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Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2002 Smithsonian Folklife Festival

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Catalog Data

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiotapes
Memorandums
Business records
Video recordings
Plans (drawings)
Negatives
Audiocassettes
Videotapes
Sound recordings
Photographic prints
Contracts
Digital images
Notes
Correspondence
Slides (photographs)
Date:
June 26-July 7, 2002
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 2002 Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 2 series. Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera Series 2: The Silk Road: Connecting Cultures, Creating Trust
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The 2002 Smithsonian Folklife Festival was produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage and cosponsored by the National Park Service. For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
For ten days in the summer of 2002, the great geographical and cultural distance that lies between the heart of Europe and the far reaches of Asia was reduced to the length of a leisurely afternoon stroll on the National Mall. For the first time in its 36-year history, the Smithsonian Folklife Festival had a single - and remarkably ambitious - theme: the Silk Road. The name denotes the network of trade routes, over both land and sea, along which merchants and travelers began to move across Asia and Europe from the first millennium B.C.E. The most famous east-west component of the Silk Road began in Xi'an, the ancient capital of China, broke north and south of China's Takla Makan Desert, and traversed a vast stretch of Central and Western Asia on its way to the eastern end of the Mediterranean. Along those staggering distances lay a wealth of cultures and traditions. They are still there; during the Folklife Festival, they came to life in the heart of Washington as well. Merchants took to the Silk Road for commercial gain. But their movement also brought riches of another kind: the cultural traditions that were transported along the Silk Road. The ingenious, distinctive emblems of peoples - their science, technology, religions, customs, crafts, music, food, architecture, fashions - made the journey, too, and the dazzling variety of the world that commerce opened was diffused, welcomed, and adapted. That's the tale that was told in the 2002 Folklife Festival, The Silk Road: Connecting Cultures, Creating Trust. Produced in association with the Silk Road Project, Inc., an organization founded by the cellist Yo-Yo Ma, supported in large part by the Aga Khan Trust for Culture, and featuring exhibits designed by Rajeev Sethi, the Festival turned the National Mall into a mammoth visual representation of the Silk Road, with the Great Gate in Nara, Japan, at the eastern end, toward the Capitol, and St. Mark's Square in Venice at the western end, in the shadow of the Washington Monument. And between the two, visitors could wander Eurasia, through Istanbul, Samarkand, and Xi'an. On the way they moved among hundreds of musicians, artists, dancers, crafts workers, and chefs from some two dozen nations of the Silk Road, working side by side with Americans who trace their origins to the region or have been culturally influenced by its traditions. An especially valuable aspect of the event was its focus on Central Asia, a region to which Americans were all too indifferent before events of the preceding year. We now know the names of the nations in that part of the world, but the Festival gave the people of those nations and their traditions a human face. Visitors who made the journey across the Festival site could immerse themselves in the energy and larger educational purpose of the Festival; they had an opportunity to travel across continents, centuries, and cultures. They could meet with a diversity of artists who, through their demonstrations of skill - with silk, jewelry, ceramics, carpets, paintings, paper, calligraphy, food, and, not least, music - did more than merely affirm their cultural traditions. They embodied them. The 2002 Folklife Festival, like every other, celebrated humanity and breathed a spirit of human engagement. On a great green stretch of this nation's capital, people from many different societies were brought together face to face. And those chance, transient encounters might affect the way they think about the world. The 2002 Festival took place during two five-day weeks (June 26-30 and July 3-7) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 10th Street and 14th Street, south of the National Museum of American History and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan). The Program Book provided information on the history and culture of the Silk Road and included a schedule and participant information. The Silk Road: Connecting Cultures, Creating Trust at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival was a partnership of the Smithsonian Institution Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage and the Silk Road Project, Inc. The Festival site was designed by Rajeev Sethi Scenographers and produced in cooperation with the Asian Heritage Foundation. The Festival was co-sponsored by the National Park Service. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage Richard Kurin, Director; Richard Kennedy, Deputy Director; Smithsonian Folklife Festival: Diana Parker, Festival Director; Carla M. Borden, Program/Publications Manager; Arlene L. Reiniger, Program Specialist; Charlie Weber, Media Specialist; Smithsonian Folkways Recordings: Daniel Sheehy, Director; Anthony Seeger, Director Emeritus; D.A. Sonneborn, Assistant Director; Ralph Rinzler Archives: Jeffrey Place, Archivist; Stephanie Smith, Assistant Archivist; Save Our Sounds: Frank Proschan, Project Director; Smithsonian GlobalSound: Jon Kertzer, Project Director; Cultural Heritage Policy: James Early, Director; Cultural Research and Education: Olivia Cadaval, Chair; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Senior Ethnomusicologist Emeritus; Betty J. Belanus, Nancy Groce, Marjorie Hunt, Diana Baird N'Diaye, Peter Seitel, Cynthia Vidaurri, Nilda Villalta, Curators, Folklorists, Education and Cultural Specialists; John W. Franklin, Program Manager; Gigi Bradford, Roland Freeman, Ivan Karp, Corinne Kratz, Alan Lomax, Worth Long, René López, Kate Rinzler, Rajeev Sethi, Research Associates; Rhea Combs, Steven Garabedian, Mark Jackson, Ajaya Khanal, Anthony McCann, Fellows Center Advisory Council Kurt Dewhurst, Anthony Gittens, Pat Jasper, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Enrique Lamadrid, David Maybury-Lewis, Judy Mitoma, J. Scott Raecker, Ricardo Trimillos (Chair) Folkways Advisory Board Michael Asch (Chair), Phyllis Barney, Hal Cannon, Don DeVito, Ella Jenkins, Fred Silber The Silk Road Project, Inc. Yo-Yo Ma, Artistic Director; Jean Davidson, Managing Director; Theodore Levin, Project Director The Asian Heritage Foundation Rajeev Sethi, Founder Trustee National Park Service Fran P. Mainella, Director; Terry R. Carlstrom, Director, National Capital Region The Festival was supported by federally appropriated funds, Smithsonian trust funds, contributions from governments, businesses, foundations, and individuals, in-kind assistance, volunteers, food and craft sales, and Friends of the Festival. The 2002 Festival was made possible through the following generous sponsors and donors to the Silk Road Project, Inc.: Lead Funder and Key Creative Partner: The Aga Khan Trust for Culture Global Corporate Partners: Ford Motor Company; Siemens Major Funding by: The Starr Foundation; Mr. and Mrs. Henry R. Kravis; Mr. Richard Li; Mr. William Rondina; Wolfensohn Family Foundation; Octavian Society; National Endowment for the Arts; Carolyn G. Mugar/The Armenian Tree Project and by the following supporters of the Smithsonian Institution: Lead Donor: ExxonMobil Donors: U.S. Department of State; Mr. Arthur Pacheco; Trust for Mutual Understanding; Music Performance Trust Funds; Asian Cultural Council; J.S. Lee In-Kind Donors: Turkish Airlines; Motorola/Nextel; Go-Ped; APL; Fresh Fields/Whole Foods Market
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2002 Smithsonian Folklife Festival forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records . Smithsonian Folklife Festival records Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers 1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Folklore  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Folk music  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Food habits  Search this
World music  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes
Memorandums
Business records
Video recordings
Plans (drawings)
Negatives
Audiocassettes
Videotapes
Sound recordings
Photographic prints
Contracts
Digital images
Notes
Correspondence
Slides (photographs)
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2002 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2002
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2002 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-2002