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Frederick Starr collection of William L. Koehne photographs of Mexican Indians

Collector:
Starr, Frederick, 1859-1933  Search this
Photographer:
Koehne, William L.  Search this
Extent:
60 mounted prints (platinum)
Culture:
Chol Indians  Search this
Chontal Indians  Search this
Chinantec Indians  Search this
Chocho Indians  Search this
Huave Indians  Search this
Mayas  Search this
Cuicatec Indians  Search this
Huastec Indians  Search this
Tepehua Indians  Search this
Tarasco Indians  Search this
Totonac Indians  Search this
Tlaxcalan Indians  Search this
Aztecs  Search this
Otomi Indians  Search this
Mixtec Indians  Search this
Zoque Indians  Search this
Indians of Mexico  Search this
Tzotzil Indians  Search this
Zapotec Indians  Search this
Trique Indians  Search this
Tzeltal Indians  Search this
Mixe Indians  Search this
Mazatec Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Mounted prints
Photographs
Date:
circa 1890-1902
Scope and Contents note:
Front and profile studio portraits of Mexican Indians, representing Aztec, Chinantec, Chocho, Chol, Chontal, Cuicatec, Huastec, Huave, Maya, Mazatec, Mixe, Mixtec, Otomi, Tarascan, Tepehua, Tlaxcalan, Totonac, Trique, Tzental, Tzotzil, Zapotec, Zapotec Tehuartepec, and Zoque tribes. The photographs were made by William L. Koehne of Chicago for publication in Frederick Starr's book, Physical Characters of Indians of Southern Mexico.
Biographical/Historical note:
Frederick Starr (1858-1933) was an anthropologist and academic who worked as curator at the American Museum of Natural History and professor of anthropology at the University of Chicago. During his professiorship, Starr hired professional photographer and studio owner William L. Koehne to make the studio portraits for his 1902 book, Physical Characters of Indians of Southern Mexico. Additionally, Starr made several field studies in Mexico and commissioned field photographs and plaster busts.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 123
Varying Form of Title:
Mexican and Mesoamerican photographs
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Photographs collected by Cyrus Thomas, Robert T. Hill, Edward W. Nelson, and Edgar L. Hewitt have been relocated to Photo Lot 169, Photo Lot 170, Photo Lot 171, and Photo Lot 172, respectively.
The Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives holds the Frederick Starr negatives and lanterns slides, 1894-1910.
Correspondence from Starr held in the National Anthropological Archives is in MS 4558, MS 4821, and the Bureau of American Ethnology records.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo lot 123, Frederick Starr collection of William L. Koehne photographs of Mexican Indians, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.123
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-123

Donald Bush Cordry photographs of Indians of Mexico

Creator:
Cordry, Donald Bush  Search this
Names:
Cordry, Donald Bush -- Exhibitions  Search this
Extent:
8 color transparencies
93 mounted photographs (silver gelatin)
Culture:
Mixe Indians  Search this
Amuzgo Indians  Search this
Zapotec Indians  Search this
Mestizos  Search this
Tarasco Indians  Search this
Tepehuan Indians  Search this
Totonac Indians  Search this
Mazatec Indians  Search this
Nahuas  Search this
Chinantec Indians  Search this
Huichol Indians  Search this
Seri Indians  Search this
Huave Indians  Search this
Chiapanec Indians  Search this
Mixtec Indians  Search this
Mayas  Search this
Mayo Indians  Search this
Cuicatec Indians  Search this
Zoque Indians  Search this
Tzotzil Indians  Search this
Indians of Mexico  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Color transparencies
Mounted photographs
Place:
Mexico
Date:
1937-1972
Scope and Contents note:
Enlargements of photographs made by Donald Bush Cordry during his time in Mexico. These were mounted for a 1970s Bellas Artes-sponsored traveling exhibit based on Cordry's collection of Mexican Indian costumes. Included are images of Mexican Indians, fiestas and dances, pottery, boats, weaving, spinning, masks, vendors and markets, churches, and shrines. Depicted tribes include the Huichol, Mestizo, Tarascan, Seri, Mayo, Tepehua, Totonac, Nahua, Mazatec, Cuicatec, Chinantec, Zapotec, Mixe, Amusgo, Huave, Mixtec, Chapanec, Zoque, Tzotzil, and Maya. Additionally, there are some self portraits of Donald Cordry and his wife Dorothy.
Biographical/Historical note:
Donald Bush Cordry (1907-1978) was an artist and photographer who studied the art of Mexican Indians. In 1931, Cordry made his first trip to Guerrero, Mexico, where he became interested in contemporary mask making. In 1934, Cordry moved to New York to work as a marionette designer for puppeteer Tony Sarg. While there, he contacted George G. Heye to learn more about Mexican Indian art. This led to a series of collecting expeditions from 1935 to 1938, during which Cordry collected Mexican masks and other artifacts for the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 87-38, USNM ACC 361232
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Additional photographs made by Cordry can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in Photo Lot 82-14.
Donald Cordry and his wife, Dorothy Mann Cordry, also donated clothing and musical instruments from Mexico to the Department of Anthropology in accessions 361232 and 355866.
The National Museum of the American Indian Archives holds the Donald Bush Cordry collection of photographs and negatives, 1933-1940, as well as artifacts collected by Cordry.
Photographs of the Donald Cordry Mexican mask exhibit can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in Photo Lot 80-3.
The Donald Cordry Mexican mask collection can be found in the Department of Anthropology in accession 355867.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Pottery -- Mexico  Search this
Dances -- Mexico  Search this
Weaving -- Mexico  Search this
Markets -- Mexico  Search this
Clothing and dress  Search this
Spinning -- Mexico  Search this
Masks -- Mexico  Search this
Citation:
Photo Lot 87-38, Donald Cordry photographs of Indians of Mexico, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.87-38
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-87-38

