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Catalog Data

Medium:
Cast iron, wire, paint
Dimensions:
Plant Holder: 23 × 34 in. (58.4 × 86.4 cm)
Stand: 32 × 22 in. (81.3 × 55.9 cm)
Style:
Rococo Revival
Type:
Plant stands
Date:
ca.1830-1920
Period:
Victorian (1837-1901)
Description:
Three-tiered, circular plant stand on cast-iron base, painted black. The frame of the plant stand is made from wrought iron and the supports and surfaces are made from wire strands drawn and interwoven to complete the structure. Each level has a shelf guard around it made from interlacing wires with an outward facing scroll at the top of each point. The open bottoms of the shelves allowed for water drainage from rain or hand-watering the plants. The top most level was for a single potted plant. Different liners could be placed inside, which allowed the gardener to change out the potted plant based on the growing seasons. The tripod pedestal base of the plant stand is made of cast iron with ornate scrolling motifs and flares out at the top to support the shelf. The ornate form and decoration of the base is typical of the Rococo Revival style of the nineteenth century. The three legs of the base are on casters with offered ease of movement. The French excelled at making the delicate wrought-iron and wire garden furniture, which was popular in the mid-to-late nineteenth century. These pieces were appealing for both the garden and terrace because they were less obtrusive than other types of garden furnishings due to the near invisibility of the wire. Rococo Revival style was the most popular style of the Victorian era in the United States. It emerged as early as the 1830s and continued to be seen into the 1900s. This style was modeled after eighteenth-century French designs, yet the revival of the style pushed elements further. Rococo Revival objects tended to be highly ornamental, with more substantial, less delicate forms, and visually dense decoration. This style is defined by its sense of movement and its delicacy, as well as curvaceousness, asymmetry, and curvilinear forms. Rococo Revival motifs included floral imagery, abundant swags of fruit and foliage, shell-like waves, ‘S’ & ‘C’ scrolls, rocaille decoration, serpentine curves, frozen water forms, volutes, acanthus leaves, and cabriole legs.
Rococo Revival style was the most popular style of the Victorian era in the United States. It emerged as early as the 1830s and continued to be seen into the 1900s. This style was modeled after eighteenth-century French designs, yet the revival of the style pushed elements further. Rococo Revival objects tended to be highly ornamental, with more substantial, less delicate forms, and visually dense decoration. This style is defined by its sense of movement and its delicacy, as well as curvaceousness, asymmetry, and curvilinear forms. Rococo Revival motifs included floral imagery, abundant swags of fruit and foliage, shell-like waves, ‘S’ & ‘C’ scrolls, rocaille decoration, serpentine curves, frozen water forms, volutes, acanthus leaves, and cabriole legs.
Label Text:
The Victorian love of nature and display were combined with the plant stand. Both decorative and storage space, plant stands displayed botanical specimens both in and out of doors in the nineteenth century. They came in a variety of sizes and shapes that might include multiple tiers, elaborate structures, decorative features, or separate surfaces for each plant or flower. Plants stands were often placed on porches and verandahs, where they provided transition between house and garden. These stands were also found throughout the home, bringing nature indoors and adding color and scents to the room. They might be the focal point, placed in corners, or other areas in need of visual interest. Fragrant varieties of flowers and potted plants, such as palms, were popular choices for plant stands in the nineteenth century. Flowers and greenery were often mixed together on its shelves, either grown in pots on saucers or displayed in decorative vases. The stands and their plants could be rented from the florist or nursery for special occasions. In addition to their decorative appeal, they were also an important tool for the gardener. Plant stands served as home for the plants more susceptible to frost and weather that were brought in to a winter garden in the home, conservatory, greenhouse, or other outbuildings.
Topic:
cast iron  Search this
plant stands  Search this
stands (support furniture)  Search this
wire  Search this
wirework  Search this
wrought iron  Search this
Garden ornaments and furniture  Search this
gardening  Search this
Credit Line:
Smithsonian Gardens, Horticultural Artifacts Collection.
Accession number:
1988.015.a, b, c
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
Horticultural Artifacts Collection
Data Source:
Smithsonian Gardens
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/aq424b916cc-e811-4a3b-bd89-fad75c719f2b
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:hac_1988.015.a__b__c