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Administration of Punishment by Application of Bastinado [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 20.7 cm. x 15.7 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s-1930s
Topic:
Criminal procedure
Executions and executioners
Headgear
Local number:
FSA A.15 17
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise
Summary:
"Public display of punishment - be it bastinado, showing of prisoners in chains, hanging or stoning - comprise a group of photos in Sevruguin collection. A thorough study of this set can yield unexpected results in the matter of uses of violence and punishment in the first few years of 20th century in Iran. The images of bastinado as a usual form of punishment in the 'orient' are prevalent also in the travelogues and other similar publications of around 1900s. Sevruguin's photos are both published in such books and journal entries and utilized as models for lithographs and paintings in them." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- On recto of the print, handwritten number in white (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "299."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled), probably by Antoin Sevruguin in French reads, "Bastanad [Bastonade]."
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "33."
Cite as:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Jay Bisno, 1985
See more items in:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs 1969-1985
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Ali Asghar Khan-i Amin al-Sultan [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 15.7 cm. x 20.9 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880-1907
Topic:
Headgear
Portrait photography
Local number:
FSA A.15 05
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise
Summary:
"Standing portrait of Mirza Ali Asghar Khan-i Amin al-Sultan (b.1843-d.1907). Amin al-Sultan was the chief minister of three Qajar kings - Nasir Al-Din Shah, Muzaffar Al-Din Shah and Muhammad Ali Shah - until he was assassinated in 1907, during Muhammad Ali Shah's reign. The print has a partial signature of Amin al-Sultan on the bottom, noting that it might have been a gift to someone." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- On recto of the print, handwritten number in white (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "83."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) in French reads, "Atabeq Azam."
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "5."
Cite as:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Jay Bisno, 1985
See more items in:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs 1969-1985
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

A Dervish and Two Men [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 15.7 cm. x 20.7 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s-1930s
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Dervishes
Headgear
Portrait photography
Local number:
FSA A.15 07
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise
Summary:
"Unlike many other photos of the same subject matter, this image of the three beggers is taken outside the photograher's studio, most probably in Maydan-I Mashq. Compared to the other images with similar subject matters, the composition of this image also seems less structured." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- On recto of the print, handwritten number in white (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "140."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) in French reads, "Dervichs."
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "40."
Cite as:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Jay Bisno, 1985
See more items in:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs 1969-1985
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Jewish Quarter of Tehran (Iran) [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 20.9 cm. x 15.6 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1880s-1930s
Topic:
Architecture
Clothing and dress
Domestic animals
Headgear
Local number:
FSA A.15 08
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise
Summary:
"The quarter was located on the southeast side of the old walls of the city of Tehran. In the background of the image, a man seems to be holding a cigarette in hand." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- On recto of the print, handwritten number in white (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "1054."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) in French reads, "Teheran. Quartier des Juifs."
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "26."
Cite as:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Jay Bisno, 1985
See more items in:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs 1969-1985
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Crowd at a Performance in Maydan-i Arg (Arg Square) or the Old Canon's Square (Maydan-I Tupkhana'I Qadim), Tehran (Iran): [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 20.8 cm. x 15.8 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1880s-1930s
Topic:
Architecture
Local number:
FSA A.15 10
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise
Summary:
"The square was the usual gathering place of people in ceremonies. Iwan-i Takht that was also the entrance to the palace overlooks the square. The image depicts the square from the opposite side of the Iwan with people gathering in the square to witness an event in the background of the image. From the two poles on the either side of the blurred scene in the middle, it can be assumed that the scene is of a hanging." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- On recto of the print, handwritten number in white (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "653."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) in French reads, "Salance(?)."
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "9."
Cite as:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Jay Bisno, 1985
See more items in:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs 1969-1985
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

A Prisoner and Guard [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 15.6 cm. x 20.6 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s-1930s
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Criminal procedure
Headgear
Portrait photography
Local number:
FSA A.15 14
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise
Summary:
"An old prisoner and his guard are photographed standing side by side inside a studio setting. While the prisonor is looking away from the camera, the guard engages the gaze of the viewer and the lens. The prisonor seems to carry a tied up piece of rope and his guard is carrying the remains of the chain on the prisonor's neck." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- On recto of the print, handwritten number in white (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "1264."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) in French reads, "Un brigand."
