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Texas Instruments SR-10 Handheld Electronic Calculator

Catalog Data:

Maker:
Texas Instruments
Physical Description:
plastic (overall material)
metal (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 1 1/2 in x 3 in x 6 1/4 in; 3.81 cm x 7.62 cm x 15.875 cm
Object Name:
electronic calculator
Date made:
1972
Subject:
Family & Social Life
Work
Computers & Business Machines
Credit Line:
Gift of John B. Priser
ID Number:
1986.0988.354
Catalog number:
1986.0988.354
Accession number:
1986.0988
Description:
The Texas Instrument Slide Rule-10, more commonly known as the TI SR-10, was a handheld calculator introduced in November 1972, just a few months after TI's first calculator, the Datamath. The SR-10 initially retailed at $149, but was produced in large numbers and soon sold at significant discount. The calculator made use of the TMS0120 single-chip calculator circuit derived from the TMS1802, better known as the first "calculator-on-a-chip."
The calculator had a LED (Light Emitting Diode) display capable of showing 10 decimal digits, and used a NICAD battery pack to power the red numeric display. The user had to constantly charge and recharge the battery after a few hours of use. The NICAD batteries would usually go bad after a few hundred charges. This was a major drawback for early electronic calculators. Later LCD (liquid Crystal Display) devices used so little power that they could run on tiny solar cells.
Location:
Currently not on view
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Computers
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

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