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Viral infections and global change / edited by Sunit K. Singh

Catalog Data

Editor:
Singh, Sunit K. http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n2012188055 http://viaf.org/viaf/266359089/  Search this
Physical description:
1 online resource (xxix, 628 pages) : illustrations
Type:
Electronic resources
Electronic books
Fulltext
Internet resources
Date:
2014
Notes:
Resource on trial 5/1/20-10/30/20.
Elecresource
Contents:
Machine generated contents note: part I GENERAL ASPECTS -- 1. Climate Change and Vector-Borne Viral Diseases / Peng Bi -- 1.1. Introduction -- 1.2. Epidemiology of VVD -- 1.2.1. What are VVD? -- 1.2.2. Temporal -- spatial distribution of VVD around the world -- 1.2.3. Factors that affect the transmission -- 1.3. Association between climatic variables and emerging VVD -- 1.3.1. Dengue fever -- 1.3.2. Yellow fever -- 1.3.3. Viral encephalitis: Japanese encephalitis, Murray Valley encephalitis, and West Nile encephalitis -- 1.3.4. Ross River fever and Barmah Forest fever -- 1.3.5. Chikungunya fever -- 1.3.6. Rift Valley fever -- 1.3.7. Omsk hemorrhagic fever and Crimean -- Congo hemorrhagic fever -- 1.4. Invasion of nonzoonotic VVD to humans -- 1.5. Implications and recommendations for prevention and control -- References -- 2. Impact of Climate Change on Vector-Borne Arboviral Episystems / Jonathan F. Day -- 2.1. Introduction -- 2.2. complex factors influencing mosquito-borne arbovirus episystems -- 2.3. West Nile virus -- 2.3.1. Influence of climate on the North American WNV episystem -- 2.3.2. Effects of future changes in climate on the North American WNV episystem -- 2.4. Dengue in Florida -- 2.4.1. Did climate change play a role in the reemergence of dengue in Florida? -- 2.5. Bluetongue -- 2.5.1. Influence of climate on the European bluetongue episystem -- 2.5.2. role of climate change in the European BTV episystem -- 2.6. Conclusions -- Acknowledgement -- References -- 3. Influence of Climate Change on Mosquito Development and Blood-Feeding Patterns / William K. Reisen -- 3.1. Introduction -- 3.2. Mosquito development -- 3.2.1. Temperature -- 3.2.2. Precipitation -- 3.2.3. Effects of elevated CO2 concentration -- 3.2.4. Photoperiodic cues -- 3.3. Blood-feeding patterns -- 3.3.1. Temperature -- 3.3.2. Humidity -- 3.3.3. Cumulative impact on mosquito-borne viral infections -- References -- 4. Environmental Perturbations That Influence Arboviral Host Range: Insights Into Emergence Mechanisms / William K. Reisen -- 4.1. Introduction -- 4.2. changing environment -- 4.3. Deforestation and the epizootic emergence of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus -- 4.4. Rice, mosquitoes, pigs, and Japanese encephalitis virus -- 4.5. Culex pipiens complex, house sparrows, urbanization, and west Nile virus -- 4.6. Urbanization, global trade, and the reemergence of chikungunya virus -- 4.7. Conclusions -- References -- 5. Socio-Ecology of Viral Zoonotic Transfer / Sarah Paige -- 5.1. Introduction -- 5.2. Historical perspective -- 5.3. Human -- animal interface -- 5.4. Surveillance -- 5.5. Deforestation and fragmentation -- 5.6. Urbanization -- 5.7. Examples -- 5.7.1. Nipah virus -- 5.7.2. Hendra -- 5.7.3. Influenza -- 5.8. Conclusion -- References -- 6. Human Behavior and The Epidemiology of Viral Zoonoses / Calum N.L. Macpherson -- 6.1. Introduction -- 6.2. Societal changes and the epidemiology of viral zoonoses -- 6.2.1. human-animal relationship -- 6.2.2. Migration and population movements -- 6.2.3. Climate change and vectors -- 6.3. Viral zoonoses and human societal values -- 6.3.1. Individual and collective responsibility -- 6.4. Human behavior and the epidemiology of vector-borne viral zoonoses -- 6.4.1. Yellow fever (urban yellow fever, sylvatic or jungle yellow fever) -- 6.4.2. WNV -- 6.4.3. TBE -- 6.4.4. Encephalitides -- 6.4.5. LAC encephalitis -- 6.4.6. JE -- 6.4.7. Saint Louis encephalitis (SLE) -- 6.4.8. EEE -- 6.4.9. Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) -- 6.5. Human behavior and the epidemiology of respiratory viral zoonoses -- 6.5.1. HeV -- 6.5.2. NIV -- 6.5.3. SARS -- 6.5.4. Influenza H1N1 -- 6.5.5. Influenza H5N1 -- 6.5.6. Travel and respiratory viral zoonoses -- 6.6. Human behavior and the epidemiology of waterborne viral zoonoses -- 6.6.1. Waterborne zoonotic viruses -- 6.6.2. Epidemiology of waterborne viral zoonoses -- 6.6.3. Prevention and control -- 6.7. Human behavior and the epidemiology of wildlife-associated Viral Zoonoses -- 6.7.1. Case study: bushmeat hunting in Cameroon -- 6.7.2. Epidemiology of viral zoonoses from wildlife -- 6.8. role of human behavior in the control of viral zoonoses -- 6.8.1. Communication -- References -- 7. Global Travel, Trade, And The Spread Of Viral Infections / Douglas W. MacPherson -- 7.1. Introduction -- 7.2. Basic principles -- 7.2.1. Extension -- 7.2.2. Expression -- 7.3. overview of population mobility -- 7.4. dynamics of modern population mobility -- 7.5. Human population mobility and the spread of viruses -- 7.6. biological aspects of population mobility and the spread of viruses -- 7.7. demographic aspects of population mobility and the spread of viruses -- 7.7.1. Elements related to the volume of travel -- 7.7.2. Elements related to disparities in health practices -- 7.7.3. Situations where population mobility and travel can affect The Spread of Viruses -- 7.7.4. Humanitarian and complex emergencies -- 7.7.5. Social and economic aspects of population mobility -- 7.7.6. overview of trade -- 7.7.7. Trade and the spread of viruses -- 7.8. Potential impact of climate change -- 7.9. Conclusion -- References -- 8. Effects of Land-Use Changes and Agricultural Practices on The Emergence and Reemergence of Human Viral Diseases / Richard Coker -- 8.1. Introduction -- 8.2. Ecological and environmental changes -- 8.2.1. Deforestation -- 8.2.2. Habitat fragmentation -- 8.2.3. Structural changes in ecosystems -- 8.3. Agricultural change -- 8.3.1. Agricultural expansion -- 8.3.2. Intensification of livestock production -- 8.4. Demographic changes -- 8.4.1. Urbanization -- 8.5. Land use, disease emergence, and multifactorial causation -- 8.6. Conclusion -- References -- 9. Animal Migration and Risk of Spread of Viral Infections / John Y. Takekawa -- 9.1. Introduction -- 9.1.1. Animal migration and disease -- 9.2. Does animal migration increase risk of viral spread? -- 9.3. Examples of migratory animals and spread of viral disease -- 9.3.1. Birds -- 9.3.2. Mammals -- 9.3.3. Fish and herpetiles -- 9.4. Climate change effects on animal migration and viral zoonoses -- 9.5. Shifts in timing of migration and range extents -- 9.6. Combined effects of climate change, disease, and migration -- 9.7. Conclusions and future directions -- Acknowledgements -- References -- 10. Illegal Animal and (Bush) Meat Trade Associated Risk of Spread of Viral Infections / Bruno Chomel -- 10.1. Introduction -- 10.2. Search strategy and selection criteria -- 10.3. bushmeat trade -- 10.4. Bushmeat hunting and emerging infectious diseases -- 10.5. Risk factors and modes of transmission -- 10.5.1. Human-nonhuman primate overlap -- 10.5.2. Behavioral risks -- 10.6. Conservation and wildlife sustainability -- 10.7. Case study: The role of the bushmeat trade in the evolution of HIV -- 10.8. Illegal trade of domestic animals and exotic pets -- 10.9. Discussion and future directions -- 10.10. Prevention and control: From supply and demand to health education techniques -- 10.11. New technologies -- 10.11.1. Laboratory tools -- 10.11.2. Surveillance tools -- 10.12. Collaboration: Multidisciplinary advances and next steps -- 10.13. Conclusion -- Conflicts of interest -- References -- 11. Biological Significance of Bats as a Natural Reservoir Of Emerging Viruses / Richard A
Bowen -- 11.1. Introduction -- 11.2. Bats as exemplars of biodiversity -- 11.3. Bats are reservoir hosts for zoonotic and emerging pathogens -- 11.3.1. Lyssaviruses -- 11.3.2. Henipaviruses -- 11.3.3. Filoviruses -- 11.3.4. Coronaviruses -- 11.3.5. Arboviruses -- 11.4. Contact rate as a driver for emergence of bat-associated zoonoses -- 11.5. Potential impact of climate change on viruses transmitted by bats -- 11.6. Conclusions -- References -- 12. Role and Strategies of Surveillance Networks in Handling Emerging And Reemerging Viral Infections / Carlos Castillo-Salgado -- 12.1. Introduction -- 12.2. Global trend of viral infectious agents and diseases -- 12.3. Recognized importance of public health surveillance -- 12.3.1. Public health surveillance as essential public health functions and core competencies -- 12.4. Definition and scope of public health surveillance -- 12.5. Key functions and uses of disease surveillance -- 12.6. New expansion of surveillance by the IHR-2005 -- 12.7. Emergence of new global surveillance networks -- 12.8. Global influenza surveillance and WHO's pandemic influenza preparedness framework -- 12.9. Early warning surveillance systems -- 12.10. Innovative approaches for surveillance -- 12.11. Electronic and web-based information platforms for information reporting, sharing, and dissemination -- 12.12. Real-time and near real-time information -- 12.13. New updated statistical methods for tracking viral and infectious disease outbreaks -- 12.13.1. Use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for mapping and geo-referencing public health events and risks of national and global importance -- 12.14. Using proxy and compiled web-based information from different sources -- 12.15. Incorporation of public -- private partnerships in surveillance activities -- 12.16. Use of volunteer sentinel physicians -- 12.17. Improving guidelines and protocols for viral surveillance -- 12.18. Incorporating health situation rooms or strategic command centers for monitoring, analysis, and response in surveillance efforts
Note continued: 12.19. Challenges of viral and public health surveillance -- References -- 13. Predictive Modeling of Emerging Infections / Sheri H. Lewis -- 13.1. Introduction -- 13.2. Types of models -- 13.3. Remote sensing and its use in disease outbreak prediction -- 13.4. Approaches to modeling and their evaluation -- 13.5. Examples of prediction models -- 13.5.1. Rift Valley fever -- 13.5.2. Cholera -- 13.5.3. Dengue -- 13.6. Conclusion -- References -- 14. Developments and Challenges in Diagnostic Virology / Giorgio Palu -- 14.1. Introduction -- 14.2. Preparedness -- 14.3. Challenges in diagnosis of emerging viral infections -- 14.4. Approaches to the diagnosis of emerging viral infections -- 14.4.1. Specimen collection -- 14.4.2. Viral culture -- 14.4.3. Viral antigen detection -- 14.4.4. Molecular