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Igbo women selling pots at Afikpo eke market, Afikpo Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1959-1960
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.
Original title reads, "Afikpo Eke market, early January 1960. Pottery section." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].
"The major Afikpo trading center is eke market, named for the day on which it meets. It is one of a connected series of markets found in adjoining village-groups to the west and north, which generally meet on different days of the four-day Igbo week. Men and women from Afikpo trade regularly in almost all of these markets. While they contain similar goods, they differ in price and the available quantities of certain products. The authority of the female elders is almost exclusively concerned with the control of trade. They regulate the price of cassava meal (gari) at the market and the number and types of pots that a woman can sell there in one day" [Ottenberg S., 1968: Double Descent in an African Society; the Afikpo Village-Group. University of Washington Press].
Local Numbers:
275/1959-1960

EEPA 2000-070492
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Marketplaces  Search this
Pottery  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0492
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref1000

Igbo women selling palm kernels at Afikpo eke market, Afikpo Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1959-1960
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.
Original title reads, "Afikpo Eke market, early January 1960. Palm kernels for sale." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].
"The major Afikpo trading center is eke market, named for the day on which it meets. It is one of a connected series of markets found in adjoining village-groups to the west and north, which generally meet on different days of the four-day Igbo week. Men and women from Afikpo trade regularly in almost all of these markets. While they contain similar goods, they differ in price and the available quantities of certain products. The authority of the female elders is almost exclusively concerned with the control of trade. They regulate the price of cassava meal (gari) at the market and the number and types of pots that a woman can sell there in one day" [Ottenberg S., 1968: Double Descent in an African Society; the Afikpo Village-Group. University of Washington Press].
Local Numbers:
276/1959-1960

EEPA 2000-070493
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Marketplaces  Search this
Households  Search this
Women  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0493
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref1001

Igbo women selling pots at Afikpo eke market, Afikpo Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1959-1960
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.
Original title reads, "Afikpo Eke market, early January 1960. Pottery section." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].
"The major Afikpo trading center is eke market, named for the day on which it meets. It is one of a connected series of markets found in adjoining village-groups to the west and north, which generally meet on different days of the four-day Igbo week. Men and women from Afikpo trade regularly in almost all of these markets. While they contain similar goods, they differ in price and the available quantities of certain products. The authority of the female elders is almost exclusively concerned with the control of trade. They regulate the price of cassava meal (gari) at the market and the number and types of pots that a woman can sell there in one day" [Ottenberg S., 1968: Double Descent in an African Society; the Afikpo Village-Group. University of Washington Press].
Local Numbers:
277/1959-1960

EEPA 2000-070494
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Marketplaces  Search this
Pottery  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0494
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref1002

Igbo women selling cassava at Afikpo eke market, Afikpo Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1959-1960
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.
Original title reads, "Afikpo Eke market, early January 1960. Cassava (manioc) foo foo balls for sale." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].
"The major Afikpo trading center is eke market, named for the day on which it meets. It is one of a connected series of markets found in adjoining village-groups to the west and north, which generally meet on different days of the four-day Igbo week. Men and women from Afikpo trade regularly in almost all of these markets. While they contain similar goods, they differ in price and the available quantities of certain products. The authority of the female elders is almost exclusively concerned with the control of trade. They regulate the price of cassava meal (gari) at the market and the number and types of pots that a woman can sell there in one day" [Ottenberg S., 1968: Double Descent in an African Society; the Afikpo Village-Group. University of Washington Press].
Local Numbers:
278/1959-1960

EEPA 2000-070495
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Marketplaces  Search this
Households  Search this
Baskets  Search this
Women  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0495
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref1003

Igbo women selling white chalk at Afikpo eke market, Afikpo Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1959-1960
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.
Original title reads, "Afikpo Eke market, early January 1960. Pinkish white or white chalk (nzu) for sale, mostly by women from Edda Village-group west of Afikpo, an Igbo group where much chalk is mined." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].
"The major Afikpo trading center is eke market, named for the day on which it meets. It is one of a connected series of markets found in adjoining village-groups to the west and north, which generally meet on different days of the four-day Igbo week. Men and women from Afikpo trade regularly in almost all of these markets. While they contain similar goods, they differ in price and the available quantities of certain products. The authority of the female elders is almost exclusively concerned with the control of trade. They regulate the price of cassava meal (gari) at the market and the number and types of pots that a woman can sell there in one day" [Ottenberg S., 1968: Double Descent in an African Society; the Afikpo Village-Group. University of Washington Press].
Local Numbers:
279/1959-1960

EEPA 2000-070496
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Marketplaces  Search this
Baskets  Search this
Women  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0496
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref1004

Goat and sheep selling section at Afikpo Eke market, Afikpo Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1959-1960
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.
Original title reads, "Afikpo Eke market, early January 1960. Goat and sheep section." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].
"The major Afikpo trading center is eke market, named for the day on which it meets. It is one of a connected series of markets found in adjoining village-groups to the west and north, which generally meet on different days of the four-day Igbo week. Men and women from Afikpo trade regularly in almost all of these markets. While they contain similar goods, they differ in price and the available quantities of certain products." [Ottenberg S., 1968: Double Descent in an African Society; the Afikpo Village-Group. University of Washington Press].
Local Numbers:
281/1959-1960

EEPA 2000-070498
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Marketplaces  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0498
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref1006

Osisake ceremony, Mgbom village, Afikpo Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1959-1960
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.
Original caption reads, "Osisake ceremony, Amebo ward square, Mgbom Village." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].
Local Numbers:
289/1959-1960

EEPA 2000-070505
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Shrines  Search this
Baskets  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0505
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref1013

Oje Ogwu ceremony for Ezi Akane compound, Ukpa Village, Afikpo Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1959-1960
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Oje Ogwu ceremony presented on the eke day of 3 January 1960 in the main common of Ukpa Village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.
Original caption reads, "Oje Ogwu ceremony at Ukpa Village. Note the different styles of dresses. String netted masks. Musicians wearing the same, some with dry leaves, some with fresh ones, some with feathers, some without. Some use porcupine quills. Ebi is what dress called if wear porcupine quills, okpu ebuba (hat-feather) is what call other musicians with feathers in hats." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].
"Oje Ogwu is a play performed in only a few common villages each year. It is a net-masked dance of about thirty players accompanied by musicians also wearing net face coverings. Most of the Ezi Akane secret society members from the age group of boys and young men took part in the actual rehearsals and performances. The Oje Ogwu dance is simpler than the Okumkpa play or the Njenji masked parade. It takes a short period of time to perform and is based on only a few contrastive elements. There are the three types of costumes, each of which has special movements and activities associated with it. The Oje Ogwu is not particularly associated with a specific festival, but rather with a season." [ Ottenberg, 1975: Masked rituals of Afikpo, the context of an African art; Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1975].
The photograph depicts akopia eka (knock-hand) musicians as well as ebulu players, entering the village common. The musicians all wore a dark brown net mask with black lines on it, and a variety of head coverings. Some had porcupine quill hats (ebi) and some headpieces of feathers, called okpu ebuba (hat-feather). Most of them played the single-piece iron gong, egele; a few had the wooden ekwe gong, and several others just hit two sticks together.
Local Numbers:
290/1959-1960

EEPA 2000-070506
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Clothing and dress -- Africa  Search this
Cultural landscapes  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Headdresses -- headgear -- Africa  Search this
Masks  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0506
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref1014

Oje Ogwu ceremony for Ezi Akane compound, Ukpa Village, Afikpo Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1959-1960
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Oje Ogwu ceremony presented on the eke day of 3 January 1960 in the main common of Ukpa Village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.
Original caption reads, "Oje Ogwu ceremony at Ukpa Village. Note the different styles of dresses. String netted masks. Musicians wearing the same, some with dry leaves, some with fresh ones, some with feathers, some without. Some use porcupine quills. Ebi is what dress called if wear porcupine quills, okpu ebuba (hat-feather) is what call other musicians with feathers in hats." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].
"Oje Ogwu is a play performed in only a few common villages each year. It is a net-masked dance of about thirty players accompanied by musicians also wearing net face coverings. Most of the Ezi Akane secret society members from the age group of boys and young men took part in the actual rehearsals and performances. The Oje Ogwu dance is simpler than the Okumkpa play or the Njenji masked parade. It takes a short period of time to perform and is based on only a few contrastive elements. There are the three types of costumes, each of which has special movements and activities associated with it. The Oje Ogwu is not particularly associated with a specific festival, but rather with a season." [ Ottenberg, 1975: Masked rituals of Afikpo, the context of an African art; Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1975].
The photograph depicts ebulu players, entering the village common. The ebulu players are the poorer and generally younger dancers who move only as a dancing group. Their costumes involve a similar body costume and net mask to the erewe, but the headpiece differs. On the head is worn a red cloth, which is peaked and surrounded by feathers, more vertically oriented.
Local Numbers:
291/1959-1960

EEPA 2000-070507
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Clothing and dress -- Africa  Search this
Cultural landscapes  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Headdresses -- headgear -- Africa  Search this
Masks  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0507
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref1015

Oje Ogwu ceremony for Ezi Akane compound, Ukpa Village, Afikpo Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1959-1960
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Oje Ogwu ceremony presented on the eke day of 3 January 1960 in the main common of Ukpa Village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.
Original caption reads, "Oje Ogwu ceremony at Ukpa Village. Note the different styles of dresses. String netted masks. Musicians wearing the same, some with dry leaves, some with fresh ones, some with feathers, some without. Some use porcupine quills. Ebi is what dress called if wear porcupine quills, okpu ebuba (hat-feather) is what call other musicians with feathers in hats." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].
"Oje Ogwu is a play performed in only a few common villages each year. It is a net-masked dance of about thirty players accompanied by musicians also wearing net face coverings. Most of the Ezi Akane secret society members from the age group of boys and young men took part in the actual rehearsals and performances. The Oje Ogwu dance is simpler than the Okumkpa play or the Njenji masked parade. It takes a short period of time to perform and is based on only a few contrastive elements. There are the three types of costumes, each of which has special movements and activities associated with it. The Oje Ogwu is not particularly associated with a specific festival, but rather with a season." [ Ottenberg, 1975: Masked rituals of Afikpo, the context of an African art; Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1975].
The photograph depicts erewe players, holding a long stick in their right hands while entering the dancing area for the first time. The erewe players are the better and generally older dancers who perform individually as well as in the group. Their characteristic headgear consists of long, black feathers pointing out in different directions from the top of the head, which move about with some freedom. Interspersed with them are shorter feathers dyed a bright pink.
Local Numbers:
292/1959-1960

EEPA 2000-070508
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Clothing and dress -- Africa  Search this
Cultural landscapes  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Headdresses -- headgear -- Africa  Search this
Masks  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0508
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref1016

Oje Ogwu ceremony for Ezi Akane compound, Ukpa Village, Afikpo Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1959-1960
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Oje Ogwu ceremony presented on the eke day of 3 January 1960 in the main common of Ukpa Village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.
Original caption reads, "Oje Ogwu ceremony at Ukpa Village. Note the different styles of dresses. String netted masks. Musicians wearing the same, some with dry leaves, some with fresh ones, some with feathers, some without. Some use porcupine quills. Ebi is what dress called if wear porcupine quills, okpu ebuba (hat-feather) is what call other musicians with feathers in hats." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].
"Oje Ogwu is a play performed in only a few common villages each year. It is a net-masked dance of about thirty players accompanied by musicians also wearing net face coverings. Most of the Ezi Akane secret society members from the age group of boys and young men took part in the actual rehearsals and performances. The Oje Ogwu dance is simpler than the Okumkpa play or the Njenji masked parade. It takes a short period of time to perform and is based on only a few contrastive elements. There are the three types of costumes, each of which has special movements and activities associated with it. The Oje Ogwu is not particularly associated with a specific festival, but rather with a season." [ Ottenberg, 1975: Masked rituals of Afikpo, the context of an African art; Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1975].
The photograph depicts akopia eka (knock-hand) musicians as well as ebulu players, entering the village common. The musicians all wore a dark brown net mask with black lines on it, and a variety of head coverings. Some had porcupine quill hats (ebi) and some headpieces of feathers, called okpu ebuba (hat-feather). Most of them played the single-piece iron gong, egele; a few had the wooden ekwe gong, and several others just hit two sticks together.
Local Numbers:
293/1959-1960

EEPA 2000-070509
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Clothing and dress -- Africa  Search this
Cultural landscapes  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Headdresses -- headgear -- Africa  Search this
Masks  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0509
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref1017

Oje Ogwu ceremony for Ezi Akane compound, Ukpa Village, Afikpo Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1959-1960
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Oje Ogwu ceremony presented on the eke day of 3 January 1960 in the main common of Ukpa Village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.
Original caption reads, "Oje Ogwu ceremony at Ukpa Village. Note the different styles of dresses. String netted masks. Musicians wearing the same, some with dry leaves, some with fresh ones, some with feathers, some without. Some use porcupine quills. Ebi is what dress called if wear porcupine quills, okpu ebuba (hat-feather) is what call other musicians with feathers in hats." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].
"Oje Ogwu is a play performed in only a few common villages each year. It is a net-masked dance of about thirty players accompanied by musicians also wearing net face coverings. Most of the Ezi Akane secret society members from the age group of boys and young men took part in the actual rehearsals and performances. The Oje Ogwu dance is simpler than the Okumkpa play or the Njenji masked parade. It takes a short period of time to perform and is based on only a few contrastive elements. There are the three types of costumes, each of which has special movements and activities associated with it. The Oje Ogwu is not particularly associated with a specific festival, but rather with a season." [ Ottenberg, 1975: Masked rituals of Afikpo, the context of an African art; Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1975].
The photograph depicts akopia eka (knock-hand) musicians as well as ebulu players, entering the village common. The musicians all wore a dark brown net mask with black lines on it, and a variety of head coverings. Some had porcupine quill hats (ebi) and some headpieces of feathers, called okpu ebuba (hat-feather). Most of them played the single-piece iron gong, egele; a few had the wooden ekwe gong, and several others just hit two sticks together.
Local Numbers:
294/1959-1960

EEPA 2000-070510
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Clothing and dress -- Africa  Search this
Cultural landscapes  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Headdresses -- headgear -- Africa  Search this
Masks  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0510
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref1018

Oje Ogwu ceremony for Ezi Akane compound, Ukpa Village, Afikpo Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1959-1960
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Oje Ogwu ceremony presented on the eke day of 3 January 1960 in the main common of Ukpa Village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.
Original caption reads, "Oje Ogwu ceremony at Ukpa Village. Note the different styles of dresses. String netted masks. Musicians wearing the same, some with dry leaves, some with fresh ones, some with feathers, some without. Some use porcupine quills. Ebi is what dress called if wear porcupine quills, okpu ebuba (hat-feather) is what call other musicians with feathers in hats." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].
"Oje Ogwu is a play performed in only a few common villages each year. It is a net-masked dance of about thirty players accompanied by musicians also wearing net face coverings. Most of the Ezi Akane secret society members from the age group of boys and young men took part in the actual rehearsals and performances. The Oje Ogwu dance is simpler than the Okumkpa play or the Njenji masked parade. It takes a short period of time to perform and is based on only a few contrastive elements. There are the three types of costumes, each of which has special movements and activities associated with it. The Oje Ogwu is not particularly associated with a specific festival, but rather with a season." [ Ottenberg, 1975: Masked rituals of Afikpo, the context of an African art; Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1975].
The photograph depicts erewe players dancing before akopia eka (knock-hand) musicians. The erewe players are the better and generally older dancers who perform individually as well as in the group. Their characteristic headgear consists of long, black feathers pointing out in different directions from the top of the head, which move about with some freedom. Interspersed with them are shorter feathers dyed a bright pink. The musicians all wore a dark brown net mask with black lines on it, and a variety of head coverings. Some had porcupine quill hats (ebi) and some headpieces of feathers, called okpu ebuba (hat-feather). Most of them played the single-piece iron gong, egele; a few had the wooden ekwe gong, and several others just hit two sticks together.
Local Numbers:
295/1959-1960

EEPA 2000-070511
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Clothing and dress -- Africa  Search this
Cultural landscapes  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Headdresses -- headgear -- Africa  Search this
Masks  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0511
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref1019

Oje Ogwu ceremony for Ezi Akane compound, Ukpa Village, Afikpo Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1959-1960
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Oje Ogwu ceremony presented on the eke day of 3 January 1960 in the main common of Ukpa Village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.
Original caption reads, "Oje Ogwu ceremony at Ukpa Village. Note the different styles of dresses. String netted masks. Musicians wearing the same, some with dry leaves, some with fresh ones, some with feathers, some without. Some use porcupine quills. Ebi is what dress called if wear porcupine quills, okpu ebuba (hat-feather) is what call other musicians with feathers in hats." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].
"Oje Ogwu is a play performed in only a few common villages each year. It is a net-masked dance of about thirty players accompanied by musicians also wearing net face coverings. Most of the Ezi Akane secret society members from the age group of boys and young men took part in the actual rehearsals and performances. The Oje Ogwu dance is simpler than the Okumkpa play or the Njenji masked parade. It takes a short period of time to perform and is based on only a few contrastive elements. There are the three types of costumes, each of which has special movements and activities associated with it. The Oje Ogwu is not particularly associated with a specific festival, but rather with a season." [ Ottenberg, 1975: Masked rituals of Afikpo, the context of an African art; Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1975].
The photograph depicts erewe player, bringing "dashes" to the musicians. The erewe players are the better and generally older dancers who perform individually as well as in the group. Their characteristic headgear consists of long, black feathers pointing out in different directions from the top of the head, which move about with some freedom. Interspersed with them are shorter feathers dyed a bright pink.
Local Numbers:
296/1959-1960

EEPA 2000-070512
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Clothing and dress -- Africa  Search this
Cultural landscapes  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Headdresses -- headgear -- Africa  Search this
Masks  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0512
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref1020

Oje Ogwu ceremony for Ezi Akane compound, Ukpa Village, Afikpo Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1959-1960
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Oje Ogwu ceremony presented on the eke day of 3 January 1960 in the main common of Ukpa Village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.
Original caption reads, "Oje Ogwu ceremony at Ukpa Village. Note the different styles of dresses. String netted masks. Musicians wearing the same, some with dry leaves, some with fresh ones, some with feathers, some without. Some use porcupine quills. Ebi is what dress called if wear porcupine quills, okpu ebuba (hat-feather) is what call other musicians with feathers in hats." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].
"Oje Ogwu is a play performed in only a few common villages each year. It is a net-masked dance of about thirty players accompanied by musicians also wearing net face coverings. Most of the Ezi Akane secret society members from the age group of boys and young men took part in the actual rehearsals and performances. The Oje Ogwu dance is simpler than the Okumkpa play or the Njenji masked parade. It takes a short period of time to perform and is based on only a few contrastive elements. There are the three types of costumes, each of which has special movements and activities associated with it. The Oje Ogwu is not particularly associated with a specific festival, but rather with a season." [ Ottenberg, 1975: Masked rituals of Afikpo, the context of an African art; Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1975].
The photograph depicts erewe player, having brought "dashes" to the musicians. The erewe players are the better and generally older dancers who perform individually as well as in the group. Their characteristic headgear consists of long, black feathers pointing out in different directions from the top of the head, which move about with some freedom. Interspersed with them are shorter feathers dyed a bright pink.
Local Numbers:
297/1959-1960

EEPA 2000-070513
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Clothing and dress -- Africa  Search this
Cultural landscapes  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Headdresses -- headgear -- Africa  Search this
Masks  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0513
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref1021

Oje Ogwu ceremony for Ezi Akane compound, Ukpa Village, Afikpo Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1959-1960
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Oje Ogwu ceremony presented on the eke day of 3 January 1960 in the main common of Ukpa Village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.
Original caption reads, "Oje Ogwu ceremony at Ukpa Village. Note the different styles of dresses. String netted masks. Musicians wearing the same, some with dry leaves, some with fresh ones, some with feathers, some without. Some use porcupine quills. Ebi is what dress called if wear porcupine quills, okpu ebuba (hat-feather) is what call other musicians with feathers in hats." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].
"Oje Ogwu is a play performed in only a few common villages each year. It is a net-masked dance of about thirty players accompanied by musicians also wearing net face coverings. Most of the Ezi Akane secret society members from the age group of boys and young men took part in the actual rehearsals and performances. The Oje Ogwu dance is simpler than the Okumkpa play or the Njenji masked parade. It takes a short period of time to perform and is based on only a few contrastive elements. There are the three types of costumes, each of which has special movements and activities associated with it. The Oje Ogwu is not particularly associated with a specific festival, but rather with a season." [ Ottenberg, 1975: Masked rituals of Afikpo, the context of an African art; Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1975].
The photograph depicts erewe player, performing in the dancing area. The erewe players are the better and generally older dancers who perform individually as well as in the group. Their characteristic headgear consists of long, black feathers pointing out in different directions from the top of the head, which move about with some freedom. Interspersed with them are shorter feathers dyed a bright pink.
Local Numbers:
298/1959-1960

