TX. Weaver, along with Clayton Bruckner and Elwood "Sam" Junkin, founded the Advance Aircraft Company in 1921 (Weaver Aircraft Company, 1922-29; Waco Aircraft Co., 1929-1946). Following Weaver's death she married Junkin ( -1926), but he died shortly afterwards and control of Weaver Aircraft slipped away. In 1929 she married Ralph Stanton Barnaby (1893-1986), a glider pilot and aviation pioneer. In 1931 she became one of the first women to earn a glider class C license and attended the University of Washington (DC) studying law, although she was unable to take the bar exam. In 1940 she moved to Garden City, NJ, where she remained until moving to Alabama in the late 1970s. She spent much of her life writing, including articles on Weaver Aircraft.
General note:
Other type of material: printing block.
Related Materials:
The National Air and Space Museum (NASM) Archives Division holds additional material about people related to Hattie Meyers Junkin, although at present this particular collection is all the information available about Hattie Meyers Junkin. Biographical information about Charles William Meyers and George "Buck" Weaver can be found in the biographical fiche collection at the NASM Archives/Garber Facility. Biographical material about Ralph Stanton Barnaby can be found in the Ralph Stanton Barnaby Collection (1915-1986), Accession number 1987-0048. It is also stored at the NASM Archives/Garber Facility. In the NASM Archives downtown facility, we recommend the biographical files which contains additional materials about George "Buck" Weaver and Charles William Meyers. There is also aircraft information available in the Waco Aircraft Technical Files found also in the NASM Archives downtown facility. For additional material related to aircraft, please see the Waco Aircraft Company Records, Accession number XXXX-0151. This collection contains mostly drawings of Waco aircraft and some company records. It is stored at the NASM Archives/Garber Facility.

For additional photographic materials about Charles William Meyers and Waco Aircraft, please see the NASM videodisc files located at the NASM Archives facility downtown. Images of Charles W. Weaver can be seen on NASM videodisc 2B-19072 to 2B-19078. Images of various types of Waco Aircraft can been seen on NASM videodiscs 1B, 2A, and 3B. In some cases, there are original videodisc prints available in the NASM Archives facility downtown and copy negatives at the Smithsonian Institution, Office of Printing and Photographic Services (OPPS). Please consult a staff member for more details and about ordering procedures.
Provenance:
Hattie Meyers Junkin, Gift, 1983, NASM.XXXX.0171
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Periodicals  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial -- United States  Search this
Women in aeronautics  Search this
Gliding and soaring  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Diaries
Publications
Photographs
Correspondence
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0171
See more items in:
Hattie Meyers Junkin Papers
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0171
Additional Online Media:

Clement Melville Keys Papers

Creator:
Keys, Clement Melville, 1876-1952  Search this
Names:
Aeronautical Chamber of Commerce of America  Search this
Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company  Search this
Curtiss-Wright Corporation  Search this
Transcontinental & Western Air, Inc.  Search this
Keys, Clement Melville, 1876-1952  Search this
Extent:
16.3 Cubic feet (32 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Financial records
Drawings
Date:
1916-1952
bulk 1928-1931
Summary:
Clement Melville Keys (1876-1952) was a financier and corporate organizer who promoted aviation through the post-World War I decade. In 1916 he came to the aid of the financially-troubled Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Co. and was made an unsalaried vice president. Keys accompanied the American Aviation Mission to Europe in 1919, returning to purchase a controlling interest in Curtiss in 1920. He remained president of Curtiss until the 1929 merger with Wright Aeronautical Corp. to form Curtiss-Wright Corporation, whereupon he became president of the new company. In 1931, however, Keys resigned as chairman of T&WA following a bitter struggle for control of the airline. Mental collapse followed and Keys surrendered all his remaining aviation interests and left Curtiss-Wright in 1933.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists primarily of Keys' business records and correspondence from the 1920s and early 1930s. The bulk of the material relates to the Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company/Curtiss-Wright Corporation and related firms, as well as Transcontinental Air Transport. The material includes business (operating) correspondence and records relating to Keys' financial interests.

The collection is divided into three series. The first series consists of materials dated through Keys' withdrawal from his aviation interests in 1932, followed by a second series of materials post-dating 1932. The final series consists of a small number of legal-sized documents not marked by Keys or his secretary and not otherwise placeable in either of the first two series. Because of the small amount of legal-sized material in the collection, the bulk of the collection has been stored in letter-sized containers; all legal-size documents have been placed in legal-sized containers at the end of the collection (Boxes 29-31) and a cross-reference note entered in the appropriate place in basic folder list. Larger materials have been placed in a single oversized box (Box 32) with cross-references in the folder list as appropriate.
Arrangement:
The processing of the Keys papers began as an intern project. The intern, however, was unable to complete the work before the end of the intemship period and I was assigned to rebox the materials that had been left unprocessed so that higher priority activities could continue. The long-term plan was that I would finish processing the collection when other projects had been completed. At this time I discovered two things: first, many of the documents had been marked for filing, apparently by Keys or Mr. Swan, his confidential secretary; second, much of the material was no longer in this order. When my work load allowed me to return to the processing of the Keys Papers, I surveyed the collection. The remaining original folder labels and cross-reference sheets appeared to confirm my first discovery - many of the documents had been marked for filing.

