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Elizabeth Gordon Papers

Creator:
Gordon, Elizabeth, 1906-2000  Search this
Names:
Claiborne, Craig  Search this
Gordon, Elizabeth, 1906-2000  Search this
Leach, Bernard  Search this
Extent:
3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Periodicals
Photographs
Correspondence
Personal papers
Place:
Japan
Date:
1958-1987
Summary:
Papers, 1959-1987, of Elizabeth Gordon, editor of the periodical, House Beautiful from 1941-1964, mostly related to her research for the August and September 1960 issues of House Beautiful regarding the Japanese aesthetic concept of "shibui", and the subsequent travelling "shibui exhibition" from 1961-1964. Included are correspondence, some photocopies, 1959-1963; notes; drafts for articles and lectures; printed material including magazine and newspaper clippings, 1959-1987; 2 books, and exhibition announcements; drawings of paper and foil art; a photo album containing photos of exhibition installations; and photographs, slides, color transparencies, and lantern slides depicting people, sites, and objects reflecting the "shibui" aesthetic.
Scope and Contents:
The Elizabeth Gordon Papers measure 4.5 linear feet and span the years 1959-1987. The collection mainly documents Ms. Gordon's research for the August and September 1960 issues of House Beautiful regarding the Japanese aesthetic concept of "shibui", and the subsequent travelling "shibui exhibition" from 1961-1964. Included are correspondence, some photocopies, 1959-1963; research notes and materials; articles; lectures; printed material including magazine and newspaper clippings, 1959-1987; 2 books, and exhibition announcements; article materials; a photo album containing photos of exhibition installations; and photographs, slides, color transparencies, and lantern slides depicting people, sites, and objects reflecting the "shibui" aesthetic.
Arrangement note:
This collection is organized into eight series. 1. Biographical data, 2. Shibui research, 3. Shibui issues of, House Beautiful, 4. Correspondence, 5. Shibui promotion, 6. Exhibition files, 7. Printed materials, and 8. Photographs.
Biographical Information:
Born in Logansport, Indiana in 1906, Elizabeth Gordon served as editor of House Beautiful magazine 1941 to 1964. Ms. Gordon first became interested in Japanese aesthetics during the mid-1950s. As a result she began to read and study Japanese art, history and culture. In 1959, Gordon travelled to Japan with three staff people from, House Beautiful. In Kyoto she met Eiko Yuasa, a young woman then employed by the City of Kyoto to handle foreign V.I.P.s, who was assigned to assist Gordon during her stay there. It was Ms. Yuasa who, in the course of discussions of Japanese aesthetics, introduced the term "shibui." Around that term and its related concepts ("iki", "jimi", "hade") the theme for the issue began to crystallize. In August and September, 1960, House Beautiful, under the editorial control of Ms. Gordon, published two extremely popular issues devoted to the subject of "shibui". Due to the popularity of the issues, museum exhibits devoted to the concept of "shibui" travelled around the United States. Ms. Gordon died in Adamstown, Maryland in 2000.

Biographical Overview

1906 -- Born in Logansport, Indiana

1920s -- Attended the University of Chicago

1930s -- Moved to New York to work as a promotional copywriter for several newspapers

1930s -- Syndicated columnist on home maintenance for The New York Herald Tribune

1930s -- Editor at Good Housekeeping (here for 8 years)

1937 -- More House for your Money by Elizabeth Gordon and Dorothy Ducas published by W. Morrow and Company: New York.

1937 -- Married Carl Hafey Norcross

1939 -- Appointed editor of House Beautiful

1964 -- Left the magazine world

1972 -- Published a special issue on Scandinavian design and awarded the insignia of a knight, first class, in the Finnish Order of the Lion

1987 -- American Institute of Architects made her an honorary member

1988 -- Carl Hafey Norcross died

September 3, 2000 -- Died in Adamstown, MD

(The following biography of Elizabeth Gordon comes courtesy of curator Louise Cort. Written in consultation with Elizabeth Gordon, October 23, 1987)

The research papers, memoranda, magazines, books, photographs and color transparencies and other materials in this archives are related to the publication by Elizabeth Gordon (Mrs. Carl Norcross), editor of House Beautiful from 1941 to 1964 and creator of the August, 1960 issue of the magazine on the special theme of the Japanese aesthetic concept of "shibui". The "shibui issue" was followed by the September, 1960, issue of the same publication on the theme, "How to be shibui with American things." As a by-product of the issues, a "Shibui Exhibition" travelled to eleven museums in the United States during 1961-1964. Each exhibition was opened with a slide lecture by Elizabeth Gordon.

