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Corona Typewriter

Maker:
Corona Typewriter Company
Measurements:
overall: 6 in x 11 1/2 in x 9 1/2 in; 15.24 cm x 29.21 cm x 24.13 cm
Object Name:
typewriter
Date made:
1923-1925
Subject:
Computers & Business Machines
Typewriters
Credit Line:
Immaculata School
ID Number:
ME*336759
Catalog number:
336759
Accession number:
1978.2479
Serial number:
590430
Description:
This Corona typewriter was manufactured by the Corona Typewriter Company, Inc. of Groton, New York sometime around 1923-1925. The typewriter is a front-striking model with a three row QWERTY keyboard, likely the Corona No. 3 although it lacks the “3” numbering on the frame below the spacebar. The Standard Typewriting Company began producing a folding model of typewriter in Groton around 1907.
The success of the Standard Typewriter Company’s Corona model typewriter prompted the company to change its named to the Corona Typewriting Company in 1914. In 1926 the company joined with the L. C. Smith & Brothers Typewriting company to become Smith-Corona. Smith-Corona manufactured typewriters and typewriter accessories throughout the 20th century, becoming Smith Corona Marchant in 1958. After two bankruptcies, Smith-Corona returned to operation in 2010 as a thermal paper manufacturing company.
Location:
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Work and Industry: Mechanisms
Typewriters
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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Visigraph Typewriter

Maker:
Visigraph Typewriter Company
Measurements:
overall: 10 in x 13 in x 15 in; 25.4 cm x 33.02 cm x 38.1 cm
Object Name:
typewriter
Subject:
Computers & Business Machines
Typewriters
ID Number:
ME*326231
Catalog number:
326231
Accession number:
257824
Description:
Charles Spiro was the inventor of a variety of typewriters including the Columbia, the Bar-Lock, and this Visigraph. Spiro held a variety of patents relating to the Visigraph, and had begun production by 1910. This typewriter was manufactured by the Visigraph Typewriter Company sometime before 1919, when the Visigraph Typewriter Company reorganized as the C. Spiro Manufacturing Company. The Visigraph was a visible front-strike typewriter with a four-row QWERTY keyboard.
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Work and Industry: Mechanisms
Typewriters
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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Demountable Typewriter

Maker:
Demountable Typewriter Company
Measurements:
overall: 9 1/2 in x 17 1/2 in x 14 1/2 in; 24.13 cm x 44.45 cm x 36.83 cm
Object Name:
typewriter
Subject:
Computers & Business Machines
Typewriters
ID Number:
ME*334783
Catalog number:
334783
Accession number:
314637
Description:
This is a Demountable typewriter that was manufactured by the Demountable Typewriter Company of Fond du Lac, Wisconsin during the 1920s. The Demountable was designed by DeWitt Clinton Harris who had previously brought the Harris Visible and the Rex Visible typewriters to market. The Demountable bears a strong resemblance to these previous typewriters, but as the name suggests, the Demountable can be separated into three main components without the use of any tools. The Demountable could be separated into the frame unit, carriage unit, and the action unit, allowing for the replacement of parts as the type bars or platen wore out as well as allowing the use of different carriage lengths without having to buy a totally new machine.
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Work and Industry: Mechanisms
Typewriters
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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Corona Four Typewriter

Maker:
Corona Typewriter Company
Measurements:
overall: 4 in x 11 in x 12 1/4 in; 10.16 cm x 27.94 cm x 31.115 cm
Object Name:
typewriter
Subject:
Computers & Business Machines
Typewriters
ID Number:
ME*308355
Catalog number:
308355
Accession number:
85488
Description:
This Corona Four model typewriter was manufactured by the Corona Typewriter Company Incorporated of Groton, New York around 1924. The Corona Four had a smaller frame to allow portability. The Corona Four had 42 full size keys, a 10-inch carriage, a 2-color ribbon, and an accelerating type bar action.
The success of the Standard Typewriter Company’s Corona model typewriter prompted the company to change its named to the Corona Typewriting Company in 1914. In 1926 the company joined with the L. C. Smith & Brothers Typewriting company to become Smith-Corona. Smith-Corona manufactured typewriters and typewriter accessories throughout the 20th century, becoming Smith Corona Marchant in 1958. After two bankruptcies, Smith-Corona returned to operation in 2010 as a thermal paper manufacturing company.
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Work and Industry: Mechanisms
Typewriters
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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Hall Index Typewriter

