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A "Dendrite Star" Snowflakes Photomicrographed by Wilson A. Bentley

Author:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Subject:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
Number of Images: 1; Color: Black and white; Size: 3" h x 3 1/2" w; Type of Image: Other; Medium: Albumen Print
Type:
Pictorial works
Other
Albumen print
Date:
c. 1890
Topic:
Photography
Photomicrography
Snowflakes
Standard number:
SIA2008-1395
Restrictions:
No restrictions
Category:
Historic Images of the Smithsonian
Summary:
A microphotograph of a "Dendrite Star" one of the seven basic shapes of snowflakes, photographed by Wilson A. Bentley (1865-1931), known the world over as the "Snowflake Man." Bentley photographed at 17 with a bellows camera that had a microscope inside. He photographed his first snow crystal in 1885. He devoted the rest of his life to exploring these fascinating forms and photographed more than 5,000 snow crystals. A self-educated farmer, he pioneered "photomicrography," the photographing of very small objects. Bentley's interest in snowflakes led to his more recognized profession as a researcher and pioneer in photomicrographical studies between 1885 and his death in 1931. Bentley become the first person to photograph a single, unique snowflake
Contained within:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 31, Box 12, Folder: 17, Bentley Neg. # 591
Contact information:
Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Archives, 600 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20024-2520, SIHistory@si.edu
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Visitor Tag(s):

Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 80 c. 1890

Creator:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
3.7 x 3.2
Type:
Albumen prints
Date:
1890
c 1890
Topic:
Environmental sciences
Microscopes
Nature and society
Photomicrography
Science
Snow
Snowflakes
Symmetry
United States--History
Local number:
SIA RU000031 [SIA2013-09171]
Restrictions:
All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by the Smithsonian Institution
Notes:
Alternate ID: SPI_262
Summary:
Wilson A. Bentley first became fascinated with snow during his childhood on a Vermont farm, and he experimented for years with ways to view individual snowflakes in order to study their crystalline structure. He eventually attached a camera to his microscope, and in 1885 he successfully photographed the flakes. This photomicrograph and more than five thousand others supported the belief that no two snowflakes are alike, leading scientists to study his work and publish it in numerous scientific articles and magazines. In 1903 Bentley sent prints of his snowflakes to the Smithsonian, hoping they might be of interest to Secretary Samuel P. Langley. This image is of a lamellar snowflake
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 1205 c. 1890

Creator:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
3.7 x 3.2
Type:
Albumen prints
Date:
1890
c 1890
Topic:
Environmental sciences
Microscopes
Nature and society
Optics
Photomicrography
Science
Snow
Snowflakes
Symmetry
United States--History
Local number:
SIA RU000031 [SIA2013-09168]
Restrictions:
All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by the Smithsonian Institution
Notes:
Alternate ID: SPI_263
Summary:
Wilson A. Bentley first became fascinated with snow during his childhood on a Vermont farm, and he experimented for years with ways to view individual snowflakes in order to study their crystalline structure. He eventually attached a camera to his microscope, and in 1885 he successfully photographed the flakes. This photomicrograph and more than five thousand others supported the belief that no two snowflakes are alike, leading scientists to study his work and publish it in numerous scientific articles and magazines. In 1903 Bentley sent prints of his snowflakes to the Smithsonian, hoping they might be of interest to Secretary Samuel P. Langley. This image is of a stellar snowflake
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 976, c. 1890

Creator:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
3.7 x 3.2
Type:
Albumen prints
Date:
1890
c 1890
Topic:
Environmental sciences
Microscopes
Nature and society
Optics
Photomicrography
Science
Snow
Snowflakes
Symmetry
United States--History
Local number:
SIA RU000031 [SIA2013-09135]
Restrictions:
All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by the Smithsonian Institution
Notes:
Alternate ID: SPI_264
Summary:
Wilson A. Bentley first became fascinated with snow during his childhood on a Vermont farm, and he experimented for years with ways to view individual snowflakes in order to study their crystalline structure. He eventually attached a camera to his microscope, and in 1885 he successfully photographed the flakes. This photomicrograph and more than five thousand others supported the belief that no two snowflakes are alike, leading scientists to study his work and publish it in numerous scientific articles and magazines. In 1903 Bentley sent prints of his snowflakes to the Smithsonian, hoping they might be of interest to Secretary Samuel P. Langley. This image is of a stellar snowflake
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 234, c. 1890