EEPA 2000-070514
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Clothing and dress -- Africa  Search this
Cultural landscapes  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Headdresses -- headgear -- Africa  Search this
Masks  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0514
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref1022

Oje Ogwu ceremony for Ezi Akane compound, Ukpa Village, Afikpo Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1959-1960
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Oje Ogwu ceremony presented on the eke day of 3 January 1960 in the main common of Ukpa Village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.
Original caption reads, "Oje Ogwu ceremony at Ukpa Village. Note the different styles of dresses. String netted masks. Musicians wearing the same, some with dry leaves, some with fresh ones, some with feathers, some without. Some use porcupine quills. Ebi is what dress called if wear porcupine quills, okpu ebuba (hat-feather) is what call other musicians with feathers in hats." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].
"Oje Ogwu is a play performed in only a few common villages each year. It is a net-masked dance of about thirty players accompanied by musicians also wearing net face coverings. Most of the Ezi Akane secret society members from the age group of boys and young men took part in the actual rehearsals and performances. The Oje Ogwu dance is simpler than the Okumkpa play or the Njenji masked parade. It takes a short period of time to perform and is based on only a few contrastive elements. There are the three types of costumes, each of which has special movements and activities associated with it. The Oje Ogwu is not particularly associated with a specific festival, but rather with a season." [ Ottenberg, 1975: Masked rituals of Afikpo, the context of an African art; Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1975].
The photograph depicts erewe player dancing before akopia eka (knock-hand) musicians. The erewe players are the better and generally older dancers who perform individually as well as in the group. Their characteristic headgear consists of long, black feathers pointing out in different directions from the top of the head, which move about with some freedom. Interspersed with them are shorter feathers dyed a bright pink. The musicians all wore a dark brown net mask with black lines on it, and a variety of head coverings. Some had porcupine quill hats (ebi) and some headpieces of feathers, called okpu ebuba (hat-feather). Most of them played the single-piece iron gong, egele; a few had the wooden ekwe gong, and several others just hit two sticks together.
Local Numbers:
299/1959-1960

EEPA 2000-070515
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Clothing and dress -- Africa  Search this
Cultural landscapes  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Headdresses -- headgear -- Africa  Search this
Masks  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0515
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref1023

Oje Ogwu ceremony for Ezi Akane compound, Ukpa Village, Afikpo Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1959-1960
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Oje Ogwu ceremony presented on the eke day of 3 January 1960 in the main common of Ukpa Village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.
Original caption reads, "Oje Ogwu ceremony at Ukpa Village. Note the different styles of dresses. String netted masks. Musicians wearing the same, some with dry leaves, some with fresh ones, some with feathers, some without. Some use porcupine quills. Ebi is what dress called if wear porcupine quills, okpu ebuba (hat-feather) is what call other musicians with feathers in hats." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].
Publication title reads, "Erewe player dancing before musicians at Ukpa village oje ogwu dance."
"Oje Ogwu is a play performed in only a few common villages each year. It is a net-masked dance of about thirty players accompanied by musicians also wearing net face coverings. Most of the Ezi Akane secret society members from the age group of boys and young men took part in the actual rehearsals and performances. The Oje Ogwu dance is simpler than the Okumkpa play or the Njenji masked parade. It takes a short period of time to perform and is based on only a few contrastive elements. There are the three types of costumes, each of which has special movements and activities associated with it. The Oje Ogwu is not particularly associated with a specific festival, but rather with a season." [ Ottenberg, 1975: Masked rituals of Afikpo, the context of an African art; Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1975].
The photograph depicts erewe player dancing before akopia eka (knock-hand) musicians. The erewe players are the better and generally older dancers who perform individually as well as in the group. Their characteristic headgear consists of long, black feathers pointing out in different directions from the top of the head, which move about with some freedom. Interspersed with them are shorter feathers dyed a bright pink. The musicians all wore a dark brown net mask with black lines on it, and a variety of head coverings. Some had porcupine quill hats (ebi) and some headpieces of feathers, called okpu ebuba (hat-feather). Most of them played the single-piece iron gong, egele; a few had the wooden ekwe gong, and several others just hit two sticks together.
Local Numbers:
300/1959-1960