detection -- 14.4.5. Viral serology -- 14.4.6. Metagenomics and virus discovery -- 14.4.7. POC testing -- 14.5. Conclusions -- Acknowledgement -- References -- 15. Advances in Detecting and Responding to Threats From Bioterrorism And Emerging Viral Infections / Angela Weber -- 15.1. Introduction -- 15.2. Emerging, reemerging, and intentionally emerging diseases -- 15.3. Bioterrorism -- 15.4. Viruses as bioweapons -- 15.5. Impact of biotechnology -- 15.5.1. Mousepox virus -- 15.5.2. Influenza A -- 15.5.3. Synthetic genomes -- 15.6. Deterrence, recognition, and response -- 15.6.1. Deterrence -- 15.6.2. Laboratory Response Network -- 15.6.3. Advances in diagnostics -- 15.6.4. Point-of-care diagnostics -- 15.6.5. PCR -- 15.7. Public health surveillance -- 15.7.1. Passive surveillance -- 15.7.2. Active surveillance -- 15.7.3. Syndromic surveillance -- 15.7.4. Detection of viral infections -- 15.8. Conclusion -- References -- 16. Molecular and Evolutionary Mechanisms of Viral Emergence / Esteban Domingo -- 16.1. Introduction: Biosphere and virosphere diversities -- 16.2. Virus variation as a factor in viral emergence: a role of complexity -- 16.3. High error rates originate quasispecies swarms -- 16.4. Evolutionary mechanisms that may participate in viral disease emergence -- 16.5. Ample genetic and host range variations of fMDV: a human epidemic to be? -- 16.6. arbovirus host alternations: high exposure to environmental modifications -- 16.7. Arenaviruses: As an emerging threat -- 16.8. Conclusion -- Acknowledgement -- References -- 17. Drivers of Emergence and Sources of Future Emerging and Reemerging Viral Infections / Albert D.M.E. Osterhaus -- 17.1. Introduction -- 17.2. Prehistoric and historic unfolding of the drivers of disease emergence -- 17.2.1. Prehistory and before: Microbial adaptation and change -- 17.2.2. Prehistoric human migrations and international travel -- 17.2.3. Domestication, demographic, and behavioral changes -- 17.2.4. Human settlements and changing ecosystems -- 17.2.5. Ancient and medieval times: Commerce, warfare, poverty, and climate -- 17.2.6. Recent past and modern times: Technology and industry -- 17.3. Proximal drivers of disease emergence and sources of future emerging and reemerging viral infections -- 17.4. Further insights from the theory of island biogeography -- References -- 18. Spillover Transmission and Emergence of Viral Outbreaks in Humans / Sunit K. Singh -- 18.1. Introduction -- 18.2. Major anthropogenic factors responsible for spillover -- 18.3. Major viral factors playing a role in spillover -- 18.3.1. Reassortment -- 18.3.2. Recombination -- 18.3.3. Mutation -- 18.4. Intermediate hosts and species barriers in viral transmission -- 18.5. Conclusion -- References -- part II SPECIFIC INFECTIONS -- 19. New, Emerging, and Reemerging Respiratory Viruses / Albert D.M.E. Osterhaus -- 19.1. Introduction -- 19.1.1. History -- 19.1.2. Newly discovered human respiratory viruses that recently crossed the species barrier -- 19.2. Influenza viruses -- 19.2.1. Transmission of avian influenza to humans -- 19.2.2. Clinical manifestations -- 19.2.3. Diagnosis -- 19.2.4. Treatment, prognosis, and prevention -- 19.3. Human metapneumovirus -- 19.3.1. Epidemiology -- 19.3.2. Clinical manifestations -- 19.3.3. Diagnosis -- 19.3.4. Treatment, prognosis, and prevention -- 19.4. Human coronaviruses: SARS and non-SARS -- 19.4.1. SARS-CoV outbreak -- 19.4.2. Clinical manifestations of SARS-CoV -- 19.4.3. Diagnosis of SARS-CoV -- 19.4.4. Epidemiology of non-SARS coronaviruses -- 