Maker:
Hall Typewriter Co.
Measurements:
overall: 4 1/8 in x 15 3/8 in x 9 in; 10.4775 cm x 39.0525 cm x 22.86 cm
Object Name:
typewriter
Subject:
Computers & Business Machines
Typewriters
ID Number:
ME*314603
Catalog number:
314603
Accession number:
205421
Description:
Thomas Hall was awarded patent number 238,387 on March 1, 1881 for his “Type-Writer” design represented in this typewriter. The Hall Typewriter was manufactured by the Hall Typewriter Company of New York, New York, beginning in 1881. The company moved from New York to Salem in 1887, then Boston in 1889, producing a similar model typewriter in all three locations. This Salem variant of the Hall index typewriter began to be produced in 1887. Index typewriters have no keyboard—the characters are selected by a pointer system. In the Hall index typewriter each hole on the grid corresponds to a character, pushing the key through the hole imprints the letter on the page and shifts the page over one space. This typewriter is contained in a wooden carrying case, with a metal handle and a metal plaque that bears the image of a feather with the inscription “HALL TYPE WRITER Co./TRADEMARK/SALEM, MASS.”
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Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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Royal KHM Typewriter

Maker:
Royal Typewriter Company
Measurements:
overall: 9 1/4 in x 15 in x 15 in; 23.495 cm x 38.1 cm x 38.1 cm
Object Name:
typewriter
Subject:
Computers & Business Machines
Typewriters
ID Number:
ME*311042
Catalog number:
311042
Accession number:
136502
Description:
This Royal KHM model typewriter was produced by the Royal Typewriter Company of Hartford, Connecticut in 1934. The Royal KHM was very similar to the Royal 10, but notable differences include plastic instead of glass sides, no scooped center, and covered ribbon spools.
The Royal Typewriter Company was founded in 1906 by Thomas Fortunes Ryan and Edward B. Hess, with Ryan providing the capital and Hess providing the inventiveness. Hess owned over 150 patents, many of which were assigned to the Royal Typewriter Company. Hess’s most noteworthy patents related to increasing the ease of typing, including an accelerating typebar, anti friction roller escapement, Magic Margins, and selective touch control. In 1954 Royal merged with the McBee Corporation, operating as Royal Mcbee until 1964. In 1964 Royal McBee was acquired by Litton Industries, which used Royal as a brand until 1968.
Location:
Currently not on view
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Work and Industry: Office Collection
Typewriters
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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Hammond Multiplex Typewriter

Maker:
Hammond Typewriter Company
Measurements:
overall: 8 in x 11 in x 11 in; 20.32 cm x 27.94 cm x 27.94 cm
Object Name:
typewriter
Subject:
Computers & Business Machines
Typewriters
ID Number:
ME*334775
Catalog number:
334775
Accession number:
314637
Description:
This Hammond Folding Multiplex typewriter was manufactured by the Hammond Typewriter Company of New York beginning in 1923. The typewriter uses Hammond’s patented type-shuttle and hammer typing mechanism where the printing is done by a hammer in the back of the machine striking a type-carrying shuttle in the front of the machine, with the paper and ink ribbon in between to receive the impression. This Hammond Folding Multiplex contains two additional Hammond innovations. It is called a Multiplex because the typewriter contains two type shuttles that can easily be rotated into use, allowing the typing of two complete alphabets in different typesets on each machine. This typewriter’s keyboard could also fold up to allow a cover to be attached to the base, allowing the typewriter to be carried. The keyboard is in a three row QWERTY array.
James Bartlett Hammond filed patents for his type-shuttle and hammer typing mechanism present in Hammond typewriters in 1879, receiving patent number 224088 on February 3rd, 1880 and patent number 232402 September 21st, 1880. The Hammond Typewriter Company was founded in 1880, and produced its first machine by 1884, winning a gold medal at the New Orleans Centennial Exposition that same year. The Hammond Typewriter touted its superior strength and durability due to its unique type-shuttle and hammer typing mechanism. The replaceable type-shuttle also contributed to the Hammond’s popularity with the ability to print in a variety of typesets in various sizes, including math formulae, special symbols, and foreign characters with an easy replacement of the type shuttle, or an even simpler rotation of a wheel in the Hammond Multiplex.
Location:
Currently not on view
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Work and Industry: Mechanisms
Typewriters
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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Hammond Multiplex Typewriter