Most of my work since has been directed at undoing the mishandling from the initial work, most of which occurred in the files relating to the Curtiss group of companies. Almost all of the items dating from mid-1928 onwards carry some sort of filing marks: these items have been reorganized into the indicated filing units (see folder list, below). Unfortunately, enclosures often were not marked: some of these were refiled in 1987 and their provenance is, therefore, lost. A close textual analysis of the collection would be necessary to reunite enclosures with their cover letters; current work load and staff levels preclude this labor-intensive operation.

Almost all of the items dating from mid-1928 onwards carry some sort of filing marks: these items have been reorganized into the indicated filing units (see folder list). Unfortunately, enclosures often were not marked: some of these were refiled in 1987 and their provenance is, therefore, lost. A close textual analysis of the collection would be necessary to reunite enclosures with their cover letters; current work load and staff levels preclude this labor-intensive operation.

Materials pre-dating mid-1928 or otherwise unmarked have been filed by "best guess" from the correspondents and subject of the letters. Some materials doubtless remain misfiled. Researchers should examine folders that seem even marginally related to their topic for unmarked but related documents.

Titles appearing in brackets [ ] are the archivist's.

Series 1

Materials through 1932

Series 2

Post-1932 Material

Series 3

Miscellaneous Materials
Biographical / Historical:
Clement Melville Keys (1876-1952) was a financier and corporate organizer who promoted aviation through the post Word War I decade. Canadian-born, Keys graduated from Toronto University (B.A. 1897) and taught classics before coming to the United States in 1901 (naturalized, 1924). He went to work for the Wall Street Journal, first as a reporter (1901-1903), then as railroad editor (1903-1905) before becoming financial editor for World's Work (1905-1911). In 1911 he founded C. M. Keys & Co., an investment counseling firm and bond dealer. In 1916 he came to the aid of the financially-troubled Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Co. and was made an unsalaried Vice President. Keys accompanied the American Aviation Mission to Europe in 1919, returning to purchase a controlling interest in Curtiss in 1920. He remained president of Curtiss until the 1929 merger with Wright Aeronautical Corp. to form Curtiss-Wright Corporation, whereupon he became president of the new company. During his tenure as president of Curtiss (1920-1929) and its successor, Curtiss-Wright Corp. (1929-1933), Keys brought the company from the brink of bankruptcy to a position as one of the leading aircraft manufacturers in the world. Curtiss also became the center of a group of aviation-related companies which served to market and operate Curtiss aircraft. At the same time, Keys expanded his own holdings until he was at the head of twenty-six corporations, including aviation holdings companies, such as North American Aviation and National Aviation Corp., as well as the first American transcontinental air service, Transcontinental Air Transport (later Transcontinental & Western Airline). In January 1932, Keys withdrew from all his aviation interests, citing ill health. He remained connected with C. M. Keys & Co., concentrating mainly on financial and real estate interests. Upon retiring from Keys & Co. in 1942, he started a new company, C. M. Keys Aircraft Service Co. and, after World War II, helped organize Peruvian International Airways, which began operating in South America in 1947.
Provenance:
Donated by Elizabeth Keys Stoney.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial -- United States  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Financial records
Drawings
Citation:
Clement Melville Keys Papers, Accession XXXX-0091, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0091
See more items in:
Clement Melville Keys Papers
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0091
Additional Online Media:

Sally K. Ride Papers

Creator:
Ride, Sally, 1951-2012  Search this
Extent:
24 Cubic feet (63 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1970-2012
Summary:
The Sally K. Ride Papers consists of over 23 cubic feet of papers, photographs, certificates, and film, created or collected by Sally Ride and chronicling her career from the 1970s through the 2010s. The papers document Ride's lifetime of achievements and include material relating to her astronaut training and duties; her contributions to space policy; her work as a physicist; and her work as an educator, including Sally Ride Science and related STEM projects.
Scope and Contents:
The Sally Ride Papers reflect Ride's careers as a student, astronaut, physicist, professor, author, and CEO of Sally Ride Science. This collection consists of material gathered by Sally Ride over the course of her life. This material is particularly rich in training materials from her astronaut days, but also provides significant insight into her career in academia and her interest and support of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) education.