Frederick Starr negatives and lantern slides

Creator:
Starr, Frederick, 1859-1933  Search this
Photographer:
Lang, Charles B.  Search this
Grabic, Louis  Search this
Extent:
152 lantern slides
3344 negatives (photographic)
Culture:
Zoque Indians  Search this
San Felipe Pueblo (N.M.)  Search this
Mazatec Indians  Search this
Zapotec Indians  Search this
Mayas  Search this
Wampanoag Indians  Search this
Mazahua Indians  Search this
San Blas  Search this
Ute Indians  Search this
Sioux Nation  Search this
Mandan Indians  Search this
Tzotzil Indians  Search this
Taos Pueblo  Search this
Tzeltal Indians  Search this
Sauk and Fox Nation  Search this
Laguna (N.M.)  Search this
Triqui  Search this
Shuar Indians  Search this
Macusi Indians  Search this
Choco Indians  Search this
Nez Percé Indians  Search this
Ottawa Indians  Search this
Chol Indians  Search this
Totonac Indians  Search this
Osage Indians  Search this
Pawnee Indians  Search this
Tonkawa Indians  Search this
Otomi Indians  Search this
Chontal Indians  Search this
Navajo Indians  Search this
Tlingit Indians  Search this
Mixe Indians  Search this
Chinantec Indians  Search this
Mixtec Indians  Search this
Potawatomi Indians  Search this
Chibcha Indians  Search this
Pima Indians  Search this
Mehinacu Indians  Search this
Flathead Indians  Search this
Apache Indians  Search this
Cheyenne Indians  Search this
Ponca Indians  Search this
Menomini Indian Tribe  Search this
Cahuilla Indians  Search this
Hopi Indians  Search this
Haida Indians  Search this
Caraja Indians  Search this
Cherokee Indians  Search this
Cuna Indians  Search this
Arikara Indians  Search this
Cuicatec Indians  Search this
Eskimos  Search this
Assiniboine Indians  Search this
Crow Indians  Search this
Caddo Indians  Search this
Tepehua Indians  Search this
Kwakiutl Indians  Search this
Cochiti Pueblo  Search this
Acoma (N.M.)  Search this
Teotihuacan  Search this
Isleta Indians  Search this
Tarasco Indians  Search this
Arapaho Indians  Search this
Iroquois Indians  Search this
Iowa Indians  Search this
Ojibwa Indians  Search this
Huave Indians  Search this
Zuni Indians  Search this
Huastec Indians  Search this
Tlaxcala  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Lantern slides
Negatives (photographic)
Negatives
Lantern slides
Place:
Colombia
Washington
West Virginia
Kentucky
Kansas
New Mexico
Brazil
Ecuador
Missouri
Wisconsin
Oklahoma
Ohio
New York
Georgia
Mexico
Iowa
Arkansas
Illinois
Pennsylvania
Alaska
Date:
1894-1910
Summary:
The collection includes materials from cultures in the United States, Mexico, Brazil, Guatemala, Colombia, Ecuador, and Guiana: Acoma Pueblo, Apache, Arapaho, Arikara, Assiniboine, Caddo, Cahuilla, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chinantec, Chippewa (Ojibwa), Choco, Chol, Chontal, Cochiti Pueblo, Crow, Cuicatec, Eskimo, Flathead, Haida, Hopi, Huastec, Huave, Iowa, Iroquois, Isleta, Karaja, Kwakiutl, Laguna Pueblo, Macusi, Mandan, Maya, Mazahua, Mazatec, Mehinaku, Menomini, Mixe, Mixtec, Navajo, Nez Perce, Osage, Otomi, Ottawa, Pawnee, Pima, Ponca, Potawatomi, Salish, San Blas, San Felipe Pueblo, Sauk & Fox, Shuar, Sioux, Taos Pueblo, Tarasco, Teotihuacan, Tepehua, Tlaxcala, Tlingit, Tonkawa, Totonac, Triqui, Tzental, Tzotzil, Ute, Wampanoag, Zapotec, Zoque, Zuni.
Arrangement note:
Collection arranged by item number.
Biographical/Historical note:
Frederick Starr was born in Auburn, New York, on September 2, 1858. He received a Ph.D. in biology in 1884 at Coe College, where he was later appointed professor of biology. Starr did postgraduate work in anthropology at Yale. In 1889 he was appointed head of Ethnology at the American Museum of Natural History, and in 1892 he was chosen by William Harper to organize the Anthropology Department at the new University of Chicago. Starr remained at the University until his retirement in 1923. Besides his field studies with various Indian tribes in the United States, Starr traveled to Mexico, Brazil, Colombia, Guatemala, Ecuador, Guiana, Japan, the Philippines, and Africa. He died in Tokyo, Japan, on August 14, 1933. Starr was the author of several books and scholarly articles.
General note:
Starr hired professional photographers Charles B. Lang and Louis Grabic to accompany him on his field trips. One lantern slide of Moses Ladd (Menomini) was taken by William H. Jackson.
Provenance:
Dr. Frederick Starr, Purchased, circa 1929
Restrictions:
Access restricted. Researchers should contact the staff of the NMAI Archives for an appointment to access the collection.
Topic:
Indians of South America -- Brazil  Search this
Indians of Mexico  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest  Search this
Salish Indians  Search this
Indians of South America -- Colombia  Search this
Indians of North America -- Alaska  Search this
Indians of North America -- Basin  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Indians of Central America -- Guatemala  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Midwest  Search this
Indians of South America -- Ecuador  Search this
Indians of South America -- Guiana  Search this
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Lantern slides
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.052
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-052

