Skip to main content Smithsonian Institution

Catalog Data

Creator:
Audubon, John James  Search this
Language:
English
Type:
Prints
Place:
North America
South America
Publication Place:
New York
Publication Date:
1854-1856
Book Title:
The quadrupeds of North America.
Caption:
Collared Peccary.
Educational Notes:
If you smell a strong musky odor and hear a sharp bark, it’s from this guy—a collared peccary. It’s also called a javelina or musk-hog because of its smell and shape. While the smell is unpleasant, it doesn’t always smell bad. The collared peccary only makes the smell and noise when it feels threatened. While its teeth look pretty scary, there is no reason to be alarmed. Collared peccaries tend to leave humans alone. They live in many areas of the Americas, including the Southwestern United States, Central America, the Amazon regions of South America, Argentina, and parts of the Caribbean. While they have physical similarities to pigs, they are members of the Tayassuidae family, not the pig family. In comparison to pigs, they have complex stomachs, shorter tails, and more teeth. They also tend to live in herds to protect themselves from predators. In desert climates, collared peccaries have adapted to the lack of rainfall by eating plants that retain moisture like prickly pear cactus. In places that are not so dry, they eat fruits, roots, tubers, and nuts, as well as small animals. Those sharp teeth sure help to gnaw through all that!
Notes:
A color drawing of a javelina or collared peccary sharpening its tusks.
Topic:
Mammals  Search this
Zoology  Search this
Biology  Search this
Javelinas  Search this
Collared peccary  Search this
Taxonomy:
Pecari tajacu
Publisher:
V.G. Audubon
Image ID:
SIL-SIL33-085-06_crop
Catalog ID:
 91942
Rights:
No Copyright - United States
See more items in:
See Wonder
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:silgoi_66581