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Catalog Data

Directed by:
Jack Santino Ph.D., American, born 1947  Search this
Paul Wagner, American, born 1948  Search this
Subject of:
Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, American, 1925 - 1978  Search this
Rosina Tucker, American, 1881 - 1987  Search this
Owned by:
D.C. Public Library, American, founded 1896  Search this
Medium:
acetate film
Dimensions:
Duration: 56 Minutes
Length (Film): 2000 Feet
Type:
sound films
color films (visual works)
16mm (photographic film size)
Place used:
Washington, District of Columbia, United States, North and Central America
Date:
1982
Caption:
This 1982 documentary details the history of the Black Pullman Porters who organized for the right to unionize and form the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters. Narrated by the activist, educator, and wife of a Pullman Porter, Mrs. Rosina Tucker, the film uses the first-hand accounts of former Pullman porters to explicate the working conditions that Black male Pullman Porters endured prior to the formation of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters in 1937. Directed by Paul Wagner in 1982, this film offers a comprehensive history of the Black Pullman porters who fought for equal pay and treatment, despite racial discrimination, through the organization and formation of a union during the Jim Crow Era.
This film was a part of the Washington D.C. Public Library's circulating 16mm film collection housed at the Martin Luther King Jr. Central Library. The collection is particularly noted for the wide variety of African American and African diaspora content.
Description:
A documentary film with the title Miles of Smiles, Years of Struggle. It consists of a single reel of color 16 mm acetate film with bilateral area optical sound.
The documentary details the history of the Black Pullman Porters who organized for the right to unionize and form the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters. It begins with a brief history of the Pullman Car Company and their reliance on exploited Black male labor. Narrated by the activist, educator, and wife of a Pullman Porter, Mrs. Rosina Tucker, the film uses a combination of archival footage, photographs, and first-hand accounts of former Pullman porters to explicate the working conditions that Black male Pullman Porters endured prior to the formation of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters in 1937. It shows how they fought for equal pay and treatment, despite racial discrimination, through the organization and formation of a union during the Jim Crow Era. Individuals featured in the documentary include Lawrence W. Davis, C.L. Dellums, Ernest Ford Jr., Green Glenn, Homer Glenn, William Harrington, Hunter Johnson, L. Long, William D. Miller, E.D. Nixon, L.C. Richie, J.D. Shaw, Rex Stewart, and C.J. Talley.
Topic:
African American  Search this
Activism  Search this
Civil Rights  Search this
Documentary films  Search this
Film  Search this
Labor  Search this
Pullman Porters  Search this
Race discrimination  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture
Object number:
2017.55.116.1a
Restrictions & Rights:
Restrictions likely apply. Proper usage is the responsibility of the user.
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Collection title:
DC Public Library Film Collection
Classification:
Media Arts-Film and Video
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd50349bbcb-bdf6-4b48-91d3-8a60a97007cd
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2017.55.116.1a