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "36."
Cite as:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Jay Bisno, 1985
See more items in:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs 1969-1985
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Executed Prisoner in a Public Square [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 20.7 cm. x 15.6 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s-1930s
Topic:
Criminal procedure
Executions and executioners
Local number:
FSA A.15 15
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise
Summary:
"The blood covered body of a man in white cloth lays in the opening in front of the camera while a large group of spectators - including children - are watching the event in the background of the image." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- On recto of the print, handwritten number in white (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "337."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) in French reads, "Executé."
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "51b."
Cite as:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Jay Bisno, 1985
See more items in:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs 1969-1985
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Man with Hunting Falcon [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 15.7 cm. x 20.7 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s-1930s
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Domestic animals
Headgear
Portrait photography
Local number:
FSA A.15 09
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise
Summary:
"The figure could be of one of the falcon trainers of the Qajar court. Unlike the trainer, the falcon seems to be directly looking at the camera." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- On recto of the print, handwritten number in white (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "1335."
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "51c."
Cite as:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Jay Bisno, 1985
See more items in:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs 1969-1985
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Group of Prisoners and Guards [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 20.7 cm. x 15.7 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s-1930s
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Criminal procedure
Headgear
Portrait photography
Local number:
FSA A.15 13
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise
Summary:
"The five prisoners in chains are seated in front of a row of nine, fully armed guards." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- On recto of the print, handwritten number in white (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "122."
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "34."
Cite as:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Jay Bisno, 1985
See more items in:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs 1969-1985
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Masjid-i Shah Abd al 'Azim (Shah Abd al 'Azim Mosque) in Tehran (Iran) [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 15.5 cm. x 20.5 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
Ca. 1897
Topic:
Architecture
Religious buildings
Local number:
FSA A.15 18
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise
Summary:
"The photo - taken from afar and a slightly elevated position - shows the courtyard and the entrance iwan of the Masjid-i Shah Abd al'Azim. The Seljuk Shrine/mosque has a lengthy list of restorations during the years, a few of the most significant of which is from Qajar period. From adding minarets and tile work to restoring the other structures and shrines around the main building, works were carried out in the span of about a hundred years during the reigns of Fath Ali Shah, Nasir al-Din Shah and Muzaffar al-Din Shah Qajar. Its golden dome was added during Nasir al-Din Shah's reign, who ordered the dome to be covered in Gold covered copper sheets around 1850s. The minarets were added around 1890s. Many of the images of the building in the 1900s publications are missing the most recent addition of the minarets. The image in Bisno collection however shows the building after the addition of minarets, which puts the date around 1895-1900. Abdullah Qajar has a very similar photo. Copies of Sevruguin's many photos of the site, along with Abdullah Qajar's photos, can be found on the website of the shrine." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- On recto of the print, handwritten number in white (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "85."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) in French reads, "Chahzadeh Abdoulazime."
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "23a."
Publications:
http://www.abdulazim.com/PERSIANnet/pageview.aspx?na=architecture_and_building/default.htm&h=1934
Cite as:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Jay Bisno, 1985
See more items in:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs 1969-1985
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Seated Dervish Holding Engraved Axe [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 15.0 cm. x 20.7 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880-1890
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Dervishes
Headgear
Portrait photography
Local number:
FSA A.15 06
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise
Summary:
"Seated portrait of a dervish. A considerable number of Sevruguin's photographs fit within the general title of dervish portraits. Most of the photos, such as this one, is taken either in the photographer's studio or a location of his choosing with ample light and unnoticeable backgrounds. The combination of the two elements allows for a dramatic depiction of the Christ-like figures of dervishes, likening the images more to a painting. It seems that the ambiguity of the subject mater - allowed by the posture and general look of the figures - appealed to Sevruguin's painterly ambitions and became a subject of artistic experimentation with the medium. In this regard, the experiments contribute to his practice of studio photography with diverse subject matters such as the kings and the beggars." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- On recto of the print, handwritten number in white (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "639."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) in French reads, "Derviche."