The bulk of this collection consists of materials related to Ride's professional work. This includes correspondence, memoranda, meeting minutes, reports and papers, notes, speeches, photographs, brochures, pamphlets, programs, newsletters, newspaper and magazine articles, and miscellaneous materials. Materials of a personal nature were retained by her family and therefore do not figure in this collection.
Arrangement:
The collection is organized chronologically into the following 12 series:

Series 1: Schooling

Series 2: NASA Career

Subseries 2.1: Training and Flights

Subseries 2.1.1: T-38 Training

Subseries 2.1.2: Space Shuttle Flight Training, General

Subseries 2.1.3: STS-7 Challenger Flight Training

Subseries 2.1.4: STS-41G Space Shuttle Challenger Flight Training

Subseries 2.1.5: Miscellaneous Space Shuttle Flight Training

Subseries 2.2: NASA Commissions and Reports

Subseries 2.2.1: Presidential Commission on the Space Shuttle Challenger Accident (Rogers Commission Report) 1986

Subseries 2.2.2: NASA Leadership and America's Future in Space: A Report to the Administrator [Ride Report] 1987

Subseries 2.2.3: Columbia Accident Investigation Board / NASA's Implementation Plan for Space Shuttle Return to Flight and Beyond Report 2003

Subseries 2.2.4: Review of United States Human Space Flight Plans Committee (Augustine Committee)

Subseries 2.3: White House Commissions and Reports

Subseries 2.3.1: President's Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST)

Subseries 2.3.2: Briefing for the Vice President of the United States, 1986

Subseries 2.3.3: Briefing for the Clinton/Gore Transition, 1992

Series 3: Space.com

Series 4: Academia Subseries 4.1: Physics Research Papers by Ride

Subseries 4.2: Ride's Physics Research Proposals and Projects

Subseries 4.3: Physics Research Files

Subseries 4.4: Physics Classes Taught by Ride

Subseries 4.5: Non-Physics Classes Taught by Ride

Subseries 4.6: Physics Conferences and Seminars

Subseries 4.7: Miscellaneous Department of Physics Materials

Subseries 4.8: California Space Institute

Series 5: Sally Ride STEM [science, technology, engineering and mathematics] Education Projects

Subseries 5.1: KidSat/EarthKAM Project Subseries 5.2: Imaginary Lines/Sally Ride Science

Subseries 5.3: STEM Books

Series 6: Space and STEM Education Advocacy

Subseries 6.1: Space Advocacy

Subseries 6.1.1: Space Advocacy Articles

Subseries 6.1.2: Space Advocacy Speeches

Subseries 6.1.3: Space Advocacy Committees.

Subseries 6.2: STEM Advocacy, Committees and Conferences

Series 7: Awards and Publicity

Subseries 7.1: Awards

Subseries 7.2: Correspondence/Invitations

Subseries 7.3: Boards

Subseries 7.4: Publicity Files

Series 8: Research Files

Subseries 8.1: Space:

Subseries 8.1.1: Space Articles, Reports, and NASA Publications

Subseries 8.1.2: Space Files – Commission, Workshops, and Special Reports

Subseries 8.2: Education

Series 9: Miscellaneous

Series 10: First Day Covers/Autographs

Series 11: Oversized material

Series 12: Films, Audio Tapes, and Media
Biographical / Historical:
Dr. Sally K. Ride became a national icon of achievement in science and space on June 18, 1983, when she became the first American woman to fly in space. Born in 1951 in suburban Encino, California, she took up tennis as a teenager and within a few years was ranked eighteenth nationally. In 1968, she enrolled at Swarthmore College as a physics major, but she dropped out after three semesters to train full-time at tennis. In 1970, Ride gave up tennis and entered Stanford University, where she took a double major in physics and English literature. She went on to complete a Masters and Ph.D. in physics from Stanford. Her doctoral dissertation dealt with the theoretical behavior of free electrons in a magnetic field.

While completing her Ph.D. in physics, she saw an announcement that National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) was looking for young scientists to serve as mission specialists and she immediately applied. She passed NASA's preliminary process and became one of 208 finalists. Ride was flown to Johnson Space Center outside Houston for physical fitness tests, psychiatric evaluation, and personal interviews. Three months later, she was an astronaut and one of six women selected for the class of 1978.

While learning to use a new space shuttle remote manipulative arm for a future mission, Ride acted as backup orbit Capsule Communicator (CAPCOM) for STS-2 and prime orbit CAPCOM for STS-3. She was named a mission specialist on the seventh flight of the Space Shuttle Challenger in 1983. As a mission specialist in the first five-member Shuttle crew, she operated a variety of orbiter systems and experiment payloads; she participated in the launch of two commercial communications satellites and also operated the remote manipulator system arm to maneuver, release, and retrieve a free-flying satellite. Ride also flew on a second mission, STS-41G in 1984, again on the Challenger. She spent a total of more than 343 hours in space.

Ride's career and legacy extended well beyond her missions in space. Ride had completed eight months of training for her third flight (STS-61-M, a TDRS deployment mission) when the space shuttle Challenger disaster occurred, and she was named to the Rogers Commission (the presidential commission investigating the accident) and headed its subcommittee on operations. Following the investigation, Ride was assigned to NASA headquarters where she led a strategic planning effort for NASA that yielded the 1987 report NASA Leadership and America's Future in Space: A Report to the Administrator (also known as the Ride Report), and she served as the first chief of the new NASA Office of Exploration. In 1993, she was named to the Columbia Accident Board, appointed to investigate the causes and to recommend remedies after that tragic loss.

