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Secretary Small

Author:
McCrea, Terry G
Subject:
Small, Lawrence M
Smithsonian Institution Building (Washington, D.C.)
Physical description:
Number of Images: 1 Color: Color ; Size: 8.1w x 9.89h ; Type of Image: Portrait ; Medium: Digital Image
Type:
Portraits
Digital Image
Date:
July 31, 2001
Topic:
Portraits
Secretary of the Smithsonian--Office
Secretaries
Standard number:
2001-7964.10
Restrictions:
No restrictions
Category:
Historic Images of the Smithsonian
Summary:
Photograph of Secretary Small in the Parlor in the Castle
Contained within:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 11-009, Digital Logbook, SPS
Contact information:
Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Archives, 600 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20024-2520, SIHistory@si.edu
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Visitor Tag(s):

Secretary Small with Rare Book from SI Libraries

Author:
Talman, Hugh
Subject:
Small, Lawrence M
Smithsonian Institution Libraries (SIL)
Physical description:
Number of Images: 1; Color: Color ; Size: 8w x 10h ; Type of Image: Interior ; Medium: [Photographic print
Type:
Photographic print
Interior
Date:
January 29, 2001
Topic:
Libraries
Standard number:
2001-901.07
Restrictions:
No restrictions
Category:
Historic Images of the Smithsonian
Summary:
Smithsonian Secretary Lawrence M. Small with rare natural history books from the Smithsonian Institution Libraries Collection in the Secretary's Parlor, Smithsonian Castle
Contained within:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 11-009, Smithsonian Photographic Services Collection
Contact information:
Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Archives, 600 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20024-2520, SIHistory@si.edu
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Visitor Tag(s):

Secretary Small Departs from Smithsonian

Subject:
Small, Lawrence M
Samper, Cristián
Risser, Paul G
Sant, Roger W
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.)
University of Oklahoma
Board of Regents
Date:
March 24, 2007
Topic:
Secretaries
Secretariats
Resignations
Acting Secretaries
Museum directors
Appointments
Category:
Chronology of Smithsonian History
Notes:
Olson, Elizabeth, "Embattled Smithsonian Official Resigns," The New York Times, 3/27/2007
Trescott, Jacqueline, and James V. Grimaldi, "Smithsonian's Small Quits in Wake of Inquiry," The Washington Post, 3/27/2007, Section A
Summary:
Lawrence M. Small, the 11th Smithsonian Secretary, 2000-2007, submits his resignation to the Board of Regents amid questions over management practices at the Institution. The Board of Regent Executive Committee Chair Roger W. Sant announces the resignation on Monday, March 26, 2007. Dr. Cristián Samper, director of the National Museum of Natural History, is named Acting Secretary. Dr. Paul G. Risser, chair of the University of Oklahoma Research Cabinet and chair of the Science Board of the National Museum of Natural History board of directors, is named Acting Director of the National Museum of Natural History and serves until January 25, 2008
Contact information:
Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Institution Archives, 600 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20024-2520, SIHistory@si.edu
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Visitor Tag(s):

Joseph Henry, First Smithsonian Secretary

Author:
Peale, Titian Ramsay
Subject:
Henry, Joseph 1797-1878
Physical description:
Color: Black and White; Size: 2.5w x 4h; Type of Image: Portrait; Medium: Card photograph
Type:
Card photograph
Portraits
Date:
1862
Topic:
Secretaries
Secretariats
Portraits
Standard number:
10603 or MAH-10603
Restrictions:
No restrictions
Category:
Historic Images of the Smithsonian
Notes:
There are two small card photographs of this image at this location (each 2.5w x 4h). There is also a small print of this image mounted on a card (total size 4.25w x 6.5h) at this location. Two prints of this image are located in SIA RU95 B11 F3. One image also has negative #10603 (size 5.75w x 7.5h), but the image is reversed (Henry is facing left). The other is negative #75630 and is a cleaned image of the original print (size 6.75w x 8h)
Summary:
Card photograph portrait of Joseph Henry (1797-1878), physicist and first Smithsonian Secretary (1846-1878). Henry is seated, facing right, and wearing glasses in this portrait
Contained within:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 95, Box 27-B
Contact information:
Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Institution Archives, 600 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20024-2520, SIHistory@si.edu
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Visitor Tag(s):