Field photographs for "Traditional Pottery of Mexico" exhibition

Photographer:
Guadagno, Carmelo  Search this
Creator:
Krevolin, Lewis  Search this
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Extent:
1402 negatives (photographic) (color, black and white, 35mm)
67 contact sheets
Culture:
Indians of North America  Search this
Guerrero Nahua  Search this
Morelos Nahua  Search this
Nahua (Xalita)  Search this
Puebla Nahua  Search this
Mixtec  Search this
Zapotec  Search this
Purepecha (Tarasco)  Search this
Chamula Maya  Search this
Tzeltal Maya  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Negatives (photographic)
Contact sheets
Negatives
Place:
Mexico
Date:
1973
Summary:
Photography taken by MAI staff photographer Carmelo Guadagno during a research project expedition with Lewis Krevolin on behalf of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation in March of 1973. The project focus was pottery making techniques in various Indigenous settlements across Mexico in support of the 1976-1977 exhibition "Traditional Pottery of Mexico."
Scope and Contents:
This collection includes 35mm negatives (photographic) and contact sheets shot by Carmelo Guadagno and Lewis Krevolin on their 1973 research trip to Mexico. The majority of the negatives were made by Guadagno and included both color and black and white rolls. There are 32 rolls of color negatives, numbered 1 to 33 (roll 15 is missing), and four rolls of black and white negatives, numbered 34, 35, 1A and 3A. The negatives depict Guadagno and Krevolin's travels in the Mexican states of Guerrero, Michoacan, Puebla, Oaxaca, Chiapas, Jalisco, and Morelos where they photographed indigenous families, markets and landscapes with a special focus on potters and pottery making. Indigenous communities photographed include the Morelos Nahua, Nahua (Xalita), Guerrero Nahua, Puebla Nahua, Mixtec, Zapotec, Purepecha (Tarasco), Tzeltal Maya and Chamula Maya. There are an additional six rolls of color and black and white negatives shot by Lewis Krevolin labeled "A-F" that were likely shot before and after Guadagno joined him on the research trip. Unlike the Guadagno negatives, these photographs did not come with accompanying descriptions.
Arrangement:
Arranged by Negative Roll number: 1-35, 1A, 3A, A-F.
Biographical / Historical:
Carmelo Guadagno was a staff photographer for the Museum of the American Indian, Heye foundation from 1948 through 1981. In addition to photographing objects in the collections, he also documented the museum's exhibits, events and participated in several research trips.

Initially begun in 1968, research and field work conducted for the "Traditional Pottery in Mexico" exhibition was led by Lewis Krevolin, a ceramicist and art historian at Duchess Community College. The project was supported by the State University of New York Research Foundation, the National Geographic Society, the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation along with the Duchess Community College. In March of 1973, at the suggestion of Frederick Dockstader, director of the Museum of the American Indian, MAI staff photographer Carmelo Guadagno accompanied Lewis "Lew" Krevolin on his field survey of traditional pottery in Mexico. In addition to photographically recording their trip, Guadagno also assisted in interviews with indigenous potters. The field survey covered 30 villages in the Mexican states of Guerrero, Michoacan, Puebla, Oaxaca, Chiapas, Jalisco, and Morelos. In addition to the photographs shot during the trip, Krevolin collected 125 pottery vessels along with tools and material samples. The Jenny and Lewis Krevolin Collection of Mexican ceramics was donated to the Museum of the American Indian in December of 1973 and the exhibition "Traditional Pottery of Mexico" opened at the Museum in December of 1976.
Related Materials:
Pottery and other materials collected during this trip can be found in NMAI's ethnographic collections with catalog numbers 24/8500 – 24/8695.

Photographs of the pottery collected during this trip can be found in the Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation photographs collection (NMAI.AC.001.002) in the "Object Photography" series (N40964 - N41123 ; N41234).