19.4.5. Clinical manifestations of non-SARS coronaviruses -- 19.4.6. Diagnosis of non-SARS coronaviruses -- 19.4.7. Treatment, prognosis, and prevention -- 19.5. Human bocavirus -- 19.5.1. Epidemiology -- 19.5.2. Clinical manifestations -- 19.5.3. Diagnosis -- 19.5.4. Treatment, prognosis, and prevention -- 19.6. KI and WU polyomaviruses -- 19.6.1. Epidemiology -- 19.6.2. Clinical manifestations -- 19.6.3. Diagnosis -- 19.6.4. Prognosis -- 19.7. Nipah and hendra viruses -- 19.7.1. Outbreaks -- 19.7.2. Clinical manifestations and prognosis -- 19.7.3. Diagnosis -- 19.7.4. Treatment and prevention -- 19.8. Conclusion -- 19.9. List of abbreviations -- References -- 20. Emergence of Zoonotic Orthopox Virus Infections / Shigeru Morikawa -- 20.1. Smallpox, a representative orthopoxvirus infection: The eradicated non-zoonotic orthopoxvirus -- 20.1.1. Clinical features -- 20.2. Zoonotic Orthopoxviruses -- 20.2.1. Cowpox -- 20.2.2. Monkeypox -- Acknowledgement -- References -- 21. Biological Aspects of The Interspecies Transmission of Selected Coronaviruses / Linda J. Saif -- 21.1. Introduction -- 21.2. Coronavirus classification and pathogenesis -- 21.3. Natural reservoirs and emergence of new coronaviruses -- 21.4. Alpha-, beta- and gamma coronaviruses: cross-species transmission -- 21.4.1. Alpha-coronaviruses cross-species transmission -- 21.4.2. Beta-coronaviruses cross-species transmission -- 21.4.3. Gamma-coronaviruses cross-species transmission -- 21.5. Anthropogenic factors and climate influence on coronavirus diversity and outbreaks -- 21.6. Conclusion -- References -- 22. Impact of Environmental and Social Factors on Ross River Virus Outbreaks / David O. Harley -- 22.1. Introduction -- 22.2. History of mosquito-borne epidemic polyarthritis outbreaks in australia and the pacific -- 22.3. RRV transmission cycles have a variety of ecologies -- 22.4. Typical environmental determinants of RRV activity -- 22.5. Social determinants of RRV disease activity -- 22.6. Conceptual framework for understanding the influence of environmental and social factors on RRV disease activity -- 22.6.1. Climatic and other variables: pathway a -- 22.6.2. Vertebrate host reservoirs: pathway b -- 22.6.3. Mosquito vectors: pathway c -- 22.6.4. Human behavior and the built environment: pathway d -- 22.6.5. Climatic influences on mosquitoes: pathway e -- 22.6.6. Climatic influences on housing and human behavior: pathway f -- 22.6.7. Climatic influences on immune function: pathway g -- 22.7. Climate Change and RRV -- 22.8. Conclusion -- Acknowledgement -- References -- 23. Infection Patterns and Emergence of O'Nyong-Nyong Virus / Ann M
Powers -- 23.1. Introduction -- 23.2. History of outbreaks -- 23.3. Clinical manifestations -- 23.4. Epidemiology -- 23.5. Factors affecting emergence -- 23.5.1. Etiologic agent: viral genomics and antigens encoded -- 23.5.2. Transmission parameters -- 23.5.3. Zoonotic maintenance -- 23.5.4. Environmental influences -- 23.6. Conclusion -- References -- 24. Zoonotic Hepatitis E: Animal Reservoirs, Emerging Risks, and Impact of Climate Change / Jerome Bouquet -- 24.1. Introduction -- 24.2. HEV biology and classification -- 24.3. Pathogenesis in humans -- 24.3.1. Acute hepatitis -- 24.3.2. Chronic hepatitis -- 24.3.3. Fulminant hepatitis -- 24.3.4. Neurologic disorders -- 24.4. Animal Reservoirs -- 24.4.1. HEV in pigs -- 24.4.2. Prevalence of HEV in wild animals -- 24.4.3. Prevalence of HEV in avian, rats, and rabbits -- 24.5. Zoonotic and Interspecies Transmission of HEV and HEV-like viruses -- 24.6. HEV in the