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Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records, 1851-1991, bulk 1962-1991

Creator:
Robert Schoelkopf Gallery  Search this
Subject:
Andrejevic, Milet  Search this
Brassaï  Search this
Bell, Leland  Search this
Bailey, William  Search this
Aponovich, James  Search this
Nadelman, Elie  Search this
Myers, Ethel  Search this
Schoelkopf, Robert J.  Search this
Storrs, John Henry Bradley  Search this
Stella, Joseph  Search this
Wiesenfeld, Paul  Search this
Freund, Gisèle  Search this
Horton, William S.  Search this
Ito, Miyoko  Search this
Lachaise, Gaston  Search this
Laderman, Gabriel  Search this
Ligare, David  Search this
Matthiasdottir, Louisa  Search this
Matulka, Jan  Search this
Cameron, Julia Margaret Pattle  Search this
Cartier-Bresson, Henri  Search this
Cornell, Joseph  Search this
Dawson, Manierre  Search this
Driggs, Elsie  Search this
Erlebacher, Martha Mayer  Search this
Evans, Walker  Search this
Fiske, Gertrude  Search this
Zabriskie Gallery  Search this
Type:
Gallery records
Illustrated letters
Photographs
Topic:
Art, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Photography, Artistic  Search this
Realism in art  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)10988
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)214859
AAA_collcode_robeschg
Theme:
The Art Market
Photography
Art Gallery Records
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_214859
Online Media:

Naomi Savage Papers on Man Ray, 1913-2005

Creator:
Savage, Naomi, 1927-2005  Search this
Subject:
Noguchi, Isamu  Search this
Duchamp, Alexina  Search this
Kimmel, Roberta  Search this
Hunter, Sam  Search this
Greenbaum, Theodora S.  Search this
Duchamp, Marcel  Search this
Serger, Helen  Search this
Savage, Naomi  Search this
Man Ray, Juliet  Search this
Ray, Man  Search this
Galerie Anderson-Mayer  Search this
Vered Gallery  Search this
Serpentine Gallery  Search this
Zabriskie Gallery  Search this
La Boetie, Inc.  Search this
Ronny Van de Velde (Gallery : Antwerp, Belgium)  Search this
Prakapas Gallery  Search this
Philadelphia Museum of Art  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Topic:
Painters -- France -- Paris  Search this
Photography  Search this
Surrealism  Search this
Photographers -- France -- Paris  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Photographers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)13640
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)272566
AAA_collcode_savanaom
Theme:
Photography
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_272566
Online Media:

Lawrence Fane papers, circa 1964-2003

Creator:
Fane, Lawrence, 1933-2008  Search this
Subject:
Grounds for Sculpture  Search this
Kouros Gallery  Search this
Bill Bace Gallery  Search this
Zabriskie Gallery  Search this
Marilyn Pearl Gallery  Search this
University of Richmond Museums  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Topic:
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Art teachers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)6143
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)216365
AAA_collcode_fanelawr
Theme:
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_216365
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Mary Frank, 2010 Jan. 10- Feb. 3

Interviewee:
Frank, Mary, 1933-  Search this
Interviewer:
Richards, Judith Olch, 1947-  Search this
Subject:
Cadmus, Paul  Search this
De Kooning, Willem  Search this
Kaprow, Allan  Search this
Nakian, Reuben  Search this
Snyder, Joan  Search this
Martha Graham Dance Company  Search this
New School for Social Research  Search this
Queens College (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Zabriskie Gallery  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Topic:
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Women art teachers  Search this
Women artists -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)15766
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)287546
AAA_collcode_frank10
Theme:
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_287546

Oral history interview with Mary Frank

Interviewee:
Frank, Mary, 1933-  Search this
Interviewer:
Richards, Judith Olch  Search this
Names:
Martha Graham Dance Company  Search this
New School for Social Research (New York, N.Y.) -- Faculty  Search this
Queens College (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Zabriskie Gallery  Search this
Cadmus, Paul, 1904-1999  Search this
De Kooning, Willem, 1904-1997  Search this
Kaprow, Allan  Search this
Nakian, Reuben, 1897-1986  Search this
Snyder, Joan, 1940-  Search this
Extent:
8 Items (Sound recording: 8 memory cards (6 hr., 43 min.), secure digital, 1.25 in.)
135 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
2010 Jan. 10- Feb. 3
Scope and Contents:
An interview interview with Mary Frank conducted 2010 Jan. 10, 11, and Feb. 3, by Judith Olch Richards, for the Archives of American Art, at Frank's home and studio, in New York, N.Y.
Ms. Frank speaks of her childhood in England and her evacuation to Brooklyn during WWII; her initial intention of becoming a professional dancer and studying with the Martha Graham Dance Company; her marriage and travels with photographer Robert Frank; the difficulties of women teaching art; teaching methods; her time at The New School and Queens College; western and non-Western influences; mushroom hunting; solar cookers; her works in clay, sculpture, painting, drawing, monoprint, and triptych installations; her relationships with the galleries Zabriskie, Midtown Payton and DC Moore; Frank also recalls Willem de Kooning, Ruben Nakian, Allan Kaprow, Marjorie Ponce Israel, Joe Chaikin, Paul Cadmus, Henrietta Mantooth Bagley, Joan Snyder, Elanor Munro, Jean-Louise Bourgeois, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Interviewee Mary Frank (1933- ) is a figurative sculptor and painter in New York, N.Y. She is married to musicologist Leo Treitler. Interviewer Judith Olch Richards (1947- ) is former Executive director of iCI in New York, N.Y.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Topic:
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Women art teachers  Search this
Women artists -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.frank10
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-frank10

Oral history interview with Richard Stankiewicz, 1979 June 26

Interviewee:
Stankiewicz, Richard, 1922-1983  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F  Search this
Subject:
Zabriskie, Virginia M., 1927-1991  Search this
Kootz, Samuel Melvin  Search this
Léger, Fernand  Search this
Smith, David  Search this
Porter, Fairfield  Search this
Hofmann, Hans  Search this
University of Albany  Search this
Zabriskie Gallery  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Sculpture, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Sculptors -- Massachusetts -- Huntington -- Interviews  Search this
Art -- Political aspects  Search this
Politics in art  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12284
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)213131
AAA_collcode_stanki79
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_213131
Online Media:

Jack Tworkov papers, circa 1926-1993

Creator:
Tworkov, Jack, 1900-1982  Search this
Subject:
Forge, Andrew  Search this
Dickinson, Edwin Walter  Search this
Demarco, Ricky  Search this
Knaths, Karl  Search this
Katz, Paul  Search this
Herzbrun, Helene  Search this
Hartigan, Grace  Search this
Bartlett, Jennifer  Search this
Ashton, Dore  Search this
Ashbury, John  Search this
Cézanne, Paul  Search this
Cavallon, Giorgio  Search this
Calfee, William H. (William Howard)  Search this
Blinken, Donald M.  Search this
Ponsold, Renate  Search this
Praeger, David A.  Search this
Westenberger, Theo  Search this
Summerford, Joe  Search this
Thorne, Joan  Search this
Matter, Herbert  Search this
Lindeberg, Linda  Search this
Osborn, Robert Chesley  Search this
Newman, Arnold  Search this
Newman, Michael  Search this
Wise, Howard  Search this
Wheeler, Dennis  Search this
Yunkers, Adja  Search this
Rothko, Mark  Search this
Egan Gallery  Search this
Stable Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Nancy Hoffman Gallery  Search this
Leo Castelli Gallery  Search this
Poindexter Gallery  Search this
Zabriskie Gallery  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Video recordings
Interviews
Motion pictures (visual works)
Sound recordings
Sketches
Diaries
Topic:
Painting -- New York (State)  Search this
Painters -- Massachusetts  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Artists' studios -- Photographs  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)13402
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)211452
AAA_collcode_tworjack2
Theme:
Diaries
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_211452
Online Media:

Zabriskie Gallery records, 1951-2010

Creator:
Zabriskie Gallery  Search this
Subject:
Archipenko, Alexander  Search this
Baizerman, Saul  Search this
Benglis, Lynda  Search this
Christenberry, William  Search this
Crawford, Ralston  Search this
Davis, Stuart  Search this
Frank, Mary  Search this
Hartley, Marsden  Search this
King, William  Search this
Lozowick, Louis  Search this
Nordfeldt, Bror Julius Olsson  Search this
Siskind, Aaron  Search this
Snelson, Kenneth  Search this
Sugarman, George  Search this
Tacha, Athena  Search this
Tworkov, Jack  Search this
Vytlacil, Vaclav  Search this
Wilmarth, Christopher  Search this
Yunkers, Adja  Search this
Zabriskie, Virginia M., 1927-1991  Search this
Stankiewicz, Richard  Search this
Galerie Zabriskie  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)10983
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)214845
AAA_collcode_zabrgall
Theme:
The Art Market
Art Gallery Records
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_214845

Arnold Friedman papers, [ca. 1910-1984]

Creator:
Friedman, Arnold, 1874-1946  Search this
Zabriskie Gallery  Search this
Subject:
Phillips, Duncan  Search this
Saint-Gaudens, Homer  Search this
Barr, Alfred H., Jr.  Search this
Osborn, Robert Chesley  Search this
Pach, Walter  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)7041
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)209174
AAA_collcode_friearno
Theme:
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_209174

Oral history interview with Richard Stankiewicz

Interviewee:
Stankiewicz, Richard, 1922-1983  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Names:
University of Albany -- Faculty  Search this
Zabriskie Gallery  Search this
Hofmann, Hans, 1880-1966  Search this
Kootz, Samuel Melvin, 1898-1982  Search this
Léger, Fernand, 1881-1955  Search this
Porter, Fairfield  Search this
Smith, David, 1906-1965  Search this
Zabriskie, Virginia M., 1927-1991  Search this
Extent:
48 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1979 June 26
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Richard Stankiewicz conducted 1979 June 26, by Robert Brown, for the Archives of American Art.
Stankiewicz speaks of his life since the Archives last interviewed him in the mid-sixties; joining the Zabriskie Gallery; the Loft Living Program and his struggles with city officials; the beginning of the respectability of modern art in America; deciding to leave New York City and move to Massachusetts; accepting a teaching position at the University of Albany; his ambivalence about teaching; his comments on photographs being shown to him of his art work over the years; how his ideas develop; how he doesn't mix his politics and art; an exhibition he did in Australia; and what he is working on right now. He recalls Hans Hofmann, Fairfield Porter, Virginia Zabriskie, Sam Kootz, David Smith, Julio Gonzales, Fernand Léger, and many others.
Biographical / Historical:
Richard Stankiewicz (1922-1983) was a sculptor and educator from Huntington, Massachusetts.
General:
Originally recorded on 1 sound tape reel. Reformatted in 2010 as 2 digital wav files. Duration is 1 hr., 30 min.
Related Materials:
The Archives of American Art also has interviews, video recordings, and the papers of Richard Stankiewicz.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives' Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Sculpture, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Sculptors -- Massachusetts -- Huntington -- Interviews  Search this
Art -- Political aspects  Search this
Politics in art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.stanki79
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-stanki79

Zabriskie Gallery records

Creator:
Zabriskie Gallery  Search this
Names:
Galerie Zabriskie  Search this
Archipenko, Alexander, 1887-1964  Search this
Baizerman, Saul, 1889-1957  Search this
Benglis, Lynda, 1941-  Search this
Christenberry, William, 1936-  Search this
Crawford, Ralston, 1906-1978  Search this
Davis, Stuart, 1892-1964  Search this
Frank, Mary, 1933-  Search this
Hartley, Marsden, 1877-1943  Search this
King, William, 1925-2015  Search this
Lozowick, Louis, 1892-1973  Search this
Nordfeldt, Bror Julius Olsson, 1878-1955  Search this
Siskind, Aaron  Search this
Snelson, Kenneth, 1927-2016  Search this
Stankiewicz, Richard, 1922-1983  Search this
Sugarman, George, 1912-1999  Search this
Tacha, Athena, 1936-  Search this
Tworkov, Jack  Search this
Vytlacil, Vaclav, 1892-1984  Search this
Wilmarth, Christopher  Search this
Yunkers, Adja, 1900-1983  Search this
Zabriskie, Virginia M., 1927-1991  Search this
Extent:
120.7 Linear feet
2 Items (rolled docs)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1951-2010
Scope and Contents:
Records of the New York and Paris locations of Zabriskie Gallery, including artist and subject files, financial records, and business records.
Artist files contain correspondence with artists, galleries and collectors, photographs of artists and their work, inventories, resumes, exhibition catalogs, press releases, and clippings. Artists include Ansel Adams, Pat Adams, Alexander Archipenko, Eugen Atget, George Ault, Saul Baizerman, Lynda Benglis, Isle Bing, Nell Blaine, Claude Cahun, Harry Callahan, William Christenberry, Ralston Crawford, Imogen Cunningham, Stuart Davis, Kiki de Montparnasse, Marcel Duchamp, Arnold Friedman, Joan Fontcuberta, Mary Frank, Lee Friedlander, Marsden Hartley, Geroges Hugnet, Allan Kaprow, William King, William Klein, Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Ellen Lanyon, Louis Lozowick, Man Ray, Elie Nadelman, Nicholas Nixon, B.J.O. Nordfeldt, Alfonso Ossorio,Albert Renger-Patzch, Jorge Ribalta,Theodore Roszak, Tomoko Sawada, Aaron Siskind, Kenneth Snelson, Ralph Steiner, Richard Stankiewicz, Alfred Stieglitz, George Sugarman, Athena Tacha, Dorothea Tanning, Jack Tworkov, Junko Uoda, Vaclav Vytlacil, Abraham Walkowotz, Christopher Wilmarth, Adja Yunkers and William Zorach, among others.
Gallery correspondence is between the Paris and New York galleries and with artists, dealers, clients, and other galleries. Financial records includes artists account statements, administrative files, Zabriskie transaction records, sales books, and price lists. Also included are signed guest books, floor plans, and inventory cards.
Also found are blueprints and line drawings by Richard Stankiewicz, with copies of designs and information relating to Stankiewicz's sculpture and studio building (0.2 linear ft.).
Biographical / Historical:
Art gallery, New York City and Paris (Galerie Zabriskie) owned by Virginia Zabriskie. The New York gallery opened in 1954; Galerie Zabriskie in Paris officially opened in January 1977, but work began there the previous year and closed in 1998.
Provenance:
Donated by Virginia Zabriskie, 1992-2011.
Restrictions:
Use requires an appointment.
Occupation:
Artists -- United States  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State) -- New York
Art galleries, Commercial -- France -- Paris
Identifier:
AAA.zabrgall
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-zabrgall

