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[Unidentified Sites] [negative]: an unidentified garden in the style of Gertrude Jekyll

Photographer:
Sears, Thomas Warren 1880-1966
Physical description:
1 negative: b&w ; 3.5 x 6 in
Type:
Negatives
Reproductions
Date:
1900
1920
[between 1900 and 1920]
Topic:
Garden borders
Flower beds
Shrubs
Walkways, dirt
Local number:
SRS047164
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu
Notes:
Original was a nitrate negative which has been digitized and the nitrate negative destroyed. A duplicate film negative is at Photographic Services, Smithsonian Institution (OIPPS). Negative Number: 94-7272
Data Source:
Archives of American Gardens
Visitor Tag(s):

[Unidentified Garden in Surrey, England] [glass negative]: garden borders in the style of William Robinson and Gertrude Jekyll

Photographer:
Sears, Thomas Warren 1880-1966
Physical description:
1 glass negative: b&w ; 8 x 10 in
Type:
Glass negatives
Place:
United Kingdom, England, Surrey
England
Surrey
Unidentified Garden (Surrey, England)
Date:
1906
1906 Aug
Topic:
Garden borders
Walkways, dirt
Shrubs
Perennials
Arbors
Gardens
Local number:
ENG105001
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu
Notes:
It is possible that this garden was at Westbrook in Godalming, Surrey
Data Source:
Archives of American Gardens
Visitor Tag(s):

Westbrook, 1906

Garden designer:
Jekyll, Gertrude 1843-1932
Former owner:
Turner, Hugh Thackeray 1853-1937
Turner, Mary Elizabeth Powell d. 1907
Physical description:
1 folder+ 4 glass negatives
Type:
Mixed archival materials
Place:
United Kingdom, England, Surrey, Godalming
England
Surrey
Godalming
Westbrook (Godalming, Surrey, England)
Date:
1906
1906-1906
Topic:
Gardens
Local number:
ENG104000
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu
Notes:
Westbrook was the home of Arts and Crafts movement architect and china painting artist Hugh Thackeray Turner and his wife Mary Elizabeth Powell Turner. It was designed and built by Thackeray Turner in 1899-1900, who worked with Gertrude Jekyll on the design of its gardens (Turner and Jekyll also collaborated on the design of the Phillips Memorial in Godalming). A sunken garden with a lily tank at its center was a key feature of the site. The original plan also featured woodland paths to a boathouse and footbridge on the River Wey. Thomas W. Sears visited Westbrook on August 2, 1906, where he had tea with Mrs. Turner and took several photographs of the site
Persons associated with the garden include: Hugh Thackeray Turner and Mary Elizabeth Powell Turner (former owners, 1899-1937) and Gertrude Jekyll (garden designer, ca. 1900)
Summary:
The folder includes worksheets, photocopies of images of the site, and other information
Data Source:
Archives of American Gardens
Visitor Tag(s):

Orchards, 1906

Garden designer:
Jekyll, Gertrude 1843-1932
Architect:
Lutyens, Edwin Landseer Sir 1869-1944
Former owner:
Chance, William Sir 1853-1935
Chance, Julia Charlotte Lady 1864-1949
Physical description:
1 folder+ 18 glass negatives; 3 lantern slides
Type:
Mixed archival materials
Place:
United Kingdom, England, Surrey, Godalming
England
Surrey
Godalming
Orchards (Godalming, Surrey, England)
Date:
1906
1906-1906
Topic:
Gardens
Local number:
ENG098000
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu
Notes:
Orchards was the country home of Sir William Chance, 2nd Baronet, and his wife, Lady Julia Chance. Designed and built between 1897 and 1902 by Sir Edwin Lutyens, with gardens by Gertrude Jekyll, it was their first collaboration on an entirely new house and garden and an important milestone for both. Not coincidentally, Jekyll lived just down the road from Orchards at Munstead Wood (also the work of Lutyens), and it was her house that inspired Lady Chance to engage this team for her own home. Orchards' formal gardens were located on the east side of the house and included the so-called "Dutch" garden, an extensive kitchen garden (in reality an expansive flower garden showing Jekyll's horticultural artistry to its best advantage), a vegetable garden (at some distance from the house), and a shrub garden adjacent to the south terrace. There was also a croquet lawn and a loggia terrace that provided not only comfortable seating but an overview of the "Dutch" garden. Several of Thomas Sears's 1906 photographs of Orchards were published in The American Architect in 1909
Persons associated with the garden include Gertrude Jekyll (garden designer, 1897-1902); Sir Edwin Lutyens (architect, 1897-1902); Sir William Chance (former owner, 1897-1935); and Lady Julia Chance (former owner, 1897-1949)
Summary:
The folder includes worksheets, a photocopied book excerpt, and additional information about the house and garden
Data Source:
Archives of American Gardens
Visitor Tag(s):

