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Catalog Data

Medium:
Cast iron, paint
Dimensions:
87 in. (221 cm)
Type:
Fountains
Date:
ca. 1890
Period:
Victorian (1837-1901)
Description:
Fountain, 3-Tier, Frog Motif, Cast Iron three tiers/ circular basin with central column rising to support two higher, graduated, smaller basins/single jet from center of top basin/bottom basin decorated with cast iron lily pads and frogs. Tazza form- one circular basin, at least, mounted on a decorative pedestal, frequently several tiers of repeated graduated basins, water is carried to top level by an internal pipe and released through a decorative spout, as top bowl fills, water spills over edges of basin into larger basin below, structure is mounted in a ground level basin or pool. Classical design, versatile form, can be used in combination or singly, plain or decorated, with or without sculptural additions. Often decorated with central figure plumbed to spout water from itself or from an accessory animal or object. - Central section with 1, 2, or 3 spills (bowls where the water runs over the edge) stacked together and surmounted by small iron or lead statue – or – a large iron or lead statue on a low base “Drooping” fountain – water spilled over the side of the basin style complimented Gothic or Elizabethan houses
three tiers/ circular basin with central column rising to support two higher, graduated, smaller basins/single jet from center of top basin/bottom basin decorated with cast iron lily pads and frogs. Tazza form- one circular basin, at least, mounted on a decorative pedestal, frequently several tiers of repeated graduated basins, water is carried to top level by an internal pipe and released through a decorative spout, as top bowl fills, water spills over edges of basin into larger basin below, structure is mounted in a ground level basin or pool. Classical design, versatile form, can be used in combination or singly, plain or decorated, with or without sculptural additions. Often decorated with central figure plumbed to spout water from itself or from an accessory animal or object. - Central section with 1, 2, or 3 spills (bowls where the water runs over the edge) stacked together and surmounted by small iron or lead statue – or – a large iron or lead statue on a low base “Drooping” fountain – water spilled over the side of the basin style complimented Gothic or Elizabethan houses
Tazza form- one circular basin, at least, mounted on a decorative pedestal, frequently several tiers of repeated graduated basins, water is carried to top level by an internal pipe and released through a decorative spout, as top bowl fills, water spills over edges of basin into larger basin below, structure is mounted in a ground level basin or pool. Classical design, versatile form, can be used in combination or singly, plain or decorated, with or without sculptural additions. Often decorated with central figure plumbed to spout water from itself or from an accessory animal or object. - Central section with 1, 2, or 3 spills (bowls where the water runs over the edge) stacked together and surmounted by small iron or lead statue – or – a large iron or lead statue on a low base “Drooping” fountain – water spilled over the side of the basin style complimented Gothic or Elizabethan houses
“Drooping” fountain – water spilled over the side of the basin style complimented Gothic or Elizabethan houses
Label Text:
Early in American history, a time when life was more about survival than decoration, water was collected from civic wells and fountains and used for irrigation, cooking, drinking, animals, and cleaning. By nineteenth century, fountains and other water features became decorative accents for the home or garden, enjoyed for the sound and play of light offered by cascading water. In the nineteenth century, systems of mass production and growth of the cast iron industry made fountains accessible to wider audience, including the middle class, yet they remained a symbol of elegance and pretention. By the mid-nineteenth century, fountain components were mass produced. Cast-iron pieces were created by pouring molten iron into molds of compressed sand. Once the iron had cooled, it was removed from the mold. Rough places and sharp edges were then filed away before the piece was bolted together. It would then be painted, varnished, galvanized, or bronzed several times to prevent rust. Since cast iron pieces were made in components and bolted together, numerous combinations were possible. Consumers were able to select from a range of figures, basins, sprays, and pedestals to create a somewhat customized fountain. The Victorian taste for highly ornate was fulfilled by the malleability of metal, which allowed for every surface to be covered with ornamental patterns and botanical subjects. Designs followed the trends of the time with natural forms, ornamental motifs pulled from historic revival styles, and complicated shapes. This satisfied the nineteenth-century tendency to combine of styles, along with elaborate, often whimsical motifs were available through the numerous options for waterspouts, fountain figures, balusters, basins, and coping—molded edging—for fountains.
Mark(s):
cast by Clawson's, Chicago, c.1840. Signed on second column between 1st and 2nd tier
Topic:
cast iron  Search this
fountains  Search this
Garden ornaments and furniture  Search this
water features  Search this
Credit Line:
Smithsonian Gardens, Horticultural Artifacts Collection.
Accession number:
1986.022
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
Horticultural Artifacts Collection
Data Source:
Smithsonian Gardens
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/aq46a2d7d60-2d80-448c-b908-02a5a8336939
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:hac_1986.022