Documents, correspondence and field notes from Carmelo Guadagno related to this trip can be found in the Museum of the American/Heye Foundation records (NMAI.AC.001) in Box 32, Folder 9 and Box 394, Folder 4a.
Provenance:
Gift of Lewis and Jenny Krevolin in 1973.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Topic:
Pottery -- Mexico  Search this
Indians of Mexico -- Photographs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Field photographs for "Traditional Pottery of Mexico" exhibition, Item Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.058
See more items in:
Field photographs for "Traditional Pottery of Mexico" exhibition
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-001-058

Transverse Pottery Flute "Flauto"

Donor Name:
Commissioner Of Chiapas  Search this
Culture:
Tzotzil Maya  Search this
: Chamula  Search this
Object Type:
Flute
Place:
Chamula, Chiapas, Mexico, North America
Accession Date:
1885-Dec-31
Topic:
Ethnology  Search this
Accession Number:
016998
USNM Number:
E93554-0
See more items in:
Anthropology
Data Source:
NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhanthropology_8487675
Additional Online Media:

Violin

Donor Name:
Commissioner Of Chiapas  Search this
Culture:
Tzotzil Maya  Search this
: Chamula  Search this
Object Type:
Violin
Place:
Chamula, Chiapas, Mexico, North America
Accession Date:
1885-Dec-31
Topic:
Ethnology  Search this
Accession Number:
016998
USNM Number:
E93552-0
See more items in:
Anthropology
Data Source:
NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhanthropology_8487673
Additional Online Media:

Robert Moody Laughlin papers

Creator:
Laughlin, Robert M.  Search this
Extent:
39 videocassettes (vhs)
1 videocassettes (betamax)
20 cd-rs
6 electronic discs (dvd)
65.09 Linear feet
50 floppy discs
147 sound recordings
Culture:
Tzotzil  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Videocassettes (vhs)
Videocassettes (betamax)
Cd-rs
Electronic discs (dvd)
Floppy discs
Sound recordings
Transcripts
Audiotapes
Paper tapes
Photographs
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Date:
1899-2016, bulk 1954-2016
Summary:
Robert Moody Laughlin is an American ethnologist specializing in the study of Mayan language, history, customs, and folklore. He spent the majority of his career working for the Smithsonian Institution, first with the Bureau of American Ethnology, then with the Department of Anthropology. He has been a curator emeritus with the department since his retirement in 2006.

The Robert Moody Laughlin papers (1899-2016, bulk 1954-2016) document his research and professional activities and primarily deal with language and folktales he recorded and studied, as well as the culture and history of the Tzotzil and other Mayan groups in the Chiapas region. His involvement in language education and training, advocacy for the Tzotzil and language and cultural revitalization, and administrative matters at the Smithsonian are also represented. The collection consists of materials created for books and other publications, field notes, research materials, correspondence, administrative files, sound recordings, video recordings, photographs, and electronic records.
Scope and Contents:
The Robert Moody Laughlin papers (1899-2016, bulk 1954-2016) document his research and professional activities and primarily deal with language and folktales he recorded and studied, as well as the culture and history of the Tzotzil and other Mayan groups in the Chiapas region. His involvement in language education and training, advocacy for the Tzotzil and language and cultural revitalization, and administrative matters at the Smithsonian are also represented. The collection consists of materials created for books and other publications, field notes, research materials, correspondence, administrative files, sound recordings, video recordings, photographs, and electronic records.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged in 14 series: Series 1. Tzotzil Dictionaries, 1963-1988, undated; Series 2. Of Wonders Wild and New, 1963-1976; Series 3. Of Cabbages and Kings, 1960-1977; Series 4. Of Shoes and Ships and Sealing Wax, 1963-1980; Series 5. Other Writings by Laughlin, 1956-2006; Series 6. Writings by Others, 1954-2002; Series 7. Biographical Files, 1906-2003; Series 8. Correspondence, 1899-1900, 1948-2002; Series 9. Research and Field Notes, 1954-1993; Series 10. Sna Jtz'ibajom, 1983-2016; Series 11. Administrative Files, 1961-2014; Series 12. Sound Recordings, circa 1960-2004; Series 13. Video Recordings, 1985-2002, undated; Series 14. Photographic Material, 1985-circa 2007, undated; Series 15. Electronic Files, 1985-circa 2004.
Biographical / Historical:
Robert Moody Laughlin (also known as Lol Bik'it Nab in Tzotzil) is an ethnologist in the Smithsonian Department of Anthropology specializing in modern and colonial Tzotzil lexicography as well as Tzotzil oral history, worldview, dreams, prayers, ethnobotany, and history. As a pioneer in advocacy anthropology, Laughlin spent the majority of his career working to support the Chiapas Mayas through his publications, research, and other professional efforts. Among his most notable contributions to local and global understandings of the Chiapas Mayas and the Tzotzil language are his publication of The Great Tzotzil Dictionary of San Lorenzo Zinacantan (1975) and his work in founding Sna Jtz'ibajom, a writers collective based in San Cristobal de las Casas, Chiapas, Mexico.