Sutton Courtenay Manor House, circa 1925-1935

Former owner:
Lindsay, Norah Bourke 1873-1948
Physical description:
1 folder+ 6 lantern slides
Type:
Mixed archival materials
Place:
United Kingdom, England, Oxfordshire, Sutton Courtenay
England
Oxfordshire
Sutton Courtenay
Sutton Courtenay Manor House (Sutton Courtenay, Oxfordshire, England)
Date:
1925
1925-1935
circa 1925-1935
Topic:
Gardens
Local number:
ENG014000
Notes:
Although various parts of the Sutton Courtenay Manor House were built between the 13th through 17th centuries, development of its gardens did not occur until the early 20th century. Norah Bourke Lindsay, who became an influential garden designer in England after World War I, lived in the house and created its gardens, which demonstrate the influence of Gertrude Jekyll and William Robinson. The property was visited by the Garden Club of America on June 11, 1929, during its English garden tour. At that time the property was in Berkshire, but in 1974 county boundary changes transferred it to Oxfordshire. It is not known whether the six lantern slides in the Archives of American Gardens collection were produced from images taken during the tour or whether they were acquired separately. Dating of the individual images is also uncertain and is based on the best available information. A copy of the GCA itinerary may be found in the folder for series ENG022
Persons associated with the garden include Norah Bourke Lindsay (former owner and garden designer, 1895-1948)
Publications:
Garden has been featured in Allyson Hayward, Norah Lindsay: The Life and Art of a Garden Designer (London: Frances Lincoln Publishers, 2007)
Garden has been featured in Country Life, Vol. LXIX (May 23, 1931)
Data Source:
Archives of American Gardens
Visitor Tag(s):

Sunnie-Holme ca. 1930

Former owner:
Jennings, Annie Burr
Landscape architect:
Kellaway, Herbert J.
Rosarian:
Foote, Harriett Risley 1863-
Physical description:
2 folders+ 27 images: 11 glass lantern slides; photoprints from postcards; photoprints from glass plate negatives
Type:
Mixed archival materials
Place:
United States of America, Connecticut, Fairfield County, Fairfield
Connecticut
Fairfield
Sunnie-Holme (Fairfield, Connecticut)
Date:
1930
ca 1930
Topic:
Gardens
Local number:
CT004000
Notes:
Miss Annie Burr Jennings, daughter of a founder of Standard Oil Company, built Sunnie-Holme in 1909-1910. For thirty years, the house was the social center of the town during the summer months. It is unclear who designed the original parterre gardens; Miss Jennings later re-designed the gardens with herbaceous perennials, roses, and flowering shrubs. Her gardens were designed to be at their peak during the summer, when she resided in the house. Over thirty gardeners kept the extensive plantings maintained. Each of the three parallel paths leading from the main house south toward the sound were bordered with perennials in various color schemes or a vine-covered arbor. The designs were influenced by the writings of Gertrude Jekyll, whom whe met a Munstead wood in 1926, and from whom she commissioned the design for a garden at the Old Glebe House in Woodbury, Connecticut
Located in the center of the garden was a formal rose garden, designed by Herbert Kellaway and rosarian, Mrs. Harriet Risley Foote, which had as its focal point an Italianate pool anchored by surrounding pergolas. Other garden "rooms" included "Irish," evergreen, white, and an herb garden. A wild garden with Indian totem poles and a rustic lodge, was situated at the end of the property. In her will, Miss Jennings forbade that the gardens become a town park. Although she encouraged her heirs to continue the gardens, the property was sold. Sunnie-Holme was dismantled on the eve of World War II
Persons associated with the property and garden include: Annie Burr jennings (former owner, 1909-1939); Herbert Kellaway (rose garden designer); and Harriett Risley Foote (rosarian)
Summary:
The folders include worksheets, articles, and copy of 1936 map
Data Source:
Archives of American Gardens
Visitor Tag(s):