Larry Small and Kenneth E. Behring

Author:
Talman, Hugh
Subject:
Small, Lawrence M
Behring, Kenneth E. 1928-
Physical description:
Number of Images: 1 Color: Color ; Size: 9.50w x 7.04h ; Type of Image: Group, Candid ; Medium: Digital Image
Type:
Group, candid
Digital Image
Date:
September 19, 2000
Topic:
Gifts
Secretaries
Standard number:
2000-9295.08a
Restrictions:
No restrictions
Category:
Historic Images of the Smithsonian
Summary:
Kenneth E. Behring (right) at the press announcement of his gift of $80 million to the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History. With Smithsonian Secretary Lawrence Small (left)
Contained within:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 11-009, Digital Logbook, SPS
Contact information:
Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Archives, 600 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20024-2520, SIHistory@si.edu
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
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Secretary Charles D. Walcott and Men at a Field Camp

Author:
Unknown
Subject:
Walcott, Charles D (Charles Doolittle) 1850-1927
Physical description:
Color: Black and White; Size: 10w x 8h; Type of Image: Group, candid; Medium: Photographic print
Type:
Photographic print
Group, candid
Date:
Unknown, some time in the 1910s or 1920s
Topic:
Secretaries
Secretariats
Research expeditions
Animals
Scientific expeditions
Standard number:
82-3134
Restrictions:
No restrictions
Category:
Historic Images of the Smithsonian
Summary:
Fourth Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution (1907-1927) Charles D. Walcott at camp in the field. In this image, Secretary Walcott is seen here wearing a hat with an upturned brim and walking behind four unidentified men. One man is sharpening an ax blade. The other three men are in the process of skinning some small animals, either beavers or woodchucks. Tents are visible in the background
Contained within:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 95, Box 24, Folder 3A
Contact information:
Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Institution Archives, 600 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20024-2520, SIHistory@si.edu
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
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Formosa, Argentina During Secretary Wetmore's Field Work

Author:
Wetmore, Alexander 1886-
Subject:
United States Bureau of Biological Survey
Physical description:
Color: Black and White; Size: 4w x 3h; Type of Image: Exterior; Medium: Photographic print
Type:
Photographic print
Exterior
Date:
August 4, 1920
Topic:
Secretaries
Field Work
Formosa, Argentina
Secretariats
Ornithology
Scientific expeditions
Argentina
Standard number:
SIA2012-0869 or B. S. 22006
Restrictions:
No restrictions
Category:
Historic Images of the Smithsonian
Notes:
There are a variety of pictures from Wetmore's field work in Latin America at this SIA location
Summary:
Residence and offices of the Governor of Formosa in Formosa, Argentina on August 4, 1920. This photograph shows most of the building along with its large covered porch that circles the entire structure. There is a small horse and buggy with two unidentified people next the building. This photograph was taken by Alexander Wetmore, noted ornithologist and sixth Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, 1944-1952, while conducting field work for the United States Bureau of Biological Survey throughout the islands of the Caribbean and various Latin American countries
Contained within:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7006, Box 170, Album: I "Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay - 1920"
Contact information:
Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Institution Archives, 600 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20024-2520, SIHistory@si.edu
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Visitor Tag(s):

Charadrai, Argentina Taken During Secretary Wetmore's Field Work

Author:
Wetmore, Alexander 1886-
Subject:
United States Bureau of Biological Survey
Physical description:
Color: Black and White; Size: 4w x 3h; Type of Image: Landscape; Medium: Photographic print
Type:
Photographic print
Landscape
Date:
July 5, 1920
Topic:
Secretaries
Field Work
Charadrai, Argentina
Secretariats
Ornithology
Scientific expeditions
Argentina
Houses
Standard number:
SIA2012-0846 or Wetmore #1344
Restrictions:
No restrictions
Category:
Historic Images of the Smithsonian
Notes:
There are a variety of pictures from Wetmore's field work in Latin America at this SIA location
Summary:
Photograph of Charadrai, a typical town in the newly settled section of Chaco, Argentina. Several small one-story buildings are visible in this image. This photograph was taken by Alexander Wetmore, noted ornithologist and sixth Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, 1944-1952, while conducting field work for the United States Bureau of Biological Survey throughout the islands of the Caribbean and various Latin American countries
Contained within:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7006, Box 170, Album: I "Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay - 1920"
Contact information:
Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Institution Archives, 600 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20024-2520, SIHistory@si.edu
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Visitor Tag(s):