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "46."
Cite as:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Jay Bisno, 1985
See more items in:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs 1969-1985
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Man Being Buried Alive [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 20.7 cm. x 15.5 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s-1930s
Topic:
Criminal procedure
Executions and executioners
Local number:
FSA A.15 16
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise
Summary:
"Public display of punishment - be it bastinado, showing of prisoners in chains, hanging or stoning - comprise a group of photos in Sevruguin collection. A thorough study of this set can yield unexpected results in the matter of uses of violence and punishment in the first few years of 20th century in Iran. The images of bastinado as a usual form of punishment in the 'orient' are prevalent also in the travelogues and other similar publications of around 1900s. Sevruguin's photos are both published in such books and journal entries and utilized as models for lithographs and paintings in them." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- On recto of the print, handwritten number in white (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "1131."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) in French reads, "Executé."
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "51a."
Publications:
Mansour Bonakdarian, "A World Born through the Chamber of a Revolver: Revolutionary Violence, Culture, and Modernity in Iran, 1906-1911," A Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East, Vol. 25, iss. 2, p:318-340
Cite as:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Jay Bisno, 1985
See more items in:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs 1969-1985
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Mirza Riza Kirmani, Nasir Al-Din Shah's Assassin [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 14.7 cm. x 20.7 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1896
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Criminal procedure
Headgear
Portrait photography
Local number:
FSA A.15 11
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise
Summary:
"Portrait of Mirza Riza Kirmani (d. 1896) taken during his imprisonment and after his assassination of Nasir Al-Din Shah Qajar. Mirza Riza Kirmani assassinated Nasir Al-Din Shah Qajar on May 1st of 1896, during the Shah's visit to Shah Abdul 'Azim Shrine in northern Tehran. Mirza Riza was executed by hanging on the dusk of the second day of Rabi 'al-Avval of 1314(11th of August, 1896), about four months after he assassinated Nasir al-Din Shah. The four month delay in his execution was due to the extensive interrogations to find out if he had any accomplices." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- On recto of the print, handwritten number in white (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "607."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "Mirza Reza."
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "3a."
Publications:
Iraj Afshar, Khatirat va Asnad-i Zahir al-Dawla, Tehran: Shirkat-i Sahami Kitabha-i Jibi, 1972, p:44
Cite as:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Jay Bisno, 1985
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Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs 1969-1985
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
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Public Hanging of Mirza Riza Kirmani, August 12, 1896 [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 20.7 cm. x 15.6 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1896
Topic:
Criminal procedure
Executions and executioners
Local number:
FSA A.15 12
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise
Summary:
"Mirza Riza Kirmani assassinated Nasir Al-Din Shah Qajar on May 1st of 1896, during the shah's visit to Shah Abdul 'Azim Shrine in northern Tehran. Nasir al-Din shah's visit to the shrine, which for the first time happened in the presence of people - was to initiate the celebration of his 50th year in reign. Mirza Riza was executed by hanging on the dusk of the second day of Rabi 'al-Avval of 1314(12th of August, 1896), about four months after he assassinated Nasir al-Din Shah. The four month delay in his execution was due to the extensive interrogations to find out if he had any accomplices. His body was left hanging for about two days after the event. From the number of people gathering around the hanging body of Mirza, it can be assumed that the photo was taken within hours after the event. Amin al-Sultan notes in his diaries that the first few hours, the square was rather crowded and he could hardly find his way close to the body." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- On recto of the print, handwritten number in white (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "623."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "Mirza Reza."
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "3b."
