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Girl

view Girl digital asset number 1
Artist:
Winslow Homer, American, 1836–1910
Medium:
Crayon on paper
Culture:
American
Type:
figures
Drawing
Object Name:
Drawing
Made in:
USA
Date:
ca. 1874
Catalogue Status:
Research in Progress
Description:
Vertical view of a girl dressed in a cap, bodice, skirt and apron, seen from the back.
Credit Line:
Gift of Charles Savage Homer, Jr.
Accession Number:
1912-12-60
See more items in:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum Collection
Drawings, Prints, and Graphic Design Department
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Girl

view Girl digital asset number 1
Artist:
Philip Evergood, American, b. New York City, 1901–1973
Medium:
Ink, gouache, and charcoal on paper
Dimensions:
38 X 25 IN. (96.7 X 63.5 CM.)
Type:
Drawing
Date:
November 1954
Credit Line:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, Gift of Joseph H. Hirshhorn, 1966
Accession Number:
66.1832
See more items in:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden Collection
Data Source:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

[Girl]

view [Girl] digital asset number 1
Artist:
Unidentified
Sitter:
unidentified
Medium:
tintype with applied color
Dimensions:
plate: 8 1/2 x 6 1/2 in. (21.6 x 16.5 cm)
Type:
Photography-Photoprint
Date:
ca. 1865-1885
Topic:
Portrait female\child
Credit Line:
Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of Mitchell and Nancy Steir
Object number:
2009.44.21
See more items in:
Smithsonian American Art Museum Collection
Data Source:
Smithsonian American Art Museum

Girl

view Girl digital asset number 1
Artist:
Reg Butler, British, b. Buntingford, England, 1913–1981
Medium:
Bronze
Dimensions:
19 3/4 x 6 5/16 x 5 5/8 in. (50 x 16 x 14.4 cm)
Type:
Sculpture
Date:
1956
Provenance:
Jh Purchased From Matisse Gallery, Pierre, New York 1957
Credit Line:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, Gift of Joseph H. Hirshhorn, 1966
Accession Number:
66.770
See more items in:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden Collection
Data Source:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

Girl

view Girl digital asset number 1
Artist:
Reg Butler, British, b. Buntingford, England, 1913–1981
Medium:
Bronze
Dimensions:
88 3/4 x 29 7/8 x 25 in. (225.2 x 75.7 x 63.3 cm)
Type:
Sculpture
Date:
1954-1956
Provenance:
Jh Purchased From Hanover Gallery, London 1957
Credit Line:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, Gift of Joseph H. Hirshhorn, 1966
Accession Number:
66.773
See more items in:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden Collection
Data Source:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

Girl

view Girl digital asset number 1
Artist:
Bernard Simon, American, 1896–1980
Medium:
Marble
Dimensions:
15 3/4 x 7 3/8 x 10 in. (40 x 18.7 x 26 cm) BASE: 2 1/4 x 7 3/8 x 9 1/8 in. (5.7 x 18.7 x 23.2 cm)
Type:
Sculpture
Date:
(n.d.)
Credit Line:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, Gift of Joseph H. Hirshhorn, 1966
Accession Number:
66.4598
See more items in:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden Collection
Data Source:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

Girls

view Girls digital asset number 1
Artist:
Donald S. Vogel, born Milwaukee, WI 1917
Medium:
lithograph on paper
Dimensions:
image: 14 1/2 x 11 in. (36.8 x 28.0 cm)
Type:
Graphic Arts-Print
Date:
ca. 1933-1943
Topic:
Children
Still life\furniture\table
New Deal
Credit Line:
Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of Jean Nichols
Object number:
1974.38.64
See more items in:
Smithsonian American Art Museum Collection
Data Source:
Smithsonian American Art Museum