High Pastures 1926-2001

Landscape architect:
Dawson, James
Landscape architecture firm:
Olmsted Brothers
Physical description:
2 folders+ 11 35 mm. slides
Type:
Mixed archival materials
Place:
United States of America, Maine, York County, Ogunquit
Maine
Ogunquit
High Pastures (Ogunquit, Maine)
Date:
1926
1926-2001
Topic:
Gardens
Local number:
ME071000
Notes:
High Pastures is an informal country house set high on a bluff overlooking the Atlantic Ocean. In 1926, the family acquired additional acreage, which led to revisions of a 1910 plan by James Dawson of the Olmsted Brothers firm. An elliptical garden, called the Round Garden, has a bird bath as its focal point. Stone steps and a stone terrace were also added. Carl Rust Parker of the Olmsted Brothers firm specified the use of native plants to attract birds. The Earle sisters maintained vegetable and cutting gardens near the original carriage house which was located at a distance from the house; this portion of the property is no longer part of High Pastures. Miss Elinor Earle designed the Long Garden, which runs along the ocean side of the house. She used Gertrude Jekyll's design from Gardens for the Small Country Home for the stone steps. Subsequent family members maintained the designs of the Olmsted Brothers. The property changed hands in 2002. The gardens were later destroyed to make way for development in 2004
Persons associated with the property and garden include: Mr. and Mrs. Alice and James Earle (former owners, 1906-1915); The Misses Elinor, Mary and Doris Earle (former owners, 1915-1956); Horace Wells Sellors (architect, 1907); James Dawson (landscape architect, 1910); and Carl Rust Parker (stonework consultant, 1926)
Summary:
The folders include a work sheet, site plan, copy of 1926 plan, copy of article, and narrative description
Publications:
Garden featured in Country Home Magazine, April 1990
Garden featured in Theresa Mattor, "High Pasture: An Olmsted Treasure," in The Maine Olmsted Alliance for Parks and Landscapes, Summer/Fall 1993
Data Source:
Archives of American Gardens
Visitor Tag(s):

Meadowburn 1905-2000

Creator:
Ely, Helena Rutherford d. 1920
Physical description:
3 folders+ 26 35 mm. slides
Type:
Projected media
Place:
United States of America, New York, Orange County, Warwick
New York
Warwick
New Jersey
Vernon
Meadowburn (Warwick, New York)
Date:
1905
1905-2000
Topic:
Gardens
Local number:
NY286000
Notes:
Meadowburn was the summer home of Helena Rutherfurd Ely, a prominent gardening author who wrote three books at the beginning of the 20th Century. Her first book, A Woman's Hardy Garden, is reflected throughout the five acres of gardens she designed at Meadowburn. She has been called the American Gertrude Jekyll, as they both advocated a casually abundant, hardy, no-fuss gardening style. Towards the end of her career as a designer/gardner, Mrs. Ely was more and more drawn to the use of evergreens
Vernon, New Jersey, Warwick, New York's "sister town" across the state line, is sometimes shown as Meadowburn's location. Meadowburn apparently straddles the border. According to Helena Ely Rutherfurd Meade's biography of her mother written in 1951, "Meadowburn Farm is mainly in New Jersey, but there is still a good bit of it in the State of New York." It was listed in a registration form (1992) for the National Register of Historic Places as being located in Vernon Township, New Jersey, however, this designation only covered the "significant features of the house and gardens at Meadowburn Farm; five acres, more or less."
Persons and organizations associated with this garden include: Louisa and Mary Rutherford (former owners, 1853-1860); John and Charlotte Rutherford (former owners, 1860-1881); Helena Rutherford Ely (former owner, 1881-1920); Alfred Ely, Jr. (former owner); Charles H. Coster (former owner, 1930-1977); Albert Furman, Sr. (gardener, 1893-1948); Albert Furman, Jr. (gardener (1948-2004); and Kurt Seligman (frog sculpture and fountain pool)
Summary:
The folder includes worksheets; landscape plans; copies of photographs; copy of biography of Helena Rutherfurd Ely(October 1951); compilation of notes from oral history by Albert Furman, Jr. (1998-2000); and copies of articles and programs
Publications:
Garden featured in Helena Rutherfurd Ely, A Woman's Hardy Garden (New York: The MacMillan Company, 1903)
Garden featured in Helena Rutherfurd Ely, "Color Arrangements of Flowers," in Scribner's Magazine, Vol. 47 No. 3, March 1910, pp. 292-301
Garden featured in Ronald J. Dupont, Jr., "Meadowburn Farm: A Flower of American Gardening History," in The North Jersey Highlander Vol. 30 No. 84 (1994), pp. 23-33
Data Source:
Archives of American Gardens
Visitor Tag(s):