environment -- 24.7. Climate change and impact on HEV exposure -- 24.8. Prevention -- 24.9. Conclusion -- Acknowledgement -- References -- 25. Impact of Climate Change on Outbreaks of Arenaviral Infections / James Christopher Clegg -- 25.1. Introduction -- 25.2. Natural history of arenaviruses -- 25.3. Predicted climate changes -- 25.4. Arenaviral diseases and climate change -- References -- 26. Emerging and Reemerging Human Bunyavirus Infections and Climate Change / A. Desiree LaBeaud -- 26.1. Introduction -- 26.2. Bunyaviridae family -- 26.2.1. Hantavirus -- 26.2.2. Nairovirus -- 26.2.3. Orthobunyavirus -- 26.2.4. Phlebovirus -- 26.3. Climate Change and Bunyaviridae: Climatic influences on transmission cycles and subsequent risk for transmission of bunyaviruses -- 26.3.1. Arboviral bunyaviruses -- 26.3.2. Non-arboviral bunyaviruses -- 26.4. Disease spread due to growing geographic distribution of competent vectors -- 26.4.1. Physical movement of vectors -- 26.4.2. Expansion of suitable range -- 26.5. Using climate as a means for outbreak prediction -- 26.5.1. Climatic influences -- 26.5.2. Risk mapping and predictions -- 26.6. Future problems -- References -- 27. Emerging Trend of Astroviruses, Enteric Adenoviruses, and Rotaviruses in Human Viral Gastroenteritis / Carl D. Kirkwood -- 27.1. Introduction -- 27.2. Emerging trends in rotaviruses
Note continued: 27.2.1. Rotavirus classification -- 27.2.2. Epidemiology of human rotaviruses -- 27.2.3. Clinical symptoms and pathogenesis -- 27.2.4. Genomic diversity of rotaviruses -- 27.2.5. Rotavirus vaccines and the impact of vaccine introduction on the burden of rotavirus disease -- 27.2.6. Globally emerging rotavirus genotypes -- 27.3. Emerging trends in enteric adenoviruses -- 27.3.1. Adenovirus classification -- 27.3.2. Epidemiology of enteric adenoviruses HAdV-F40 and HAdV-F41 -- 27.3.3. Clinical symptoms and pathogenesis -- 27.3.4. Diversity and evolution of enteric adenoviruses -- 27.3.5. Emerging human enteric adenovirus species -- 27.4. Emerging trends in astroviruses -- 27.4.1. Astrovirus classification -- 27.4.2. Epidemiology of HAstVs -- 27.4.3. Clinical symptoms and pathogenesis -- 27.4.4. Diversity and evolution of HAstVs -- 27.4.5. Emerging HAstV species -- References -- 28. Emerging Human Norovirus Infections / Stephanie M. Karst -- 28.1. Introduction -- 28.2. Norovirus epidemiology -- 28.3. Features of norovirus outbreaks -- 28.4. Clinical features of norovirus infection -- 28.5. Host Susceptibility -- 28.6. Effect of increased size of immunocompromised population -- 28.7. Effect of globalization of the food market on norovirus spread -- 28.8. Effect of climate change -- References -- 29. Emergence of Novel Viruses (Toscana, Usutu) in Population And Climate Change / Ana Vazquez -- 29.1. Introduction -- 29.2. TOSV -- 29.2.1. Virus properties and classification -- 29.2.2. Clinical picture and geographical distribution -- 29.2.3. Phylogenetic studies: distribution of genotypes -- 29.2.4. Ecology -- 29.2.5. Laboratory diagnosis -- 29.2.6. Prevention of transmission and treatment -- 29.3. USUV -- 29.3.1. Virus: properties and classification -- 29.3.2. History and geographical distribution -- 29.3.3. Ecology: vector, host, and incidental host -- 29.3.4. Pathology -- 29.3.5. Laboratory diagnosis -- 29.3.6. Phylogenetic studies -- 29.3.7. Treatment, prevention, and surveillance -- 29.4. Conclusions -- Acknowledgement -- References -- 30. Borna Disease Virus and The Search for Human Infection / Juan Carlos de la Torre -- 30.1. Introduction -- 