Girls

view Girls digital asset number 1
Artist:
Donald S. Vogel, born Milwaukee, WI 1917
Medium:
lithograph on paper
Dimensions:
image: 14 1/2 x 11 in. (36.8 x 28.0 cm)
Type:
Graphic Arts-Print
Date:
ca. 1933-1943
Topic:
Children
Figure group\female
Still life\furniture\table
New Deal
Architecture Interior\domestic\living room
Credit Line:
Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of Jean Nichols
Object number:
1974.38.65
See more items in:
Smithsonian American Art Museum Collection
Data Source:
Smithsonian American Art Museum

Official Girl Scout 620 Camera

view Official Girl Scout 620 Camera digital asset number 1
Associated institution:
Girl Scouts of the United States of America
Maker:
Herbert George Company
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
glass (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 10 cm x 7.5 cm x 9 cm; 3 15/16 in x 2 15/16 in x 3 9/16 in
Object Name:
camera, box
Camera, box
Place made:
United States: Illinois, Chicago
Date made:
ca 1950s
Description:
In the 1950s, the Herbert George Company of Chicago, Illinois produced an official Girl Scout camera. Many Boy Scout cameras were produced throughout the mid-1900s, but few models were made for the female scouts. This easy-use 620 box style camera used an eye-level viewfinder and featured the Girl Scout logo on its faceplate.
From its invention in 1839, the camera has evolved to fit many needs, from aerial to underwater photography and everything in between. Cameras allow both amateur and professional photographers to capture the world around us. The Smithsonian’s historic camera collection includes rare and unique examples of equipment, and popular models, related to the history of the science, technology, and art of photography.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Photography
Girl Scouts of the United States of America
Artifact Walls exhibit
ID Number:
2001.0293.01
Accession number:
2001.0293
Catalog number:
2001.0293.1
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Photographic History
Artifact Walls exhibit
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Additional Online Media:

Photograph of B-Girl Laneski

view Photograph of B-Girl Laneski digital asset number 1
Depicted:
B-Girl Laneski
Physical Description:
paper (overall material)
ink (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 8 in x 10 in; 20.32 cm x 25.4 cm
overall: 8 in x 9 15/16 in; 20.32 cm x 25.24125 cm
Object Name:
photograph
Date made:
1985
Description (Brief):
Photograph of B-girl Laneski with the breakdance group, Majestic Rockers in New York City, 1985. B-Girl Laneski, (born Lane Davey), was born in Nashville, Tennessee in 1970. Later moving to Seattle, she enrolled in a breakdancing class in 1983, taught by the Seattle Circuit Breakers. The group was impressed with her dancing skills and subsequently gave her the name LaneSki. A pioneer in the male dominated Hip Hop world, Laneski was one of the first female breakdancers to master and develop many of the dance moves created in the early 1980s.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Highlights from the Culture and the Arts Collection
Hip-Hop
Music & Musical Instruments
Cultures & Communities
Photography
ID Number:
2006.0192.03
Accession number:
2006.0192
Catalog number:
2006.0192.03
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Entertainment
Highlights from the Culture and the Arts Collection
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Photograph of B-Girl Laneski

view Photograph of B-Girl Laneski digital asset number 1
Depicted:
B-Girl Laneski
Physical Description:
paper (overall material)
ink (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 4 in x 6 in; 10.16 cm x 15.24 cm
overall: 4 in x 6 in; 10.16 cm x 15.24 cm
Object Name:
photograph
Date made:
1985
Description (Brief):
Photograph of B-girl Laneski with the breakdance group, Majestic Rockers in New York City, 1985. B-Girl Laneski, (born Lane Davey), was born in Nashville, Tennessee in 1970. Later moving to Seattle, she enrolled in a breakdancing class in 1983, taught by the Seattle Circuit Breakers. The group was impressed with her dancing skills and subsequently gave her the name LaneSki. A pioneer in the male dominated Hip Hop world, Laneski was one of the first female breakdancers to master and develop many of the dance moves created in the early 1980s.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Highlights from the Culture and the Arts Collection
Hip-Hop
Music & Musical Instruments
Cultures & Communities
Photography
ID Number:
2006.0192.06
Accession number:
2006.0192
Catalog number:
2006.0192.06
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Entertainment
Highlights from the Culture and the Arts Collection
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Photograph of B-Girl Laneski