Garden Club of America collection, circa 1920-[on-going]

Creator:
Garden Club of America
Subject:
New York Flower Show
Physical description:
3,479 lantern slides
37,000 35mm slides
33 linear feet (garden files)
Type:
Articles
Collection descriptions
Brochures
Clippings
Correspondence
Lantern slides
Plans (drawings)
Slides (photographs)
Place:
United States
Mexico
France
Japan
England
Spain
Italy
Scotland
Date:
1920
circa 1920-on-going
Topic:
Flower shows
Gardens
Gardening--Societies, etc
Landscape architecture
Notes:
The Garden Club of America was established in 1913 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, when the Garden Club of Philadelphia and eleven other garden clubs met to create a national garden club. Its purpose is to foster the knowledge and love of gardening and to restore and protect the quality of the environment through educational programs and gardening and conservation efforts. The GCA was incorporated in Delaware in 1923, with its headquarters established in New York City. Today, local clubs are organized under twelve regional zones. The GCA continues its tradition of hosting flower shows and publishing material related to gardening in the United States
The GCA's glass lantern slides were used by the GCA for presentations and lectures about notable gardens throughout the United States dating back to colonial times. An effort was made in the late 1980s, in preparation of the 75th anniversary of the Garden Club of America's founding, to collect the disbursed slides. These slides were to eventually form the GCA's Slide Library of Notable American Parks and Gardens. The informational value of this collection is extensive since a number of images of the more than 4,500 gardens represented show garden designs that have changed over time or no longer exist. While the majority of images document a range of designed upper and upper-middle class gardens throughout the U.S., the scope of the collection is expanding as volunteers photograph and document contemporary gardens including community and vernacular gardens
The gardens illustrate the design work of dozens of landscape architects including Marian Coffin, Beatrix Farrand, Lawrence Halprin, Hare & Hare, Umberto Innocenti, Gertrude Jekyll, Jens Jensen, Warren Manning, the Olmsted Brothers, Charles Platt, Ellen Biddle Shipman, and Fletcher Steele. Because of their proximity to the gardens, works of notable architects and sculptors may also be featured in the images
Summary:
This collection contains over 37,000 35mm slides, 3,479 glass lantern slides and a small number of landscape architectural plans and drawings, all of which document the history of American gardens and landscapes. Garden files were compiled by Garden Club of America (GCA) members for most of the gardens included in the collection. These files may include information sheets, photocopied articles (from journals, newspapers, or books), planting lists, correspondence, brochures and other notes. Some gardens have been photographed over the course of several decades; others only have images from a single point in time. In addition to images of American gardens, there are glass lantern slides of the New York Flower Show (1941-1951) and trips that GCA members took to other countries, including Mexico (1937), Italy, Spain, Japan (1935), France (1936), England (1929), and Scotland
Cite as:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Garden Club of America collection
Data Source:
Archives of American Gardens
Visitor Tag(s):

Hill-Stead Museum Sunken Garden 1999-2000

Former owner:
Pope, Alfred Atmore 1844-1913
Pope, Ada Brooks
Riddle, Theodate Pope 1867-1946
Landscape designer:
Farrand, Beatrix 1872-1959
Owner:
Hill-Stead Museum
Landscape restorers:
Roland/Towers
Physical description:
1 folder+ 11 35 mm. slides
Type:
Mixed archival materials
Place:
United States of America, Connecticut, Hartford County, Farmington
Connecticut
Farmington
Hill-Stead Museum Sunken Garden (Farmington, Connecticut)
Date:
1999
1999-2000
Topic:
Gardens
Local number:
CT206000
Notes:
The Sunken Garden is located adjacent to the 1901 Colonial Revival mansion, Hill-Stead, designed by Theodate Pope (later Riddle), with plans prepared by the architectural firm McKim, Mead, and White, to showcase the Pope family's important collection of French Impressionist paintings. Integral to the original plan of the country house was its landscape, designed to embrace not only a working New England farm, but also rustic woodland walking gardens and the formal Sunken Garden. Laid out in a natural depression with its asymmetrical boundaries defined by eight-to-ten-foot high drystone walls, the Sunken Garden consists of a summer house surrounded by brick paths and geometric flower beds that are enclosed by a hedge, forming an elongated octagon with grass filling the space between the hedge and outer stone wall. The garden is planted with 75 varieties of primarily perennials as well as small flowering trees and evergreens. At the far end is a stone sundial designed by Theodate Pope Riddle. The Sunken Garden was grassed over in the 1940s wartime labor shortage, leaving only the summer house in place. Today's reconstruction, initiated in 1983 by the Connecticut Valley Garden Club and the Garden Club of Hartford, is based on a planting plan by the landscape designer Beatrix Farrand for the "garden of Mrs. J. W. Riddle, Farmington, Conn.," discovered in the former's archives at the University of California, Berkeley. The Farrand design, dating from 1916, with its careful choice of texture, foliage, and color combinations of perennials (limited here to a palette of blues, pinks, whites, pale purple, and greys) echoes the theories of Gertrude Jekyll, the English garden designer whose work Farrand admired
Persons and organizations associated with the garden include: Alfred Atmore Pope (former owner, 1901-1913); Ada Brooks Pope (former owner, 1913-1920); Theodate Pope Riddle (former owner, 1920-1946); the Hill-Stead Museum (owner, 1946 to date); Beatrix Farrand (landscape designer, 1916); and Roland/Towers (landscape restorers, 1986)
Summary:
The folder includes a worksheet, photocopies of garden plans and Beatrix Farrand's plant list, a 1999 plant list, and brochures about the museum and the garden that also include plans and plant lists
Publications:
Garden has been featured in Paula Dietz, "The Sunken Garden at Hill-Stead," The Hartford Monthly, May 1989, p. 54
Garden has been featured in Anne Stillman, "The Garden at Hill-Stead," Connecticut Preservation News, September/October 1995, p. 12
Garden has been featured in Kathleen McCormick, "The Hidden Jewel," Historic Preservation, October 1995, p. 80
Garden has been featured in Rea Lubar Duncan, "Sunken Treasures," Connecticut Magazine, August 1998, pp. 116-121
Garden has been featured in James F. O'Gorman, Edward S. Cooke, Jr., and Allyson M. Hayward, Hill-Stead: The Country Place of Theodate Pope Riddle (New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2010)
Data Source:
Archives of American Gardens
Visitor Tag(s):