Maker:
Hammond Typewriter Company
Measurements:
overall: 8 7/8 in x 14 in x 14 1/8 in; 22.5425 cm x 35.56 cm x 35.8775 cm
Object Name:
typewriter
Subject:
Computers & Business Machines
Typewriters
ID Number:
ME*315099
Catalog number:
315099
Accession number:
215861
Description:
This Hammond Multiplex typewriter was manufactured by the Hammond Typewriter Company of New York beginning in 1913. The typewriter uses Hammond’s patented type-shuttle and hammer typing mechanism. The type shuttle is a curved piece of rubber/metal that rotates when the key is pressed to bring up the correct character. The printing is done by a hammer in the back of the machine striking the type-shuttle in the front of the machine, with the paper and ink ribbon in between to receive the impression. The typewriter is called a Multiplex because the typewriter contains two type shuttles in its central “turret” that can easily be rotated into use, allowing the typing of two complete alphabets in different typesets on each machine. The keyboard is in a three row QWERTY array.
James Bartlett Hammond filed patents for his type-shuttle and hammer typing mechanism present in Hammond typewriters in 1879, receiving patent number 224088 on February 3rd, 1880 and patent number 232402 September 21st, 1880. The Hammond Typewriter Company was founded in 1880, and produced its first machine by 1884, winning a gold medal at the New Orleans Centennial Exposition that same year. The Hammond Typewriter touted its superior strength and durability due to its unique type-shuttle and hammer typing mechanism. The replaceable type-shuttle also contributed to the Hammond’s popularity with the ability to print in a variety of typesets in various sizes, including math formulae, special symbols, and foreign characters with an easy replacement of the type shuttle, or an even simpler rotation of a wheel in the Hammond Multiplex.
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Work and Industry: Mechanisms
Typewriters
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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New Franklin Typewriter

Maker:
Franklin Typewriter Manufacturing Company
Measurements:
overall: 7 in x 12 in x 15 1/2 in; 17.78 cm x 30.48 cm x 39.37 cm
Object Name:
typewriter
Subject:
Computers & Business Machines
Typewriters
ID Number:
1981.0107.01
Accession number:
1981.0107
Catalog number:
1981.0107.01
81.0107.01
Description:
This New Franklin typewriter was manufactured by the Franklin Typewriter Company of New York, New York around 1904. The design for the Franklin typewriter was patented by Wellington P. Kidder, receiving patent number 464,504 on December 8, 1891. The main feature of the Franklin typewriter is its series of radial type bars that carry multiple typefaces. The curved Franklin keyboard remains one of its most distinctive features.
The Tilton Manufacturing Company of Boston, Massachusetts was originally assigned patents to both the Victor Index Typewriter (invented by Arthur Jacobs in 1889) and the Franklin typewriter (invented by Wellington Kidder in 1891). Eventually, both these typewriters were sold by their own companies, with the Victor Typewriter Company staying in Boston and the Franklin Typewriter Company moving to New York. The Franklin Typewriter Company began producing Franklin Typewriters in 1892, releasing numerous models before the company went bankrupt in 1904. The Victor Typewriter Company of Boston absorbed the interests of the Franklin Typewriter Company in 1907 and moved into its New York factory and offices at 812 and 814 Greenwich Street, producing its new visible frontstriking typewriter Victor No.1 that same year.
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Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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Keaton Music Typewriter

Maker:
Keaton Music Typewriter Company
Measurements:
overall -case: 6 1/2 in x 22 1/2 in x 18 in; 16.51 cm x 57.15 cm x 45.72 cm
Object Name:
typewriter
Subject:
Computers & Business Machines
Typewriters
ID Number:
ME*330212
Catalog number:
330212
Accession number:
287938
Description:
As typewriters developed during the 20th century, a class of music typewriters began to emerge. This is a Keaton Music Typewriter that was invented by Robert H. Keaton of San Francisco, California. Keaton had two patents that covered his music typewriter, the first was given patent number 2,047,690 on July 14, 1936 and related to a 14 key music typewriter, and the second was given number 2,631,712 on March 17, 1953 and covered a 33 key music typewriter. The typewriter’s board held sheet music in place while a semicircle ring of keys containing notes and musical notation typebars could be maneuvered above the sheet music to create musical compositions.
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Currently not on view
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Work and Industry: Mechanisms
Typewriters
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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Williams Typewriter

Maker:
Williams Manufacturing Company
Measurements:
overall: 4 1/2 in x 14 3/4 in x 13 1/2 in; 11.43 cm x 37.465 cm x 34.29 cm
Object Name:
typewriter
Subject:
Computers & Business Machines
Typewriters
ID Number:
ME*310896
Catalog number:
310896
Accession number:
131831
Description:
The Williams typewriter was produced by the Williams Typewriter Company from around 1891 until 1909, mostly from a factory located in Derby, Connecticut. John N. Williams received patent number 501753 on July 18, 1893 for his type-writing machine. Williams’s design served to correct the inability of a typists writing to be seen in the prevalent “upstriking machines” such as the Remington Standard. Williams’s solution was an innovative keystroke, where the key sat on an inking pad and raised itself up before springing forward to type on the paper. This innovative action wouldn’t allow for all the keys to be on the front of the machine, so there were typebars at the front and back of most William’s machines. This necessitated the upper part of the paper being pulled down into a basket below the type bars after it had been typed on, allowing only a few lines to be seen.
This machine does not fit the standard Williams design of front and back typebars, and does not have any visible branding. During the early 20th century, Williams was trying to design a typewriter with a full front typebar. A number of patents by Jerome B. Secor of Derby, Connecticut, were assigned to Williams during this period, many relating to “front-strike” machines. Secor later bought the Derby factory from Williams and produced several typewriter models, until the factory was purchased by Maxim Munitions Corporation in 1915. This may have been an early Williams front strike prototype.
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Work and Industry: Mechanisms
Typewriters
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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Densmore No. 5 Typewriter

Maker:
Densmore Typewriter Company
Measurements:
overall: 8 1/4 in x 15 1/2 in x 15 in; 20.955 cm x 39.37 cm x 38.1 cm
Object Name:
typewriter
Subject:
Computers & Business Machines
Typewriters
ID Number:
ME*315052
Catalog number:
315052
Accession number:
214853
Description:
This Densmore No. 5 typewriter was made by the Densmore Typewriter Company of New York, New York beginning in 1907. The Densmore No. 5 is an upstriking machine with its keyboard in a three row QWERTY layout with a fourth top row of numbers. The advertising for Densmore mahcines claimed that its use of ball bearings in the type-bar joints led to its consistent alignment, light touch, and durability.
The Densmore name is associated with typewriter history in its earliest stages. James Densmore invested in the Sholes & Glidden typewriter, one of the first commercially produced typewriters, and eventually sold his controlling interest to E. Remington & Sons who continued to produce typewriters into the 20th century. Densmore’s brothers, Amos and Emmett, produced typewriters under the Densmore brand name, working with typewriter designers Franz Wagner and Walter Barron who made significant contributions to Densmore machines.
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Typewriters
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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Underwood Standard Portable Typewriter

Maker:
Underwood Typewriter Company
Measurements:
overall: 4 1/2 in x 11 3/4 in x 9 in; 11.43 cm x 29.845 cm x 22.86 cm
Object Name:
typewriter
Subject:
Computers & Business Machines
Typewriters
ID Number:
ME*328708
Catalog number:
328708
Accession number:
274352
Description:
This Underwood Standard Portable Typewriter was manufactured between 1919 and 1929 by the Underwood Typewriter Company. The Underwood Portable had a three-bank QWERTY keyboard, and unlike the more popular Corona 3, the carriage and platen did not have to be folded to become portable. The typewriter had a cover with a handle that allowed it to be easily transported.
Location:
Currently not on view
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Work and Industry: Mechanisms
Typewriters
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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Williams No. 6 Typewriter

Maker:
Williams Typewriter Company
Measurements:
overall: 10 in x 16 1/2 in x 13 1/4 in; 25.4 cm x 41.91 cm x 33.655 cm
Object Name:
typewriter
Subject:
Computers & Business Machines
Typewriters
ID Number:
ME*326647
Catalog number:
326647
Accession number:
261226
Description:
This is a Williams No. 6 typewriter that was manufactured by the Williams Typewriter Company of New York between 1904 and 1909. John N. Williams received patent number 501753 on July 18, 1893 for his type-writing machine invention. Prior to William’s design, most typewriters were blind-writing upstriking machines, forcing the typist to lift the platen to see their work. Williams’s design allowed for visible writing with an intriguing “grasshopper” typing mechanism. The typebars were arranged in two semi-circles around the platen and rested on an inking pad. When their key was struck, the typebar rose up and sprung forward to hit the paper, printing a visible line.
Location:
Currently not on view
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Work and Industry: Mechanisms
Typewriters
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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Hammond Folding Multiplex Typewriter

Maker:
Hammond Typewriter Company
Measurements:
overall: 7 1/2 in x 12 1/2 in; 19.05 cm x 31.75 cm
Object Name:
typewriter
Subject:
Computers & Business Machines
Typewriters
ID Number:
ME*315035
Catalog number:
315035
Accession number:
213958
Description:
This Hammond Folding Multiplex typewriter was manufactured by the Hammond Typewriter Company of New York beginning in 1923. The typewriter uses Hammond’s patented type-shuttle and hammer typing mechanism where the printing is done by a hammer in the back of the machine striking a type-carrying shuttle in the front of the machine, with the paper and ink ribbon in between to receive the impression. This Hammond Folding Multiplex contains two additional Hammond innovations. It is called a Multiplex because the typewriter contains two type shuttles that can easily be rotated into use, allowing the typing of two complete alphabets in different typesets on each machine. This typewriter’s keyboard could also fold up to allow a cover to be attached to the base, allowing the typewriter to be carried. The keyboard is in a three row QWERTY array.
James Bartlett Hammond filed patents for his type-shuttle and hammer typing mechanism present in Hammond typewriters in 1879, receiving patent number 224088 on February 3rd, 1880 and patent number 232402 September 21st, 1880. The Hammond Typewriter Company was founded in 1880, and produced its first machine by 1884, winning a gold medal at the New Orleans Centennial Exposition that same year. The Hammond Typewriter touted its superior strength and durability due to its unique type-shuttle and hammer typing mechanism. The replaceable type-shuttle also contributed to the Hammond’s popularity with the ability to print in a variety of typesets in various sizes, including math formulae, special symbols, and foreign characters with an easy replacement of the type shuttle, or an even simpler rotation of a wheel in the Hammond Multiplex.
Location:
Currently not on view
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Work and Industry: Mechanisms
Typewriters
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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Royal KHM Typewriter (Cutaway)

Maker:
Royal Typewriter Company
Measurements:
overall: 9 1/2 in x 15 1/4 in x 16 in; 24.13 cm x 38.735 cm x 40.64 cm
Object Name:
typewriter
Subject:
Computers & Business Machines
Typewriters
ID Number:
ME*311043
Catalog number:
311043
Accession number:
136502
Description:
The Royal KHM model typewriter was produced by the Royal Typewriter Company of Hartford, Connecticut in 1934. The Royal KHM was very similar to the Royal 10, but notable differences include a lack of glass sides, no scooped center, and covered ribbon spools. This version has had pieces removed so the inner workings of the typewriter can be seen.
The Royal Typewriter Company was founded in 1906 by Thomas Fortunes Ryan and Edward B. Hess, with Ryan providing the capital and Hess providing the inventiveness. Hess owned over 150 patents, many of which were assigned to the Royal Typewriter Company. Hess’s most noteworthy patents related to increasing the ease of typing, including an accelerating typebar, anti friction roller escapement, Magic Margins, and selective touch control. In 1954 Royal merged with the McBee Corporation, operating as Royal Mcbee until 1964. In 1964 Royal McBee was acquired by Litton Industries, which used Royal as a brand until 1968.
Location:
Currently not on view
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Work and Industry: Mechanisms
Typewriters
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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Fox No. 3 Typewriter

Maker:
Fox Typewriter Company, Ltd.
Measurements:
overall: 12 in x 15 1/2 in x 14 1/4 in; 30.48 cm x 39.37 cm x 36.195 cm
Object Name:
typewriter
Subject:
Computers & Business Machines
Typewriters
ID Number:
ME*315311
Catalog number:
315311
Accession number:
219759
Description:
This Fox No. 3 Typewriter was manufactured by the Fox Typewriter Company of Grand Rapids, Michigan during the early 1900s. Fox No. 3 is an upstriking machines, with a three row QWERTY keyboard with a fourth top row containing the machine’s number and symbols. The disadvantage of the upstriking machine is that the carriage had to be lifted up for the typist to view her work, slowing the typing process down and obscuring errors.
The Fox Typewriter Company was founded in 1902 in Grand Rapids, Michigan. The Fox Typewriter Company was an offspring of the Fox Machine Company, originally produced blind upstriking typewriters before producing a visible typewriter in 1906. World War I created uneasiness in the typewriter market, leading many companies to cease manufacture. The President of the Fox Typewriter Company, William R. Fox, returned to the Fox Machine Company in 1915, but a new Fox Typewriter Company was founded later in the year, buying the company’s patents and factory. The new Fox Typewriter Company produced the Fox portable in 1917 before declaring bankruptcy in 1921.
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Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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Hammond No. 12 Quadruple Shift Typewriter

Maker:
Hammond Typewriter Company
Measurements:
overall: 8 in x 14 1/2 in x 14 1/4 in; 20.32 cm x 36.83 cm x 36.195 cm
Object Name:
typewriter
Subject:
Computers & Business Machines
Typewriters
ID Number:
ME*330392
Catalog number:
330392
Accession number:
288893
Description:
This Hammond No. 12 typewriter was manufactured by the Hammond Typewriter Company of New York sometime around 1905. This Hammond No. 12 (serial number 121443) contains many of the hallmarks of Hammond’s design including the Multiplex shuttle type with it’s the hammer typing mechanism. The Multiplex allowed different type shuttles with alternate language characters to be used by rotating the center shuttle holder. This model has a few features that were not as common to Hammond 12s, including the keyboard with English, Greek, and mathematical characters whose use was enabled by a quadruple shift. In addition to the normal capitalization shift key, there are two shift keys above the Hammond No. 12 nameplate that would raise and lower the hammer, allowing for a different set of characters to be printed from the type shuttle. There were not many typewriters that enable the user to write mathematical equations in the early 20th century, and this typewriter is a great example of Hammond’s innovative spirit.
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Typewriters
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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American Model No. 7 Typewriter

Maker:
American Typewriter Company
Physical Description:
iron (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 6 1/2 in x 11 3/4 in x 13 in; 16.51 cm x 29.845 cm x 33.02 cm
Object Name:
typewriter
Place made:
United States: Connecticut, Derby
Subject:
Office Equipment
Computers & Business Machines
Typewriters
ID Number:
1982.0201.05
Accession number:
1982.0201
Catalog number:
1982.0201.05
Description:
This model number 7 typewriter was manufactured by the American Manufacturing Company of New York, New York at the Williams plant in Derby, Connecticut during the early 20th century. The American Typewriter Company was located at 265 Broadway in New York, New York, and operated from 1893 until 1915. This model 7 typewriter is a blind writer with upwards striking type mechanism and a QWERTY keyboard.
Location:
Currently not on view
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Work and Industry: Mechanisms
Typewriters
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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Harris Visible Typewriter No. 4

Maker:
Harris Typewriter Manufacturing Company
Measurements:
overall: 8 1/4 in x 19 in x 14 in; 20.955 cm x 48.26 cm x 35.56 cm
Object Name:
typewriter
Subject:
Computers & Business Machines
Typewriters
ID Number:
ME*314854
Catalog number:
314854
Accession number:
211302
Description:
This Harris Visible Typewriter No. 4 was produced by the Harris Typewriter Manufacturing Company of Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, beginning in 1912 until around 1918. DeWitt C. Harris submitted a patent application on April 15, 1912 for improvements to a front-striking visible typewriter. The patent was granted patent number 1,115,311 on October 27, 1914 and mainly concerned the machine’s ease of assembly and repair. The patent described a typewriter with upper and lower actions that can be tested before the machine is fully assembled into the main metal frame of the typewriter. The three-bank keyboard is in the QWERTY layout, with left and right shift keys, shift lock, tabulator, back spacer, and marginal release. It has an 11-inch carriage and writes a line 9-inches long. While this model is Number 4, model numbers one through three never sold at retail and were likely early Harris prototypes. The Harris typewriter attempted to undercut the market, claiming to have all the features of a $100.00 machine, but selling for $39.80.
Location:
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Work and Industry: Mechanisms
Typewriters
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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