Cite as:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Jay Bisno, 1985
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Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs 1969-1985
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Muzaffar Al-Din Shah-i Qajar, Shah of Iran, Accompanied by Amin al-Sultan and Mushir al-Dawla [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Muzaffar al-Dīn Shāh 1853-1907 Shah of Iran
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 10.8 cm. x 14.4 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1898
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Portrait photography
Regalia (Insignia)
Royalty (Nobility)
Local number:
FSA A.15 04
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise
Summary:
"The studio portrait shows Muzaffar Al-Din Shah (seated) with Amin al-sultan(b.1843-d.1907) on his left and Shaykh Muhsin Khan-i Mushir al-Dawla(b.1820-d.1899) on his right. Compared to another portrait of Muzaffar al-Din in the Bisno collection (Bisno 3), the crown in this image is the crown of the king and not the heir to the throne. Therefore the photo must have been taken after the coronation of Muzaffar al-Din Shah and during the short period of Mushir al-Dawla's appointment as the chief minister in June of 1898." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "2."
- On verso of the print, unidentified inked seal marked
Publications:
Mahdi Bamdad: Sharh-i Hal-i Rijal-i Iran dar Qarn-i 12, 13, 14 Hijri, Tehran: Intisharat-i Zavvar (Zavvar Publishing): 1992, Vol. 3, p:204-212
Ghasem Safi, Aksha-I Ghadimi-I Iran, Rijal, Manazir, Bana-ha, va Muhit-i Ijtima'i, Tehran: Intisharat va Chap-i Danishgah-i Tehran, 1989, p:480
Michael Myers Shoemaker, The Heart of the Orient, New York: The Knickerbockers Press, 1904, p:129
Cite as:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Jay Bisno, 1985
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Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs 1969-1985
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Muzaffar Al-Din Shah Qajar, Shah of Iran [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Muzaffar al-Dīn Shāh 1853-1907 Shah of Iran
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 15.6 cm. x 20.7 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
Before 1896
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Portrait photography
Regalia (Insignia)
Royalty (Nobility)
Local number:
FSA A.15 03
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise
Summary:
"Muzaffar Al-Din Shah Qajar (b.1853-d.1906) succeeded Nasir Al-Din Shah as the fifth king of Qajar dynasty after his assassination in 1896. The new king, who originally resided in Tabriz, moved to Tehran in May of 1896 to take over his father's throne. However, the inscription on the crown's emblem in this image makes it a Nasiri crown. The photo is therefore taken while he was still the crown prince and during Nasir al-Din Shah's reign. The small bit of railing visible in the image - where the figure rests his arm - closely resembles the studio props of the photographer's studio. If the image is not taken in the studio and in the palace, the choice of the setting complicates the distinction, possibly contributing to the photographic studio's profile of clienteles and thus its fame." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- On recto of the print, handwritten number in white (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "600."
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "1."
Cite as:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Jay Bisno, 1985
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Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs 1969-1985
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
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Funeral Bier of Nasir al-Din Shah, Placed in the Takkiya Dawlat, Tehran (Iran) [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Nāsir al-Dīn Shāh Shah of Iran 1831-1896
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 15.6 cm. x 20.7 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
May-June,1896
Topic:
Architecture
Rites and ceremonies
Royalty (Nobility)
Local number:
FSA A.15 02
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise
Summary:
"Nasir al-Din shah (b. 1831-d. 1896), the fourth king of Qajar dynasty, was assassinated by Mirza Riza Kirmani on May 1st of 1896, on his short visit to Shah Abdul 'Azim Shrine in Shemiran, North of Tehran. The purpose of the trip was to celebrate the 50th anniversary of his reign. On April 30th of 1896, Kirmani, who was amongst the spectators of the Shah's visit to the Abd al-'Azim shrine - allowed for the first time in the presence of the Royal entourage - shot Nasir on his way out of the Shrine. Nasir al-Din shah's funeral was held on the 18th of Zi Gha'da of 1313 (May 1st, 1896) from Kakh-i Gulistan's Diamond room to Takkiya Dawlat. His body was kept in Takkiya Dawlat for a few months until his burial place was prepared. He was then buried beside his favorite wife - Furugh al-Saltana or Jayran - in Shah Abdul 'Azim. Another funeral was held upon his relocation from Takkiya Dawlat to Shah Abdul 'Azim in July of 1896. The image seems to have been taken in Takkiya Dawlat, where Nasir al-Din Shah's body was kept for the first few months. Nasir al-Din Shah's bier is placed on top of a platform that is set up above a few carpet covered steps in Takkiya Dawlat's main iwan. Candles are placed atop the platform and the bier is covered with flowers. The bier is accompanied by religious figures, guards and court officials, standing beside the bier on the platform and the steps. Above the bier a portrait painting of Nasir al-Din Shah - standing and in armor - is hung under another smaller painting that seems to depict Hussayn, the third Imam of Shi'i Islam. In the newspapers of the time, the death of Nasir al-Din Shah was likened to the death of Hussayn and the mourning period for the king likened to the Muharram mourning period of Tasu'a and 'Ashura. Considering the fact that Nasir was assassinated about a month and half before the Muharram mourning days ( 17th of Zi Gha'da) and his body was not moved from Takkiya Dawlat before the end of the Muharram mourning period, the two mourning periods coincided in date as well as the location." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- On recto of the print, handwritten number in white (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "368."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) in French reads, "Catafalque de feu Shah."