Alberdi, Paraguay During Secretary Wetmore's Field Work

Author:
Wetmore, Alexander 1886-
Subject:
United States Bureau of Biological Survey
Physical description:
Color: Black and White; Size: 4w x 3h; Type of Image: Landscape, Exterior; Medium: Photographic print
Type:
Photographic print
Landscape
Exterior
Date:
August 26, 1920
Topic:
Secretaries
Field Work
Alberdi, Paraguay
Secretariats
Ornithology
Scientific expeditions
Paraguay
Paraguayans
Standard number:
SIA2012-0857 or Wetmore #1387
Restrictions:
No restrictions
Category:
Historic Images of the Smithsonian
Notes:
There are a variety of pictures from Wetmore's field work in Latin America at this SIA location
Summary:
Photograph of a street in Alberdi, Paraguay, at high noon. Small, open, thatch roofed structures line a dirt road with several small trees scattered throughout the area. A dog is asleep in the middle of the road and several people are sitting and standing in front of one of the structures. This photograph was taken by Alexander Wetmore, noted ornithologist and sixth Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, 1944-1952, while conducting field work for the United States Bureau of Biological Survey throughout the islands of the Caribbean and various Latin American countries
Contained within:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7006, Box 170, Album I: "Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay - 1920"
Contact information:
Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Institution Archives, 600 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20024-2520, SIHistory@si.edu
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Visitor Tag(s):

Las Palmas, Argentina During Secretary Wetmore's Field Work

Author:
Wetmore, Alexander 1886-
Subject:
United States Bureau of Biological Survey
Physical description:
Color: Black and White; Size: 4w x 3h; Type of Image: Animal, candid; Medium: Photographic print
Type:
Photographic print
Animal, candid
Date:
July 13, 1920
Topic:
Secretaries
Field Work
Las Palmas, Argentina
Birds
Secretariats
Ornithology
Scientific expeditions
Argentina
Horses
Standard number:
SIA2012-0867 or B. S. 21957
Restrictions:
No restrictions
Category:
Historic Images of the Smithsonian
Notes:
There are a variety of pictures from Wetmore's field work in Latin America at this SIA location
Summary:
Photograph of Shining cowbirds, Molothrus bonariensis, warming their feet on a cold winter's morning by standing on the back of a horse in Las Palmas within Chaco, Argentina on July 13, 1920. The horse and birds are in a small field next to a one story house. This photograph was taken by Alexander Wetmore, noted ornithologist and sixth Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, 1944-1952, while conducting field work for the United States Bureau of Biological Survey throughout the islands of the Caribbean and various Latin American countries
Contained within:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7006, Box 170, Album: I "Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay - 1920"
Contact information:
Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Institution Archives, 600 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20024-2520, SIHistory@si.edu
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Visitor Tag(s):

Las Palmas, Argentina During Secretary Wetmore's Field Work

Author:
Wetmore, Alexander 1886-
Subject:
United States Bureau of Biological Survey
Physical description:
Color: Black and White; Size: 4w x 3h; Type of Image: Group, candid; Medium: Photographic print
Type:
Photographic print
Group, candid
Date:
July 19, 1920
Topic:
Secretaries
Field Work
Las Palmas, Argentina
Secretariats
Ornithology
Scientific expeditions
Argentina
Horses
Argentines
Standard number:
SIA2012-0848 or Wetmore # 1352
Restrictions:
No restrictions
Category:
Historic Images of the Smithsonian
Notes:
There are a variety of pictures from Wetmore's field work in Latin America at this SIA location
Summary:
Photograph of three unidentified men and one boy sitting on a fence at a wayside boliche, combination store and drinking place, in Las Palmas within Chaco, Argentina. On the right of the photo is a horse with a saddle and to the left of the image is the boliche, a small, mud-brick and thatch roof building. This photograph was taken by Alexander Wetmore, noted ornithologist and sixth Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, 1944-1952, while conducting field work for the United States Bureau of Biological Survey throughout the islands of the Caribbean and various Latin American countries
Contained within:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7006, Box 170, Album: I "Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay - 1920"
Contact information:
Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Institution Archives, 600 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20024-2520, SIHistory@si.edu
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Visitor Tag(s):

