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Photograph of Government Gendarmerie (Zandarmeri-e Dawlati) [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 23.5 cm. x 16.8 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s - 1930
Topic:
Military
Portrait photography
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 B.10
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
- Partial handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Photograph of Artillery Batallion [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 23.7 cm. x 18 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1880s - 1930
Topic:
Architecture
Military
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 B.14
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
- Handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Photograph of a Room at the Kakh-i Gulistan (Gulistan Palace Complex), Tehran (Iran) [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Kākh-i Gulistān (Tehran, Iran)
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 20.6 cm. x 15.6 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1880s-1930
Topic:
Architecture
Palaces
Qajar dynasty
Royalty (Nobility)
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 B.19
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
- Partial handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Photograph of Shams-Al Emarat Palace at the Kakh-i Gulistan (Gulistan Palace Complex), Tehran (Iran) [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Kākh-i Gulistān (Tehran, Iran)
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 15.7 cm. x 20.9 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
Ca.1880
Topic:
Architecture
Palaces
Qajar dynasty
Royalty (Nobility)
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 B.20
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
- Faded handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Photograph of the Dari-Ahmasi at the Kakh-i Gulistan (Gulistan Palace Complex), Tehran (Iran) [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Kākh-i Gulistān (Tehran, Iran)
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 20.1 cm. x 15.1 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1880s-1930
Topic:
Architecture
Palaces
Qajar dynasty
Royalty (Nobility)
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 B.23
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
- Handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Photograph of a Man Holding a Book [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 13.1 cm. x 20.4 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s - 1930
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Portrait photography
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 B.30
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
- Handwritten Cyrillic signature (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Photograph of a Begger [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 13.1 cm. x 20 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s - 1930
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Hairstyles
Portrait photography
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 B.35
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
- Handwritten Cyrillic signature (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Photograph of Si-o-Se Pol or Pol-i Allah Verdi Khan (Allah Verdi Khan Bridge), in Isfahan (Iran) [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 21.5 cm. x 16 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Iṣfahān (Iran)
Date:
1880s - 1930
Topic:
Architecture
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 B.03
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
"Isfahan, Zayanda-rud, Si-o-Se pol (Thirty-Three bridges). Built during the reign of Shah Abbas I and under the supervision of one his most powerful army officer, Allah Verdi Khan, the bridge connects the two sides of Zayanda-Rud river, also continuing the famous Chahar Bagh avenue of Isfahan that was being built simultaneously." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Photograph of a Imarat-I Namakdanak (Building of Namakdanak), Isfahan (Iran) [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 21.3 cm. x 16.7 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Iṣfahān (Iran)
Date:
1880s - 1930
Topic:
Architecture
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 B.05
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
"The Safavid structure was built in three storeys and on the same site as the building of Ayina Khana. It was also destroyed in 1889 - along with Ayinakhana - by Zil al-Sultan, Isfahan's governor and the oldest son of Nasir al-Din Shah." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Photograph of Soldiers from Fawj-I Jalali, Isfahan Army Battalion [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 24.6 cm. x 17.4 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s - 1930
Topic:
Military
Portrait photography
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 B.11
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
"The image depicts a group of soldiers, part of Isfahan's army. These soldiers were recruited and trained in Isfahan, to be a part of an army known as Fawj-I Jalali. The army was placed under Zil al-Sultan's supervision (Nasir al-Din Shah's oldest son)." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- Partial handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Photograph of Soldiers' Drill, Including Fawj-I Jalali, Isfahan Army Battalion [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 24.4 cm. x 18.3 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s - 1930
Topic:
Military
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 B.13
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
"The image depicts a group of soldiers s part of Isfahan's army. These soldiers were recruited and trained in Isfahan, to be a part of an army known as Fawj-I Jalali. The army was placed under Zil al-Sultan's supervision (Nasir al-Din Shah's oldest son). The soldiers are shown during what seems to be military practice." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- Handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Photograph of Soldiers' Drill, Including Fawj-I Jalali, Isfahan Army Battalion [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 24.5 cm. x 18 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s - 1930
Topic:
Military
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 B.16
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