In 1987, Ride left NASA to become a full-time educator. She first worked at the Stanford University Center for International Security and Arms Control and in 1989 she became a professor of physics at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) and Director of the California Space Institute. From the mid-1990s until her death, Ride led two public-outreach programs for NASA — the ISS EarthKAM and GRAIL MoonKAM projects, in cooperation with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and UCSD. The programs allowed middle school students to request images of the Earth.

Ride continued her endeavors to improve science education and encourage young people to study science through her independent initiatives as an author or co-author of seven books on space aimed at children, and as a co-founder of Sally Ride Science, a company founded in 2001 that creates entertaining science programs and publications for upper elementary and middle school students, with a particular focus on science education for girls.

Ride died on July 23, 2012, at the age of 61, seventeen months after being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer.
Provenance:
Gift of Tam O'Shaughnessy, received March 2014.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Space shuttles  Search this
Science -- Study and teaching  Search this
Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator Arm  Search this
Manned space flight  Search this
Physics  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Citation:
Sally K. Ride Papers, Acc. 2014-0025, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2014.0025
See more items in:
Sally K. Ride Papers
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2014-0025
Additional Online Media:

Giuseppe M. Bellanca Collection

Creator:
Bellanca, Giuseppe M., 1886-1960  Search this
Names:
Bellanca  Search this
Wright Aeronautical Corporation  Search this
Chamberlin, Clarence  Search this
Extent:
248.5 Cubic feet (245 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Financial records
Newspaper clippings
Drawings
Photographic prints
Date:
1919-1959
Summary:
This collection consists of the archives of Giuseppe M. Bellanca and his company, including the following types of mediums: drawings, stress analysis tests, reports, photographs/negatives, documents, correspondence, patent information, newspaper clippings, business records, and financial statements.
Scope and Contents:
Series I: Mr. Bellanca's professional life

Here, the researcher will find documents regarding the day-to-day operations of the Bellanca Aircraft Corporation. The material is generally divided into core documents of the corporation, correspondence, financial documents, subcontracting pursuits, patents, employee relations, and company history.

Series II: Technical Material

This material is separated into the following subseries: Miscellaneous Handwritten Notes and Sketches, Bellanca Aircraft Technical Data, Bellanca Aircraft Corporation Reports, Technical Research Files, Bellanca Aircraft Drawing Lists, Bellanca Aircraft Drawings, and Bellanca Aircraft Drawing Indexes. The Bellanca Collection is not a complete history of the Bellanca Aircraft Corporation. Over the years, it appears that many items were loaned out by the Bellanca Family to researchers and not returned. Therefore, there are significant gaps in correspondence, formal, numbered reports, and other areas of the collection. For example, the earliest report in the Bellanca Collection is Report #28, the next report which appears is report #45.

The Giuseppe M. Bellanca Collection contains over 10,000 drawings. (At the time of processing, not all drawings were entered into the Bellanca Drawings Database. These drawings will be entered as time allows.) The drawings vary in size from 8 x 11 inches to 36 x 185 inches. There are original pencil drawings, blueprints, and blueline drawings. Over 130 models of Bellanca aircraft are represented in the Collection. There are General Arrangement, or Three-View drawings for over 80 of these models. Bellanca drawings are not easy to decipher. Most of the drawings have data blocks which contain only a finite amount of information. Often the aircraft has been identified only by serial number. In some cases the model number of the aircraft is also the drawing number. Other times, the aircraft name would be given, but no model number, i.e. Skyrocket. Also, words were abbreviated and it was left up to the processing archivist to determine their probable meaning. Despite the explanation in the scope and content notes, the Bellanca Corporation was not consistent when assigning model numbers. Letters were sometimes assigned that reflected a United States War Department designation, i.e. the VSO and the VF. By using the Bellanca Drawing indexes, the processing archivist was able to supply model numbers for some of the drawings.

7136 Bellanca Aircraft Company Drawings have been added to the National Air and Space Museum Miscellaneous Drawings Database. As time allows, the remaining Bellanca Drawings will be added to this database. An Archives Staff member will assist researchers in retrieving these materials from the database finding aid.

The Bellanca drawings were stored for over thirty years in less-than-ideal conditions. Many of the drawings were drawn on poor-quality tracing paper, and have become extremely brittle and fragile. Therefore, many of the drawings in the Bellanca Collection may not be available to researchers.

During processing of the collection, the project archivist has gained some insight about how Mr. Bellanca chose the model designations for his aircraft. The earliest system of model designations was based upon letters of the alphabet. No model designations appear for any Bellanca design until his work for Maryland Pressed Steel in 1916. The CD, which he designed for that company, was his fourth aircraft design that was built, and the letter D is the fourth letter of the alphabet. This pattern continues through the Bellanca CF. During 1926, when Mr. Bellanca worked for the Wright Corporation, he already had in mind an improved version of the CF, which was designated the CG. This aircraft received the designation WB-1 from the Wright Corporation.