Naomi Savage Papers on Man Ray

Creator:
Savage, Naomi, 1927-2005  Search this
Names:
Galerie Anderson-Mayer  Search this
La Boetie, Inc.  Search this
Philadelphia Museum of Art  Search this
Prakapas Gallery  Search this
Ronny Van de Velde (Gallery : Antwerp, Belgium)  Search this
Serpentine Gallery  Search this
Vered Gallery  Search this
Zabriskie Gallery  Search this
Duchamp, Alexina, 1906-1995  Search this
Duchamp, Marcel, 1887-1968 -- Photographs  Search this
Greenbaum, Theodora S.  Search this
Hunter, Sam, 1923-  Search this
Kimmel, Roberta  Search this
Man Ray, Juliet, d. 1991  Search this
Noguchi, Isamu, 1904-1988  Search this
Ray, Man, 1890-1976  Search this
Savage, Naomi, 1927-2005  Search this
Serger, Helen  Search this
Extent:
1.6 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Date:
1913-2005
Summary:
The Naomi Savage papers on Man Ray measure 1.6 linear feet and date from 1913-2005. The collection provides an overview of Man Ray's career as a photographer and painter through correspondence, exhibition files, writings, notes, artwork, printed material, and photographs.
Scope and Content Note:
The Naomi Savage papers on Man Ray measure 1.6 linear feet and date from 1913-2005. The collection provides an overview of Man Ray's career as a photographer and painter through correspondence, exhibition files, writings, notes, artwork, printed material, and photographs.

Correspondence primarily consists of incoming letters from art historians, students, publishers, museums, and galleries interested in obtaining biographical information, scheduling exhibitions, or seeking permission to reproduce artwork. Correspondents include Theodora Greenbaum, Sam Hunter, and Roberta Kimmel. Also found is a letter to Man Ray from Isamu Noguchi.

Exhibition files document some of Man Ray's solo and group exhibitions held at museums and galleries in the United States and abroad, including Galerie Anderson Mayer, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Prakapas Gallery, Helen Serger, La Boetie, Inc., Ronny Van De Velde Gallery, Serpentine Gallery, Vered Gallery, and Zabriskie Gallery.

Writings and notes include typescripts of unpublished pieces on Man Ray and Surrealist photography and on Juliet Man Ray, miscellaneous writings, and Naomi Savage's list of Man Ray published work. Artwork consists of an artist's proof of a print by Paul Levitt.

Printed material houses news and periodical clippings on Man Ray and Juliet Man Ray, newsletters, reproductions of artwork, and miscellaneous printed material. Clippings provide documentation on Man Ray's early commercial photography for advertisements and fashion magazines as well as his experimental photographic work.

Photographs include portrait photographs of Man Ray and Juliet Man Ray. There are photographs of Man Ray and Juliet with family, friends, and colleagues, including photographs of Marcel Duchamp and Teeny Duchamp.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 6 series:

Series 1: Naomi Savage Correspondence, 1939-1995 (Box 1; 0.1 linear feet)

Series 2: Man Ray Exhibition Files, 1941-1997 (Box 1, OV 4; 0.8 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, 1974-1998 (Box 1, OV 4; 0.1 linear feet)

Series 4: Artwork, circa 1963 (Box 1; 1 folder)

Series 5: Printed Material, circa 1913-1998 (Boxes 1, 3; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 6: Photographs, 1913-1991 (Boxes 1-3; 0.4 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Photographer Naomi Siegler Savage (1927-2007) lived and worked in Princeton, New Jersey. While a teenager, Savage attended a photography class taught by Berenice Abbott and pursued this interest at Bennington College in Vermont. In California, Savage apprenticed with her uncle Man Ray, who was a close friend as well as mentor to his niece.

Influenced by Man Ray's experimental techniques with film, Naomi Savage pioneered the use of the photographic metal plate which produced a three dimensional form with a metallic surface. One of her best-known photographic engravings is a magnesium mural for the Johnson Library and Museum in Austin, Texas, depicting the national elective offices held by President Johnson and the various Presidents under which he served. In later years, Savage continued to experiment with the photographic process by using digital cameras, color photocopiers, and computer imaging.

In 1952, Savage had her first exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. In addition to the Museum of Modern Art, Savage's work is also in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, the Fogg Museum at Harvard University, the International Center of Photography in New York, and the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, Massachusetts.

Naomi Savage was married to the painter, sculptor, and architect, David Savage. Naomi Savage died in Princeton, New Jersey in 2007.

Man Ray (1890-1976) lived and worked in New York and Paris, France and was best known for his painting and photography.

Man Ray was born Emmanuel Radnitsky in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1890. His family later moved to Brooklyn, New York. During this period, the family changed their name to Ray and Emmanuel shortened his first name to Man, gradually using Man Ray as his combined single name. Man Ray attended Boys High School from 1904-1908 where he developed an interest in painting. After high school, he worked as a commercial artist and technical illustrator in New York City while attending classes at the Art Students League, Ferrer School, and National Academy of Design.

Influenced by European artists, whose Modernist works were being shown at the 1913 Armory Show and Alfred Stieglitz's "292" Gallery, and other such venues, Man Ray began to incorporate elements of Cubism in his paintings and drawings. In 1915, Man Ray met Marcel Duchamp (1887-1968) and they formed a lifelong friendship and professional partnership. That same year, the Dada group, founded by a Tristan Tzara and other artists in Zurich, Switzerland also took root in New York; Man Ray, Marcel Duchamp and Francis Picabia were credited for starting the New York Dada movement.

By 1921, Man Ray moved to Paris and became part of the circle that formed the Dada group. He photographed many of the Dada poets and writers, including Louis Aragon, André Breton, and Paul Eluard. Man Ray's work for André Breton established his reputation as a portrait photographer of artists, writers, and other prominent individuals, including George Antheil, Salvador Dalí, James Joyce, Sinclair Lewis, Gertrude Stein, and Virginia Woolf. In that same period, Man Ray pioneered the photographic process of rayographs (named after him) and he also participated in the first Surrealist exhibition at the Galerie Pierre.

Man Ray moved to Los Angeles, California in 1940. There he met New York City-born Juliet Browner (1910-1991), a trained dancer and professional artists' model. They married in 1946 in a double wedding ceremony with their friends Max Ernst and Dorothea Tanning. In 1951, Man Ray and Juliet Man Ray returned to live in the Montparnasse section of Paris.

In addition to an autobiography, Self-Portrait, published in 1963, Man Ray wrote a number of monographs and articles on photography that included Electricité, a portfolio of ten gravure prints of rayographs commissioned by the Paris electric company, Compagnie Parisenne de Distribution d'Electricité, 1931.