Creator:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
3.7 x 3.2
Type:
Albumen prints
Date:
1890
c 1890
Topic:
Environmental sciences
Microscopes
Nature and society
Optics
Photomicrography
Science
Snow
Snowflakes
Symmetry
United States--History
Local number:
SIA RU000031 [SIA2013-09134]
Restrictions:
All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by the Smithsonian Institution
Notes:
Alternate ID: SPI_266
Summary:
Wilson A. Bentley first became fascinated with snow during his childhood on a Vermont farm, and he experimented for years with ways to view individual snowflakes in order to study their crystalline structure. He eventually attached a camera to his microscope, and in 1885 he successfully photographed the flakes. This photomicrograph and more than five thousand others supported the belief that no two snowflakes are alike, leading scientists to study his work and publish it in numerous scientific articles and magazines. In 1903 Bentley sent prints of his snowflakes to the Smithsonian, hoping they might be of interest to Secretary Samuel P. Langley. This image is of a lamellar snowflake
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 951, c. 1890

Creator:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
3.6 x 3.1
Type:
Albumen prints
Date:
1890
c 1890
Topic:
Environmental sciences
Microscopes
Nature and society
Optics
Photomicrography
Science
Snow
Snowflakes
Symmetry
United States--History
Local number:
SIA RU000031 [SIA2013-09126]
Restrictions:
All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by the Smithsonian Institution
Notes:
Alternate ID: SPI_267
Summary:
Wilson A. Bentley first became fascinated with snow during his childhood on a Vermont farm, and he experimented for years with ways to view individual snowflakes in order to study their crystalline structure. He eventually attached a camera to his microscope, and in 1885 he successfully photographed the flakes. This photomicrograph and more than five thousand others supported the belief that no two snowflakes are alike, leading scientists to study his work and publish it in numerous scientific articles and magazines. In 1903 Bentley sent prints of his snowflakes to the Smithsonian, hoping they might be of interest to Secretary Samuel P. Langley. This image is of a lamellar snowflake
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 1152, c. 1890

Creator:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
3.7 x 3.2
Type:
Albumen prints
Date:
1890
c 1890
Topic:
Environmental sciences
Microscopes
Nature and society
Optics
Photomicrography
Science
Snow
Snowflakes
Symmetry
United States--History
Local number:
SIA RU000031 [SIA2013-09131]
Restrictions:
All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by the Smithsonian Institution
Notes:
Alternate ID: SPI_268
Summary:
Wilson A. Bentley first became fascinated with snow during his childhood on a Vermont farm, and he experimented for years with ways to view individual snowflakes in order to study their crystalline structure. He eventually attached a camera to his microscope, and in 1885 he successfully photographed the flakes. This photomicrograph and more than five thousand others supported the belief that no two snowflakes are alike, leading scientists to study his work and publish it in numerous scientific articles and magazines. In 1903 Bentley sent prints of his snowflakes to the Smithsonian, hoping they might be of interest to Secretary Samuel P. Langley. This image is of a stellar snowflake
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 1206, c. 1890

Creator:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
3.7 x 3.1
Type:
Albumen prints
Date:
1890
c 1890
Topic:
Environmental sciences
Microscopes
Nature and society
Optics
Photomicrography
Science
Snow
Snowflakes
Symmetry
United States--History
Local number:
SIA RU000031 [SIA2013-09170]
Restrictions:
All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by the Smithsonian Institution
Notes:
Alternate ID: SPI_269
Summary:
Wilson A. Bentley first became fascinated with snow during his childhood on a Vermont farm, and he experimented for years with ways to view individual snowflakes in order to study their crystalline structure. He eventually attached a camera to his microscope, and in 1885 he successfully photographed the flakes. This photomicrograph and more than five thousand others supported the belief that no two snowflakes are alike, leading scientists to study his work and publish it in numerous scientific articles and magazines. In 1903 Bentley sent prints of his snowflakes to the Smithsonian, hoping they might be of interest to Secretary Samuel P. Langley. This image is of a stellar snowflake
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 482, c. 1890