When Mr. Bellanca formed his own company in 1927, the letter pattern described above reasserted itself for a time with the introduction of the Bellanca CH. It was a common practice of manufacturers of the time to also include the engine horsepower as part of the model number, so the Bellanca CH actually received its Approved Type Certificate (ATC) as the CH-200. When the next model came out, it was the CH-300 with a 300 horsepower Wright Whirlwind engine. This system remained in place through the CH-400. Names were given to some Bellanca aircraft. It appears that the names were a marketing tool meant to appeal to the buying public. With this idea in mind, the CH-300 became the "Pacemaker", the CH-400 became the "Skyrocket", and the P 100 was christened the "Airbus". In the early 1930's, the Bellanca Corporation moved away from the alphabetical designations and moved to numerical designations. Later Bellanca aircraft model designations consist of a series of numbers, such as 31-50. The first number was the wing area, in this case, 310 square feet, divided by 10. The second number was the horsepower of the engine, 500, divided by 10. This resulted in a distinctive system of model designations, which lasted until Mr. Bellanca sold the company.

Series III: Mr. Bellanca's personal material.

In this series, the researcher will find personal correspondence among family members, from both Giuseppe and Dorothy Bellanca's families and personal, legal and financial records for Bellanca family. As the lines between Mr. Bellanca's personal and professional lives were sometimes blurred, a fine line of separation between the two was not always possible. For example, at one time or another, two of Mr. Bellanca's brothers, John and Frank, worked for the Bellanca Aircraft Corporation and Andrew Bellanca, Mr. Bellanca's nephew, was his lawyer throughout his life. Therefore, the processing archivist suggests that the researcher look in the professional series of documents as well as Mr. Bellanca's personal papers for a more complete representation of Mr. Bellanca's correspondence.

After processing was completed, publications which previously had been offered to the NASM Branch Library were returned to the collection. They are listed in an addendum at the end of this finding aid.

Series IV: Photographs.

The researcher will find photographs of Bellanca aircraft, including the Bellanca Aircraft Corporation's Master Photograph Files, photographs of the Bellanca factory and factory workers, and photographs of Giuseppe M. Bellanca, business associates, and family members.

Series V: Miscellaneous and Oversize Materials.

This series contains ephemera of the Bellanca Collection: Scrapbooks, Loose Newspaper Clippings, Artwork, Ephemera and Magazine Clippings.

The Bellanca Collection included 27 motion picture films. In May of 2000, this film was transferred to the NASM Film Archives. Researchers wishing to access this part of the collection should contact the NASM Film Archivist.
Arrangement:
Series I: Mr. Bellanca's Professional Life

Series II: Technical Data

Series III: Personal Papers

Series IV: Photographs

Series V: Miscellaneous and Oversize Materials
Biographical / Historical:
Giuseppe Mario Bellanca was born in 1886 in Sciacca, Sicily. As a young man, he attended the Technical Institute in Milan, graduating with a teaching degree in mathematics in 1908. During his quest for a second mathematics and engineering degree, he became enamoured of aviation, and set out to design and build his own airplane. Bellanca's first aircraft design was a "pusher" aircraft, somewhat similar to the Wright Flyer. Lacking funds for such an endeavor, he joined with two partners, Enea Bossi, and Paolo Invernizzi. The union of the three produced the first flight of a totally Italian-designed and Italian-built aircraft in early December of 1909. The flight was short, but it was a start. Bellanca's second design was a tractor-type aircraft. Although the aircraft was successfully constructed, it was never flown due to insufficient funds for an engine.

At the urging of his brother Carlo, who was already established in Brooklyn, New York, Giuseppe Bellanca immigrated to America in 1911. Before the end of the year, he began construction of his third airplane design, a parasol monoplane. After construction was completed, he took the small craft to Mineola Field on Long Island, NY, and proceeded to teach himself to fly. He began by taxiing. He then, taxied faster, which gave way to short hops. The hops got longer, until, on May 19, 1912, there was not enough room to land straight ahead, and Bellanca had to complete a turn in order land safely. Having successfully taught himself to fly, Bellanca then set about teaching others to fly, and from 1912 to 1916, he operated the Bellanca Flying School. One of his students was a young Fiorello La Guardia, the future mayor of New York City. In return for flying lessons, La Guardia taught Bellanca how to drive a car.

In 1917 the Maryland Pressed Steel Company of Hagerstown, MD hired Bellanca as a consulting engineer. While there, he designed two trainer biplanes, the CD, and an improved version, the CE. With the conclusion of WWI, Maryland Pressed Steel's contracts were cancelled and the company entered into receivership. Thus, the CE never went into production.