30.2. Long-standing controversy around BDV as a human pathogen -- 30.3. negative is impossible to prove, but do we have enough evidence to stop looking? -- 30.4. Recent improvements in testing for evidence of BDV in human samples -- 30.4.1. Serology -- 30.4.2. Nucleic acid tests -- 30.5. possibilities for clinical expression of human BDV infection are myriad and almost impossible to predict -- 30.6. Epidemiology: the "new" frontier of human BDV studies? -- 30.7. Where do we go from here? -- Acknowledgement -- References -- 31. Tick-Transmitted Viruses and Climate Change / Ivo Rudolf -- 31.1. Introduction -- 31.2. Ticks in nature -- 31.3. Family Flaviviridae -- 31.3.1. Tick-borne encephalitis virus -- 31.3.2. Louping ill virus -- 31.3.3. Powassan virus -- 31.3.4. Omsk hemorrhagic fever virus -- 31.3.5. Kyasanur Forest disease virus -- 31.4. Family Bunyaviridae -- 31.4.1. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus -- 31.4.2. Henan virus -- 31.4.3. Bhanja virus -- 31.4.4. Keterah virus -- 31.5. Family Reoviridae -- 31.5.1. Colorado tick fever virus -- 31.5.2. Kemerovo virus -- 31.5.3. Tribec virus -- 31.6. Family Orthomyxoviridae -- 31.6.1. Thogoto virus -- 31.6.2. Dhori virus -- 31.7. Other tick-transmitted viruses -- 31.8. Conclusions -- Acknowledgements -- References -- 32. Tick -- Virus Interface / Marshall E. Bloom -- 32.1. Introduction -- 32.2. Viruses within the tick vector -- 32.2.1. Impact of virus infection on ticks -- 32.2.2. Impact of the tick vector on viruses -- 32.2.3. Tick immunity -- 32.2.4. Other mediators of immunity -- 32.3. Saliva-assisted transmission -- 32.4. Summary and future directions -- 32.4.1. Generation of tick cell lines -- 32.4.2. role of endosymbionts and coinfections -- 32.4.3. Tick innate immunity -- 32.4.4. Identification and characterization of viral SAT factors -- 32.4.5. Viral persistence in tick vectors -- 32.4.6. impact of climate change on tick vectors and tick-borne diseases -- Acknowledgements -- References
Summary:
A timely exploration of the impact of global change on the emergence, reemergence, and control of vector-borne and zoonotic viral infections From massively destructive ""superstorms"" to rapidly rising sea levels, the world media is abuzz with talk of the threats to civilization posed by global warming. But one hazard that is rarely discussed is the dramatic rise in the number and magnitude of tropical virus outbreaks among human populations. One need only consider recent developments, such as the spread of chikungunya across southern Europe and dengue in Singapore, Brazil, and the so.
Topic:
Virus diseases--Transmission  Search this
Virus diseases--Environmental aspects  Search this
Global warming--Health aspects  Search this
Globalization--Health aspects  Search this
Virus Diseases  Search this
HEALTH & FITNESS--Diseases--General  Search this
MEDICAL--Clinical Medicine  Search this
MEDICAL--Diseases  Search this
MEDICAL--Evidence-Based Medicine  Search this
MEDICAL--Internal Medicine  Search this
virusziekten  Search this
viral diseases  Search this
infectieziekten  Search this
infectious diseases  Search this
ziekten overgebracht door vectoren  Search this
vector-borne diseases  Search this
zoonoses  Search this
ziekteoverdracht  Search this
disease transmission  Search this
hepatitis e virus  Search this
bunyaviridae  Search this
Agricultural Virology (General)  Search this
virology  Search this
Landbouwkundige virologie (algemeen)  Search this
virologie  Search this
Call number:
RC114.5
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1134200