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A "Dendrite Star" Snowflakes Photomicrographed by Wilson A. Bentley

view A "Dendrite Star" Snowflakes Photomicrographed by Wilson A. Bentley digital asset number 1
Author:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Subject:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
Number of Images: 1; Color: Black and white; Size: 3" h x 3 1/2" w; Type of Image: Other; Medium: Albumen Print
Type:
Pictorial works
Other
Albumen print
Date:
c. 1890
Category:
Historic Images of the Smithsonian
Summary:
A microphotograph of a "Dendrite Star" one of the seven basic shapes of snowflakes, photographed by Wilson A. Bentley (1865-1931), known the world over as the "Snowflake Man." Bentley photographed at 17 with a bellows camera that had a microscope inside. He photographed his first snow crystal in 1885. He devoted the rest of his life to exploring these fascinating forms and photographed more than 5,000 snow crystals. A self-educated farmer, he pioneered "photomicrography," the photographing of very small objects. Bentley's interest in snowflakes led to his more recognized profession as a researcher and pioneer in photomicrographical studies between 1885 and his death in 1931. Bentley become the first person to photograph a single, unique snowflake.
Contained within:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 31, Box 12, Folder: 17, Bentley Neg. # 591
Contact information:
Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Archives, 600 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20024-2520, SIHistory@si.edu
Topic:
Photography
Photomicrography
Snowflakes
Standard number:
SIA2008-1395
Restrictions:
No restrictions
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sic_11698

Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 80 c. 1890

view Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 80 c. 1890 digital asset number 1
Creator:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
3.7 x 3.2
Type:
Albumen prints
Black-and-white photographs
Date:
1890
c 1890
Notes:
Alternate ID: SPI_262
Public Domain
Summary:
Wilson A. Bentley first became fascinated with snow during his childhood on a Vermont farm, and he experimented for years with ways to view individual snowflakes in order to study their crystalline structure. He eventually attached a camera to his microscope, and in 1885 he successfully photographed the flakes. This photomicrograph and more than five thousand others supported the belief that no two snowflakes are alike, leading scientists to study his work and publish it in numerous scientific articles and magazines. In 1903 Bentley sent prints of his snowflakes to the Smithsonian, hoping they might be of interest to Secretary Samuel P. Langley. This image is of a lamellar snowflake.
Cite as:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 31, Image #SIA2013-09171
Repository Loc.:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Capital Gallery, Suite 3000, MRC 507; 600 Maryland Avenue, SW; Washington, DC 20024-2520
Topic:
Microscopes
Photomicrography
Snowflakes
Local number:
SIA RU000031 [SIA2013-09171]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_308062

Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 951, c. 1890

view Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 951, c. 1890 digital asset number 1
Creator:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
3.6 x 3.1
Type:
Albumen prints
Black-and-white photographs
Date:
1890
c 1890
Notes:
Alternate ID: SPI_267
Public Domain
Summary:
Wilson A. Bentley first became fascinated with snow during his childhood on a Vermont farm, and he experimented for years with ways to view individual snowflakes in order to study their crystalline structure. He eventually attached a camera to his microscope, and in 1885 he successfully photographed the flakes. This photomicrograph and more than five thousand others supported the belief that no two snowflakes are alike, leading scientists to study his work and publish it in numerous scientific articles and magazines. In 1903 Bentley sent prints of his snowflakes to the Smithsonian, hoping they might be of interest to Secretary Samuel P. Langley. This image is of a lamellar snowflake.
Cite as:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 31, Image #SIA2013-09126
Repository Loc.:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Capital Gallery, Suite 3000, MRC 507; 600 Maryland Avenue, SW; Washington, DC 20024-2520
Topic:
Microscopes
Photomicrography
Snowflakes
Local number:
SIA RU000031 [SIA2013-09126]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_308067

Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 1206, c. 1890

view Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 1206, c. 1890 digital asset number 1
Creator:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
3.7 x 3.1
Type:
Albumen prints
Black-and-white photographs
Date:
1890
c 1890
Notes:
Alternate ID: SPI_269
Public Domain
Summary:
Wilson A. Bentley first became fascinated with snow during his childhood on a Vermont farm, and he experimented for years with ways to view individual snowflakes in order to study their crystalline structure. He eventually attached a camera to his microscope, and in 1885 he successfully photographed the flakes. This photomicrograph and more than five thousand others supported the belief that no two snowflakes are alike, leading scientists to study his work and publish it in numerous scientific articles and magazines. In 1903 Bentley sent prints of his snowflakes to the Smithsonian, hoping they might be of interest to Secretary Samuel P. Langley. This image is of a stellar snowflake.
Cite as:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 31, Image #SIA2013-09170
Repository Loc.:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Capital Gallery, Suite 3000, MRC 507; 600 Maryland Avenue, SW; Washington, DC 20024-2520
Topic:
Microscopes
Photomicrography
Snowflakes
Local number:
SIA RU000031 [SIA2013-09170]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_308069

Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 562, c. 1890

view Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 562, c. 1890 digital asset number 1
Creator:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
3.7 x 3.2
Type:
Albumen prints
Black-and-white photographs
Date:
1890
c 1890
Notes:
Alternate ID: SPI_271
Public Domain
Summary:
Wilson A. Bentley first became fascinated with snow during his childhood on a Vermont farm, and he experimented for years with ways to view individual snowflakes in order to study their crystalline structure. He eventually attached a camera to his microscope, and in 1885 he successfully photographed the flakes. This photomicrograph and more than five thousand others supported the belief that no two snowflakes are alike, leading scientists to study his work and publish it in numerous scientific articles and magazines. In 1903 Bentley sent prints of his snowflakes to the Smithsonian, hoping they might be of interest to Secretary Samuel P. Langley. This image is of a stellar snowflake.
Cite as:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 31, Image #SIA2013-09169
Repository Loc.:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Capital Gallery, Suite 3000, MRC 507; 600 Maryland Avenue, SW; Washington, DC 20024-2520
Topic:
Microscopes
Photomicrography
Snowflakes
Local number:
SIA RU000031 [SIA2013-09169]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_308071

Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 1225, c. 1890

view Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 1225, c. 1890 digital asset number 1
Creator:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
3.7 x 3.2
Type:
Albumen prints
Black-and-white photographs
Date:
1890
c 1890
Notes:
Alternate ID: SPI_272
Public Domain
Summary:
Wilson A. Bentley first became fascinated with snow during his childhood on a Vermont farm, and he experimented for years with ways to view individual snowflakes in order to study their crystalline structure. He eventually attached a camera to his microscope, and in 1885 he successfully photographed the flakes. This photomicrograph and more than five thousand others supported the belief that no two snowflakes are alike, leading scientists to study his work and publish it in numerous scientific articles and magazines. In 1903 Bentley sent prints of his snowflakes to the Smithsonian, hoping they might be of interest to Secretary Samuel P. Langley. This image is of a tabular snowflake.
Cite as:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 31, Image #SIA2013-09166
Repository Loc.:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Capital Gallery, Suite 3000, MRC 507; 600 Maryland Avenue, SW; Washington, DC 20024-2520
Topic:
Microscopes
Photomicrography
Snowflakes
Local number:
SIA RU000031 [SIA2013-09166]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_308072

Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 10, c. 1890

view Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 10, c. 1890 digital asset number 1
Creator:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
3.7 x 3.2
Type:
Albumen prints
Black-and-white photographs
Date:
1890
c 1890
Notes:
Alternate ID: SPI_273
Public Domain
Summary:
Wilson A. Bentley first became fascinated with snow during his childhood on a Vermont farm, and he experimented for years with ways to view individual snowflakes in order to study their crystalline structure. He eventually attached a camera to his microscope, and in 1885 he successfully photographed the flakes. This photomicrograph and more than five thousand others supported the belief that no two snowflakes are alike, leading scientists to study his work and publish it in numerous scientific articles and magazines. In 1903 Bentley sent prints of his snowflakes to the Smithsonian, hoping they might be of interest to Secretary Samuel P. Langley. This image is of a stellar snowflake.
Cite as:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 31, Image #SIA2013-09167
Repository Loc.:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Capital Gallery, Suite 3000, MRC 507; 600 Maryland Avenue, SW; Washington, DC 20024-2520
Topic:
Microscopes
Photomicrography
Snowflakes
Local number:
SIA RU000031 [SIA2013-09167]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_308073

Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 332, c. 1890

view Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 332, c. 1890 digital asset number 1
Creator:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
3.7 x 3.2
Type:
Albumen prints
Black-and-white photographs
Date:
1890
c 1890
Notes:
Alternate ID: SPI_275
Public Domain
Summary:
Wilson A. Bentley first became fascinated with snow during his childhood on a Vermont farm, and he experimented for years with ways to view individual snowflakes in order to study their crystalline structure. He eventually attached a camera to his microscope, and in 1885 he successfully photographed the flakes. This photomicrograph and more than five thousand others supported the belief that no two snowflakes are alike, leading scientists to study his work and publish it in numerous scientific articles and magazines. In 1903 Bentley sent prints of his snowflakes to the Smithsonian, hoping they might be of interest to Secretary Samuel P. Langley. This image is of a stellar snowflake.
Cite as:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 31, Image #SIA2013-09132
Repository Loc.:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Capital Gallery, Suite 3000, MRC 507; 600 Maryland Avenue, SW; Washington, DC 20024-2520
Topic:
Microscopes
Photomicrography
Snowflakes
Local number:
SIA RU000031 [SIA2013-09132]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_308075

Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 349, c. 1890

view Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 349, c. 1890 digital asset number 1
Creator:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
3.7 x 3.2
Type:
Albumen prints
Black-and-white photographs
Date:
1890
c 1890
Notes:
Alternate ID: SPI_278
Public Domain
Summary:
Wilson A. Bentley first became fascinated with snow during his childhood on a Vermont farm, and he experimented for years with ways to view individual snowflakes in order to study their crystalline structure. He eventually attached a camera to his microscope, and in 1885 he successfully photographed the flakes. This photomicrograph and more than five thousand others supported the belief that no two snowflakes are alike, leading scientists to study his work and publish it in numerous scientific articles and magazines. In 1903 Bentley sent prints of his snowflakes to the Smithsonian, hoping they might be of interest to Secretary Samuel P. Langley. This image is of a tabular snowflake.
Cite as:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 31, Image #SIA2013-09129
Repository Loc.:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Capital Gallery, Suite 3000, MRC 507; 600 Maryland Avenue, SW; Washington, DC 20024-2520
Topic:
Microscopes
Photomicrography
Snowflakes
Local number:
SIA RU000031 [SIA2013-09129]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_308077

Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 1205 c. 1890

view Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 1205 c. 1890 digital asset number 1
Creator:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
3.7 x 3.2
Type:
Albumen prints
Black-and-white photographs
Date:
1890
c 1890
Notes:
Alternate ID: SPI_263
Public Domain
Summary:
Wilson A. Bentley first became fascinated with snow during his childhood on a Vermont farm, and he experimented for years with ways to view individual snowflakes in order to study their crystalline structure. He eventually attached a camera to his microscope, and in 1885 he successfully photographed the flakes. This photomicrograph and more than five thousand others supported the belief that no two snowflakes are alike, leading scientists to study his work and publish it in numerous scientific articles and magazines. In 1903 Bentley sent prints of his snowflakes to the Smithsonian, hoping they might be of interest to Secretary Samuel P. Langley. This image is of a stellar snowflake.
Cite as:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 31, Image #SIA2013-09168
Repository Loc.:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Capital Gallery, Suite 3000, MRC 507; 600 Maryland Avenue, SW; Washington, DC 20024-2520
Topic:
Microscopes
Photomicrography
Snowflakes
Local number:
SIA RU000031 [SIA2013-09168]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_308063

Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 976, c. 1890

view Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 976, c. 1890 digital asset number 1
Creator:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
3.7 x 3.2
Type:
Albumen prints
Black-and-white photographs
Date:
1890
c 1890
Notes:
Alternate ID: SPI_264
Public Domain
Summary:
Wilson A. Bentley first became fascinated with snow during his childhood on a Vermont farm, and he experimented for years with ways to view individual snowflakes in order to study their crystalline structure. He eventually attached a camera to his microscope, and in 1885 he successfully photographed the flakes. This photomicrograph and more than five thousand others supported the belief that no two snowflakes are alike, leading scientists to study his work and publish it in numerous scientific articles and magazines. In 1903 Bentley sent prints of his snowflakes to the Smithsonian, hoping they might be of interest to Secretary Samuel P. Langley. This image is of a stellar snowflake.
Cite as:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 31, Image #SIA2013-09135
Repository Loc.:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Capital Gallery, Suite 3000, MRC 507; 600 Maryland Avenue, SW; Washington, DC 20024-2520
Topic:
Microscopes
Photomicrography
Snowflakes
Local number:
SIA RU000031 [SIA2013-09135]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_308064

Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 579A, c. 1890

view Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 579A, c. 1890 digital asset number 1
Creator:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
3.7 x 3.2
Type:
Albumen prints
Black-and-white photographs
Date:
1890
c 1890
Notes:
Alternate ID: SPI_265
Public Domain
Summary:
Wilson A. Bentley first became fascinated with snow during his childhood on a Vermont farm, and he experimented for years with ways to view individual snowflakes in order to study their crystalline structure. He eventually attached a camera to his microscope, and in 1885 he successfully photographed the flakes. This photomicrograph and more than five thousand others supported the belief that no two snowflakes are alike, leading scientists to study his work and publish it in numerous scientific articles and magazines. In 1903 Bentley sent prints of his snowflakes to the Smithsonian, hoping they might be of interest to Secretary Samuel P. Langley. This image is of a stellar snowflake.
Cite as:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 31, Image #SIA2013-09136
Repository Loc.:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Capital Gallery, Suite 3000, MRC 507; 600 Maryland Avenue, SW; Washington, DC 20024-2520
Topic:
Microscopes
Photomicrography
Snowflakes
Local number:
SIA RU000031 [SIA2013-09136]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_308065

Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 234, c. 1890

view Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 234, c. 1890 digital asset number 1
Creator:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
3.7 x 3.2
Type:
Albumen prints
Black-and-white photographs
Date:
1890
c 1890
Notes:
Alternate ID: SPI_266
Public Domain
Summary:
Wilson A. Bentley first became fascinated with snow during his childhood on a Vermont farm, and he experimented for years with ways to view individual snowflakes in order to study their crystalline structure. He eventually attached a camera to his microscope, and in 1885 he successfully photographed the flakes. This photomicrograph and more than five thousand others supported the belief that no two snowflakes are alike, leading scientists to study his work and publish it in numerous scientific articles and magazines. In 1903 Bentley sent prints of his snowflakes to the Smithsonian, hoping they might be of interest to Secretary Samuel P. Langley. This image is of a lamellar snowflake.
Cite as:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 31, Image #SIA2013-09134
Repository Loc.:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Capital Gallery, Suite 3000, MRC 507; 600 Maryland Avenue, SW; Washington, DC 20024-2520
Topic:
Microscopes
Photomicrography
Snowflakes
Local number:
SIA RU000031 [SIA2013-09134]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_308066

Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 1152, c. 1890

view Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 1152, c. 1890 digital asset number 1
Creator:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
3.7 x 3.2
Type:
Albumen prints
Black-and-white photographs
Date:
1890
c 1890
Notes:
Alternate ID: SPI_268
Public Domain
Summary:
Wilson A. Bentley first became fascinated with snow during his childhood on a Vermont farm, and he experimented for years with ways to view individual snowflakes in order to study their crystalline structure. He eventually attached a camera to his microscope, and in 1885 he successfully photographed the flakes. This photomicrograph and more than five thousand others supported the belief that no two snowflakes are alike, leading scientists to study his work and publish it in numerous scientific articles and magazines. In 1903 Bentley sent prints of his snowflakes to the Smithsonian, hoping they might be of interest to Secretary Samuel P. Langley. This image is of a stellar snowflake.
Cite as:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 31, Image #SIA2013-09131
Repository Loc.:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Capital Gallery, Suite 3000, MRC 507; 600 Maryland Avenue, SW; Washington, DC 20024-2520
Topic:
Microscopes
Photomicrography
Snowflakes
Local number:
SIA RU000031 [SIA2013-09131]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_308068

Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 482, c. 1890

view Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 482, c. 1890 digital asset number 1
Creator:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
3.7 x 3.2
Type:
Albumen prints
Black-and-white photographs
Date:
1890
c 1890
Notes:
Alternate ID: SPI_270
Public Domain
Summary:
Wilson A. Bentley first became fascinated with snow during his childhood on a Vermont farm, and he experimented for years with ways to view individual snowflakes in order to study their crystalline structure. He eventually attached a camera to his microscope, and in 1885 he successfully photographed the flakes. This photomicrograph and more than five thousand others supported the belief that no two snowflakes are alike, leading scientists to study his work and publish it in numerous scientific articles and magazines. In 1903 Bentley sent prints of his snowflakes to the Smithsonian, hoping they might be of interest to Secretary Samuel P. Langley. This image is of a tabular snowflake.
Cite as:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 31, Image #SIA2013-09127
Repository Loc.:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Capital Gallery, Suite 3000, MRC 507; 600 Maryland Avenue, SW; Washington, DC 20024-2520
Topic:
Microscopes
Photomicrography
Snowflakes
Local number:
SIA RU000031 [SIA2013-09127]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_308070

Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 990, c. 1890

view Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 990, c. 1890 digital asset number 1
Creator:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
3.6 x 3.1
Type:
Albumen prints
Black-and-white photographs
Date:
1890
c 1890
Notes:
Alternate ID: SPI_277
Public Domain
Summary:
Wilson A. Bentley first became fascinated with snow during his childhood on a Vermont farm, and he experimented for years with ways to view individual snowflakes in order to study their crystalline structure. He eventually attached a camera to his microscope, and in 1885 he successfully photographed the flakes. This photomicrograph and more than five thousand others supported the belief that no two snowflakes are alike, leading scientists to study his work and publish it in numerous scientific articles and magazines. In 1903 Bentley sent prints of his snowflakes to the Smithsonian, hoping they might be of interest to Secretary Samuel P. Langley. This image is of a stellar snowflake.
Cite as:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 31, Image #SIA2013-09130
Repository Loc.:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Capital Gallery, Suite 3000, MRC 507; 600 Maryland Avenue, SW; Washington, DC 20024-2520
Topic:
Microscopes
Photomicrography
Snowflakes
Local number:
SIA RU000031 [SIA2013-09130]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_308076

Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 920, c. 1890

view Wilson Bentley's Snowflake 920, c. 1890 digital asset number 1
Creator:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
3.8 x 3.2
Type:
Albumen prints
Black-and-white photographs
Date:
1890
c 1890
Notes:
Alternate ID: SPI_279
Public Domain
Summary:
Wilson A. Bentley first became fascinated with snow during his childhood on a Vermont farm, and he experimented for years with ways to view individual snowflakes in order to study their crystalline structure. He eventually attached a camera to his microscope, and in 1885 he successfully photographed the flakes. This photomicrograph and more than five thousand others supported the belief that no two snowflakes are alike, leading scientists to study his work and publish it in numerous scientific articles and magazines. In 1903 Bentley sent prints of his snowflakes to the Smithsonian, hoping they might be of interest to Secretary Samuel P. Langley. This image is of a fern-stellar snowflake.
Cite as:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 31, Image #SIA2013-09128
Repository Loc.:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Capital Gallery, Suite 3000, MRC 507; 600 Maryland Avenue, SW; Washington, DC 20024-2520
Topic:
Microscopes
Photomicrography
Snowflakes
Local number:
SIA RU000031 [SIA2013-09128]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_308078

Bentley Snowflake 342, c. 1890

view Bentley Snowflake 342, c. 1890 digital asset number 1
Creator:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
3.7 x 3.2
Type:
Albumen prints
Black-and-white photographs
Date:
1890
c 1890
Notes:
Alternate ID: SPI_274
Public Domain
Summary:
Wilson A. Bentley first became fascinated with snow during his childhood on a Vermont farm, and he experimented for years with ways to view individual snowflakes in order to study their crystalline structure. He eventually attached a camera to his microscope, and in 1885 he successfully photographed the flakes. This photomicrograph and more than five thousand others supported the belief that no two snowflakes are alike, leading scientists to study his work and publish it in numerous scientific articles and magazines. In 1903 Bentley sent prints of his snowflakes to the Smithsonian, hoping they might be of interest to Secretary Samuel P. Langley.
Cite as:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 31, Image #SIA2008-1394
Repository Loc.:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Capital Gallery, Suite 3000, MRC 507; 600 Maryland Avenue, SW; Washington, DC 20024-2520
Topic:
Microscopes
Photomicrography
Snowflakes
Local number:
SIA RU000031 [SIA2008-1394]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_308074

John A. Bentley

view John A. Bentley digital asset number 1
Artist:
Unidentified Artist
Sitter:
John A. Bentley, born early-mid 19th Century
Medium:
Pencil on paper
Dimensions:
76.2cm x 63.5cm (30" x 25"), Accurate
Type:
Drawing
Topic:
Interior
Personal Attribute\Facial Hair\Beard
John A. Bentley: Male
John A. Bentley: Law and Law Enforcement\Lawyer
John A. Bentley: Law and Law Enforcement\Judge
John A. Bentley: Education\Educator\Teacher
John A. Bentley: Politics and Government\State Senator\Wisconsin
John A. Bentley: Politics and Government\Government Official\Commissioner\Pensions
Portrait
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; transfer from the National Archives
Object number:
S/NPG.65.11
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_S_NPG.65.11

Cover page and first page of W. A. Bentley's "Studies Among the Snow Crystals"

view Cover page and first page of W. A. Bentley's "Studies Among the Snow Crystals" digital asset number 1
Author:
Bentley, W. A (Wilson Alwyn) 1865-1931
Physical description:
Number of Images: 2 Color: Color ; Size: 9 3/8w x 11 6/8h ; Type of Image: Document ; Medium: Paper
Type:
Pictorial works
Document
Paper
Place:
United States
Date:
1902
Category:
Historic Images of the Smithsonian
Notes:
SIA2011-0984 (cover), SIA2011-0985 (page 1).
Summary:
Cover page and first page of Wilson A. Bentley's "Studies Among the Snow Crystals" from 1902. Bentley, who invented the technique of microphotography of snowflakes and took thousands of images throughout his life, donated many of his snowflake photographs to the Smithsonian Institution in 1904.
Contained within:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 31, Box 12, Folder 18: Bentley, Wilson A., 1902. Article on structure of snow crystals, including photographs
Contact information:
Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Archives, 600 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20024-2520, SIHistory@si.edu
Topic:
Snow
Photography
Donors
Snowflakes
Crystallography
Photography--History
Photomicrography
Photography--Scientific applications
Standard number:
SIA2011-0984 and SIA2011-0985
Restrictions:
No restrictions
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sic_12882

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