Laughlin was born in 1934 in Princeton, New Jersey and graduated from Princeton University with a Bachelors degree in English in 1956. He first visited the Chiapas area of Mexico in 1957 as a graduate student at the Escuela Nacional de Antropologia e Historia in Mexico City. He then transferred to Harvard University and began studying under cultural anthropologist Evon Vogt who had recently started the Harvard Chiapas Project. Laughlin completed his field work in Zinacantan, where he learned to speak Tzotzil. After receiving his Ph. D. in anthropology from Harvard in 1963, he collected myths and folk tales in Zinacantan as an ethnologist for the Smithsonian's Bureau of American Ethnology. During regular trips to the field in Chiapas, Mexico, he also worked to compile a dictionary of Tzotzil words. After fourteen years of work, The Great Tzotzil Dictionary of San Lorenzo Zinacantan was published in 1975.

After his dictionary was published, Laughlin returned to the study of folk tales and culture in Tzotzil and other Mayan cultural groups in Central America. He published several books on stories, dreams, marriage and other customs, ethnobotany, and history of the Tzotzil peoples. Laughlin's efforts at revitalizing the Tzotzil language and promoting the area's culture sparked significant Tzotzil interest in their own language and history, but illiteracy was still a major barrier to cultural revitalization. In 1983, Laughlin helped found Sna Jtz'ibajom (House of the Writer), a writers cooperative that took writings about Tzotzil history, folklore, and customs and translated them into Tzotzil. Sna Jtz'ibajom also created Teatro Lo'il Maxil (Monkey Business Theater), a group that wrote and performed plays related to Mayan folklore and education about social issues such as family planning and alcoholism.

Laughlin received the Premio Chiapas in Science in 2002 and the PEN Gregory Kolovakos Award for the translation of Spanish (including Native American) literature in 2004. He retired in 2006 and is currently a curator emeritus in the Department of Anthropology at the Smithsonian Institution.

1934 -- Born on May 29 in Princeton, New Jersey

1956 -- Received Bachelor's Degree in English from Princeton University

1957 -- First trip to Chiapas area of Mexico in 1957 as a graduate student at the Escuela Nacional de Antropologia e Historia in Mexico City

1959 -- Traveled to Chiapas as a member of the Harvard Chiapas Project

1961 -- Received Masters Degree in Anthropology from Harvard University

1962 -- Hired as an ethnologist by the Bureau of American Ethnology (Smithsonian Institution).

1962-1964 -- Ethnologist, Bureau of American Ethnology, Smithsonian Institution

1963 -- Received a Ph. D. in Anthropology from Harvard University

1964-1969 -- Associate Curator, Smithsonian Office of Anthropology

1969-1973 -- Associate Curator, Smithsonian Department of Anthropology

1973-2006 -- Curator, Smithsonian Department of Anthropology

1983 -- Aided in the foundation of Sna Jtz'ibajom (House of the Writer) in Chiapas.

2006 -- Retired from the Smithsonian Department of Anthropology.
Separated Materials:
Material in Series 13. Video Recordings has been transferred to the National Anthropological Film Collection (NAFC), but is described in the this finding aid.
Provenance:
These papers were donated and transferred to the National Anthropological Archives by Robert M. Laughlin in 1985, 2011, and 2016 under accessions 1974-15, 2011-06, and 2016-16.
Restrictions:
The Robert Moody Laughlin papers are open for research.

Electronic media is currently restricted due to preservation concerns.

Please contact the archives for information on availability of access copies of audiovisual recordings. Original audiovisual material in the National Anthropological Film Collection may not be played.

Access to the Robert Moody Laughlin papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Dreams  Search this
Genre/Form:
Transcripts
Audiotapes
Paper tapes
Photographs
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Citation:
Robert Moody Laughlin papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NAA.2011-06
See more items in:
Robert Moody Laughlin papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2011-06
Additional Online Media:

Bernard J. Edley prints and negatives

Creator:
Edley, Bernard J., 1925-1994  Search this
Extent:
78 acetate negatives (black and white, 5 x 7 inches.)
35 Photographic prints (gelatin silver, 2 x 3 inches.)
Culture:
Mayas  Search this
Tzotzil Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Acetate negatives
Photographic prints
Photographs
Black-and-white negatives
Gelatin silver prints
Place:
Monte Albán Site (Mexico)
Mitla Site (Mexico)
Date:
1948-1949
Summary:
This collection contains 78 black-and-white negatives and 35 gelatin silver prints taken by Bernard J. Edley in 1948-1949. The images depict scenes of everyday life among the Santa Cruz Indians of Quintana Roo State and the Tzotzil Indians of Chamula, Chiapas State. Also present are views of archaeological sites at Monte Alban and Mitla in Oaxaca State.
Arrangement note:
Negatives: organized in individual sleeves; arranged by image number.