Man Ray received an honorary Master of Fine Arts degree from Freemont University, Los Angeles, 1948 and the gold medal for photography at the Venice Photo Biennale, 1962. In 1967, Man Ray received an award from the Philadelphia Arts Festival honoring its native son for his accomplishments.

Man Ray died in Paris in 1976. Juliet Man Ray survived her husband and continued to live in Paris until her death in 1991.
Provenance:
The Naomi Savage papers were donated in 2007 by Lourie Savage Bates, Naomi Savage's daughter. Naomi Savage was Man Ray's niece.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use of original papers requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Naomi Savage papers on Man Ray are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Painters -- France -- Paris  Search this
Photography  Search this
Surrealism  Search this
Photographers -- France -- Paris  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Photographers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Naomi Savage papers on Man Ray, 1913-2005. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.savanaom
See more items in:
Naomi Savage Papers on Man Ray
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-savanaom

Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records

Creator:
Robert Schoelkopf Gallery  Search this
Names:
Zabriskie Gallery  Search this
Andrejevic, Milet, 1925-  Search this
Aponovich, James, 1948-  Search this
Bailey, William, 1930-  Search this
Bell, Leland  Search this
Brassaï, 1899-  Search this
Cameron, Julia Margaret Pattle, 1815-1879  Search this
Cartier-Bresson, Henri, 1908-  Search this
Cornell, Joseph  Search this
Dawson, Manierre, 1887-1969  Search this
Driggs, Elsie, 1898-1992  Search this
Erlebacher, Martha Mayer  Search this
Evans, Walker, 1903-1975  Search this
Fiske, Gertrude, 1878-1961  Search this
Freund, Gisèle  Search this
Horton, William S., 1865-1936  Search this
Ito, Miyoko, 1918-1983  Search this
Lachaise, Gaston, 1882-1935  Search this
Laderman, Gabriel, 1929-  Search this
Ligare, David  Search this
Matthiasdottir, Louisa  Search this
Matulka, Jan, 1890-1972  Search this
Myers, Ethel  Search this
Nadelman, Elie, 1882-1946  Search this
Schoelkopf, Robert J., 1927-1991  Search this
Stella, Joseph, 1877-1946  Search this
Storrs, John Henry Bradley, 1885-1956  Search this
Wiesenfeld, Paul  Search this
Extent:
29 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gallery records
Illustrated letters
Photographs
Date:
1851-1991
bulk 1962-1991
Summary:
The collection comprises 29 linear feet of records that document the day-to-day administration of the Robert Schoelkopf Gallery from 1962 to 1991, with additional items predating the founding of the gallery from 1851 to 1961. The collection records artist and client relations, exhibitions, and daily business transactions through artist files, correspondence, printed matter, and photographic material.
Scope and Content Note:
The records of the Robert Schoelkopf Gallery comprise 29 linear feet of material from 1851 to 1991, with some items predating the founding of the gallery. The bulk of the records date from 1962 to 1991, providing researchers with fairly comprehensive coverage of the gallery's development and operations from its inception in 1962 until its closure in 1991. Items dated prior to 1962 relate principally to the period of transition during which Robert Schoelkopf ended his partnership with the Zabriskie Gallery and established his own business. There are also some items relating to artists of the nineteenth and early twentieth century.

The collection consists primarily of artist files documenting relations with contemporary artists, representation of deceased artists, and other works of art handled by the gallery. It also chronicles the gallery's exhibition schedule and the day-to-day administration of the business. The types of material that can be found here include correspondence, exhibition inventories, price lists, accounting and consignment records, shipping and insurance records, printed material, and photographs.

The collection is a valuable source of information on twentieth-century American art history, focusing primarily on early-twentieth-century modernists as well as an important group of American realist painters and sculptors from the latter half of the century. The collection illuminates, in detail, the developing market for these schools and, in the case of the latter group, provides personal insights from artists on the realist perspective.

The records also document the Robert Schoelkopf Gallery's significant contribution to the resurgence of interest in fine art photography during the 1960s and 1970s as reflected in an increase in the value of works by important American photographers such as Walker Evans.

Much of the outgoing correspondence from the gallery consists of copies of letters written by Robert Schoelkopf, with additional business being handled by assistant staff and, from the mid-1970s, Schoelkopf's wife, Laura Jane Schoelkopf. The records offer insight into the personalities of the Schoelkopfs and how their congenial and candid management style influenced their relationships with the contemporary artists they represented.
Arrangement:
Originally the collection was organized as one large file arranged alphabetically by folder title, with titles ranging from names of artists to general subject headings such as "Correspondence." During processing it became clear that the gallery delineated operations into three main functions: artist relations, client-dealer relations, and exhibitions. Consequently the collection is arranged as three main series based on these areas of concern. A small group of miscellaneous photographs of artists constitutes an additional series at the end of the collection.

Originally paper records throughout the collection were generally arranged chronologically, although this order was not strictly adhered to. Frequently, correspondence and memoranda were attached to related records going back several years. To preserve the relationship between such documents, records stapled together in this way have been left together. They are arranged in reverse chronological order and filed in the folder corresponding to the primary date (i.e., the date of the first and most recent paper in the group). Researchers should be aware that date ranges provided on folders refer to the primary dates of documents contained therein and that some items in the folder may predate that range. Otherwise, the general chronological scheme has been retained throughout the collection, with undated material placed at the beginning of the appropriate file.

Printed material is arranged in chronological order, with undated material at the beginning of the folder, and may include press releases, exhibition announcements, exhibition catalogs, posters, clippings from newspapers, magazines, and journals, and other publicity material. Large amounts of printed material are broken down into several discrete folder units.

The most consistent labeling system for photographic material apparent throughout the collection was title of work of art. The majority of images are not dated with a printing date or the date that the work of art was produced, and although many of them have a processing number, these are by no means consistent and there are no master lists that can be used to interpret them. Consequently, images are arranged primarily by media type and then alphabetically by title. Untitled images are placed at the beginning of a media group; "the" in a title is ignored. Exceptions to this method are addressed in the appropriate series descriptions.

Files labeled "Photographs of Works of Art" will typically include any or all of the following: black-and-white copy prints, black-and-white transparencies, color transparencies, slide transparencies, Polaroid prints, color snapshots, contact sheets, and separation sheets. Often the same image will be duplicated in several different formats. Any notes on photographic material found in or on the original folder in which the material was filed have been preserved with the material or transcribed onto a sheet of acid-free paper that either encloses or is placed directly before the item to which the information applies.

The designation "General" indicates that a file may contain any or all of the types of material outlined above.

Series 1: Artist Files, 1851-1991, undated (Boxes 1-23; 23 linear ft.)

Series 2: General Business Files, 1960-1991, undated (Boxes 24-28; 4.74 linear ft.)

Series 3: Group Exhibition Files, 1960-1988, undated (Boxes 28-29; 1 linear ft.)