Miss Gordon first became curious about Japanese aesthetics in the mid-1950s when she began to see Japanese objects being displayed and used in the homes of Americans who had spent time in Japan during the Occupation and Japanese influence began to appear in wholesale showrooms of home furnishings manufacturers. It was clear that the time had come: she HAD to go to Japan!

She read for five years before going to Japan - history, social mores, art history. (Many of the books on Japan that she collected during this time have been presented to the library at the University of Maryland, College Park.)

An important bit of advice came from Alice Spaulding Bowen, owner of Pacifica, the highest quality shop of Asian antiquities in Honolulu, who told her, "Be sure to read, The Tale of Genji - then you'll understand everything."

She made her first trip to Japan in April, 1959, accompanied by three staff people from, House Beautiful. In Kyoto she met Eiko Yuasa, a young woman then employed by the City of Kyoto to handle foreign V.I.P.s, who was assigned to assist Miss Gordon during her stay there. It was Ms. Yuasa who, in the course of discussions of Japanese aesthetics, introduced the term "shibui." Around that term and its related concepts ("iki", "jimi", "hade") the theme for the issue began to crystallize.

Miss Gordon came home, planning to spend the summer researching "shibui" with the aid of the Japan Society. But she found virtually nothing written in English on the concept. So she returned to Japan in December, 1959 together with staff member Marion Gough, to dig deeper and to work out details and get better educated with Eiko Yuasa. One of their devices was to walk through department stores and discuss with sales personnel whether objects for sale were "shibui", or were "jimi" or "hade", and why. Between themselves, they did the same for the costumes of women they saw on the streets.

Lacking printed sources for information on "shibui", Miss Gordon sought out and interviewed experts, including Douglas Overton, head of the Japan Society in New York. In Japan in December, 1959, she met Yanagi Soetsu, founder of Japan's Folk Craft Movement and head of the Craft Museum in Tokyo (with an introduction from Tonomura Kichinosuke, head of the Craft Museum in Kurashiki). She met the chef Tsuji Kaichi, who was commissioned to write an article on "kaiseki" (that could not be used because of an inadequate English translation) and Frances Blakemore. She met several times with Bernard Leach and attended his lecture at Bonnier's while he was in New York in March, 1960. (He would later write a "fan letter" for the issue)

As the concept of "the shibui issue" began to take shape, a third trip in the spring of 1960 focused on photography - to produce the shooting script decided on the preceding December. This was executed by the noted photographer Ezra Stoller of Rye, New York, and John DeKoven Hill, House Beautiful's Editorial Director. (Mr. Hill worked with Frank Lloyd Wright except for the ten years that he was a member of the House Beautiful editorial staff)

Miss Gordon was back in Japan in Mid-August 1960 as the "shibui issue" was causing a sensation. Altogether she spent sixteen months in Japan.

As one of the experiences that influenced her strong interest in Japanese costumes and textiles, Miss Gordon remembers a spectacularly thorough exhibition at the Tokyo National Museum in Ueno on, 1200 Years of Japanese Costume. She saw it on the last day of its exhibition (possibly 1964).

The August 1960 issue sold out quickly. Copies of the magazine, which sold for fifty cents, were sold on the "black market" for ten dollars.