In 1921, a group of investors lured Bellanca westward to Omaha, NE, in hopes of establishing that town as a center for aircraft manufacture. Before the aircraft could be built, the company went bankrupt, but construction of the aircraft continued under the financial backing of a local motorcycle dealer named Victor Roos. The resultant aircraft, the Bellanca CF, was called by Janes's All the World's Aircraft "the first up-to-date transport aeroplane that was designed, built, and flown with success in the United States." Among the local people helping to build the aircraft was the daughter of Bellanca's landlord, Dorothy Brown. Giuseppe and she were married on November 18, 1922.

Despite its advanced design, the Bellanca CF could not compete with the economics of the time. In the days just after World War I, a surplus Curtiss Jenny could be purchased for as little as $250.00. A Bellanca CF, with a price tag of $5000.00, was just too expensive and the aircraft never went into production. After the disappointment of the CF, Bellanca designed wings for the Post Office Department's DH-4's. His new wings were a tremendous improvement over the original design, but only a few aircraft were so modified.

In 1925, Bellanca went to work for the Wright Aeronautical Corporation of Paterson, NJ. His assignment there was to develop an aircraft around the new Wright Whirlwind engine. He already had a design in mind, which was an improved version of the CF, called the CG. This design evolved into the Wright-Bellanca WB-1.

The WB-1 enjoyed a short, but successful flying career. The aircraft had already won one race and efficiency contest before an untimely accident destroyed the craft during preparation for an attempt to break the world's non-refueled endurance record. Fortunately, at the time of the crash, Bellanca was already working on an improved version, of the WB-1 designated the WB-2.

During 1926, the WB-2 won two efficiency trophies at the National Air Races in Philadelphia. Wright considered putting the aircraft into production, but decided against it to avoid alienating other aircraft companies that were potential customers for their engines. Disappointed by Wright's decision, Bellanca left the company and joined with a young businessman named Charles Levine to form the Columbia Aircraft Company. Wright sold the WB-2 and all drawings and production rights to the new company. The WB-2 went on to a long and fruitful flying career starting with establishing a new world's non-refueled endurance record of 51 hours, 11 minutes, and 59 seconds in April of 1927.

In the latter half of 1926, Charles Lindbergh wanted to buy the WB-2, now named the 'Columbia', for his proposed flight from New York to Paris. He was rebuffed by Levine who also had designs on the flight and the $25,000 prize money. Lindbergh then went to Ryan for his specially designed NYP. Meanwhile Levine, in choosing the crew, managed to promise two seats to three people. So while the Columbia was grounded by a court order brought by the third party, Lindbergh took off on his successful flight to Paris.

Eventually, the 'Columbia' was cleared of litigation and took off on its successful transatlantic flight on June 4, 1927. In the cockpit were Clarence Chamberlin, one of the pilots of the endurance record and Charles Levine, who became the first transatlantic passenger. The plan was to fly all the way to Berlin, and Chamberlin had vowed to fly until they ran out of fuel. Forty-three hours later, they landed in Eisleben, Germany, the first of two successful Atlantic crossings for Bellanca's most famous aircraft.

Disappointed because the 'Columbia' was not the first aircraft to accomplish the New York to Paris flight, Bellanca severed all relations with Levine, and started his own company, the Bellanca Aircraft Corporation of America, and rented facilities on Staten Island, NY. The new Bellanca model was designated the CH, and was basically a commercial version of the WB-2. The new company also had two other models that were built for special orders, the Bellanca Model J and the Model K.

It was not long before Bellanca caught the attention of the Du Pont family of Delaware. They wanted to start aircraft manufacturing in Delaware, and in late 1927, an agreement was made with Bellanca to locate his factory outside of Wilmington. The site was large enough for a first-class airfield, with a seaplane ramp on the nearby Delaware River.

This was a busy time in Bellanca's life. Along with all that was happening in his professional life, he and Dorothy celebrated the birth of their son August T. Bellanca in March of 1927.

With the exception of a few years immediately before and during the early stages of WWII, Bellanca was President and Chairman of the Board from the corporation's inception on the last day of 1927 until he sold the company to L. Albert and Sons in 1954. After his departure from the company, Giuseppe and his son, August, formed the Bellanca Development Company with the purpose of building a new aircraft. It would have increased performance due to the use of lighter materials for its structure. Work on this aircraft was progressing when Giuseppe Bellanca succumbed to leukemia and died on December 26, 1960. After his father's death, August continued the project, and under his guidance, the aircraft first flew in 1973.

In 1993, August Bellanca donated his father's personal and professional papers to the National Air and Space Museum Archives. Prior to that time, they were kept in the Bellanca home near Galena, MD, and administered by Dorothy and August Bellanca.

1886 -- Born in Sciacca, Sicily

1909 -- Built first airplane. It completed the first flight of an Italian-designed, Italian-built, aircraft on December 8, 1909.

1911 -- Immigrated to America, settled in Brooklyn, NY.