Series 4: Photographs of Artists, undated (Box 29; 0.25 linear ft.)
Historical Note:
Robert Schoelkopf, Jr., was born in Queens, New York, in 1927. He graduated from Yale College in 1951 with a bachelor of arts degree and then taught briefly at his alma mater while conducting graduate research in art history. Schoelkopf began his career in commercial art in 1957 as an independent dealer of American painting and sculpture and became a member of the Art Dealers Association of America in 1958. In 1959 he formed a partnership with Virginia Zabriskie, of the Zabriskie Gallery in New York, which lasted until 1962. The gallery exhibited late-nineteenth and early-twentieth-century American painting, together with contemporary painting of a somewhat conservative style.

In 1962 Schoelkopf signed a three-year lease for the fourth floor of a building at 825 Madison Avenue in New York, where he opened the Robert Schoelkopf Gallery. From the outset, Schoelkopf aimed to specialize in American painting of the nineteenth and twentieth century and sculpture of all schools. He predicted a burgeoning market for the Hudson River School in particular, believing that American painting was increasingly perceived as being worthy of serious attention. In a letter dated January 3, 1963, Schoelkopf congratulated John Spencer for his decision to collect nineteenth-century American paintings for the Allen Memorial Art Museum at Oberlin College, assuring him that "progressive chauvanism [ sic] will operate to elevate prices in American painting. Every year more colleges teach Art History, and soon they shall have reached the level of sophistication and development where they will be obliged (for face) to offer tuition in specifically American art - hitherto neglected of academicians.... I and many other dealers have plans for exhibitions of nineteenth-century American painting, especially the Hudson River School."

Schoelkopf's instincts regarding the Hudson River School were undoubtedly correct, and consequently nineteenth-century American painters formed a permanent mainstay of his inventory. He is perhaps remembered more, however, for his dedication to reviving interest in lesser-known American painters from the turn-of-the-century who were impressionist or modernist in style. Schoelkopf developed something of a reputation for unearthing forgotten talent that, while sometimes mediocre or inconsistent, was occasionally exceptional and certainly worthy of note. He was committed to reinstalling Joseph Stella in the pantheon of major American artists, representing Stella's estate from 1963 to 1971 and holding regular exhibitions of the artist's work from 1962 on. In 1969 the gallery held the first New York exhibition of the paintings of Manierre Dawson, who was subsequently acclaimed by the critics for his important and innovative contributions to modernism. In 1970 Schoelkopf began showing the work of Jan Matulka, an artist whose work had been neglected since the 1930s, and his enthusiastic representation of the Matulka estate paved the way for a retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1979.

Schoelkopf's interest in turn-of-the-century artists also extended to sculptors such as John Flannagan, Ethel Myers, Elie Nadelman, and John Henry Bradley Storrs, and he directed considerable energy to furthering Gaston Lachaise's reputation as an artist of major stature. When Lachaise died at the peak of his career in 1935, his estate was left to his wife, Isabel, and in 1957 to Isabel's son, Edward. When Edward died shortly thereafter, John B. Pierce, Jr., a nephew of Isabel Lachaise, was appointed trustee of the estate and formed the Lachaise Foundation. In 1962 Pierce entered an agreement with Robert Schoelkopf and Felix Landau to represent Lachaise's sculpture on the East and West Coasts, respectively. In this capacity Schoelkopf helped to launch a major retrospective of the artist's work at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1964 and a traveling exhibition that began circulating in 1967.

The gallery's other major commitment was to painting and sculpture by contemporary American realists, many of whom worked in a figurative style and explored elements of allegory and classical mythology in their work, presenting landscapes, still lifes, and portraits from a realist perspective. The bulk of the gallery's exhibitions were, in fact, of work by contemporary artists, including metaphysical still-life painter William Bailey, colorist Leland Bell, figurative painter Martha Mayer Erlebacher, landscape and narrative painter Gabriel Laderman, and Icelandic artist Louisa Matthiasdottir. William Bailey was one of the gallery's most commercially successful artists, and his first one-person exhibition in New York was held there in 1968. Demand for Bailey's paintings often far exceeded his output, and by the late 1970s Schoelkopf invariably sold out his exhibitions and had compiled a lengthy waiting list for his work.

In its early years the Robert Schoelkopf Gallery contributed considerably to the development of interest in fine art photography that fostered an increasingly lucrative market for photographic prints during the 1960s and 1970s. In 1965 Schoelkopf began incorporating photography into the gallery's exhibition schedule and, in the spring of 1974, opened a gallery dedicated to photography on the second floor at 825 Madison Avenue. Between 1965 and 1979 Schoelkopf's was the only serious New York gallery dealing in painting and sculpture that also regularly exhibited photography as fine art. His interests lay primarily in antiquarian photography and the work of nineteenth-century and twentieth-century masters including Eugéne Atget, Mathew Brady, James Robertson, and Carleton Watkins. Schoelkopf organized shows examining specific photographic processes, the photogravure and the cyanotype, and presented surveys of genres such as portrait and landscape photography. In 1967 he held the first exhibition in many years of the work of Julia Margaret Cameron, an important figure in the history of Victorian photography, timing it to coincide with a show at the Metropolitan Museum of Art that focused on Cameron as one of four Victorian photographers.

Schoelkopf also handled the work of several influential contemporaries, most notably Brassaï, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Walker Evans, and Gisèle Freund. The gallery held Freund's first exhibition in the United States in 1975 and was, for a time, the only place in New York where one could see and purchase prints by Cartier-Bresson. Schoelkopf began exhibiting Evans's work in 1966 and regularly thereafter, including a 1971 exhibition that coincided with a major retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art.

In the fall of 1976 the second-floor gallery space was turned over to Marcuse (Cusie) Pfeifer, then the gallery's director, who planned to use it to show the work of young photographers in a gallery under her own name. Schoelkopf continued to hold several photography exhibitions a year in the fourth-floor gallery but decided to concentrate primarily on nineteenth-century masters.

In March 1971 a fire in the building at Madison Avenue resulted in substantial water damage to the gallery space. Although very little of the inventory was destroyed, the incident forced Schoelkopf to close until September. This temporary loss of revenue compounded with a nationwide recession cut into Schoelkopf's financial resources and left him questioning his commission policy and his level of commitment to contemporary work in all media. A letter to artist Adolph Rosenblatt dated May 3, 1971, records how Schoelkopf had become increasingly disenchanted with "all contemporary work" and would begin taking 40 percent commission on sales, instead of 33.3 percent. "Beside the matter of enthusiasm is the matter of economics," Schoelkopf remarked, "and the last year and a half have been really dreadful for the art business."

This difficult period was followed immediately by more prosperous times. January 1973 proved to be the gallery's most successful month to date, encouraging Schoelkopf to purchase a house in Chappaqua, New York, later that year. In November 1974 Schoelkopf wrote to Anthony D'Offay that business "is as slow as it has ever been, but what sales we make are big ones" and revealed that auctions had, at that point, become his primary avenue for trade.

Around 1975 Schoelkopf's wife of eleven years, Laura Jane Schoelkopf, began working in the gallery. Although seemingly dubious of the work at first, she became a considerable asset to the business and reputedly complemented her husband's relationship with the gallery's contemporary artists through her warmth and hospitality, qualities often noted by artists who corresponded regularly with the couple.