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "4."
- On verso of the print, handwritten annotation (penciled) reads, "Ernst Höltzer."
Publications:
Iraj Afshar, Khatirat va Asnad-i Zahir al-Dawla, Tehran: Shirkat-i Sahami Kitabha-i Jibi, 1972, p:34 For more info on the symbolic relation of Qajar kings to the Shi'i Imams see: Afsaneh Najmabadi, Women with Moustaches Men without Beards: Gender and Sexual Anxieties of Iranian Modernity, University of California Press, 2005
Cite as:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Jay Bisno, 1985
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Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs 1969-1985
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
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Nasir al-Din Shah Sitting on the Lower Step of Takht-I Tavoos (Peacock Throne), in the Talar-i Takht (Throne Room) at Kakh-i Gulistan (Gulistan Palace Complex), Tehran (Iran) [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Nāsir al-Dīn Shāh Shah of Iran 1831-1896
Kākh-i Gulistān (Tehran, Iran)
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 15.5 cm. x 20.7 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1885-1896
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Palaces
Portrait photography
Royalty (Nobility)
Thrones
Local number:
FSA A.15 01
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise
Summary:
"The Shah is sitting on the lower step of Takht-i Tavoos or the Peacock Throne in the throne room of Kakh-i Gulistan. Nasir al-Din Shah's headgear is missing the royal emblem of the Qajar court. The negative of this image is present in the archives (31.1). A close comparison of the print and the negative shows that the framing of the image in the print is a bit closer to the figure of the Shah, eliminating part of the surrounding room. The overall impression of the scene in the print is therefore that of an intimate and informal encounter between the king and the photographer, much like many other images by Sevruguin (Nasir having his moustache dyed, Hunting with Malijak, patting Aqa khan Khaja's head, etc.) Takht-i Tavoos (Peacock Throne) is a later name of Takht-i Khurshid or the Sun Throne. Erroneously the name of the Throne as the peacock throne equated it with the famous Indian throne of Shah Jahan and Nadir's war booty from India, whereas Takht-i Khurshid - visible in this image - was ordered by Fath Ali Shah Qajar around 1800s and built by an Isfahani artist known as Haji Muhammad Hussayn Khan Sadr. The name of the throne changed to the Peacock Throne after Fath Ali Shah's marriage to Tavoos Khanum, his favorite wife. The marriage was celebrated on this particular throne. In the occasion of various royal celebration - such as Salam-i Nawruzi - the throne would be moved out of the palace and into the Iwan-i Dar al-Imara (later known as the hall of Takht-i Marmar or the marble throne) and would be the seating place of the Qajar kings of the time. The tight framing of the print as compared to the negative also eliminates the number that is that is visible in the negative." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- On recto of the print, handwritten number in white (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "628."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "Nasrdin Chah."