The publication of the August 1960 issue was followed by an unprecedented avalanche of "fan mail". Many department heads in colleges and universities, including the Harvard-Yenching Institute and the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago (where Miss Gordon had worked as an undergraduate) wrote to comment on the issue. Many people in other fields of endeavor wrote: heads of firms concerned with interior design, landscape architecture, and related areas expressed their interest in the concept of "shibui" Other writers include Bernard Leach, Gertrude Natzler, Laura Gilpin, Mainbocher, the architect Yoshimura Junzo, the textile artist Marianne Strengell, Walter Kerr, Craig Claiborne, and Oliver Statler.

The "shibui issue" was followed immediately by the September issue dealing with the use of non-Japanese objects to express the concept of "shibui." (Miss Gordon convinced her advertisers, who had been skeptical about the potential success of the August issue, by promising the September issue dealing with American products.) Four American firms were involved in the production of an integrated line of paints, wallpaper, furniture and carpets expressive of the concept. Products were designed by the firms' designers following the clues offered by objects and fabrics purchased by Miss Gordon in Japan in December 1959 and spring 1960. Miss Gordon has expressed her dissatisfaction with the September issue, although public opinion was positive. She feels that some of the firms failed in the "shibui" project, though some "caught" the message: namely the paint company and the fabric/wallpaper company.

In response to strong public interest, the House Beautiful staff prepared a travelling exhibition to introduce the concept of "shibui" through a series of vignettes, mixing fabrics and objects, colors and textures. The museum installation was designed by John Hill of House Beautiful. Japan Air Lines underwrote shipping costs.

The exhibition began in Philadelphia in late 1961. Ezra Stoller was sent to photograph the installation in considerable detail at the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts in January, 1962, so that his photographs cold serve as guidelines for installations at the other museums, which included the San Francisco Museum of Art (April 1962), the Newark Pubic Library, and the Honolulu Academy of Art. Miss Gordon presented a lecture on "shibui" at each of the museum installations.

In appreciation of her work to introduce Americans to the concept of "shibui", the city of Kyoto presented a bolt of especially "shibui" kimono fabric executed by a Living National Treasure textile artist. Miss Gordon eventually tailored the fabric into a dress and jacket. She received the 1961 Trail Blazer Award from the New York Chapter of the National Home Fashions League, Inc. In June, 1987, Miss Gordon was named an honorary member of the American Institute of Architects, with her introduction of the concept of "shibui" and her promotion of an understanding of other culture cited as her major contributions to American architecture.
Provenance:
Elizabeth Gordon donated her papers to the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives in 1988.
Elizabeth Gordon donated her papers to the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives in 1988.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
No restrictions on use.
Topic:
Interior decoration -- Periodicals  Search this
Landscape gardening  Search this
Art, Japanese  Search this
Aesthetics, Japanese  Search this
House funishings  Search this
Interior decoration  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Interior decorators  Search this
Gardens -- Japan  Search this
Genre/Form:
Periodicals -- 1940-1970
Photographs
Correspondence
Personal papers -- 1950-2000
Citation:
The Elizabeth Gordon Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. Gift of Elizabeth Gordon, 1988
Identifier:
FSA.A1988.03
See more items in:
Elizabeth Gordon Papers
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-fsa-a1988-03
Online Media:

Benjamin March Papers

Creator:
March, Benjamin, 1899-1934  Search this
Names:
March, Benjamin, 1899-1934  Search this
Rowe, Dorothy, 1898-  Search this
Extent:
15 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Lecture notes
Letters
Place:
China
Japan
China -- Description and Travel
Michigan
Date:
1923-1934
Summary:
Writer, curator, and professor Benjamin Franklin March Jr. (1899-1934) studied, lectured, and wrote in the United States and in China, and through his works gained respect as one of the foremost authorities on Chinese art during the 1920s and 1930s. His papers, dating from 1923 to 1934, document his professional and personal life in the United States and in China and include lecture notes and outlines; research notes; diaries; scrapbooks; and photographs.
Scope and Content Note:
The Benjamin March Papers span the years 1923 to 1934 and measure 15 linear feet. The collection includes: biographical data included in passports, obituaries, and fifty-seven condolence letters; lecture and course outlines; research notes; four diaries; one scrapbook; four illustrations including sketches for the March bookplate; fourteen photograph albums; printed matter; and 100 personal and artistic photographs.
Arrangement note:
The collection is divided into the following series:

Series 1: Biographical Information, 1927-1935

Series 2: Diaries, 1925-1934

Series 3: Writings and Research Materials, 1927-1934, undated

— Subseries 3.1: Lecture Materials

— Subseries 3.2: Research

— Subseries 3.3: Printed Matter

Series 4: Scrapbooks, 1924-1934

Series 5: Graphic Materials, 1925, 1933, undated

— Subseries 5.1: Illustrations

— Subseries 5.2: Photo Albums

— Subseries 5.3: Photographs
Biographical Information:
Biographical Sketch

1899 -- Born, Chicago, IL. Son of Benjamin Franklin and Isabel (née McNeal)

[1917?] -- Attended Lewis Institute and the YMCA College before transferring to the University of Chicago

1918-1919 -- Military service, Sergeant, Field Remount Squadron, No. 305, Army Service Corps

1922 -- Graduated from the University of Chicago (Ph.B)

1922-1923 -- Attended the Union Theological Seminary, New York, NY

1923-1925 -- Teacher of English, Latin, and Bible Studies at Hopei University; the Second Normal School; and the YMCA in Paotingfu, China

1925 June 25 -- Married Dorothy Rowe in Nanking, China

1925-1927 -- English instructor; Librarian; and Lecturer in Chinese Art, Yenching University Peiping, China

1927, summer -- Lecturer on Chinese art Columbia University

1927-1931 -- Curator of Asiatic Art Detroit Institute of Arts

1928 -- Honorary Curator of Oriental Aesthetic Art at the Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

1928 -- Appointed honorary curator at the Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

[1929?] -- Daughter (Judith) born

1929 -- China and Japan in Our Museums, published by the American Council, Institute of Pacific Relations

1931 -- Spent six months in China under a special grant from the American Council of Learned Societies to study 13th century painter, Ch'ien Hsuan

1932 -- Curator, Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

1932 -- Appointed honorary curator at the Detroit Institute of Arts

1933 -- Awarded a Freer Fellowship

1934 -- Standards of Pottery Description, published by the University of Michigan Press

1934, summer -- Organized, directed, and lectured at a summer session of the Institute of Asiatic Studies at the University of California, Berkeley

1934 December -- Died at home in Ann Arbor, Michigan after a five-week illness (heart ailment)

Far Eastern art writer, curator, and lecturer, Benjamin Franklin March Jr., was born in Chicago on July 4, 1899 to Benjamin and Isabel March. He studied, lectured, and wrote in the United States and China and through his works gained respect as one of the foremost authorities on Chinese art during the 1920s and 1930s. Although he lived only thirty-five years, Benjamin March was a respected and influential scholar of Asian art.

After high school, March attended the Lewis Institute and the YMCA College before transferring to the University of Chicago from which he graduated in 1922 (Ph.B). With thoughts of becoming a Methodist minister, March enrolled at the Union Theological Seminary in New York City. At the same time, March enrolled in art classes at the Metropolitan Museum. After one year at the seminary, March was presented with and accepted the opportunity to work in China. From 1923 to 1927, March resided in China where he taught and lectured at colleges. Initially, March taught English, Latin, and Bible Studies at Hopei University, the Second Normal School, and the YMCA. From 1925 to 1927, he worked at Yenching University in Peiping (now Peking) as an instructor in English, a librarian, and lecturer in Chinese art.

While in China, March met Dorothy Rowe, the daughter of a Methodist missionary stationed in Nanking. On June 25, 1925 the two were married. Ms. Rowe, whom March sometimes called Doré, had lived in China since infancy. The author of the children's story, "The Begging Dear," Rowe wrote children's stories with Chinese settings.

During the summer of 1927, the March's moved to the United States when Columbia University offered March an appointment as lecturer of Chinese Art. Later that year March was appointed curator of Asiatic art at the Detroit Institute of Arts. He remained at the Detroit Institute of Arts in this capacity until 1931. In 1928, March was appointed Honorary Curator of Oriental Aesthetic Art by the University of Michigan's Museum of Anthropology. The next year, Dorothy March gave birth to the couple's only child, Judith.

