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Catalog Data

Collector:
Livingston Stone  Search this
Donor Name:
Livingston Stone  Search this
Culture:
Wintu, McCloud  Search this
Object Type:
Botanical
Place:
McCloud River, California, United States, North America
Accession Date:
1875
Notes:
FROM CARD: "FROM THE DIGGER [SIC] PINE, PINUS SABINIANA. TO AVOID THE TROUBLE OF COLLECTING THE SEED FROM THE CONES THE "DIGGER" INDIANS SOMETIMES KINDLE A FIRE AGAINST THE TREES, WHICH CAUSES THE NUTS TO FALL, WHILE AT THE SAME TIME A SWEET GUM EXUDES FROM THE BARK WHICH SERVES FOR SUGAR."
Pinus sabiniana, has been called gray, foothill, grayleaf, ghost, bull, Sabine, or towani pine. "It has [also] widely been named digger pine due to its wide use by Native American tribes collectively and colloquially referred to as "diggers." However, that term has fallen into disgrace. As explained by Hunter (1991): "many Native Americans find the term digger offensive. A spokesman, who requests anonymity, for the California State Native American Heritage Commission says, "The word 'digger' is very derogatory and insulting to California Indian people." A historical interpreter, who also requests anonymity, for the California State Indian Museum in Sacramento agrees: "To call a California Indian a 'digger' means you are either ignorant or you are purposely trying to insult him. It is a very derisive word."" Source: The Gymnosperm Database entry on Pinus sabiniana, https://www.conifers.org/pi/Pinus_sabiniana.php , retrieved 11-24-2021. See also J. Robert Haller & Nancy J. Vivrette 2012, Pinus sabiniana, in Jepson Flora Project (eds.) Jepson eFlora, https://ucjeps.berkeley.edu/eflora/eflora_display.php?tid=38304, accessed on November 24, 2021. Per the Columbian Electronic Encyclopedia, 2007, "Digger Indians" is a "term indiscriminately applied to many Native Americans of the central plateau region of W North America, including tribes in Oregon, Idaho, Utah, Arizona, Nevada, and central California. The name is supposedly derived from the fact that they dug roots for food. It has no ethnological significance and was a term of opprobrium."
Record Last Modified:
24 Nov 2021
Specimen Count:
25
Topic:
Ethnology  Search this
Accession Number:
004457
USNM Number:
E19348-0
See more items in:
Anthropology
Data Source:
NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/34029da57-de57-4b24-b41b-2da9438aae90
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhanthropology_8353932