Publications:
Yahya Zoka and Mohammad Hassan Semsar, Tehran Dar Tasvir, Tehran: Sazman-i Miras-i Farhangi-i Kishvar, 1997, p:155-161
Cite as:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Jay Bisno, 1985
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Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs 1969-1985
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
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Jay A. Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs, 1969-1985

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Nāsir al-Dīn Shāh Shah of Iran 1831-1896
Physical description:
18 albumen prints : b&w
Type:
Albumen prints
Collection descriptions
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1985
1969-1985
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Criminal procedure
Landscapes
Executions and executioners
Headgear
Portrait photography
Religious buildings
Royalty (Nobility)
Local number:
FSA A.15
Notes:
Jay A. Bisno (b. 1939) was Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History curator of archaeology
Summary:
Antoin Sevruguin managed and operated one of the most successful commercial photography studios in Tehran in the late 19th century. Born in the 1840s in Iran, Sevruguin's mother returned with her children to her hometown of Tbilisi after his father Vassil, a Russian diplomat in Iran, died in a horse riding accident. Trained as a painter, Sevruguin returned to Iran in the early 1870s accompanied by his two brothers, establishing a photography studio first in Tabriz and then Tehran. His studio's ties to Tbilisi, however, persisted through the years; many of the early portraits of Dervishes and women have been simultaneously attributed to Antoin Sevruguin and Dimitri Yermakov, the Georgian photographer who is often referred to as Sevruguin's mentor from Tbilisi. Many of Antoin Sevruguin's photographs were published as early as 1885 in travelogues, journals and books indicating that by that time he had a fully established practice in Tehran's Ala al-Dawla street, with ties to the court of Nasir al-Din Shah Qajar. Often unacknowledged as the producer of published images in his own time - the 1902 photographic survey of Persepolis being the most glaring of such authorial misrepresentations - he was nevertheless celebrated and acknowledged for his artistic vision and his keen eye for composition, achieving the Medal of Lion and Sun from Nasir al-Din Shah, the 1897 Medal of Honour in the Brussels International Exposition, and the 1900 Medal of Honour in Paris International Exposition. Reflecting a career that spans nearly half a century, Sevruguin's diverse body of work includes studio portraits of families, women and dervishes, survey photographs of archeological sites, objects, landscapes and architecture, and photographs of royalty, high officials and ceremonies of the Qajar court. The range of his output not only demonstrates his own pictorial concerns and artistic abilities but also the divergent interests of his clients. Despite numerous devastating incidents throughout his career - the loss of more than half of his negatives in a 1908 blast and fire, an unsuccessful attempt at diversifying into cinematography in the 1910s, and the confiscation of the remainder of his negatives in the mid-1920s to name a few - his studio remained operational even after his death in 1933. A number of negatives from the Sevruguin studio can be dated to the years after Antoin's death, indicating that the Sevruguin studio continued to be commercially viable. As one of the most prolific early commercial photographers in Iran, Antoin Sevruguin's artistic legacy has since proved far more enduring
Cite as:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Jay Bisno, 1985
See more items in:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs 1969-1985
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs

Creator:
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Collector:
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Photographer:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Muzaffar al-Dīn Shāh 1853-1907 Shah of Iran
Nāsir al-Dīn Shāh Shah of Iran 1831-1896
Reza Shah Pahlavi Shah of Iran 1878-1944
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
Photographic prints : 66 items; various dimensions
Glass Negatives : 695 items; b&w ; 13 cm. x 18 cm
Photographic prints : 98 items; various dimensions
Type:
Photographic prints
Collection descriptions
Glass negatives
Gelatin silver prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Iraq
India
Uzbekistan
Baghdad (Iraq)
Basṭām (Iran)
Bīshāpūr (Extinct city)
Dāmghān (Iran)
Delhi (India)
Fīrūzābād (Iran)
Hamadān (Iran)
Iṣfahān (Iran)
Naqsh-i Rustam (Iran)
Pasargadae (Extinct city)
Persepolis (Iran)
Tāq-e Bostān Site (Iran)
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1880s-1933
Topic:
Abbasids
Ancient Near Eastern Art