An Evening with Smithsonian Secretary Wayne Clough

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution
Type:
Conversations and talks
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2010-07-15T14:39:52.000Z
Metadata Updated:
2013-08-27T14:17:07.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education
Views:
390
Video Title:
An Evening with Smithsonian Secretary Wayne Clough
Description:
Leading the world's largest museum and research complex comprising 19 museums, nine research centers, the National Zoo, and research activities in more than 90 countries is no small job. But Wayne Clough, the 12th secretary of the Smithsonian, is more than up to it. Since becoming secretary in July 2008, he has overseen several major openings at the Smithsonian, including the Sant Ocean Hall and the David H. Koch Hall of Human Origins at the National Museum of Natural History, and the reopening of the National Museum of American History. Secretary Clough, who holds a doctorate in civil engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, and who served for 14 years as president of the Georgia Institute of Technology before coming to the Smithsonian, envisions a new era for the 164-year-old Institution. In this special evening, he shares his vision for expanding the Smithsonian's relevance globally and helping the nation shape its future through cutting-edge research, education, and scientific discovery. He discusses one of his first initiatives, which led to the Smithsonian's new strategic plan. The plan speaks to four grand challenges that will bring together the diverse resources of the Smithsonian's museums and science centers through interdisciplinary approaches and that will help ensure that the Institution's vast collection is accessible to everyone. He also talks about the challenges the Smithsonian faces as it moves forward in the 21st century. Following his talk, Secretary Clough responds to questions from the audience.
Video Duration:
5192 seconds
See more by:
SmithsonianVideos
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianVideos
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution
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Nurse and Secretary to the Astronauts