1912 -- Completed construction of parasol monoplane. Successfully learned to fly this aircraft at Mineola, Long Island, NY.

1912 - 1916 -- Taught others to fly the parasol monoplane, including Fiorello LaGuardia.

1917 - 1920 -- Employed as a consulting engineer for Maryland Pressed Steel Company of Hagerstown, MD. While there, Bellanca designed and built the Bellanca CD and CE tractor biplanes.

1921 - 1922 -- Moved to Omaha, NE, and with Victor Roos, formed the Roos-Bellanca Aircraft Company. Bellanca designed and built the Bellanca CF. Married Dorothy Brown on November 18, 1922, in Omaha, NE.

1923 -- Moved back to New York, and designed and built new sets of wings for the Post Office Department's DH-4 mailplanes

1925 -- Employed by the Wright Aeronautical Corporation of Paterson, NJ, designing an aircraft around their new "Whirlwind" engine. The Wright-Bellanca 1, or WB-1, was the result, and was first flown in the latter part of that year.

1926 -- First flight of the WB-2.

1927 -- Bellanca started the Bellanca Aircraft Corporation of America, on Staten Island, NY. Bellanca established the Bellanca Aircraft Corporation of New Castle, DE. Wright decided not to enter into quantity production of the WB-2. Bellanca entered into a partnership with Charles A. Levine, and together, they formed the Columbia Aircraft Corporation. From Tuesday, April 12 to Thursday, April 14, Clarence Chamberlin and Bert Acosta set a new world's non-refueled endurance record in the WB-2, which was shortly thereafter, renamed the "Columbia". On June 4th, the Columbia set off across the Atlantic, and landed in Eisleben, Germany.

1941 - 1943 -- Head of the aviation department at Higgins Industries, Inc., in New Orleans, designing large cargo aircraft for troop movement during the war.

1954 -- Formed the Bellanca Development Company, to conduct research in lightweight aircraft construction materials.

1960 -- Died of leukemia in New York, December 26.
Provenance:
Mr. and Mrs. August Bellanca, Gift, 1993, NASM.1993.0055
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Bellanca WB-2 "Miss Columbia"  Search this
Transatlantic flights  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Financial records
Newspaper clippings
Drawings
Photographic prints
Citation:
Giuseppe M. Bellanca Collection, Acc. NASM.1993.0055, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.1993.0055
See more items in:
Giuseppe M. Bellanca Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1993-0055
Additional Online Media:

A. LaVerne Zell photographs of Kukukuku people

Creator:
Zell, A. LaVerne  Search this
Extent:
6 Prints (silver gelatin)
Culture:
Hamtai (Papua New Guinean people)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Photographs
Place:
New Guinea
Date:
circa 1963
Scope and Contents note:
Images of Kukukuku (Anga) men, women, and children in the Watut Valley of New Guinea.
Biographical/Historical note:
A. LaVerne Zell (d. 2012) was the Mayor of Terre Hill, Pennsylvania, for 14 years. She served as a missionary teacher in the Watut Valley, New Guinea, from 1959-1964.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 2004-02, USNM ACC 357199
Location of Other Archival Materials:
New Guinea artifacts collected by Zell held in the Department of Anthropology collections in accession 357199.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 2004-02, A. LaVerne Zell photographs of Kukukuku people, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.2004-02
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-2004-02

Aylette Jenness Collection

Photographer:
Jenness, Aylette  Search this
Extent:
2293 negatives (photographic) (black and white, 35 mm)
46 negatives (photographic) (black and white, 120. mm)
72 contact sheets (black and white)
Culture:
Kamberi (African people)  Search this
Fulani  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Contact sheets
Black-and-white negatives
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1967-1969
Summary:
The collection includes photographs taken by Aylette Jenness in northern Nigeria between 1967 and 1969. They document daily life in a remote part of Yauri Emerite, focusing on the townspeople of Yelwa and those in its environs.
Scope and Contents:
The collection includes photographs taken by Aylette Jenness in northern Nigeria between 1967 and 1969. They document daily life in a remote part of Yauri Emerite, focusing on the townspeople of Yelwa and those in its environs. Peoples depicted include the Fulani, Kamberi, and Hausa peoples. Subjects include markets, the flooded Kainji Reservoir, ceremonies, fishing, and vernacular architecture.
Arrangement:
Arranged in six series by geographic location.