Creator:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
3.7 x 3.2
Type:
Albumen prints
Date:
1890
c 1890
Topic:
Environmental sciences
Microscopes
Nature and society
Optics
Photomicrography
Science
Snow
Snowflakes
Symmetry
United States--History
Local number:
SIA RU000031 [SIA2013-09127]
Restrictions:
All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by the Smithsonian Institution
Notes:
Alternate ID: SPI_270
Summary:
Wilson A. Bentley first became fascinated with snow during his childhood on a Vermont farm, and he experimented for years with ways to view individual snowflakes in order to study their crystalline structure. He eventually attached a camera to his microscope, and in 1885 he successfully photographed the flakes. This photomicrograph and more than five thousand others supported the belief that no two snowflakes are alike, leading scientists to study his work and publish it in numerous scientific articles and magazines. In 1903 Bentley sent prints of his snowflakes to the Smithsonian, hoping they might be of interest to Secretary Samuel P. Langley. This image is of a tabular snowflake
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 562, c. 1890

Creator:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
3.7 x 3.2
Type:
Albumen prints
Date:
1890
c 1890
Topic:
Environmental sciences
Microscopes
Nature and society
Optics
Photomicrography
Science
Snow
Snowflakes
Symmetry
United States--History
Local number:
SIA RU000031 [SIA2013-09169]
Restrictions:
All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by the Smithsonian Institution
Notes:
Alternate ID: SPI_271
Summary:
Wilson A. Bentley first became fascinated with snow during his childhood on a Vermont farm, and he experimented for years with ways to view individual snowflakes in order to study their crystalline structure. He eventually attached a camera to his microscope, and in 1885 he successfully photographed the flakes. This photomicrograph and more than five thousand others supported the belief that no two snowflakes are alike, leading scientists to study his work and publish it in numerous scientific articles and magazines. In 1903 Bentley sent prints of his snowflakes to the Smithsonian, hoping they might be of interest to Secretary Samuel P. Langley. This image is of a stellar snowflake
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 1225, c. 1890

Creator:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
3.7 x 3.2
Type:
Albumen prints
Date:
1890
c 1890
Topic:
Environmental sciences
Microscopes
Nature and society
Optics
Photomicrography
Science
Snow
Snowflakes
Symmetry
United States--History
Local number:
SIA RU000031 [SIA2013-09166]
Restrictions:
All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by the Smithsonian Institution
Notes:
Alternate ID: SPI_272
Summary:
Wilson A. Bentley first became fascinated with snow during his childhood on a Vermont farm, and he experimented for years with ways to view individual snowflakes in order to study their crystalline structure. He eventually attached a camera to his microscope, and in 1885 he successfully photographed the flakes. This photomicrograph and more than five thousand others supported the belief that no two snowflakes are alike, leading scientists to study his work and publish it in numerous scientific articles and magazines. In 1903 Bentley sent prints of his snowflakes to the Smithsonian, hoping they might be of interest to Secretary Samuel P. Langley. This image is of a tabular snowflake
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 10, c. 1890

Creator:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
3.7 x 3.2
Type:
Albumen prints
Date:
1890
c 1890
Topic:
Environmental sciences
Microscopes
Nature and society
Optics
Photomicrography
Science
Snow
Snowflakes
Symmetry
United States--History
Local number:
SIA RU000031 [SIA2013-09167]
Restrictions:
All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by the Smithsonian Institution
Notes:
Alternate ID: SPI_273
Summary:
Wilson A. Bentley first became fascinated with snow during his childhood on a Vermont farm, and he experimented for years with ways to view individual snowflakes in order to study their crystalline structure. He eventually attached a camera to his microscope, and in 1885 he successfully photographed the flakes. This photomicrograph and more than five thousand others supported the belief that no two snowflakes are alike, leading scientists to study his work and publish it in numerous scientific articles and magazines. In 1903 Bentley sent prints of his snowflakes to the Smithsonian, hoping they might be of interest to Secretary Samuel P. Langley. This image is of a stellar snowflake
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 332, c. 1890

Creator:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
3.7 x 3.2
Type:
Albumen prints
Date:
1890
c 1890
Topic:
Environmental sciences
Microscopes
Nature and society
Optics
Photomicrography
Science
Snow
Snowflakes
Symmetry
United States--History
Local number:
SIA RU000031 [SIA2013-09132]
Restrictions:
All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by the Smithsonian Institution
Notes:
Alternate ID: SPI_275
Summary:
Wilson A. Bentley first became fascinated with snow during his childhood on a Vermont farm, and he experimented for years with ways to view individual snowflakes in order to study their crystalline structure. He eventually attached a camera to his microscope, and in 1885 he successfully photographed the flakes. This photomicrograph and more than five thousand others supported the belief that no two snowflakes are alike, leading scientists to study his work and publish it in numerous scientific articles and magazines. In 1903 Bentley sent prints of his snowflakes to the Smithsonian, hoping they might be of interest to Secretary Samuel P. Langley. This image is of a stellar snowflake
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 990, c. 1890

Creator:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
3.6 x 3.1
Type:
Albumen prints
Date:
1890
c 1890
Topic:
Environmental sciences
Microscopes
Nature and society
Optics
Photomicrography
Science
Snow
Snowflakes
Symmetry
United States--History
Local number:
SIA RU000031 [SIA2013-09130]
Restrictions:
All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by the Smithsonian Institution
Notes:
Alternate ID: SPI_277
Summary:
Wilson A. Bentley first became fascinated with snow during his childhood on a Vermont farm, and he experimented for years with ways to view individual snowflakes in order to study their crystalline structure. He eventually attached a camera to his microscope, and in 1885 he successfully photographed the flakes. This photomicrograph and more than five thousand others supported the belief that no two snowflakes are alike, leading scientists to study his work and publish it in numerous scientific articles and magazines. In 1903 Bentley sent prints of his snowflakes to the Smithsonian, hoping they might be of interest to Secretary Samuel P. Langley. This image is of a stellar snowflake
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 349, c. 1890

Creator:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
3.7 x 3.2
Type:
Albumen prints
Date:
1890
c 1890
Topic:
Environmental sciences
Microscopes
Nature and society
Optics
Photomicrography
Science
Snow
Snowflakes
Symmetry
United States--History
Local number:
SIA RU000031 [SIA2013-09129]
Restrictions:
All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by the Smithsonian Institution
Notes:
Alternate ID: SPI_278
Summary:
Wilson A. Bentley first became fascinated with snow during his childhood on a Vermont farm, and he experimented for years with ways to view individual snowflakes in order to study their crystalline structure. He eventually attached a camera to his microscope, and in 1885 he successfully photographed the flakes. This photomicrograph and more than five thousand others supported the belief that no two snowflakes are alike, leading scientists to study his work and publish it in numerous scientific articles and magazines. In 1903 Bentley sent prints of his snowflakes to the Smithsonian, hoping they might be of interest to Secretary Samuel P. Langley. This image is of a tabular snowflake
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 920, c. 1890

Creator:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
3.8 x 3.2
Type:
Albumen prints
Date:
1890
c 1890
Topic:
Environmental sciences
Microscopes
Nature and society
Optics
Photomicrography
Science
Snow
Snowflakes
Symmetry
United States--History
Local number:
SIA RU000031 [SIA2013-09128]
Restrictions:
All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by the Smithsonian Institution
Notes:
Alternate ID: SPI_279
Summary:
Wilson A. Bentley first became fascinated with snow during his childhood on a Vermont farm, and he experimented for years with ways to view individual snowflakes in order to study their crystalline structure. He eventually attached a camera to his microscope, and in 1885 he successfully photographed the flakes. This photomicrograph and more than five thousand others supported the belief that no two snowflakes are alike, leading scientists to study his work and publish it in numerous scientific articles and magazines. In 1903 Bentley sent prints of his snowflakes to the Smithsonian, hoping they might be of interest to Secretary Samuel P. Langley. This image is of a fern-stellar snowflake
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 579A, c. 1890

Creator:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
3.7 x 3.2
Type:
Albumen prints
Date:
1890
c 1890
Topic:
Environmental sciences
Microscopes
Nature and society
Optics
Photomicrography
Science
Snow
Snowflakes
Symmetry
United States--History
Local number:
SIA RU000031 [SIA2013-09136]
Restrictions:
All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by the Smithsonian Institution
Notes:
Alternate ID: SPI_265
Summary:
Wilson A. Bentley first became fascinated with snow during his childhood on a Vermont farm, and he experimented for years with ways to view individual snowflakes in order to study their crystalline structure. He eventually attached a camera to his microscope, and in 1885 he successfully photographed the flakes. This photomicrograph and more than five thousand others supported the belief that no two snowflakes are alike, leading scientists to study his work and publish it in numerous scientific articles and magazines. In 1903 Bentley sent prints of his snowflakes to the Smithsonian, hoping they might be of interest to Secretary Samuel P. Langley. This image is of a stellar snowflake
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Bentley Snowflake 342, c. 1890

Creator:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
3.7 x 3.2
Type:
Albumen prints
Date:
1890
c 1890
Topic:
Environmental sciences
Microscopes
Nature and society
Optics
Photomicrography
Science
Snow
Snowflakes
Symmetry
United States--History
Local number:
SIA RU000031 [SIA2008-1394]
Restrictions:
All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by the Smithsonian Institution
Notes:
Alternate ID: SPI_274
Summary:
Wilson A. Bentley first became fascinated with snow during his childhood on a Vermont farm, and he experimented for years with ways to view individual snowflakes in order to study their crystalline structure. He eventually attached a camera to his microscope, and in 1885 he successfully photographed the flakes. This photomicrograph and more than five thousand others supported the belief that no two snowflakes are alike, leading scientists to study his work and publish it in numerous scientific articles and magazines. In 1903 Bentley sent prints of his snowflakes to the Smithsonian, hoping they might be of interest to Secretary Samuel P. Langley
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Cover page and first page of W. A. Bentley's "Studies Among the Snow Crystals"

Author:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
Number of Images: 2 Color: Color ; Size: 9 3/8w x 11 6/8h ; Type of Image: Document ; Medium: Paper
Type:
Pictorial works
Document
Paper
Place:
United States
Date:
1902
Topic:
Snow
Photography
Donors
Snowflakes
Crystallography
Photography--History
Photomicrography
Photography--Scientific applications
Standard number:
SIA2011-0984 and SIA2011-0985
Restrictions:
No restrictions
Category:
Historic Images of the Smithsonian
Notes:
SIA2011-0984 (cover), SIA2011-0985 (page 1)
Summary:
Cover page and first page of Wilson A. Bentley's "Studies Among the Snow Crystals" from 1902. Bentley, who invented the technique of microphotography of snowflakes and took thousands of images throughout his life, donated many of his snowflake photographs to the Smithsonian Institution in 1904
Contained within:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 31, Box 12, Folder 18: Bentley, Wilson A., 1902. Article on structure of snow crystals, including photographs
Contact information:
Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Archives, 600 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20024-2520, SIHistory@si.edu
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Visitor Tag(s):

Additional Online Media:

Letter from W. A. Bentley to S. P. Langley, December 26, 1904

Author:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Subject:
Langley, S. P (Samuel Pierpont) 1834-1906
Physical description:
Number of Images: 2 Color: Color ; Size: 5w x 8h ; Type of Image: Document ; Medium: Paper
Type:
Pictorial works
Document
Paper
Place:
United States
Date:
December 26, 1904
Topic:
Snow
Photography
Donors
Snowflakes
Crystallography
Photography--History
Photomicrography
Photography--Scientific applications
Standard number:
SIA2011-0986 and SIA2011-0987
Restrictions:
No restrictions
Category:
Historic Images of the Smithsonian
Notes:
SIA2011-0986 (page 1), SIA2011-0987 (page 2)
Summary:
Letter from Wilson A. Bentley to Smithsonian Institution Secretary Samuel P. Langley promising to send Bentley's snowflake photographs to the Smithsonian Institution. Bentley invented the technique of microphotography of snowflakes and took thousands of photographs throughout his life. December 26, 1904. 2 pages
Contained within:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 31, Box 13, Folder: Bentley, Wilson A. 1904-1905
Contact information:
Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Archives, 600 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20024-2520, SIHistory@si.edu
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Visitor Tag(s):

Additional Online Media:

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