"The image depicts a group of soldiers s part of Isfahan's army. These soldiers were recruited and trained in Isfahan, to be a part of an army known as Fawj-I Jalali. The army was placed under Zil al-Sultan's supervision (Nasir al-Din Shah's oldest son). The soldiers are shown during what seems to be military practice." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- Handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Photograph of Ayina-khana (Hall of Mirrors), Isfahan (Iran) [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 22 cm. x 15.8 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Iṣfahān (Iran)
Date:
1880s-1930
Topic:
Architecture
Palaces
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 B.17
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
"The palace of Ayina-Khana was built by Shah Safi (Safavid) in the 17th century to resemble Chihil Sutun, the other royal palace in Isfahan. It was destroyed in 1891 by orders from the Qajar ruler of the city: Zil al-Sultan. Mas'ud Mirza or Zil al-Sultan was Nasir Al-Din Shah's oldest son and the governor of Isfahan for about thirty years." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Photograph of the Imarat-i Badgir (Wind-catcher Building) at the Kakh-i Gulistan (Gulistan Palace Complex), Tehran (Iran) [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Kākh-i Gulistān (Tehran, Iran)
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 20.8 cm. x 16 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1880s-1930
Topic:
Architecture
Palaces
Qajar dynasty
Royalty (Nobility)
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 B.18
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
"The villa was built on the south side the Gulistan Palace complex on the orders of Fath Ali Shah Qajar. Later on and on the orders of Nasir al-Din Shah extensive renovations were carried out on the site and the renovations continued later in the early Pahlavi era as well. The building is currently undergoing fresh rounds of renovations. The photo depicts the structure from the far end of the front pool, carefully framing the structure in the centre of the image. The complete symmetry of the plans allows for such symmetry in the image." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- Handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Photograph of Iwan inside the courtyard of Masjid-i Shah (al-Nabi Mosque), Qazvin (Iran) [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 20 cm. x 15.2 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Qazvīn (Iran)
Date:
1880s-1930
Topic:
Architecture
Religious buildings
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 B.24
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
"The mosque bears the inscription of Fath Ali Shah-i Qajar, but the structure can be dated as far back as mid 18th century." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- Handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Photograph of Imarat-i Atabak (Atabak's Palace), Tehran (Iran) [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 20.5 cm. x 15.2 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1880 - 1890
Topic:
Architecture
Palaces
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 B.25
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
"The park and palace of Atabak was built between 1886 and 1888 on the orders of Mirza Ali Asghar Khan, The second Amin al-Sultan and the chief minister of Nasir al-Din Shah. After Amin al-Sultan's assassination in 1907, the complex, which was a debt collateral with Russian Bank for discounted loans to Amin al-Sultan, was repossessed by the bank and used as the Russian Embassy. The building was destroyed in fire in 1922. Originally only a one storey building, Imarat-i Atabak was renovated around 1900 (based on the earliest published account) to add a second storey to the building. The photo must have been taken after this addition." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- Handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
- Handwritten number (inked) reads, "5431."
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Photograph of a Dallak (Bathhouse Worker) at Work [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 13.1 cm. x 20.8 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
Ca.1900
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Domestic scenes
Hairstyles
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 B.29
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
"The photo depicts a bathhouse worker (Dallak), engaging the gaze of the camera, and a customer sitting with his profile to the viewer. The setting is posed in the artist's studio." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- Handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Photograph of a Dervish [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 13.6 cm. x 20.7 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s - 1930
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Dervishes
Hairstyles
Portrait photography
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 B.36
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
"The photo depicts a man commonly referred to as a Dervish. The man's appearance fits the stereotype of the Dervish type, which is a common theme of portraiture in Sevruguin's portfoli." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- Handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Photograph of a Dervish [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 13.2 cm. x 20.3 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s - 1930
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Dervishes
Headgear
Portrait photography
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 B.41
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
"The portrait is one of the prime examples of 'Dervish' genre in Sevruguin's oeuvre. The christ like features of this set of portraits is their defining feature." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- Handwritten Cyrillic signature (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Photograph of a Man and Two Women [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 13.1 cm. x 20.3 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s - 1930
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Domestic scenes
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 B.52
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
"The man depicted on the far left side of the image appears in other studio portraits of Sevruguin, signalling that he is most possibly using different models in various scenarios for his studio portraits." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- Handwritten Cyrillic signature (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

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