Prints: organized in folders; arranged by image number.
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment.
Rights:
Copyright: National Museum of the American Indian.
Topic:
Indians of Mexico -- Mexico -- Chiapas (State)  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology) -- Mexico -- Oaxaca (State)  Search this
Indians of Mexico -- Mexico -- Quintana Roo (State)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Black-and-white negatives
Gelatin silver prints
Citation:
Bernard J. Edley prints and negatives, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (image, negative or catalog number).
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.026
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-001-026

Donald B. Cordry photographs from Mexico

Creator:
Cordry, Donald Bush  Search this
Source:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Former owner:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Extent:
93 Photographic prints
9 negatives (photographic)
24 copy negatives
Culture:
Nahua  Search this
Guerrero Nahua  Search this
Purepecha (Tarasco)  Search this
Tzotzil Maya  Search this
Wixarika (Huichol)  Search this
Chinantec [Chinantla]  Search this
Cora  Search this
Yoreme (Mayo)  Search this
Zoque  Search this
Otomi  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographic prints
Negatives (photographic)
Copy negatives
Photographs
Negatives
Place:
Mexico
Date:
1933-1940
Summary:
Images consist mostly of portraits of the indigenous people in the Mexican states of Michoacán, Guerrero, Nayarit, Sinaloa, Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz. The collection primarily contains images of Wikarika (Huichol) people, but includes images of the Purepecha (Tarasco), Guerrero Nahua, Chinantec [Chinantla], Zoque, Otomí (Otomi), Tzotzil Maya, Yoreme (Mayo) and Zapotec peoples.
Scope and Contents:
The Donald Bush Cordry collection primarily contains photographic prints and negatives made by Cordry while he collected objects from 1935 to 1938 on behalf of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. Photographic materials from his private 1933 trip to Guerreo and a few taken around 1940 are also housed in the collection. The photographs depict the native peoples of the Mexican states of Chiapas, Guerrero, Michoacán, Nayarit, Oaxaca, Sinaloa, and Veracruz and represent people preparing food, making masks, pottery and textiles, and dressing for and participating in ceremonies. In addition there are village scenes and informal portraits of individuals. Series 1: Michoacán and Guererro States, includes images shot within the Purepecha (Tarasco) and Guererro Nahua communities between 1935 and 1936. (Negatives: N21118-N21126; Prints: P11986- P12008; Copy Negatives: N36725-N36731) Series 2: Nayarit and Sinaloa States, is the largest series and includes images shot in various Wixarika (Huichol) villages in 1937 and depicts many ceremonial functions. (Prints: P12659-P12672, P12880-P12887, P13273-P13275, P13386-P13414; Copy Negatives: N36855-N36863, N41431-N41432) Series 3: Oaxaca, Chiapas, Sonora and Mexico States, includes images from various culture groups from around 1940. These include Chinantec [Chinantla], Zoque, Otomí (Otomi), Tzotzil Maya, Yoreme (Mayo) and Zapotec. (Prints: P15052-P15053, P15202-P15203, P15347-P15348, P16553-P16562; Copy Negatives: N37306-N37307, N37335-N37336, N37506-N37507)

The photographic prints are all silver gelatin (DOP) and are a range of sizes. The majority of the negatives are copy negatives made by the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation during a photo conservation project in the 1960s.
Arrangement note:
Arranged into three series by date and geographical location. Series 1: Michoacán and Guererro States: Purepecha (Tarasco), Guererro Nahua, 1933, 1935-1936; Series 2: Nayarit and Sinaloa States: Wixarika (Huichol), 1937; Series 3: Oaxaca, Chiapas, Sonora States: Various communities, circa 1940. Within each series the prints and negatives are physically arranged by catalog number.
Biographical/Historical note:
Starting in high school, Donald Bush Cordry was deeply committed to theatrical set design and puppetry and while attending the Minneapolis Institute of Art began to carve his own wooden marionettes and hand puppets. In 1931, Cordry made his first trip to Mexico (Guerrero) and become fascinated by contemporary Mexican Indian art, especially mask making. In 1934, Cordry moved to New York to work as a marionette designer for puppeteer Tony Sarg and soon contacted George G. Heye to learn more about Mexican Indian art. From 1935 to 1938, Cordry collected Mexican masks and other art forms on behalf of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. On his first 1935 collecting trip for Heye, Cordry traveled throughout the states of Michoacán and Guerrero and collected carved and painted dance masks.

In 1936, Cordry married fellow artist Dorothy Mann. Shortly after their wedding, the newlyweds traveled by horseback for six months through Nayarit, Jalisco, and southern Sonora and extensively collected among and photographed the Huichol, Cora and Mayo Indians. The couple moved to Mexico in 1938, first settling in Oaxaca; in the mid-1940s, no longer working for Heye, they relocated to Mexico City. There Cordry established his own design business and produced decorative Mexican folk art-style crafts. His business was highly successful and his work was featured in House and Garden magazine. The couple moved to Cuernavaca, where in 1953 Cordry suffered a stroke and was forced to close his workshop. His stroke also put an end to his traveling and collecting activities. Deeply interested in the history and traditions of Mexican Indians, Cordry assembled an extensive reading library of pre- and post-conquest Mexico materials and together with his wife published "Costumes and Textiles of the Aztec Indians of the Cuetzalan Region, Puebla, Mexico" (1940); "The Costumes and Weaving of the Zoque Indians of Chiapas, Mexico" (1941); and, most importantly, "Mexican Indian Costumes" (1968). Cordry's monumental "Mexican Masks" (1980) was published shortly after his death. Cordry died in Cuernavaca, Mexico, at the age of 71.
Related Materials:
There are around 900 ethnographic items collected by Donald Cordry in Mexico in the National Museum of American Indian's ethnology collections. For more information about these materials contact NMAI Collections.