view Photograph of B-Girl Laneski digital asset number 1
Depicted:
B-Girl Laneski
Physical Description:
paper (overall material)
ink (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 4 in x 6 in; 10.16 cm x 15.24 cm
overall: 4 in x 6 in; 10.16 cm x 15.24 cm
Object Name:
photograph
Date made:
1985
Description (Brief):
Photograph of B-girl Laneski in New York City, 1985. B-Girl Laneski, (bornLane Davey), was born in Nashville, Tennessee in 1970. Later moving to Seattle, she enrolled in a breakdancing class in 1983, taught by the Seattle Circuit Breakers. The group was impressed with her dancing skills and subsequently gave her the name LaneSki. A pioneer in the male dominated Hip Hop world, Laneski was one of the first female breakdancers to master and develop many of the dance moves created in the early 1980s.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Highlights from the Culture and the Arts Collection
Hip-Hop
Music & Musical Instruments
Cultures & Communities
Photography
ID Number:
2006.0192.05
Accession number:
2006.0192
Catalog number:
2006.0192.05
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Entertainment
Highlights from the Culture and the Arts Collection
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Girl standing under tree in front of houses in Quintas, 1938 October

view Girl standing under tree in front of houses in Quintas, 1938 October digital asset number 1
Creator:
Landes, Ruth 1908-1991
Physical description:
3 photographic prints : black & white ; 3.5 x 5 centimeters and 5 x 3.5 centimeters
Culture:
Brazilians
Afro-Brazilians
Type:
Photographs
Place:
Brazil
Salvador (Brazil)
Bahia (Brazil : State)
Date:
1938
1938 October
Summary:
Photographs from anthropologist Ruth Landes' 1938-1939 field research on Afro-Brazilians and Candomblé in Brazil in the city of Bahia (now known as Salvador).
Handwritten by Landes on versos:
landes-_photo_brazil_91-4_0459 - "N- girl under big tree at Quintas. Washing at house 2 left. Note slopes. Oct. 1938. Barra, Bahia."
landes_photo_brazil_91-4_0511 - "Quintas - Laundry - , N- girl under tree. Oct. 1938."
landes_photo_brazil_91-4_0561 - "Houses climbing up gentle slope in Quintas da Barra - girl on roadside. Oct. 1938."
Cite as:
Image ID #, Brazil: Bahian blacks and candomblé [2 of 3], Box 62, Ruth Landes Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Topic:
Girls
Dwellings
Local number:
Image ID landes_photo_brazil_91-4_0459
Image ID landes_photo_brazil_91-4_0511
Image ID landes_photo_brazil_91-4_0561
See more items in:
Field photographs from Bahia, Brazil 1938 - 1939
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
Additional Online Media:

Little girl on a chair, [ca. 1880s] [graphic]

view Little girl on a chair, [ca. 1880s] [graphic] digital asset number 1
Photographer:
Nihon Shashinkai
Nihon Shashinkai
Collector:
Rosin, Henry D Dr
Rosin, Nancy
Physical description:
Cartes-de-visite: 1 card; 10.5 x 6.4 cm
Culture:
Portraits
Type:
Photographs
Cartes-de-visite
Place:
Japan
Asia
Date:
ca 1880s
[ca.1880s]
19th century
Notes:
Verso inscribed: "Japan Photographic Association. Baron Stillfried of the firm Stillfried & Anderson. By special appointment. Photographer to his JMP & Royal Austrian Majesty's Court. Yokohama, Japan." "Trapp & Munch, Wien."
Title devised by Henry and Nancy Rosin.
Cite as:
Henry and Nancy Rosin Collection of Early Photography of Japan. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. Partial purchase and gift of Henry and Nancy Rosin, 1999-2001
Topic:
Photography
Girls
Local number:
FSA A1999.35 489
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday through Thursday 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Please contact the Archives to make an appointment: AVRreference@si.edu
See more items in:
Henry and Nancy Rosin Collection of Early Photography of Japan 1860 - ca. 1900
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Additional Online Media:

Cover Girl Advertising Oral History and Documentation Project, 1923-1991

view Cover Girl Advertising Oral History and Documentation Project, 1923-1991 digital asset number 1
Donor:
Noxell Corporation
Poris, George
Weithas, Art
Interviewee:
Bergin, John
Brinkley, Christie
Bunting, George L. Jr
Colonel, Sheri
Ford, Eileen
Giordano, Lynn
Grathwohl, Geraldine
Hall, L. C. "Bates"
Harrison, Fran
Huebner, Dick
Hunt, William D
Lindsay, Robert
MacDougall, Malcolm
McIver, Karen
Nash, Helen
Noble, Stan
Oelbaum, Carol
O'Neill, Jennifer
Pelligrino, Nick
Roberts, F. Stone
Tiegs, Cheryl
Troup, Peter
Witt, Norbert
Author:
Ellsworth, Scott Dr
Subject:
Noxzema Chemical Company
Physical description:
15.5 cu. ft.: 33 boxes
Culture:
Latinas Beauty culture
Hispanic Americans
Type:
Bumper stickers
Collection descriptions
Interviews
Business records
Audiotapes
Tear sheets
Television scripts
Videotapes
Scrapbooks
Oral histories (document genres)
Press releases
Annual reports
Photographs
Place:
Maryland
Baltimore (Md.)
Hunt Valley (Maryland)
Date:
1959
1990
1923-1991
1950-2000
1890-1900
1950-1990
20th century
1990-2000
Notes:
This project is the result of a year-long study of advertising created for the Noxell Corporation's Cover Girl make-up products, 1959-1990. The effort was supported in part by a grant from the Noxell Corporation. The target audience was identified as women 18-54, and initially, the "glamour" ads were targeted at women's magazines, while the "medicated" claims were reserved for teen magazines. Television ads featured both elements. Cover Girl advertising has always featured beautiful women (especially Caucasian women), but the Cover Girl image evolved over time to conform with changing notions of beauty. In the late 1950s-1960s, the Cover Girl was refined and aloof, a fashion conscious sophisticate. By the 1970s, a new social emphasis on looking and dressing "naturally" and the introduction of the "Clean Make-up" campaign created a new advertising focus on the wholesome glamour of the "girl next door," a blue-eyed, blonde all-American image. Through the 1980s, the Cover Girl look was updated to include African-American and Hispanic models and images of women at work.
Summary:
Twenty-two oral history interviews (conducted by Dr. Scott Ellsworth for the Archives Center) and a variety of print and television advertisements, photographs, scrapbooks, personal papers, business records and related materials were gathered by the Center for Advertising History staff. The objective was to create a collection that provides documentation, in print and electronic media, of the history and development of advertising for Cover Girl make-up since its inception in 1959.
Collection also includes earlier material related to other Noxell products, including Noxzema, with no direct connection to the Cover Girl campaign.
Cite as:
Cover Girl Advertising Oral History & Documentation Project, 1923-1991, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Topic:
African American women--Beauty culture
Beauty culture
Advertising
Endorsements in advertising
Radio advertising
Sex role in advertising
Television advertising
Women in advertising
Modelling
Cosmetics--Advertising
Restrictions:
Unrestricted research access on site
See more items in:
Cover Girl Advertising Oral History and Documentation Project
Data Source:
Archives Center - NMAH
Additional Online Media:

Puma Sneakers, worn by B-Girl Laneski

view Puma Sneakers, worn by B-Girl Laneski digital asset number 1
User:
B-Girl Laneski
Maker:
Puma
Physical Description:
leather (overall material)
rubber (overall material)
fabric (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 4 in x 8 in x 10 in; 10.16 cm x 20.32 cm x 25.4 cm
right shoe: 4 3/8 in x 4 in x 10 1/4 in; 11.1125 cm x 10.16 cm x 26.035 cm
left shoe: 4 in x 4 in x 10 1/4 in; 10.16 cm x 10.16 cm x 26.035 cm
Object Name:
shoes, pair of
Place made:
Taiwan
Date made:
1984
Description (Brief):
These shoes were made by Puma, circa 1984. The Dassler Brothers Shoe Factory was founded by Rudolph and Adolph Dassler, in Herzogenaurach, Germany in 1924. The company manufactured track shoes for professional athletes and by 1948, split into two companies, Puma and Adidas.
These Puma Clyde model shoes, named after New York Knicks basketball star Walt “Clyde” Frazier who wore and endorsed them, were popular with graffiti artists in the 1970s and later with hip hop artists in the 1980s.
B-Girl Laneski, (born Lane Davey), wore these shoes around 1984-1985. She was born in Nashville, Tennessee in 1970. Later moving to Seattle, she enrolled in a breakdancing class in 1983, taught by the Seattle Circuit Breakers. The group was impressed with her dancing skills and subsequently gave her the name LaneSki. A pioneer in the male dominated Hip Hop world, Laneski was one of the first female breakdancers to master and develop many of the dance moves created in the early 1980s.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Highlights from the Culture and the Arts Collection
Hip-Hop
Music & Musical Instruments
Clothing & Accessories
Cultures & Communities
ID Number:
2006.0192.01
Accession number:
2006.0192
Catalog number:
2006.0192.01
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Entertainment
Highlights from the Culture and the Arts Collection
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Adidas Sneakers, worn by B-Girl Laneski

view Adidas Sneakers, worn by B-Girl Laneski digital asset number 1
User:
B-Girl Laneski
Maker:
Adidas
Physical Description:
leather (overall material)
rubber (overall material)
fabric (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 4 in x 8 in x 10 in; 10.16 cm x 20.32 cm x 25.4 cm
right shoe: 4 1/2 in x 4 in x 10 1/2 in; 11.43 cm x 10.16 cm x 26.67 cm
left shoe: 4 1/8 in x 4 in x 10 5/8 in; 10.4775 cm x 10.16 cm x 26.9875 cm
Object Name:
shoes, pair of
Place made:
France
Date made:
1984
Description (Brief):
These shoes were made by Adidas, circa 1984. The Dassler Brothers Shoe Factory was founded by Rudolph and Adolph Dassler, in Herzogenaurach, Germany in 1924. The company manufactured track shoes for professional athletes and by 1948, split into two companies, Puma and Adidas.
These Three Stripe Basketball model sneakers were popular with hip hop artists such as Run-DMC in the 1980s.
B-Girl Laneski, (born Lane Davey), wore these shoes around 1984-1985. She was born in Nashville, Tennessee in 1970. Later moving to Seattle, she enrolled in a breakdancing class in 1983, taught by the Seattle Circuit Breakers. The group was impressed with her dancing skills and subsequently gave her the name LaneSki. A pioneer in the male dominated Hip Hop world, Laneski was one of the first female breakdancers to master and develop many of the dance moves created in the early 1980s.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Highlights from the Culture and the Arts Collection
Hip-Hop
Music & Musical Instruments
Clothing & Accessories
Cultures & Communities
ID Number:
2006.0192.02
Accession number:
2006.0192
Catalog number:
2006.0192.02
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Entertainment
Highlights from the Culture and the Arts Collection
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Factory Girl’s Song