Antiquities
Architecture
Art of the Islamic World
Clothing and dress
Criminal procedure
Executions and executioners
Headgear
Inscriptions
Landscapes
Portrait photography
Pottery
Relief (Sculpture)
Religious buildings
Royalty (Nobility)
Sassanids
Shrines
Textile design
Local number:
FSA A.4 Subseries 2.12
Notes:
Titles and summary notes are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist
Antoin Sevruguin managed and operated one of the most successful commercial photography studios in Tehran in the late 19th century. Born in the 1840s in Iran, Sevruguin's mother returned with her children to her hometown of Tbilisi after his father Vassil, a Russian diplomat in Iran, died in a horse riding accident. Trained as a painter, Sevruguin returned to Iran in the early 1870s accompanied by his two brothers, establishing a photography studio first in Tabriz and then Tehran. His studio's ties to Tbilisi, however, persisted through the years; many of the early portraits of Dervishes and women have been simultaneously attributed to Antoin Sevruguin and Dimitri Yermakov, the Georgian photographer who is often referred to as Sevruguin's mentor from Tbilisi. Many of Antoin Sevruguin's photographs were published as early as 1885 in travelogues, journals and books indicating that by that time he had a fully established practice in Tehran's Ala al-Dawla street, with ties to the court of Nasir al-Din Shah Qajar. Often unacknowledged as the producer of published images in his own time - the 1902 photographic survey of Persepolis being the most glaring of such authorial misrepresentations - he was nevertheless celebrated and acknowledged for his artistic vision and his keen eye for composition, achieving the Medal of Lion and Sun from Nasir al-Din Shah, the 1897 Medal of Honour in the Brussels International Exposition, and the 1900 Medal of Honour in Paris International Exposition. Reflecting a career that spans nearly half a century, Sevruguin's diverse body of work includes studio portraits of families, women and dervishes, survey photographs of archeological sites, objects, landscapes and architecture, and photographs of royalty, high officials and ceremonies of the Qajar court. The range of his output not only demonstrates his own pictorial concerns and artistic abilities but also the divergent interests of his clients. Despite numerous devastating incidents throughout his career - the loss of more than half of his negatives in a 1908 blast and fire, an unsuccessful attempt at diversifying into cinematography in the 1910s, and the confiscation of the remainder of his negatives in the mid-1920s to name a few - his studio remained operational even after his death in 1933. A number of negatives from the Sevruguin studio can be dated to the years after Antoin's death, indicating that the Sevruguin studio continued to be commercially viable. As one of the most prolific early commercial photographers in Iran, Antoin Sevruguin's artistic legacy has since proved far more enduring
Summary:
- 66 black-and-white gelatin silver photoprints, unmounted, were a gift from Joseph Upton, received by the committee for Islamic Culture, as reported in their official minutes of October 24, 1953. The 66 photoprints were initially purchased by Joseph Upton in 1928 from Antoin Sevruguin in Tehran
- 695 glass negatives were included into the "Islamic Archives," which was administered jontly by the committee for Islamic Culture and the committee for Arabic and Islamic Studies of the American Council of Learned Societies. According to the official minutes, the committee for Islamic Culture reported purchasing the 696 glass plates during their fiscal years 1951-1952 from the American Presbyterian Mission in Tehran. Antoin Sevruguin's daughter gave these plates to the mission with instruction that they be sold for the benefit of the mission
- 98 gelatin silver photoprints were collected by Myron Bement Smith after he viewed a portion of Sevruguin's negatives in 1934 ( these include recent finds in the Myron Bement Smith collection)
In addition of Antoin Sevruguin's 695 glass negatives and 164 silver gelatin prints in the Myron Bement Smith collection; 18 albumen prints are available in Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs (FSA A.15); 31 photographic prints in the Ernst Herzfeld Papers (FSA A.6); as well as a photograph album and individual albumen prints donated by Stephen Arpee (FSA A2011.03). Finally, Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives also own 3 separate gelatin silver prints
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
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Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
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Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
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  • Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives