Skip to main content Smithsonian Institution

Catalog Data

Artist:
Rogers, John, 1829-1904  Search this
Medium:
Composition stone
Dimensions:
46 × 21 × 19 in. (116.8 × 53.3 × 48.3 cm)
Type:
Statues
Date:
ca. 1874-1890
Period:
Victorian (1837-1901)
Description:
“Hide & Seek” and “Hide & Seek: Whoop!” are a pair of life-sized sculptures of a young boy and girl meant for display in a garden. The sculptor, John Rogers, used his daughter, Katherine Rebecca, as the model for the little girl in “Hide & Seek: Whoop!” After exhibiting the piece at the National Academy's spring exhibition in April 1874, he had the sculpture patented in May of 1874. That summer Rogers began working on a companion figure for “Hide & Seek: Whoop!” This time, the sculptor used the seven-year-old grandson, Harry Stimson, of his long-time friends Thomas and Candace Wheeler as the model for the statue. Both the statues of the girl and boy sold in Roger’s catalogs from 1876-1890. The little boy who modeled for this playful piece grew up to be Henry L. Stimson, Secretary of War under President Taft from 1911-1913, Secretary of State under President Hoover from 1929-33, and Secretary of War again under Franklin D. Roosevelt from 1940-45. As Secretary of War, Stimson assumed direct personal control over the atomic bomb project and acted as supervisor over General Leslie Groves on the Manhattan Project. The artist, John Rogers (1829-1904), was an American sculptor known for his small statues and groups for the middle-class Victorian parlor. Rogers mass-produced subjects often taken from everyday life, as well as popular literature, myths, and symbols of old New England, using bronze molds to make plaster copies. His works were extremely popular, and the artist sold almost 80,000 plaster statuettes in his lifetime.
The artist, John Rogers (1829-1904), was an American sculptor known for his small statues and groups for the middle-class Victorian parlor. Rogers mass-produced subjects often taken from everyday life, as well as popular literature, myths, and symbols of old New England, using bronze molds to make plaster copies. His works were extremely popular, and the artist sold almost 80,000 plaster statuettes in his lifetime.
Label Text:
The placement of statues in the garden dates to ancient times, but placing sculpture outdoors gained momentum in the Renaissance in Italy. This was due to increased interest in classical art and design. The avid collection of antiquities soon filled the houses with sculptures and by necessity they began to spill out into gardens. Since the Renaissance both antique and contemporary statues and sculptures have been an admired form of garden ornament. The use of statues in the garden has a much shorter history in America, and in the Victorian era, it reached its height. Sculptures could be made from a variety of materials and could be free standing or as part of fountain or birdbath. In large gardens, life-sized statues elevated on plinths brought grandeur to designs, while smaller scale designs were available for more moderate spaces.
Topic:
statues  Search this
Garden ornaments and furniture  Search this
girls  Search this
outdoor sculpture  Search this
Credit Line:
Smithsonian Gardens, Horticultural Artifacts Collection.
Accession number:
1986.018.002
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
Horticultural Artifacts Collection
Data Source:
Smithsonian Gardens
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/aq4cc05cd6c-0388-47c5-9009-da6b45b67a1b
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:hac_1986.018.002