view Factory Girl’s Song digital asset number 1
Physical Description:
paper (overall material)
printer's ink (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 9 1/2 in x 5 3/4 in; 24.13 cm x 14.605 cm
Object Name:
broadside
Place made:
United States
Date made:
1840s
Description:
This broadside contains the lyrics to “The Factory Girl’s Song,” a folk song whose origins date back at least to the 1830s. The song’s nineteen 4-line stanzas describe the daily work of the mill girls in different jobs: spinning, weaving, and dressing the finished cloth. At the end the singer tells of returning home to marry, giving up the rigors of tending the machinery and working for harsh overseers. The song may have originated in Lowell, Massachusetts, but some scholars suggest that the reference to wages earned in “shillings” instead of dollars may mean it had connections to Canadian immigrants to the Lowell textile mills. Several iterations of the song are known, including “The Lowell Factory Girl”, “The Factory Girl’s Come-All-Ye” from Lewiston, Maine, and generalized versions titled “Factory Girl.”
Subject:
Cultures & Communities
Work
Industry & Manufacturing
American Enterprise
ID Number:
2013.0125.01
Accession number:
2013.0125
Catalog number:
2013.0125.01
See more items in:
Home and Community Life: Textiles
American Enterprise
Exhibition:
American Enterprise
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

[Three women and a girl], Before 1877. [graphic]

view [Three women and a girl], Before 1877. [graphic] digital asset number 1
Photographer:
Beato, Felice b. ca. 1825
Collector:
Rosin, Henry D Dr
Rosin, Nancy
Subject:
Beato, Felice b. ca. 1825
Physical description:
1 Photographic print : hand coloring ; image 22.5 x 19.5 cm., on mount 39.2 x 47.5 cm
Type:
Photographs
Photographic prints
Place:
Japan
Asia
Date:
Before 1877
19th century
Notes:
Title devised by Henry and Nancy Rosin.
Felice Beato was born in Venice around 1825. During his lifetime, he accompanied the British troops in India, recording images of the Indian Mutiny in 1857, and the Franco-British troops in China to cover the end of the Second Opium War in 1859. With his friend Charles Wirgman, Beato opened a photography studio in Yokohama, Japan in the early 1860s, and produced many images of the Japanese and their lifestyle, as interpreted by the Westerners. Selling his studio to Baron von Stillfried in 1877, Beato eventually died in Burma around 1908.
Summary:
Three ornately dressed young women with powdered faces and dressed hair pose in an outdoor setting. A young girl dressed in rags stands to the right of the trio.
According to Henry Rosin, this print demonstrates Beato's artistry as as a master of capturing social conflicts.
This print is a pair with Baron von Stillfried's print of the same image, with the exception of the young ragged girl. (Rosin number 139) When von Stillfried purchased Beato's studio in 1877, he also purchased Beato's negatives, of which included "Three women and a girl." Since von Stillfried's studio was for commercial uses, he cropped out the young girl and cut the photo. Only very rarely can one find such clear evidence of the artistry of Beato and the commercialization of von Stillfried.
Cite as:
Henry and Nancy Rosin Collection of Early Photography of Japan. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. Partial purchase and gift of Henry and Nancy Rosin, 1999-2001
Topic:
Photography
Kimonos
Fashion
Women
Girls
Portraits
Local number:
FSA A1999.35 138
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday through Thursday 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Please contact the Archives to make an appointment: AVRreference@si.edu
See more items in:
Henry and Nancy Rosin Collection of Early Photography of Japan 1860 - ca. 1900
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives

Young Girl

view Young Girl digital asset number 1
Artist:
Adeline Oppenheim Guimard
Medium:
Brush and white gouache, brown, red watercolor over photograph
Culture:
French
Type:
portraits
Photograph
Object Name:
Photograph
Made in:
France
Catalogue Status:
Research in Progress
Description:
Portrait of young girl.
Accession Number:
1956-77-10
See more items in:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum Collection
Drawings, Prints, and Graphic Design Department
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

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