Parterre 2008-2009

Former owner:
Belmont, August 1813-1890
McLean, Evalyn Walsh 1886-1947
Van Clief, Ray d. 1945
Monroe, J. Edgar 1897-1991
Gobb, Ray
Preservation Society of Newport County
Architect:
Bissinger, Frederick L. Jr
Certified horticulturist:
Purviance, Virginia Pepper
Landscape architect:
Toland, Julia Rush
Provenance:
Newport Garden Club
Physical description:
1 folder + 16 35 mm. reference slides and 22 digital images
Type:
Mixed archival materials
Place:
United States of America, Rhode Island, Newport County, Newport
Rhode Island
Newport
Parterre (Newport, Rhode Island)
Date:
2008
2008-2009
Topic:
Gardens
Local number:
RI166000
Notes:
Parterre comprises three acres of the former Belmont estate in Newport, Rhode Island, which had been maintained as parkland since the demolition of By-the-Sea in 1944. Mature trees were left in place, fronting the Normandy manor house designed by architect Frederick L Bissinger, and distinct formal garden rooms were installed by horticulturalist Virginia P. Purviance and landscape architect Julia R. Toland. The garden rooms are described as winter, black and white, potager, woodland and cutting, which provides material for the owner's award-winning floral designs. Specimen trees were planted as understory to the mature trees, and to soften the transitions between the different areas of the estate. The owner took inspiration from the elegant and understated garden designs of Russell Page (1906-1985) and the innovative and rule breaking style of Gertrude Jekyll (1843-1932)
The black and white garden was originally conceived as a green and white garden, to be planted in shades of white, green and copper. Darker plant materials were introduced later. An orangerie is used for entertaining small parties, while large parties are held under a tent on the back lawn. The cutting garden beds are situated near the service area on the estate for convenience. The winter garden next to the house has a reflecting pool as well as hedges and Versailles containers and a dovecote in one corner. The shady woodland garden has a fall flame border planted with Japanese maple and a developing moss garden
Persons associated with the garden include August Belmont (former owner, 1860-1924); Evalyn Walsh McLean (former owner, 1924-1944); Ray Van Clief (former owner, 1944-1947); J. Edgar Monroe (former owner, 1947-1971); Preservation Society of Newport County (former owner, 1971-1986); Ray Gobb (former owner, 1986-1994); George Champlin Mason (architect of "By-the Sea", previous residence on property which was demolished in 1944); Frederick L. Bissinger, Jr. (architect, F. L. Bissinger, Inc., dates unknown); Virginia Pepper Purviance (certified horticulturalist, 1999) and Julia Rush Toland of Toland Landscape Design (landscape architect, 1998?)
Summary:
The folder includes worksheets, photocopies of articles, write-ups of the property's history, a write-up of plans and inspiration for the garden, and an invoice for the original installation of the garden
Publications:
This property is featured in Private Newport at Home and in the Garden by Bettie Bearden Pardee published in 2004; "A Rare Look" by Marion Laffey Fox published in "Newport Life Magazine" Spring 2004; "Garden Design Awards" published in "Rhode Island Monthly" February 2000; "The Newport Daily News" published June 8, 2001 and June 17, 2009
Data Source:
Archives of American Gardens
Visitor Tag(s):

Reef Point, ca. 1940

Former owner:
Jones, Mary Cadwalader
Farrand, Max 1869-1945
Landscape architect, former owner:
Farrand, Beatrix 1872-1959
Provenance:
Buckler, James R
Architects:
Rotch and Tilden
Physical description:
1 folder+ 10 35 mm slides; 2 glass lantern slide
Type:
Mixed archival materials
Place:
United States of America, Maine, Hancock County, Bar Harbor
Maine
Bar Harbor
Reef Point (Bar Harbor, Maine)
Date:
1940
ca 1940
Topic:
Gardens
Local number:
ME047000
Notes:
Landscape designer Beatrix Farrand (1872 - 1959) spent her childhood summers at Reef Point on Mount Desert Island in Maine, a six-acre property with distinct garden rooms that featured native plants and panoramas of trees set against the ocean vista. According to landscape historian Judith Tankard the front of the half-timbered house supported flowering vines including clematis, jasmine, wisteria and hydrangea. A stone terrace facing the water had a rose garden complimented by gray foliage plants. In the acid soil banks of azaleas grew on slopes that led to the bay. There was an informal perennial garden sheltered by hemlocks, a vegetable garden, a small rock garden, a bog plantation, a large heather garden, and carpets of ground covers including bunchberry, ferns, trilliums, and ginger. Besides areas for seating and entertaining the grounds resembled an arboretum of spruce and Asian shrubs. Farrand inherited Reef Point after her mother's death and it became her permanent home in 1941
Circa 1939 Farrand incorporated Reef Point Gardens as a botanical garden and reference library to be used by students of outdoor life and gardening. Her own professional papers and those of English garden designer Gertrude Jekyll were made available for study along with illustrations of European gardens that had influenced Farrand, thousands of books including English herbals, a herbarium of 1,800 plant species found at Reef Point, and the garden slides of garden architect Mary Rutherfurd Jay (1872 - 1953). The center was closed and the garden was dismantled by Farrand in 1955 due to lack of funds and a dearth of visitors to the area, which is near Acadia National Park. Farrand's and Jekyll's documents were sent to the University of California at Berkeley
Persons associated with the garden include: Mary Cadwalader Rawle Jones (1850 - 1935) (former owner, 1882 until 1935); Beatrix (1872 - 1959) and Max (1869 - 1945) Farrand (former owners, 1941 - 1955); Arthur Rotch (1850 - 1894) & George Thomas Tilden (1845 - 1919) (architects, 1883); Beatrix Farrand (landscape designer)
Summary:
The folders includes worksheets and photocopies of articles
Publications:
This property is featured in: Golden Age of American Gardens, p. 34; "Such, Such Were the Joys" published in Lost Bar Harbor, by G.W. Helfrich and Gladys O'Neil, Down East Books, 1982, pp. 42 - 43; "The Start and The Goal" by Beatrix Farrand, Bulletin of the Garden Club of America, 1947, pp. 13 - 15; Beatrix Farrand: Private Gardens, Public Landscapes by Judith B. Tankard, The Monacelli Press, 2009, pp. 193 - 203
Data Source:
Archives of American Gardens
Visitor Tag(s):