The National Anthropological Archives (National Museum of Natural History) holds several collections of Donald B. Cordry photographs. See: NAA Photo Lot 87-38, NAA Photo Lot 82-14, and NAA Photo Lot 80-3. The Donald Cordry Mexican mask collection at Natural History can be found in the Department of Anthropology in accession 355867.
Provenance:
The majority of the Donald Cordry photographs came to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation along with field collections in 1936 and 1938. There were additional donations of photographs made by Cordry in 1937, 1940, 1941 and 1943.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Topic:
Indians of Mexico  Search this
Indians of Mexico -- Social life and cutoms  Search this
Indians of Mexico -- Rites and ceremonies  Search this
Nayarit (Mexico)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Photographic prints
Negatives
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Donald B. Cordry photographs from Mexico, Item Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.008
See more items in:
Donald B. Cordry photographs from Mexico
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-001-008
Additional Online Media:

Oaxaca, Chiapas, Sonora, Mexico States: Various communities

Collection Creator:
Cordry, Donald Bush  Search this
Collection Source:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Extent:
16 Photographic prints
6 copy negatives
Culture:
Tzotzil Maya  Search this
Chinantec [Chinantla]  Search this
Zoque  Search this
Otomi  Search this
Yoreme (Mayo)  Search this
Zapotec  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Copy negatives
Date:
circa 1940
Scope and Contents:
This series includes photographic prints and copy negatives made across Mexico sometime around 1940, after Cordry was no longer working for the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. The photographs were included with additional gifts and exchanges with the MAI in 1940, 1941 and 1943. The prints include portraits of Tzotzil Maya women in San Bartolomé de los Llanos, Chiapas; Chinantec [Chinantla] women in Choapam, Oaxaca; Zoque men and women in Copainala and Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas; an Otomi fiesta in Chalma, Mexico; Yoreme (Mayo) man and woman in Huatabampo, Sonora; and a Zapotec woman in Villa Hidalgo (Yalálag), Oaxaca. There are also several images of Zoque masks Cordry collected and two photographs of watercolor paintings made by Cordry.
Prints: P15052-P15053, P15202-P15203, P15347-P15348, P16553-P16562. Copy Negatives: N37306-N37307, N37335-N37336, N37506-N37507.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Donald B. Cordry photographs from Mexico, Item Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.008, Series 3
See more items in:
Donald B. Cordry photographs from Mexico
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-001-008-ref512

Tzotzil Maya group in a plaza

Collection Creator:
Cordry, Donald Bush  Search this
Collection Source:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Extent:
1 Photographic print
1 copy negative
Container:
Photo-folder 10
Culture:
Tzotzil Maya  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Photographic prints
Copy negatives
Date:
1940
Scope and Contents:
Group of Tzotzil Maya women and young girls gathered near a plaza fountain in San Bartolomé de los Llanos, Chiapas State, Mexico. They wear traditional clothing and some hold jugs for gathering water.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Donald B. Cordry photographs from Mexico, Item Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.008, Item P15052
See more items in:
Donald B. Cordry photographs from Mexico
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-001-008-ref548

Tzotzil Maya group portrait

Collection Creator:
Cordry, Donald Bush  Search this
Collection Source:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Extent:
1 Photographic print
1 copy negative
Container:
Photo-folder 10
Culture:
Tzotzil Maya  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Photographic prints
Copy negatives
Date:
1940
Scope and Contents:
Group portrait of five young Tzotzil Maya women and children in traditional clothing in San Bartolomé de los Llanos, Chiapas State, Mexico. They are posed in front of a fence.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Donald B. Cordry photographs from Mexico, Item Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.008, Item P15053
See more items in:
Donald B. Cordry photographs from Mexico
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-001-008-ref549

Flute

Culture/People:
Tzotzil Maya  Search this
Collector:
Dr. Richard Ceough (Albert J.C. Kretzmann), Non-Indian, 1898-1947  Search this
Previous owner:
Hispanic Society of America  Search this
Donor:
Hispanic Society of America  Search this
Object Name:
Flute
Media/Materials:
Wood
Techniques:
Carved
Object Type:
Music and Sound
Place:
Chiapas State; Mexico
Catalog Number:
23/6521
Barcode:
236521.000
See related items:
Tzotzil Maya
Music and Sound
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_251898
Additional Online Media:

Man's Costume

Donor Name:
Richard Ceough  Search this
Culture:
Tzeltal Maya  Search this
Tzotzil Maya  Search this
: Chamula  Search this
Object Type:
Poncho / Trousers / Belt / Hat / Sandal
Place:
Tenejapa, Near San Cristobal Las Casas, Chiapas, Mexico, North America
Accession Date:
1943-Mar-31
Topic:
Ethnology  Search this
Accession Number:
164992
USNM Number:
E382775-0
See more items in:
Anthropology
Data Source:
NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhanthropology_8418043
Additional Online Media:

Ribbons For The Top Of The Flag "Lixtonal Sjol Jtotik"

Donor Name:
Dr. Robert M. Laughlin  Search this
Collector:
Walter F. Morris Jr.  Search this
Length:
38cm
Width:
11cm
Culture:
Tzotzil Maya  Search this
: Chamula  Search this
Object Type:
Ribbon
Place:
San Juan Chamula, Chiapas, Mexico, North America
Accession Date:
1986-Sep-05
Collection Date:
1980
Topic:
Ethnology  Search this
Accession Number:
359007
USNM Number:
E423121-0
See more items in:
Anthropology
Data Source:
NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhanthropology_8456105

Mask for the Dance of the Para Chicos

Culture/People:
Tzotzil Maya [Chiapa de Corzo] (Chiapense)  Search this
Collector:
Donald B. Cordry (Donald Bush Cordry), Non-Indian, 1907-1978  Search this
Seller:
Donald B. Cordry (Donald Bush Cordry), Non-Indian, 1907-1978  Search this
Object Name:
Mask for the Dance of the Para Chicos
Media/Materials:
Wood, glass eyes, paint
Techniques:
Carved, painted
Object Type:
Masks and Masking
Place:
Chiapa de Corzo; Chiapa de Corzo Municipality, Centro Region; Chiapas State; Mexico
Date created:
1935-1940
Catalog Number:
20/2679
Barcode:
202679.000
See related items:
Tzotzil Maya [Chiapa de Corzo] (Chiapense)
Masks and Masking
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_216613
Additional Online Media:

Mask accessory

Culture/People:
Tzotzil Maya [Chiapa de Corzo] (Chiapense)  Search this
Collector:
Donald B. Cordry (Donald Bush Cordry), Non-Indian, 1907-1978  Search this
Seller:
Donald B. Cordry (Donald Bush Cordry), Non-Indian, 1907-1978  Search this
Object Name:
Mask accessory
Media/Materials:
Vegetal Fiber
Techniques:
Knotted
Object Type:
Masks and Masking
Place:
Chiapa de Corzo; Chiapa de Corzo Municipality, Centro Region; Chiapas State; Mexico
Date created:
1935-1940
Catalog Number:
20/2680
Barcode:
202680.000
See related items:
Tzotzil Maya [Chiapa de Corzo] (Chiapense)
Masks and Masking
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_216614
Additional Online Media:

Rosary

Culture/People:
Chamula Maya  Search this
Collector:
Bernard J. Edley, Non-Indian, 1925-1994  Search this
Seller:
Bernard J. Edley, Non-Indian, 1925-1994  Search this
Presenter/funding source:
Viking Fund, Incorporated (The Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, Inc.), 1941-  Search this
Object Name:
Rosary
Media/Materials:
Metal, job's tear seeds, metal chain
Techniques:
Cast, strung
Object Type:
Ceremonial/Ritual items
Place:
San Cristóbal de Las Casas; San Cristóbal de Las Casas Municipality, Altos Region; Chiapas State; Mexico (inferred)
Date created:
circa 1940
Catalog Number:
21/1517
Barcode:
211517.000
See related items:
Chamula Maya
Ceremonial/Ritual items
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_225786
Additional Online Media:

Rosary part/fragment

Culture/People:
Chamula Maya  Search this
Collector:
Bernard J. Edley, Non-Indian, 1925-1994  Search this
Seller:
Bernard J. Edley, Non-Indian, 1925-1994  Search this
Presenter/funding source:
Viking Fund, Incorporated (The Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, Inc.), 1941-  Search this
Object Name:
Rosary part/fragment
Media/Materials:
Job's Tear seeds, metal chain
Techniques:
Strung
Object Type:
Ceremonial/Ritual items
Place:
San Cristóbal de Las Casas; San Cristóbal de Las Casas Municipality, Altos Region; Chiapas State; Mexico (inferred)
Date created:
circa 1940
Catalog Number:
21/1518
Barcode:
211518.000
See related items:
Chamula Maya
Ceremonial/Ritual items
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_225787
Additional Online Media:

Doll tableau

Culture/People:
Chamula Maya  Search this
Previous owner:
Carolyn Burritt (Mrs. John G. Burritt), Non-Indian, 1936-2018  Search this
Donor:
Carolyn Burritt (Mrs. John G. Burritt), Non-Indian, 1936-2018  Search this
Object Name:
Doll tableau
Media/Materials:
Wax, wool cloth, yarn, wood, cotton cloth, ribbon, ink
Techniques:
Modeled, painted, sewn
Dimensions:
4 x 9.5 x 17 cm
Object Type:
Made-for-Sale items and Souvenirs
Place:
Chiapas State; Mexico
Date created:
1960-1980
Catalog Number:
26/5445
Barcode:
265445.000
See related items:
Chamula Maya
Made-for-Sale items and Souvenirs
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_281672
Additional Online Media:

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