Skip to main content Smithsonian Institution

Online Media

Catalog Data

Creator:
Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum  Search this
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Tue, 31 Jan 2017 13:00:08 +0000
Blog Post Category:
Blog Post
Object of the Day
Korea
Scraps
textiles
traditions
waste
Description:
<img width="640" height="701" src="http://www.cooperhewitt.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/1994-22-1-700x767.jpg" class="attachment-large size-large wp-post-image" alt="1981-65- Matt Flynn 016" style="display: block; margin-bottom: 5px; clear:both;" srcset="http://uh8yh30l48rpize52xh0q1o6i.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/1994-22-1-274x300.jpg 274w, http://uh8yh30l48rpize52xh0q1o6i.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/1994-22-1-700x767.jpg 700w, http://uh8yh30l48rpize52xh0q1o6i.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/1994-22-1-170x186.jpg 170w, http://uh8yh30l48rpize52xh0q1o6i.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/1994-22-1.jpg 935w" sizes="(max-width: 640px) 100vw, 640px" />Bojagi cloths were essential elements of Korean households since the very beginning of the Joseon Dynasty in the late fourteenth century up until the 1950s. Equally used and valued by Korean peasants, working classes, and royalty, these multipurpose textiles combined functionality, aesthetic, and craftsmanship. They served a variety of functions including wrapping gifts, covering cooked food from insects and rodents, and textile carrier. Bojagi were usually...
Topic:
Design  Search this
See more posts:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Data Source:
Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_2a4ce67b71346db00a5e098b645c30fc