Series 1: Agwana

Series 2: Borgu

Series 3: Kainji Reservoir Region

Series 4: Unidentified

Series 5: Yauri

Series 6: Yelwa
Biographical / Historical:
Author and museum exhibition planner Aylette Jenness has written numerous books, including "Who Am I? (Multicultural Celebrations)" (coauthored by Donn Moulton) (1993); "Families: A Celebration of Diversity, Commitment, and Love" (1990); "In Two Worlds: a Yu'pik Eskimo Family" (coauthored with Alice Rivers) (1989); and "Along the Niger River: An African Way of Life" (1974), among many others. Traveling with her husband, an anthropologist, Jenness lived in such varying locales as Scammon Bay, Alaska (1962-1963) and Nigeria (1967-1969). She worked for twenty-four years at the Boston Children's Museum developing exhibitions, programs, festivals, and workshops.
Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Vernacular architecture  Search this
Hausa (African people)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Black-and-white negatives
Citation:
Aylette Jenness Collection, EEPA 2015-019, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
EEPA.2015-019
See more items in:
Aylette Jenness Collection
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-eepa-2015-019
Additional Online Media:

Great Migration Home Movie Study Collection

Creator:
National Museum of African American History and Culture (U.S.)  Search this
Names:
Church of God  Search this
Mid-Atlantic Regional Moving Image Archive (MARMIA)  Search this
Most Worshipful Prince Hall Grand Lodge of District of Columbia  Search this
WHUT Howard University Television  Search this
Barker family  Search this
Brown family  Search this
Foye family  Search this
Henderson family  Search this
Howard family  Search this
Leigh family  Search this
Montgomery family  Search this
Swart family  Search this
Swygert family  Search this
Taylor family  Search this
Turner family  Search this
Vaughn family  Search this
White family  Search this
Wilkinson family  Search this
Extent:
2 sound recordings
41 video recordings
39 motion picture films
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Motion picture films
Home movies
Date:
1940 - Ongoing
Summary:
The Great Migration is a unique, ongoing digitization service program that partners the National Museum of African American History and Culture with individuals and organizations across the United States to preserve their important analog audiovisual media.

While major motion picture film and television historically lacked diverse representation, black history was instinctively being preserved in everyday home movies. Today, these personal narratives serve as an invaluable tool for understanding and re-framing black moving image history, and provide a much needed visualization of African American history and culture.
Scope and Contents:
The collection contains 39 digitized home movies, 41 digitized home videos, and 2 digitized audiotape recordings. However, as an ongoing project the scope of the collection will continue to increase over time. The scope will be updated as is appropriate.

The content of the collection consists predominantly of amateur recordings created by families to document their lives. This includes major life events, such as birthdays, as well as family vacations and holidays. Additionally, the collection includes footage produced by professionals for broadcast on television. This particular footage entered the collection through partnerships with other memory institutions.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into series and item-level records. Each series corresponds to a family or organization that has participated in the Great Migration program. Each item within a series corresponds to a single piece of audiovisual media, such as a film or videotape, digitized by NMAAHC staff.
Provenance:
NMAAHC creates and retains digital copies, 2016-[ongoing]. Original analog materials are not retained by the museum.
Restrictions:
Collection is available online for open research.
Rights:
The Great Migration Home Movie Study Collection, is a product of and owned by the National Museum of African American History and Culture, Smithsonian Institution.

Copyright for all works are retained by the creators of the original analog materials. Permissions for any use of the material may be requested from National Museum of African American History and Culture Right and Reproductions 202-633-3846.
Topic:
Amateur films  Search this
Families  Search this
Travel  Search this
Parties  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Genre/Form:
Home movies
Citation:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture. Supported by the Robert Frederick Smith Fund of the National Museum of African American History and Culture.
Identifier:
NMAAHC.SC.0001
See more items in:
Great Migration Home Movie Study Collection
Archival Repository:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmaahc-sc-0001

Photographs of Zanzibar carved doors donated by William F. Webb

Donor:
Webb, William F.  Search this
Photographer?:
Webb, William F.  Search this
Extent:
6 color prints
18 color negatives (acetate, 35 mm)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Color prints
Color negatives
Photographs
Place:
Zanzibar
Date:
circa 1975
Scope and Contents note:
Images of a set of carved wooden doors from Zanzibar, which were loaned to the National Museum of Natural History by Evan P. Wright and later donated by William F. Webb. The collection includes images of the doors on exhibit at the museum and copies of photographs of other doors that were possibly also part of the exhibit.
Biographical/Historical note:
The Zanzibar carved wooden doors depicted in this collection were purchased by William J. Bushwaller, then American Vice Counsel in Nairobi, Kenya, on the behalf of Evan P. Wright of Salt Lake City, Utah, who had spent over two decades living in Africa between 1930 and 1973. Bushwaller bought the doors, which were probably made in the 19th century, in 1948 from the Zanzibar Curio Shop in Nairobi. According to the owner of the curio shop, the doors had been purchased from an Arab in Zanzibar in 1945. Starting in 1974, Wright loaned the doors to the National Museum of Natural History, where they were exhibited in the Africa Hall. In 1978, he sold the doors to William Webb, who continued to lend the doors until 1991, when they were officially donated.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 2003-22, USNM ACC 364373
Location of Other Archival Materials:
The doors depicted in these photographs are held in the Department of Anthropology collections in accession 364373.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Doors  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 2003-22 William F. Webb photographs of Zanzibar doors, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.2003-22
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-2003-22

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