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Catalog Data

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Names:
Islamic Archives  Search this
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Smith, Myron Bement, 1897-1970  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smith, Myron Bement, 1897-1970  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print, b&w, 24 cm. x 18 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Hamadān (Iran)
Date:
1880s-1930
Scope and Contents:
"A Bakhtiari guard posing beside the Sassanid inscriptions of Ganj-nama (in Cuneiform), located close to the city of Hamadan. The two inscriptions were most probably ordered by Darius I and Xerxes I." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- On recto of the print, handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "12."
- On recto of the print, faded handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "587."
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "47.9."
- On verso of the print (lower left corner), original stamp, in French and Persian, reads, "Photographie Sevruguin."
- On verso of the print, Myron Bement Smith caption in English reads, "Persia; Hamadān; Gang Nameh [Ganj Nameh]; Curzon i., 566: Trilingual inscriptions relating names and titles of Darius, first due to interpretation of cuneiform in mountain range of Mount Girend near Hamadan."
Arrangement:
Gelatin silver prints organized by Myron B. Smith into subject categories (People; Architecture - Pre-Islamic; Royalty - Residences - Gulistan Palace (Tehran; Architecture; Landscapes). This print is in the following subject category: Architecture - Pre-Islamic.
Biographical / Historical:
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Local Numbers:
[Myron Bement Smith collection. Freer/Sackler Archives, No. A.4.58] FSA A.4 2.12.Sm.39
General:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Ancient Near Eastern Art  Search this
Cuneiform inscriptions  Search this
Relief (Sculpture)  Search this
Inscriptions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
The Myron Bement Smith Collection. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A.04, Item FSA A.4 2.12.Sm.39
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith Collection
Myron Bement Smith Collection / Series 2: The Islamic Archives / 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs / 2.12.02: Sevruguin Smith Prints / Architecture: Pre-islamic
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/dc3fa46ae98-70eb-447f-9d8f-6b5c778fae60
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-04-ref9854