The financial instability that characterized the 1970s undoubtedly influenced Schoelkopf's decision to cease exhibiting photography in 1979. By 1978 however, his investment in early-twentieth-century art appeared to be paying off. Jan Matulka, Joseph Stella, and John Henry Bradley Storrs had all been represented in exhibitions at major museums, and sales of their work had increased considerably. Gaston Lachaise's reputation continued to grow, and the traveling exhibition still circulated, garnering far more interest than had originally been anticipated.

Although contemporary artists continued to take up the largest portion of the gallery's changing exhibitions, Schoelkopf's interest in contemporary work was growing more conservative, tending toward a narrower focus on the narrative and allegorical. By 1979 he no longer exhibited contemporary sculpture, admitting to a lack of enthusiasm for the work of any of the current figurative sculptors and a dislike of all contemporary abstract work. In a letter to Lillian Delevoryas, dated March 17, 1982, he confessed, "With age has come a hardening of the aesthetic arteries perhaps. What we have been showing is realism, but getting tighter all the time."

In April 1984 the gallery was moved to 50 West Fifty-seventh Street, and, during the years that followed, the Schoelkopfs pared down the number of contemporary artists they represented, handling only those to whom they felt most strongly committed while continuing to specialize in nineteenth-century and early-twentieth-century American painting and sculpture. As the gallery approached its thirtieth anniversary, Schoelkopf's achievements were considerable. He had operated a successful New York gallery for almost three decades, rejuvenated the reputations of several important American artists, and was respected by artists and clients alike for the integrity, intelligence, and humor with which he conducted his business affairs. In 1987 he had been appointed to the board of trustees of the Williamstown Regional Art Conservation Laboratory. By this time he was also a member of the advisory board to the National Academy of Design, and in 1988 he became a co-trustee of the Joseph and Robert Cornell Memorial Foundation.

In March 1990, Robert Schoelkopf was diagnosed with leukemia and underwent a regimen of cancer treatment that resulted in a brief remission by the summer. Schoelkopf returned to work temporarily, but by 1991 his condition had worsened and he died in April of that year. Having known for some time that her husband's prognosis was poor, Laura Jane Schoelkopf had apparently decided that she would not continue the gallery in the event of his death. With the help of the youngest of their two sons, Andrew, she settled final accounts and assisted the gallery's contemporary artists in finding representation elsewhere before closing the business in August 1991.
Provenance:
Twenty-seven linear feet of records were donated to the Archives of American Art by Laura Jane Schoelkopf, Robert Schoelkopf's widow, and the Coe Kerr Gallery in 1991 and 1992. An additional gift of 3.4 linear feet was donated by Laura Jane Schoelkopf in 1996. The collection was reduced slightly during processing.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Art, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Photography, Artistic  Search this
Realism in art  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Gallery records
Illustrated letters
Photographs
Citation:
Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records, 1851-1991, bulk 1962-1991. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.robeschg
See more items in:
Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-robeschg
Online Media:

Arnold Friedman papers

Creator:
Friedman, Arnold, 1874-1946  Search this
Zabriskie Gallery  Search this
Names:
Barr, Alfred H., Jr., 1902-1981  Search this
Osborn, Robert Chesley, 1904-1994  Search this
Pach, Walter, 1883-1958  Search this
Phillips, Duncan, 1886-1966  Search this
Saint-Gaudens, Homer, b. 1880  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet ((177 items))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
[ca. 1910-1984]
Scope and Contents:
Letters, undated and 1933-1946, from Albany Institute of History and Art, Art Institute of Chicago, Alfred Barr, Cincinnati Art Museum, Robert W. Leeds, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Robert C. Osborn, Duncan Phillips, Homer Saint-Gaudens, Edward B. Rowan and Edward Bruce, Treasury Section of Fine Arts, and others.
Also includes a citation, 1945, for meritorious service rendered in the U.S. Treasury Department's Seventh War Loan; letters to Friedman's widow, Renee, 1946-1949 and 1961, from Walter Pach, Robert C. Osborn, and others; a photocopy of the decision of the Appellate Division of the New York Supreme Court regarding the ownership of 305 works by Friedman, 1977; exhibition catalogs and announcements, undated and ca. 1925-1983; clippings, press releases and Zabriskie Gallery newsletters, 1940-1984; photographs of Friedman, his family and friends, undated and ca. 1910-1913; and miscellany.
Biographical / Historical:
Painter; New York, N.Y. Birthdate also given as 1872, 1879, and 1882.
Provenance:
Donated 1984 by Elizabeth Friedman, daughter of Arnold Friedman.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.friearno
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-friearno

Lawrence Fane papers

Creator:
Fane, Lawrence, 1933-2008  Search this
Names:
Bill Bace Gallery  Search this
Grounds for Sculpture  Search this
Kouros Gallery  Search this
Marilyn Pearl Gallery  Search this
University of Richmond Museums  Search this
Zabriskie Gallery  Search this
Extent:
0.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Date:
circa 1964-2003
Summary:
The papers of New York sculptor Lawrence Fane measure 0.4 linear feet and date from circa 1964-2003. The collection primarily documents Lawrence Fane's activities as a sculptor through biographical material; printed material, including clippings, exhibition announcements, and catalogs; and photographs of artwork.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of New York sculptor Lawrence Fane measure 0.4 linear feet and date from circa 1964-2003. The collection primarily documents Lawrence Fane's activities as a sculptor through biographical material; printed material, including clippings, exhibition announcements, and catalogs; and photographs of artwork.

Biographical material includes curriculum vitae, artist's statement, brief narrative, and a bibliography.

Printed material contains clippings, exhibition announcements and catalogs. Clippings contain mostly reviews of Lawrence Fane's work. Exhibition announcements and catalogs document many of Fane's exhibitions, including the Bill Bace Gallery, Grounds for Sculpture, Kouros Gallery, Marilyn Pearl Gallery, University of Richmond Museums, and the Zabriskie Gallery.

Photographic material houses photographs, transparencies, slides, and reproductions of Lawrence Fane's artwork.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as # series:

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1995-1998 (Box 1; folder 1)

Series 2: Printed Material, 1968-2003 (Box 1; 0.1 linear feet)

Series 3: Photographic Material, circa 1964-2003 (Box 1; 0.3 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Lawrence Fane (b. 1933) lives and works in New York and is known primarily as a sculptor.

Born in Kansas City, Missouri in 1933, Lawrence Fane moved to New York City in the mid-1960s. Fane attended Harvard University, where he received his Bachelor of Arts in 1955. He studied at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, Massachusetts from 1955-1956; during this period, he served as an apprentice to the sculptor, George Demetrios.