Artist:
Chrystal Jackson
Medium:
Painting, Watercolor and Ink on Paper
Dimensions:
2-D - Unframed (H x W): 20.2 x 24.8cm (7 15/16 x 9 3/4 in.)
2-D - Unframed (H x W) (Mounted): 30.5 x 45.4cm (12 in. x 17 7/8 in.)
Type:
ART-Paintings
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Credit Line:
Transferred from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Inventory Number:
A19781222000
Rights:
Do not reproduce without permission from the Smithsonian Institution, National Air and Space Museum
Physical Description:
The nurse, Dee O'Hara, and the secretary, Lola Marlow, to the astronauts, page 37.
Summary:
In March 1962, James Webb, Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, suggested that artists be enlisted to document the historic effort to send the first human beings to the moon. John Walker, director of the National Gallery of Art, was among those who applauded the idea, urging that artists be encouraged "…not only to record the physical appearance of the strange new world which space technology is creating, but to edit, select and probe for the inner meaning and emotional impact of events which may change the destiny of our race."
Working together, James Dean, a young artist employed by the NASA Public Affairs office, and Dr. H. Lester Cooke, curator of paintings at the National Gallery of Art, created a program that dispatched artists to NASA facilities with an invitation to paint whatever interested them. The result was an extraordinary collection of works of art proving, as one observer noted, "that America produced not only scientists and engineers capable of shaping the destiny of our age, but also artists worthy to keep them company." Transferred to the National Air and Space Museum in 1975, the NASA art collection remains one of the most important elements of what has become perhaps the world's finest collection of aerospace themed art.
Long Description:
The spring of 1962 was a busy time for the men and women of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. On February 20, John H. Glenn became the first American to orbit the earth. For the first time since the launch of Sputnik 1 on October 4, 1957, the U.S. was positioned to match and exceed Soviet achievements in space. NASA was an agency with a mission -- to meet President John F. Kennedy's challenge of sending human beings to the moon and returning them safely to earth by the end of the decade. Within a year, three more Mercury astronauts would fly into orbit. Plans were falling into place for a follow-on series of two-man Gemini missions that would set the stage for the Apollo voyages to the moon.
In early March 1962, artist Bruce Stevenson brought his large portrait of Alan Shepard, the first American to fly in space, to NASA headquarters.(1) James E. Webb, the administrator of NASA, assumed that the artist was interested in painting a similar portrait of all seven of the Mercury astronauts. Instead, Webb voiced his preference for a group portrait that would emphasize "…the team effort and the togetherness that has characterized the first group of astronauts to be trained by this nation." More important, the episode convinced the administrator that "…we should consider in a deliberate way just what NASA should do in the field of fine arts to commemorate the …historic events" of the American space program.(2)
In addition to portraits, Webb wanted to encourage artists to capture the excitement and deeper meaning of space flight. He imagined "a nighttime scene showing the great amount of activity involved in the preparation of and countdown for launching," as well as paintings that portrayed activities in space. "The important thing," he concluded, "is to develop a policy on how we intend to treat this matter now and in the next several years and then to get down to the specifics of how we intend to implement this policy…." The first step, he suggested, was to consult with experts in the field, including the director of the National Gallery of Art, and the members of the Fine Arts Commission, the arbiters of architectural and artistic taste who passed judgment on the appearance of official buildings and monuments in the nation's capital.
Webb's memo of March 16, 1962 was the birth certificate of the NASA art program. Shelby Thompson, the director of the agency's Office of Educational Programs and Services, assigned James Dean, a young artist working as a special assistant in his office, to the project. On June 19, 1962 Thompson met with the Fine Arts Commission, requesting advice as to how "…NASA should develop a basis for use of paintings and sculptures to depict significant historical events and other activities in our program."(3)
David E. Finley, the chairman and former director of the National Gallery of Art, applauded the idea, and suggested that the agency should study the experience of the U.S. Air Force, which had amassed some 800 paintings since establishing an art program in 1954. He also introduced Thompson to Hereward Lester Cooke, curator of paintings at the National Gallery of Art.
An imposing bear of a man standing over six feet tall, Lester Cooke was a graduate of Yale and Oxford, with a Princeton PhD. The son of a physics professor and a veteran of the U.S. Army Air Forces, he was both fascinated by science and felt a personal connection to flight. On a professional level, Cooke had directed American participation in international art competitions and produced articles and illustrations for the National Geographic Magazine. He jumped at the chance to advise NASA on its art program.
While initially cautious with regard to the time the project might require of one of his chief curators, John Walker, director of the National Gallery, quickly became one of the most vocal supporters of the NASA art initiative. Certain that "the present space exploration effort by the United States will probably rank among the more important events in the history of mankind," Walker believed that "every possible method of documentation …be used." Artists should be expected "…not only to record the physical appearance of the strange new world which space technology is creating, but to edit, select and probe for the inner meaning and emotional impact of events which may change the destiny of our race." He urged quick action so that "the full flavor of the achievement …not be lost," and hoped that "the past held captive" in any paintings resulting from the effort "will prove to future generations that America produced not only scientists and engineers capable of shaping the destiny of our age, but also artists worthy to keep them company."(4)
Gordon Cooper, the last Mercury astronaut to fly, was scheduled to ride an Atlas rocket into orbit on May 15, 1963. That event would provide the ideal occasion for a test run of the plan Cooke and Dean evolved to launch the art program. In mid-February, Cooke provided Thompson with a list of the artists who should be invited to travel to Cape Canaveral to record their impressions of the event. Andrew Wyeth, whom the curator identified as "the top artist in the U.S. today," headed the list. When the time came, however, Andrew Wyeth did not go to the Cape for the Cooper launch, but his son Jamie would participate in the program during the Gemini and Apollo years.
The list of invited artists also included Peter Hurd, Andrew Wyeth's brother-in-law, who had served as a wartime artist with the Army Air Force; George Weymouth, whom Wyeth regarded as "the best of his pupils"; and John McCoy, another Wyeth associate. Cooke regarded the next man on the list, Robert McCall, who had been running the Air Force art program, as "America's top aero-space illustrator. Paul Calle and Robert Shore had both painted for the Air Force program. Mitchell Jamieson, who had run a unit of the Navy art program during WW II, rounded out the program. Alfred Blaustein was the only artist to turn down the invitation.
The procedures that would remain in place for more than a decade were given a trial run in the spring of 1963. The artists received an $800 commission, which had to cover any expenses incurred while visiting a NASA facility where they could paint whatever interested them. In return, they would present their finished pieces, and all of their sketches, to the space agency. The experiment was a success, and what might have been a one-time effort to dispatch artists to witness and record the Gordon Cooper flight provided the basis for an on-going, if small-scale, program. By the end of 1970, Jim Dean and Lester Cooke had dispatched 38 artists to Mercury, Gemini and Apollo launches and to other NASA facilities.
The art program became everything that Jim Webb had hoped it would be. NASA artists produced stunning works of art that documented the agency's step-by-step progress on the way to the moon. The early fruits of the program were presented in a lavishly illustrated book, Eyewitness to Space (New York: Abrams, 1971). Works from the collection illustrated NASA publications and were the basis for educational film strips aimed at school children. In 1965 and again in 1969 the National Gallery of Art mounted two major exhibitions of work from the NASA collection. The USIA sent a selection of NASA paintings overseas, while the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service created two exhibitions of NASA art that toured the nation.
"Since we …began," Dean noted in a reflection on the tenth anniversary of the program, the art initiative had resulted in a long string of positive "press interviews and reports, congressional inquiries, columns in the Congressional Record, [and] White House reports." The NASA effort, he continued, had directly inspired other government art programs. "The Department of the Interior (at least two programs), the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of the Army and even the Veterans Administration have, or are starting, art programs." While he could not take all of the credit, Dean insisted that "our success has encouraged other agencies to get involved and they have succeeded, too."(5)
For all of that, he noted, it was still necessary to "defend" the role of art in the space agency. Dean, with the assistance of Lester Cooke, had been a one-man show, handling the complex logistics of the program, receiving and cataloguing works of art, hanging them himself in museums or on office walls, and struggling to find adequate storage space. In January 1976, a NASA supervisor went so far as to comment that: "Mr. Dean is far too valuable in other areas to spend his time on the relatively menial …jobs he is often burdened with in connection with the art program."(6) Dean placed a much higher value on the art collection, and immediately recommended that NASA officials either devote additional resources to the program, or get out of the art business and turn the existing collection over the National Air and Space Museum, "where it can be properly cared for."(7)
In January 1974 a new building for the National Air and Space Museum (NASM) was taking shape right across the street from NASA headquarters. Discussions regarding areas of cooperation were already underway between NASA officials and museum director Michael Collins, who had flown to the moon as a member of the Apollo 11 crew. Before the end of the year, the space agency had transferred its art collection to the NASM. Mike Collins succeeded in luring Jim Dean to the museum, as well.
The museum already maintained a small art collection, including portraits of aerospace heroes, an assortment of 18th and 19th century prints illustrating the early history of the balloon, an eclectic assortment of works portraying aspects of the history of aviation and a few recent prizes, including several Norman Rockwell paintings of NASA activity. With the acquisition of the NASA art, the museum was in possession of one of the world's great collections of art exploring aerospace themes. Jim Dean would continue to build the NASM collection as the museum's first curator of art. Following his retirement in 1980, other curators would follow in his footsteps, continuing to strengthen the role of art at the NASM. Over three decades after its arrival, however, the NASA art accession of 2,091 works still constitutes almost half of the NASM art collection.
(1) Stevenson's portrait is now in the collection of the National Air and Space Museum (1981-627)
(2) James E. Webb to Hiden Cox, March 16, 1962, memorandum in the NASA art historical collection, Aeronautics Division, National air and Space Museum. Webb's preference for a group portrait of the astronauts was apparently not heeded. In the end, Stevenson painted an individual portrait of John Glenn, which is also in the NASM collection (1963-398).
(3) Shelby Thompson, memorandum for the record, July 6, 1962, NASA art historical collection, NASA, Aeronautics Division.
(4) John Walker draft of a talk, March 5, 1965, copy in NASA Art historical collection, NASM Aeronautics Division.
(5) James Dean, memorandum for the record, August 6, 1973, NASA art history collection, NASM Aeronautics Division.
(6) Director of Planning and Media Development to Assistant Administrator for Public Affairs, January 24, 1974, NASA art history collection, NASM Aeronautics Division.
(7) James Dean to the Assistant Administrator for Public Affairs, January 24, 1974, copy in NASA Art history Collection, Aeronautics Division, NASM.
Tom D. Crouch
Senior Curator, Aeronautics
National Air and Space Museum
Smithsonian Institution
July 26, 2007
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
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Danish Legation Secretary with Members of Rasmussen Expedition