During this period March published extensively, including two publications, China and Japan in Our Museums, in 1929 and, Standards of Pottery Description, in 1934. In the latter, March developed a new technique for the scientific study of the materials and methods of manufacture of ancient Chinese pottery. ( Ann Arbor Daily News. -- "Death Takes Noted Curator". -- December 14, 1934)

In 1931, March received a grant from the American Council of Learned Societies. This grant allowed March the opportunity to travel to China and Europe to study the 13th century painter, Ch'ien Hsuan. In 1932, March was named a curator at the Museum of Anthropology at the University of Michigan. The following year he was named a Freer Fellow. The summer of 1934 found March in Berkeley, California, organizing and directing the Institute of Asiatic Studies at the University of California. During the fall of 1934, March fell ill with a heart ailment. He was ill for five weeks before he died, at the age of 35, in December of 1934. At the time of his death, Benjamin March was survived by his wife Dorothy and their daughter, Judith.
Related Collections:
The Detroit Institute of Arts maintains administrative correspondence and files generated by Benjamin March during his tenure as curator.

The Bentley Historical Library at the University of Michigan houses the Benjamin Franklin March drawings collection, This is a collection of drawings by March for his daughter; includes illustrated poems of Pentwater Beach, Michigan.
Provenance:
Judith March Davis, the daughter of Benjamin March, donated her father's papers to the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives in 1995.
Benjamin March's daughter, Judith March Davis, donated her father's papers to the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives in 1995.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
No restrictions on use.
Topic:
Art, Japanese  Search this
Art, Chinese  Search this
Architecture -- China  Search this
Architecture, Japanese  Search this
Painting, Chinese  Search this
Art, Korean  Search this
Art, Asian  Search this
Painting, Japanese  Search this
Art, Asian -- Research  Search this
Chinese language -- Terms and phrases  Search this
Art -- Terminology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Lecture notes
Letters
Citation:
Benjamin March Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. Gift of Judith March Davis, 1995
Identifier:
FSA.A1995.10
See more items in:
Benjamin March Papers
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-fsa-a1995-10
Online Media:

Suit Of Armor

Donor Name:
No Information  Search this
Culture:
Japanese  Search this
Object Type:
Armor
Place:
Japan, Asia
Accession Date:
1991
Topic:
Ethnology  Search this
Accession Number:
999999
USNM Number:
ET610-0
See more items in:
Anthropology
Data Source:
NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/39c381907-5100-4df6-baea-62013990f61f
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhanthropology_8942371
Online Media:

Mannequin

Collector:
Gen. Horace Capron  Search this
Donor Name:
Gen. Horace Capron  Search this
Length - Object:
170 cm
Width - Object:
52 cm
Height - Object:
35 cm
Culture:
Japanese  Search this
Object Type:
Mannequin
Place:
Japan, Asia
Accession Date:
1878
Topic:
Ethnology  Search this
Accession Number:
007352
USNM Number:
E92427-0
See more items in:
Anthropology
Data Source:
NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/3e4fab72f-ee3c-4870-9bf7-ea800a6d60ad
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhanthropology_8541614
Online Media:

Mannequin

Collector:
Gen. Horace Capron  Search this
Donor Name:
Gen. Horace Capron  Search this
Length - Object:
158 cm
Width - Object:
57 cm
Height - Object:
38 cm
Culture:
Japanese  Search this
Object Type:
Mannequin
Place:
Japan, Asia
Accession Date:
1878
Topic:
Ethnology  Search this
Accession Number:
007352
USNM Number:
E92429-0
See more items in:
Anthropology
Data Source:
NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/3b56cebaf-2991-4a4a-99ee-c47777000a46
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhanthropology_8541616
Online Media:

Mannequin

Collector:
Gen. Horace Capron  Search this
Donor Name:
Gen. Horace Capron  Search this
Length - Object:
151 cm
Width - Object:
54 cm
Height - Object:
34 cm
Culture:
Japanese  Search this
Object Type:
Mannequin
Place:
Japan, Asia
Accession Date:
1878
Topic:
Ethnology  Search this
Accession Number:
007352
USNM Number:
E92430-0
See more items in:
Anthropology
Data Source:
NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/32ba9ff46-71e4-4a15-a142-f6598aea46f3
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhanthropology_8541617
Online Media:

Knife-Handle

Donor Name:
Thomas Dowling  Search this
Culture:
Japanese  Search this
Object Type:
Knife Handle
Place:
Japan, Asia
Accession Date:
1888
Topic:
Ethnology  Search this
Accession Number:
020197
USNM Number:
E94478-0
See more items in:
Anthropology
Data Source:
NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/3cdc667d2-63bf-43bc-9e60-a5046dc5244a
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhanthropology_8488358
Online Media:

A Set Of Work Clothes For Man

Donor Name:
Tokyo National Museum  Search this
Culture:
Japanese  Search this
Object Type:
Shirt / Trousers / Belt / Shoe
Place:
Japan, Asia
Accession Date:
12 Jul 1963
Topic:
Ethnology  Search this
Accession Number:
242908
USNM Number:
E401398A-0
See more items in:
Anthropology
Data Source:
NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/3393f8694-b188-441e-bea6-f28d5d548852
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhanthropology_8430416
Online Media:

Net Floats Of Blown Glass

Donor Name:
Theodore H. Freter  Search this
Culture:
Japanese  Search this
Object Type:
Float
Place:
Oahu Island (Coast), Hawaii, United States, Polynesia
Accession Date:
30 Jun 1946
Topic:
Ethnology  Search this
Accession Number:
173381
USNM Number:
E384007-0
See more items in:
Anthropology
Data Source:
NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/3cf89e6a2-7b4f-4fb4-af3e-5fd3447fe891
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhanthropology_8419121
Online Media:

Incense container in the shape of toy top

Artist:
Ogata Kenzan (1663-1743)  Search this
Edo-Iriya Workshop  Search this
Medium:
Brown clay with white slip, enamels, and iron pigment under lead glaze, enamels over glaze
Dimensions:
H x Diam: 5.4 × 9.6 cm (2 1/8 × 3 3/4 in)
Type:
Ceramic
Container
Origin:
Tokyo, Japan
Date:
ca. 1731-1743
Period:
Edo period
Topic:
Edo period (1615 - 1868)  Search this
incense  Search this
Japan  Search this
Japanese Art  Search this
Credit Line:
Gift of Charles Lang Freer
Accession Number:
F1900.76a-b
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Related Online Resources:
Google Cultural Institute
See more items in:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Collection
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ye32e8e49d5-e92e-4aee-bc7e-ad90ad29af48
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:fsg_F1900.76a-b
Online Media:

Incense box in imitation of Koetsu

Artist:
Imitation of Hon'ami Koetsu 本阿弥光悦 (1558-1637)  Search this
Medium:
Raku-type earthenware with red slip under clear glaze
Dimensions:
H x Diam: 4.4 × 7 cm (1 3/4 × 2 3/4 in)
Style:
Raku ware, unknown workshop
Type:
Ceramic
Container
Origin:
Kyoto, Kyoto prefecture, Japan
Date:
19th century
Period:
Edo period or Meiji era
Topic:
Raku ware  Search this
Edo period (1615 - 1868)  Search this
Meiji era (1868 - 1912)  Search this
incense  Search this
Japan  Search this
earthenware  Search this
Japanese Art  Search this
Credit Line:
Gift of Charles Lang Freer
Accession Number:
F1900.79a-b
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Related Online Resources:
Google Cultural Institute
See more items in:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Collection
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ye3548ba924-301b-40c9-b4da-8a2fa8448dcb
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:fsg_F1900.79a-b