Lawrence Fane has used various materials in constructing his sculptures, e.g., wood, bronze, and steel. He has described his work, primarily abstract in design, as evolving from studies of the human body to the landscape and its structural relationship to the body. Fane has exhibited in numerous solo and exhibitions in the United States and abroad: Bill Bace Gallery, Brooklyn Museum, Civici Musei 3 Gallerie di Storia e Arte, Colby College Museum of Art, de Cordova Museum, Galleria II Mercato del Sale, Kouros Gallery, Marilyn Pearl Gallery, Washington Art Gallery, and Zabriskie Gallery. In 2002, the University of Richmond Museum and the Muscarelle Museum in Virginia collaborated on twenty-five year retrospective of Fane's drawings and sculptures. Over the years, Fane has participated in group invitationals at the American Academy of Arts and Letters, Greater Hartford Council, the National Academy of Design, and New England Sculpture Association and other venues. He also participated in the Whitney Biennial Exhibition as a contributor to the Mark di Suvero Peace Tower.

Further, Fane has held teaching positions at the Rhode Island School of Design, 1963-1966 and Queens City, 1996-1998. Lawrence Fane has also been a visiting critic and lecturer at many colleges and universities throughout the United States including Boston University, Duke University, and the Yale School of Architecture.

Fane's work is in a number of public collections: the Brooklyn Museum, Corcoran Gallery of Art, Marsh Art Gallery, Museum of Contemporary Art in Udine, Italy, the Rhode Island School of Design, Weatherspoon Gallery, and the University of North Carolina, among others.

Lawrence Fane was awarded the Rome Prize by the American Academy in Rome for three consecutive years from 1960 to 1962. He has also received grants from the Ingram Merrill Foundation, 1984; New York Foundation for the Arts, 1997; and the Research Foundation, City University of New York, 1994 and 1996.
Related Material:
Also found at the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Lawrence Fane conducted by Albert Boime in 1982 on microfilm reel 4909.
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Lawrence Fane to the Archives of American Art in 2003.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Lawrence Fane papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Art teachers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Lawrence Fane papers, circa 1964-2003. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.fanelawr
See more items in:
Lawrence Fane papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-fanelawr

Jack Tworkov papers

Creator:
Tworkov, Jack  Search this
Names:
Egan Gallery  Search this
Leo Castelli Gallery  Search this
Nancy Hoffman Gallery  Search this
Poindexter Gallery  Search this
Stable Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Zabriskie Gallery  Search this
Ashbury, John  Search this
Ashton, Dore  Search this
Bartlett, Jennifer, 1941-  Search this
Blinken, Donald M., 1925-  Search this
Calfee, William H. (William Howard), 1909-1995  Search this
Cavallon, Giorgio, 1904-1989  Search this
Cézanne, Paul, 1839-1906  Search this
Demarco, Ricky  Search this
Dickinson, Edwin Walter, 1891-1978  Search this
Forge, Andrew  Search this
Hartigan, Grace  Search this
Herzbrun, Helene  Search this
Katz, Paul  Search this
Knaths, Karl, 1891-1971  Search this
Lindeberg, Linda, 1915-1973  Search this
Matter, Herbert, 1907-1984  Search this
Newman, Arnold, 1918-2006  Search this
Newman, Michael  Search this
Osborn, Robert Chesley, 1904-1994  Search this
Ponsold, Renate  Search this
Praeger, David A.  Search this
Rothko, Mark, 1903-1970  Search this
Summerford, Joe  Search this
Thorne, Joan, 1943-  Search this
Westenberger, Theo  Search this
Wheeler, Dennis  Search this
Wise, Howard  Search this
Yunkers, Adja, 1900-1983  Search this
Extent:
9.7 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Video recordings
Interviews
Motion pictures (visual works)
Sound recordings
Sketches
Diaries
Date:
1926-1993
Summary:
The Jack Tworkov papers measure 9.7 linear feet and are dated 1926-1993. Tworkov's work as a painter and influential teacher, as well as his personal life, are documented by extensive journals and substantive correspondence that record his ideas about art and teaching, and illuminate his relationships with friends, colleagues, and students. Many sketchbooks, writings, interviews, photographs, and moving images are also included.
Scope and Content Note:
The Jack Tworkov papers measure 9.7 linear feet and are dated 1926-1993, with the bulk from the period 1931-1982. Tworkov's work as a painter and influential teacher, as well as his personal life, are documented by extensive journals and substantive correspondence that record his ideas about art and teaching, and illuminate his relationships with friends, colleagues, and students. Many sketchbooks, writings, interviews, photographs, and moving images are also included.

Biographical material includes Tworkov's citizenship certificate, awards, diplomas, a copy of Jack Tworkov: Video Portrait, produced by Electronic Arts Intermix, and a motion picture film, USA Artists: Jack Tworkov, produced by National Education Television.

Correspondence consists largely of incoming letters. It is both professional and personal in nature and often combines both spheres. Correspondents include artists Jennifer Bartlett, William H. Calfee, Giorgio Cavallon and Linda Lindeberg, Grace Hartigan, Helene Herzbrun (also named Helene McKinsey), Karl Knaths, Joe Summerford, Joan Thorne, and Adja Yunkers; cartoonist Robert C. Osborn; collectors Donald M. Blinken and David A. Praeger (who was also Tworkov's lawyer); illustrator Roger Dovoisin; critics Dore Ashton and Andrew Forge; critic and poet John Ashbury; galleries that represented Tworkov: Egan Gallery, Leo Castelli, Nancy Hoffman Gallery, Poindexter Gallery, Stable Gallery and Zabriskie Gallery; and many museums, arts organizations, colleges and universities.

Interviews with Tworkov include one with Ricky Demarco videotaped in 1979 and two conducted on video by Twokov's daughter Helen in 1975. The remaining interviews are sound recordings, one conducted by Grace Alexander for the show Artists in New York in 1967, one conducted by Michael Newman in 1980, and the remainder by unidentified interviewers. None have transcripts.

All writings are by Tworkov and include poems, an artist's statement, and documentation for two children's books by Tworkov illustrated by Roger Duvoisin. Two additional notebooks contain miscellaneous notes, teaching notes, and some specific to identified courses. Lectures exist as untranscribed sound recordings.

Tworkov's journals (33 volumes) span a period of 35 years, from 1947 until 1982, with the final entry dated a few weeks before his death. They record his reflections on painting, his challenges as a painter, aesthetics, the role of the artist in society, Jewish identity, painters he admired (especially Cézanne and Edwin Dickinson), politics, and teaching. They also recount everyday life: the comings and goings of friends and family members, social engagements, professional activities, illness, and travel.

The lone subject file concerns Mark Rothko and includes a photograph of Rothko and the guest list for the dedication of the Rothko Chapel in Houston.

Artwork consists of a small number of sketches by Tworkov in pencil and ink. Tworkov's sketchbooks (28 volumes) contain sketches and some finished drawings. Most are in pencil, but scattered throughout are a few pencil sketches embellished with colored marker or pastel, and a small number in ink.

Photographs are of people, places and events. Most photographs are of Tworkov alone and with others including Giogio Cavallon, though most friends and students are unidentified. Of note are views of Tworkov producing a series of prints at Tamarind Institute. Also found is an informal portrait of Wally Tworkov. Events recorded include the jurying of "Exhibition Momentum" in Chicago, 1956. Among the places shown are Tworkov's studios at Black Mountain College and in Provincetown. When known, photographers are noted; among them are Paul Katz, Herbert Matter, Arnold Newman, Renate Ponsold, Theo Westenberger, Dennis Wheeler, and Howard Wise.

