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Studio thinking : the real benefits of visual arts education / Lois Hetland ... [et al.] ; foreword by David N. Perkins

Catalog Data

Author:
Hetland, Lois 1953-  Search this
Teachers College (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Physical description:
viii, 120 p. : ill ; 28 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
United States
Date:
2007
C2007
Contents:
1. Making the case for the arts : why arts education is not just a luxury -- The failure of instrumental arguments -- The framework of studio thinking -- Conclusion -- 2. Taking arts education seriously : our school-based colleagues -- The three Boston Arts Academy teachers -- Beth Balliro : painting and ceramics -- Kathleen Marsh : sculpture and drawing -- Guy Michel Telemaque : photography and design -- The two Walnut Hill teachers -- Jason Green : ceramics and ceramic sculpture -- Jim Woodside : drawing -- Conclusion --
pt. I. Studio classrooms : the how of studio teaching -- 3. Elements of studio classrooms -- Creating a studio culture -- Focusing thinking with studio assignments -- Teaching through artworks -- 4. Studio structures : three flexible teaching formats -- The demonstration-lecture -- Setting tasks : African pottery projects (example 4.1) -- Illustrating concepts : tile project (example 4.2) -- Modeling processes, approaches, and attitudes : light and boxes project (example 4.3) -- Students-at-work -- The critique -- Variations in use of the studio structures --
pt. II. Studio habits of mind : what the arts teach -- 5. Learning to develop craft : using art tools, materials, and concepts -- Teaching students to understand technique -- Teaching the theory and practice of color : inventing colors project (example 5.1) -- Teaching students to understand studio practice -- Teaching the practice of maintaining the studio : self-portraits in colored pencil project (example 5.2) -- Teaching the studio practice of keeping a portfolio : light and boxes project (5.3) -- Structuring a class to focus on both technique and studio practice -- Teaching care of the wheel and throwing technique : introducing centering on the wheel (example 5.4) -- 6. Learning to engage and persist : committing and following through -- Designing in clay : completing the tile project (example 6.1) -- Finishing the process : making puppets project (example 6.2) -- 7. Learning to envision : planning beyond seeing -- Places for an imaginary creature : inventing colors project (example 7.1) -- Designing in clay : beginning the tile project (example 7.2) -- 8. Learning to express : finding personal visions -- Drawing for feeling : figures in evocative space project (example 8.1) -- Drawing for meaning : imaginary creatures project (example 8.2) -- 9. Learning to observe : seeing beyond the ordinary -- Seeing with new eyes : using the viewfinder (example 9.1) -- Seeing the world and putting it on paper : light and boxes project (example 9.2) -- 10. Learning to reflect : thinking metacognitively -- Teaching students to question and explain -- Drawing yourself as mythical : imaginary creatures project (example 10.1) -- Building objects in relation : coil sculpture project (example 10.2) -- Teaching students to evaluate -- Drawing values in color : self-portrait in colored pencil project (example 10.3) -- 11. Learning to stretch and explore : beyond the familiar -- Introducing the medium : sketching in clay (example 11.1) -- Building form : repeating units project (example 11.2) -- 12. Learning to understand the artist's worlds : navigating domain and field -- Teaching students to understand the domain of art -- Considering representations : figures in evocative space project (example 12.1) -- Drawing inspiration from images : African pottery project (example 12.2) -- Design inspired by objects : ceramic sets project (example 12.3) -- Structuring a whole class to focus on domain : cubism project (example 12.4) -- Teaching students to understand the art community -- Exhibition : mounting the show (example 12.5) -- Creating a library of molds : coil sculpture project (example 12.6) -- Focusing on strength and form : the egg drop project (example 12.7) --
pt. III. Integrating studio structures with the studio habits of mind -- 13. Demonstration-lecture and the studio habits of mind -- Fostering particular studio habits of mind through demonstration-lectures -- Integrating studio habits of mind in the demonstration-lecture -- Teaching the theory and practice of color : inventing colors project (example 13.1) -- Design inspired by objects : ceramic sets project (example 13.2) -- 14. Students-at-work and the studio habits of mind -- Studio habits of mind are taught in clusters -- Introducing throwing : centering on the wheel project (example 14.1) -- Connecting worlds : secret ritual vessels project (example 14.2) -- Individualizing during students-at-work sessions -- Differentiating for students of various ability/experience levels : abstraction project (example 14.3) -- Individualizing for multiple agendas : hat and vest project (example 14.4) -- 15. Critique and the studio habits of mind -- Teaching studio habits of mind through critique -- Integrating studio habits of mind through critique -- Comparing works : contour drawing project (example 15.1) -- Critiquing throughout the process : figures in evocative space project (example 15.2) -- 16. Conclusion : a common language for intellectual growth -- Using the studio thinking framework in the visual arts -- Using the studio thinking framework in other arts and non-arts disciplines -- Using the studio thinking framework beyond the classroom -- Appendix A. Project examples -- Appendix B. Conducting the research
Topic:
Art--Study and teaching  Search this
Team learning approach in education  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_906554