Author:
Unknown
Subject:
Arnarulunguak
Boysen, A. K
Hansen, Leo
Miteq
Rasmussen, Knud 1879-1933
Denmark Legation
Physical description:
Number of Images: 1; Color: Black and white; Size:10w x 8h; Type of Image: Group; Medium: Photographic print
Type:
Photographic print
Group, candid
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
1924
Topic:
Arctic peoples
Diplomats
Eskimos
Explorers
Photographers
Standard number:
2005-8651
Category:
Historic Images of the Smithsonian
Notes:
Born in Greenland of a Danish missionary father and an Inuit mother, Knud Johan Victor Rasmussen, 1879-1933, was a Danish arctic explorer and ethnologist, who between 1921 and 1924, led a small band of colleagues in a journey of investigation across arctic North America from Hudson Bay to the Bering Strait. In 1910 he established his Thule station at Cape York, Greenland, the base for seven expeditions, five led by Rasmussen himself. Rasmussen was an excellent explorer, interpreter, and translator. He documented many Inuit legends that may have gone unnoticed without him. His work helped future explorers and he will always be remembered as the first man to cross the Northwest Passage by dog sled. He made a visit in 1924 to Washington, D.C., with several of his expedition companions. The visit was documented by Science Service, a news service established in 1920, which also publicized his expeditions. For a similar shot, see Neg. # 2005-8656
Summary:
Four members of the Rasmussen expedition who visited the Danish legation at Washington, D.C., are from left to right, Leo Hansen, photographer of the expedition, Armarulunguak, Knud Rasmussen, A. K. Boysen, secretary of the Danish legation, and Miteq
Contained within:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Science Service Records, Record Unit 7091, Box 409, Folder 2
Contact information:
Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Institution Archives, 600 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20024-2520, SIHistory@si.edu
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Visitor Tag(s):