Tea bowl, copy of Kaga Koetsu, named Chigusa, unknown Raku ware workshop

Artist:
Style of Hon'ami Koetsu 本阿弥光悦 (1558-1637) , by an unknown professional potter  Search this
Medium:
Earthenware with red slip under clear lead glaze
Dimensions:
H x Diam: 9.9 × 13 cm (3 7/8 × 5 1/8 in)
Style:
Raku ware, unknown workshop
Type:
Ceramic
Vessel
Origin:
Kyoto, Japan
Date:
19th century
Period:
Edo period
Topic:
Raku ware  Search this
Edo period (1615 - 1868)  Search this
tea  Search this
copy  Search this
Japan  Search this
Japanese Art  Search this
Credit Line:
Gift of Charles Lang Freer
Accession Number:
F1900.81
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Related Online Resources:
Google Cultural Institute
See more items in:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Collection
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ye3c17ee6d3-7870-4014-8f0c-928c94336c08
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:fsg_F1900.81
Online Media:

Bottle with design of bamboo, possibly Tamba ware

Medium:
Stoneware with white slip and iron decoration under clear glaze
Dimensions:
H x Diam: 19.2 × 14.5 cm (7 9/16 × 5 11/16 in)
Style:
Possibly Tamba ware
Type:
Ceramic
Vessel
Origin:
Tachikui, Hyogo prefecture, Japan
Date:
18th-19th century
Period:
Edo period
Topic:
Tamba ware  Search this
Edo period (1615 - 1868)  Search this
bamboo  Search this
Japan  Search this
stoneware  Search this
Japanese Art  Search this
Credit Line:
Gift of Charles Lang Freer
Accession Number:
F1900.83
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Related Online Resources:
Google Cultural Institute
See more items in:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Collection
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ye3d79288b4-29e0-40f0-85ab-944b43e41aa5
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:fsg_F1900.83
Online Media:

Tea caddy, named Karaneko (Chinese cat)

Artist:
Style of Nonomura Ninsei (active ca. 1646-77)  Search this
Medium:
Stoneware with rice-straw ash and iron glazes; ivory lid
Dimensions:
H x Diam: 6.4 × 7.2 cm (2 1/2 × 2 13/16 in)
Style:
Kyoto ware
Type:
Ceramic
Vessel
Origin:
Kyoto, Kyoto prefecture, Japan
Date:
19th century
Period:
Edo period
Topic:
Kyoto ware  Search this
Edo period (1615 - 1868)  Search this
tea  Search this
Japan  Search this
stoneware  Search this
Japanese Art  Search this
Credit Line:
Gift of Charles Lang Freer
Accession Number:
F1900.84a-b
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Related Online Resources:
Google Cultural Institute
See more items in:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Collection
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ye3e703585e-5a94-4383-8ff5-0179bddb4584
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:fsg_F1900.84a-b
Online Media:

Serving bowl in style of Genpin

Medium:
Stoneware with white slip and iron pigment under clear glaze
Dimensions:
H x Diam: 5.8 × 16.7 cm (2 5/16 × 6 9/16 in)
Style:
Seto ware Genpin type
Type:
Ceramic
Vessel
Origin:
Seto, Aichi prefecture, Japan
Date:
1800-1868
Period:
Edo period
Topic:
Seto ware  Search this
Edo period (1615 - 1868)  Search this
iron pigment  Search this
Japan  Search this
stoneware  Search this
white slip  Search this
Japanese Art  Search this
Credit Line:
Gift of Charles Lang Freer
Accession Number:
F1900.85
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Related Online Resources:
Google Cultural Institute
See more items in:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Collection
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ye39ad1b283-47ef-42e9-bc98-7312fcc46938
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:fsg_F1900.85
Online Media:

Tea caddy with landscape decoration

Medium:
Stoneware with cobalt decoration under clear, colorless glaze; ivory lid
Dimensions:
H x Diam: 9 × 7.1 cm (3 9/16 × 2 13/16 in)
Style:
Satsuma ware, White Satsuma type
Type:
Ceramic
Vessel
Origin:
Iso kiln or Sengan kiln, Kagoshima, Kagoshima prefecture, Japan
Date:
mid-19th century
Period:
Edo period or Meiji era
Topic:
landscape  Search this
Satsuma ware, White Satsuma type  Search this
Edo period (1615 - 1868)  Search this
Meiji era (1868 - 1912)  Search this
tea  Search this
Japan  Search this
stoneware  Search this
Japanese Art  Search this
Credit Line:
Gift of Charles Lang Freer
Accession Number:
F1900.86a-b
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Related Online Resources:
Google Cultural Institute
See more items in:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Collection
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ye39a8cf727-cf4b-4ee3-a37c-cf71b30dc219
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:fsg_F1900.86a-b
Online Media:

Tea caddy with inscription

Medium:
Earthenware with lead glaze
Dimensions:
H x Diam: 8.4 × 6.5 cm (3 5/16 × 2 9/16 in)
Style:
Raku ware, unknown workshop
Type:
Ceramic
Vessel
Origin:
Kyoto or Tokyo, Japan
Date:
19th century
Period:
Edo period or Meiji era
Topic:
Raku ware  Search this
Edo period (1615 - 1868)  Search this
Meiji era (1868 - 1912)  Search this
tea  Search this
Japan  Search this
Japanese Art  Search this
Credit Line:
Gift of Charles Lang Freer
Accession Number:
F1900.88a-b
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Related Online Resources:
Google Cultural Institute
See more items in:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Collection
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ye3331569c2-4aac-4e08-a6f2-b83eedf2f2ed
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:fsg_F1900.88a-b
Online Media:

Asahi ware tea bowl in Gohon style

Medium:
Stoneware with feldspathic glaze
Dimensions:
H x Diam: 8.4 × 12.9 cm (3 5/16 × 5 1/16 in)
Style:
Asahi ware
Type:
Ceramic
Vessel
Origin:
Uji, Kyoto prefecture, Japan
Date:
19th century
Period:
Edo period or Meiji era
Topic:
Asahi ware  Search this
Edo period (1615 - 1868)  Search this
tea  Search this
Japan  Search this
stoneware  Search this
Japanese Art  Search this
Credit Line:
Gift of Charles Lang Freer
Accession Number:
F1900.89
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Related Online Resources:
Google Cultural Institute
See more items in:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Collection
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ye3786142f3-0b02-4153-87d4-775722cfdbd3
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:fsg_F1900.89
Online Media:

Shigaraki ware tea-leaf storage jar

Medium:
Stoneware with misfired copper-green glaze
Dimensions:
H x Diam: 17 × 14.7 cm (6 11/16 × 5 13/16 in)
Style:
Shigaraki ware
Type:
Ceramic
Vessel
Origin:
Shigaraki, Shiga prefecture, Japan
Date:
19th century
Period:
Edo period or Meiji era
Topic:
Shigaraki ware  Search this
Edo period (1615 - 1868)  Search this
Meiji era (1868 - 1912)  Search this
tea  Search this
Japan  Search this
stoneware  Search this
Japanese Art  Search this
Credit Line:
Gift of Charles Lang Freer
Accession Number:
F1900.90
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Related Online Resources:
Google Cultural Institute
See more items in:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Collection
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ye3ee2460a3-a9bd-4d9e-bace-7cdcadf552e9
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:fsg_F1900.90
Online Media:

Takatori ware bottle

Medium:
Stoneware with iron and ash glazes
Dimensions:
H x Diam: 16.1 × 8.9 cm (6 5/16 × 3 1/2 in)
Style:
Takatori ware
Type:
Ceramic
Vessel
Origin:
Nishi Sarayama kiln, Fukuoka prefecture, Japan
Date:
late 19th century
Period:
Meiji era
Topic:
Takatori ware  Search this
Meiji era (1868 - 1912)  Search this
Meiji era (1868 - 1912)  Search this
Japan  Search this
stoneware  Search this
brown and black glaze  Search this
Japanese Art  Search this
Credit Line:
Gift of Charles Lang Freer
Accession Number:
F1900.91
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Related Online Resources:
Google Cultural Institute
See more items in:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Collection
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ye3213a7c67-9443-4d19-bced-4b3570eb7a89
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:fsg_F1900.91
Online Media:

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