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Networks and trans-cultural exchange : slave trading in the South Atlantic, 1590-1867 / edited by David Richardson and Filipa Ribeiro da Silva

Catalog Data

Editor:
Richardson, David 1946-  Search this
Silva, Filipa Ribeiro da 1974-  Search this
Physical description:
xvi, 278 pages : maps ; 24 cm
Type:
Books
History
Place:
Portugal
Brazil
South Atlantic Ocean
Africa, Sub-Saharan
Date:
2015
Contents:
Introduction: The South Atlantic slave trade in historical perspective / David Richardson and Filipa Ribeiro da Silva -- Brazil's colonial economy and the Atlantic slave trade : supply and demand / Gustavo Acioli Lopes -- Private businessmen in the Angolan trade,1590s to 1780s : insurance, commerce and agency / Filipa Ribeiro da Silva -- Angola and the seventeenth-century South Atlantic slave trade / Arlinda Manuel Caldeira -- Trade networks in benguela, 1700-1850 / Mariana P. Candido -- Slave trade networks in eighteenth-century Mozambique / Jose Capela -- Trans-cultural exchange at Malemba Bay : the voyages of Fregatschip Prins Willem V, 1755 to 1771 / Stacey Sommerdyk -- Measuring short- and long-term impacts of abolitionism in the South Atlantic, 1807-1860s / Roquinaldo Ferreira
Summary:
"Studies of the South Atlantic commercial world typically focus on connections between Angola and Brazil, and specifically on the flows of enslaved Africans from Luanda and the relations between Portuguese-Brazilian traders and other agents and their local African and mulatto trading partners. While reaffirming the centrality of slaving activities and of the networks that underpinned them, this collection of new essays shows that there were major Portuguese-Brazilian slave-trading activities in the South Atlantic outside Luanda as well as the Angolan-Brazil axes upon which historians usually focus. In drawing attention to these aspects of the South Atlantic commercial world, we are reminded that this was a world of change and also one in which Portuguese-Brazilian traders were unable to sustain in the face of competition from northern European rivals the dominant position in slave trading in Atlantic Africa that they had first established in the sixteenth century"--Provided by publisher.
Topic:
Slave trade--History  Search this
Business networks--History  Search this
Social networks--History  Search this
Commerce  Search this
History  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1048380