Danish Legation Secretary with Armarulunguak and Miteq

Author:
Unknown
Subject:
Arnarulunguak
Boysen, A. K
Miteq
Rasmussen, Knud 1879-1933
Denmark Legation
Physical description:
Number of Images: 1; Color: Black and white; Size: 10w x 8h; Type of Image: Group; Medium: Photographic print
Type:
Photographic print
Group, candid
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
1924
Topic:
Arctic peoples
Diplomats
Eskimos
Standard number:
2005-8648
Category:
Historic Images of the Smithsonian
Notes:
Born in Greenland of a Danish missionary father and an Inuit mother, Knud Johan Victor Rasmussen, 1879-1933, was a Danish arctic explorer and ethnologist, who between 1921 and 1924, led a small band of colleagues in a journey of investigation across arctic North America from Hudson Bay to the Bering Strait. In 1910 he established his Thule station at Cape York, Greenland, the base for seven expeditions, five led by Rasmussen himself. Rasmussen was an excellent explorer, interpreter, and translator. He documented many Inuit legends that may have gone unnoticed without him. His work helped future explorers and he will always be remembered as the first man to cross the Northwest Passage by dog sled. He made a visit in 1924 to Washington, D.C., with several of his expedition companions. The visit was documented by Science Service, a news service established in 1920, which also publicized his expeditions
Summary:
Armarulunguak (left) and Miteq (right), Eskimos who accompanied Rasmussen on his expeditions, came to Washington, D.C. and met with A. K. Boysen (center), secretary of the Danish Legation. There are two views of the group
Contained within:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Science Service Records, Record Unit 7091, Box 409, Folder 2
Contact information:
Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Institution Archives, 600 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20024-2520, SIHistory@si.edu
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Visitor Tag(s):