EEPA 2000-070516
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Clothing and dress -- Africa  Search this
Cultural landscapes  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Headdresses -- headgear -- Africa  Search this
Masks  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0516
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref1024

Oje Ogwu ceremony for Ezi Akane compound, Ukpa Village, Afikpo Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1959-1960
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Oje Ogwu ceremony presented on the eke day of 3 January 1960 in the main common of Ukpa Village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.
Original caption reads, "Oje Ogwu ceremony at Ukpa Village. Note the different styles of dresses. String netted masks. Musicians wearing the same, some with dry leaves, some with fresh ones, some with feathers, some without. Some use porcupine quills. Ebi is what dress called if wear porcupine quills, okpu ebuba (hat-feather) is what call other musicians with feathers in hats." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].
"Oje Ogwu is a play performed in only a few common villages each year. It is a net-masked dance of about thirty players accompanied by musicians also wearing net face coverings. Most of the Ezi Akane secret society members from the age group of boys and young men took part in the actual rehearsals and performances. The Oje Ogwu dance is simpler than the Okumkpa play or the Njenji masked parade. It takes a short period of time to perform and is based on only a few contrastive elements. There are the three types of costumes, each of which has special movements and activities associated with it. The Oje Ogwu is not particularly associated with a specific festival, but rather with a season." [ Ottenberg, 1975: Masked rituals of Afikpo, the context of an African art; Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1975].
The photograph depicts erewe player, performing in the dancing area. The erewe players are the better and generally older dancers who perform individually as well as in the group. Their characteristic headgear consists of long, black feathers pointing out in different directions from the top of the head, which move about with some freedom. Interspersed with them are shorter feathers dyed a bright pink.
Local Numbers:
301/1959-1960

EEPA 2000-070517
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Clothing and dress -- Africa  Search this
Cultural landscapes  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Headdresses -- headgear -- Africa  Search this
Masks  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0517
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref1025

Oje Ogwu ceremony for Ezi Akane compound, Ukpa Village, Afikpo Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1959-1960
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Oje Ogwu ceremony presented on the eke day of 3 January 1960 in the main common of Ukpa Village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.
Original caption reads, "Oje Ogwu ceremony at Ukpa Village. Note the different styles of dresses. String netted masks. Musicians wearing the same, some with dry leaves, some with fresh ones, some with feathers, some without. Some use porcupine quills. Ebi is what dress called if wear porcupine quills, okpu ebuba (hat-feather) is what call other musicians with feathers in hats." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].
"Oje Ogwu is a play performed in only a few common villages each year. It is a net-masked dance of about thirty players accompanied by musicians also wearing net face coverings. Most of the Ezi Akane secret society members from the age group of boys and young men took part in the actual rehearsals and performances. The Oje Ogwu dance is simpler than the Okumkpa play or the Njenji masked parade. It takes a short period of time to perform and is based on only a few contrastive elements. There are the three types of costumes, each of which has special movements and activities associated with it. The Oje Ogwu is not particularly associated with a specific festival, but rather with a season." [ Ottenberg, 1975: Masked rituals of Afikpo, the context of an African art; Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1975].
The photograph depicts erewe player, performing in the dancing area. The erewe players are the better and generally older dancers who perform individually as well as in the group. Their characteristic headgear consists of long, black feathers pointing out in different directions from the top of the head, which move about with some freedom. Interspersed with them are shorter feathers dyed a bright pink.
Local Numbers:
302/1959-1960

EEPA 2000-070518
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Clothing and dress -- Africa  Search this
Cultural landscapes  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Headdresses -- headgear -- Africa  Search this
Masks  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0518
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref1026

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