A separate series of audiovisual recordings was established for those recordings that could not be readily identified to be arranged in other series. They consist of three videocassettes (2 VHS and 1 miniDV).
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 11 series:

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1933-1981 (Boxes 1, 9, 11, FC 13; 0.7 linear ft.)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1926-1993 (Boxes 1-5; 3.8 linear ft.)

Series 3: Interviews, 1978-1982 (Boxes 5, 9-10; 1 linear ft.)

Series 4: Writings, Notes, and Lectures, 1955-1982 (Boxes 5, 9; 0.5 linear ft.)

Series 5: Journals, 1947-1982 (Boxes 5-7; 2.0 linear ft.)

Series 6: Subject File, 1961-1977 (Box 7; 1 folder)

Series 7: Printed Material, 1952-1981 (Box 7, OV 12; 0.1 linear ft.)

Series 8: Artwork, circa 1950s-1960s (Box 7: 3 folders)

Series 9: Sketchbooks, circa 1950s-1960s (Boxes 7-8, 11; 1.0 linear ft.)

Series 10: Photographic Materials, 1941-1981 (Boxes 8-9; 0.5 linear ft.)

Series 11: Audiovisual Recordings, 1961-1975 (Box 9; 0.1 linear ft.)
Biographical Note:
New York School painter Jack Tworkov (1900-1982), best known for his Abstract Expressionist paintings and as a highly regarded teacher, lived and worked in New York City and Provincetown, MA.

At age 13, Tworkov (born Yakov Tworkovsky) emigrated from Poland with his mother and sister to join his father already in the United States. In America, they chose to use the name of distant relatives, the Bernsteins, who were their sponsors. Eventually, Jack and his sister, Janice, reclaimed and shortened their name to Tworkov; later, she adopted the name of their hometown in Poland and became the painter Janice Biala.

As a high school student in New York City, Tworkov attended drawing classes. After graduating from Columbia University, where he had been an English major and considered becoming a writer, Tworkov instead turned to art. He studied with Ivan Olinsky at the National Academy of Design between 1923 and 1925, and from 1925 to 1926 attended painting classes taught by Guy Péne Du Bois and Boardman Robinson at the Art Students League. During his college years, Tworkov began visiting museums and became a great admirer of Cézanne. Tworkov's early paintings - still life, landscapes, and portraits - showed the influence of European modernism and Cézanne.

Tworkov spent his first summer in Provincetown while still a student and subsequently returned to study with Ross Moffet. In Provincetown he met and was greatly influenced by Karl Knaths and developed a lifelong friendship with Edwin Dickinson. By 1929, Tworkov was painting there year round. Over the years, Tworkov and his family continued to return for long stretches, and in 1958 he purchased a house in Provincetown.

During the Great Depression, Tworkov participated in the Treasury Department's Public Works of Art Project until 1934, and then moved to the easel division of the WPA Federal Art Project. He felt uncomfortable with the growing ideological and political influences on art and found it depressing to paint for the WPA rather than for himself, so he left the WPA in 1941. Tworkov, who had studied mechanical drawing while in high school, spent most of the War years employed as a tool designer and draftsman at an engineering firm with government contracts.

By the 1940s, Tworkov was painting in the Abstract Expressionist style. Between 1948 and 1953, he leased a studio on Fourth Avenue that adjoined that of his friend Willem de Kooning. During this time, they mutually influenced each other as they developed into mature Abstract Expressionists. At Yale in the 1960s, Tworkov became close friends with fellow student Josef Albers. Alber's influence on Tworkov resulted in a turn to geometric compositions of small, systematic, and repetitive strokes defined by a grid. He experimented with diagonal compositions, and later geometric work that featured large areas of color and soft texture.

Tworkov's first teaching experience was during 1930-1931 when he served as a part-time painting instructor at the Ethical Culture Fieldston School. His teaching career began in earnest when he joined the faculties of Queens College, 1948-1955, and Pratt Institute, 1955-1958. During the summers he taught at various schools, most notably Black Mountain College's 1952 summer session. Tworkov was a visiting artist at the Yale University School of Art and Architecture, 1961-1963, and became chairman of its Art Department from 1963 until his retirement in 1969. In retirement he lived in Provincetown and was a visiting artist for both short and extended periods at various universities and art schools.

An avid reader of literature and poetry, Tworkov also wrote poems and essays. He published essays in It Is, Art Digest, and Art In America; his most notable piece, "The Wandering Soutine," appeared in Art News, November 1950. Tworkov also kept a journal for 35 years (1947-1982) that recorded his thoughts on a wide range of subjects concerning professional, personal, and philosophical issues, as well as details of everyday life.

Tworkov was among the founders of the Artists' Club or The Club in 1949, and for a decade actively participated in the stimulating discussions for which the group was known. In 1968 he helped to establish the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown. Its residency program enabled younger artists and writers to advance their careers and kept Provincetown's historic artists' colony active year round.

He was the recipient of the William A. Clark Award and Corcoran Gold Medal from the Corcoran Gallery of Art, 1963; Skowhegan School of Art's Painter of the Year Award, 1974; and Distinguished Teaching of Art Award from College Art Association, 1976. Tworkov was appointed to serve on the Massachusetts Art Commission, 1970-1971, and in 1981 was named a Fellow of The Cleveland Museum of Art and of the Rhode Island School of Design.

Following his second divorce in 1935, Rachel (Wally) Wolodarsky became Tworkov's third wife and their marriage endured. They had two daughters. Hermine Ford (b. 1939) is an artist married to fellow painter Robert Moskowitz. Helen Tworkov (b. 1943) is the founder of Tricycle: The Buddhist Review and the author of a book about yoga.

Tworkov remained physically and intellectually active after a diagnosis of bone cancer around 1980, and continued to paint until shortly before his death in Provincetown on September 4, 1982.
Related Material:
Among the holdings of the Archives of American Art are two oral history interviews with Jack Tworkov, one conducted by Dorothy Seckler, Aug. 17, 1962, and another by Gerald Silk, May 22, 1981. There is also a small collection of three letters written by Jack Tworkov to friend Troy-Jjohn Bramberger.
Separated Material:
The Archives of American Art also holds material lent for microfilming (reel N70-38 and 62) including writings by Tworkov, notebooks, notes for teaching and talks, notes on art and miscellaneous subjects, poems, artist's statements, biographical data, the transcript of a 1970 interview with Tworkov conducted by Phyllis Tuchman, and a few letters and drafts of letters, 1950-1963. Loaned materials were returned to the lender and are not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
Jack Tworkov lent the Archives of American Art papers for microfilming in 1970-1971. Jack Tworkov's daughters, Hermine Ford and Helen Tworkov, donated the rest of the collection in 2009, which included some of the material from the original loan.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Jack Tworkov papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Painting -- New York (State)  Search this
Painters -- Massachusetts  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Artists' studios -- Photographs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Video recordings
Interviews
Motion pictures (visual works)
Sound recordings
Sketches
Diaries
Citation:
Jack Tworkov papers, 1926-1993. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.tworjack2
See more items in:
Jack Tworkov papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-tworjack2
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