Administrative Records, 2003-2006

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution Office of the Secretary
Subject:
Small, Lawrence M
Smithsonian Institution Administration
Physical description:
0.5 cu. ft. (1 document box)
Type:
Manuscripts
Collection descriptions
Date:
2003
2003-2006
Topic:
Museums--Administration
Local number:
SIA Acc. 12-498
Summary:
This accession consists of records documenting the administrative activities of Lawrence M. Small as Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution. The records document issues with regard to the Institution's museums, exhibitions, research, fundraising, programs, and special events. Materials include correspondence and articles
See more items in:
Administrative Records 1835-2009 [Smithsonian Institution Office of the Secretary]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Smithsonian Reception Honoring USPS

Author:
Tinsley, Jeff
Subject:
Small, Lawrence M
United States Postal Service
National Postal Museum (U.S.)
Physical description:
Number of Images: 1 Color: Color ; Size: 10.02w x 6.66h ; Type of Image: Person, Candid ; Medium: Digital Image
Type:
Person, candid
Digital Image
Date:
January 5, 2005
Topic:
Awards
Secretaries
Standard number:
2005-2007
Restrictions:
No restrictions
Category:
Historic Images of the Smithsonian
Summary:
Smithsonian Institution reception honoring United States Postal Service for their continuing support of the National Postal Museum. Smithsonian Secretary Lawrence Small presents Postmaster General John Potter with a piece of Smithsonite to commemorate the occasion
Contained within:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 11-009, Digital Logbook, SPS
Contact information:
Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Archives, 600 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20024-2520, SIHistory@si.edu
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Visitor Tag(s):

Administrative Records, 2000

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution Office of the Secretary
Subject:
Small, Lawrence M
Smithsonian Institution Administration
Physical description:
15 cu. ft. (15 record storage boxes)
Type:
Manuscripts
Collection descriptions
Brochures
Clippings
Compact discs
Black-and-white photographs
Color photographs
Video recordings
Date:
2000
Topic:
Museums--Administration
Local number:
SIA Acc. 05-009
Summary:
This accession includes records documenting the administrative activities of Lawrence M. Small during his first year as Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution. The records document issues with regard to the Institution's museums, exhibitions, research, fundraising, programs, and special events. Materials include correspondence, memoranda, and notes; meeting schedules and minutes; policies; agreements; invitations; conference information; budget summaries; and articles
See more items in:
Administrative Records 1835-2009 [Smithsonian Institution Office of the Secretary]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Administrative Records, 2001

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution Office of the Secretary
Subject:
Small, Lawrence M
Smithsonian Institution Administration
Physical description:
11 cu. ft. (11 record storage boxes)
Type:
Manuscripts
Collection descriptions
Video recordings
Date:
2001
Topic:
Budget
Museums--Administration
Local number:
SIA Acc. 07-145
Summary:
This accession consists of records documenting the administrative activities of Lawrence M. Small during his second year as Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution. The records document issues with regard to the Institution's museums, exhibitions, research, fundraising, programs, and special events. Materials include correspondence, memoranda, and notes; meeting schedules and minutes; policies; agreements; invitations; reports; conference information; budget summaries; lecture papers; articles; and VHS tapes
See more items in:
Administrative Records 1835-2009 [Smithsonian Institution Office of the Secretary]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Administrative Records, 2002

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution Office of the Secretary
Subject:
Small, Lawrence M
Smithsonian Institution Administration
Physical description:
10 cu. ft. (10 record storage boxes)
Type:
Manuscripts
Collection descriptions
Date:
2002
Topic:
Budget
Museums--Administration
Local number:
SIA Acc. 09-087
Summary:
This accession includes records documenting the administrative activities of Lawrence M. Small during his third year as Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution. The records document issues with regard to the Institution's museums, exhibitions, research, fundraising, programs, and special events. Materials include correspondence, memoranda, and notes; meeting schedules and minutes; policies; agreements; invitations; reports; conference information; budget summaries; lecture papers; and articles
See more items in:
Administrative Records 1835-2009 [Smithsonian Institution Office of the Secretary]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

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