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Catalog Data

Created by:
Unidentified  Search this
Owned by:
Harriet Tubman, American, 1822 - 1913  Search this
Medium:
silk lace and linen
Dimensions:
H x W: 36 1/2 x 28 1/2 in. (92.7 x 72.4 cm)
Type:
shawls
Place used:
Auburn, Cayuga County, New York, United States, North and Central America
Place depicted:
England, Europe
Date:
ca. 1897
Caption:
Harriet Tubman escaped the bonds of slavery as a young woman in the early 1800s. She returned to the South many times as a "conductor" on the Underground Railroad to lead other African Americans to freedom. During the Civil War, Tubman served as a spy, nurse, and cook for Union Forces. In 1863, she helped free more than 700 African Americans during a raid in South Carolina - a feat that earned her the nickname "General Tubman." England's Queen Victoria gave Tubman this shawl around 1897.
From Changing America: The Emancipation Proclamation, 1863, and the March on Washington, 1963.
Description:
A white, square-shaped shawl made of silk lace and linen, given to Harriet Tubman by Queen Victoria around 1897.
Topic:
African American  Search this
Activism  Search this
Clothing and dress  Search this
Emancipation  Search this
Freedom  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Charles L. Blockson
Object number:
2009.50.39
Restrictions & Rights:
No Known Copyright Restrictions
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Slavery and Freedom Objects
Clothing-Historical
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd5e626c62e-bd45-44ed-bb87-bd2f87abf700
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2009.50.39