The Farm House, ca. 1930, ca. 1983, 1988

Former owner:
McCormick, Mildred Day
Landscape architect:
Farrand, Beatrix 1872-1959
Smith, Ann Leighton
Physical description:
2 folders+ 15 35 mm slides
Type:
Mixed archival materials
Place:
United States of America, Maine, Hancock County, Bar Harbor
Maine
Bar Harbor
The Farm House (Bar Harbor, Maine)
Date:
1930
1930-1988
ca 1930, ca 1983, 1988
Topic:
Gardens
Local number:
ME048000
Notes:
One of the earliest Mount Desert Island dwellings, The Farm House was built in 1800 and extensively remodeled circa 1925. The garden designed by Beatrix Farrand (1872 - 1959) for the eight-acre Bar Harbor property was installed in 1923 and amended over the next five years. Farrand moved the main entrance of the shingled cottage to the opposite side of the house and added a small stone terrace. The main garden areas were now behind the house and featured two 80-foot long borders along a gravel path planted with massed drifts of summer annuals in a style developed by the English garden designer Gertrude Jekyll (1843 - 1932) for her own pastel border. That style has been described as impressionistic, with blooms of blended colors cascading over the walk, generously massed with attention paid to texture and foliage. Each of the three garden rooms - the borders, the orchard and the vegetable garden -was enclosed by hedges of arborvitae. Gates designed by Farrand divided the rooms and each area had benches she designed as well
When The Farmhouse changed hands within the McCormick family in the 1980's the carefully designed flower borders were in decline but the structure of the garden remained. The current owners have undertaken the restoration of the long borders more in keeping with Farrand's original plans but with plant substitutions that simplify upkeep and reduce the expense. Changes include planting more perennials, especially astilbe, and replacing hollyhocks with sunflowers. The peak blooming season has been shortened to the two months the family is in residence rather than the six month flowering season envisioned by Farrand
Persons associated with the garden include: Mildred Day McCormick (former owner, circa 1920 to circa 1980); Arthur McFarland (architect); Beatrix Farrand (1872 - 1959) (landscape architect, 1923-1928) and Ann Leighton Smith (restoration landscape architect, ca. 1982)
Summary:
The folders include worksheets, photocopies of articles, and photocopies of Farrand's designs
Publications:
This property is featured in: the Bulletin of the Garden Club of America, 1934, p. 36, and in the winter 1983 edition; the August 1932 issue of House Beautiful; "All in the Family: Restoring a Design Legacy in Maine" by Anne Kozak, published in "Garden Design" January/February 1991, pp. 50 - 56; "In Bloom Again" by Peter Lemos, published in "House Beautiful" April 1992, pp. 34 - 38; Beatrix Farrand: Private Gardens, Public Landscapes by Judith B. Tankard, published by The Monacelli Press, 2009, pp. 111 - 114
Data Source:
Archives of American Gardens
Visitor Tag(s):

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