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Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Nāsir al-Dīn Shāh Shah of Iran 1831-1896
Kākh-i Gulistān (Tehran, Iran)
Physical description:
1 album (99 photoprints): b&w; 31.2 cm. x 41.6 cm. (sheet)
62 albumen prints : b&w; 25 cm. x 20 cm. or smaller
Culture:
Qajar dynasty Iran 1794-1925
Type:
Albumen prints
Collection descriptions
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Bandar Anzalī (Iran)
Iṣfahān (Iran)
Qazvīn (Iran)
Qum (Iran)
Rasht (Iran)
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
2011
Topic:
Qajar dynasty
Architecture
Clothing and dress
Criminal procedure
Landscapes
Executions and executioners
Hairstyles
Headgear
Jewelry
Military
Musical instruments
Palaces
Portrait photography
Religious buildings
Royalty (Nobility)
Shrines
Street vendors
Thrones
Women
Local number:
FSA A2011.03
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday through Thursday 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Please contact the Archives to make an appointment: AVRreference@si.edu
Summary:
Antoin Sevruguin managed and operated one of the most successful commercial photography studios in Tehran in the late 19th century. Born in the 1840s in Iran, Sevruguin's mother returned with her children to her hometown of Tbilisi after his father Vassil, a Russian diplomat in Iran, died in a horse riding accident. Trained as a painter, Sevruguin returned to Iran in the early 1870s accompanied by his two brothers, establishing a photography studio first in Tabriz and then Tehran. His studio's ties to Tbilisi, however, persisted through the years; many of the early portraits of Dervishes and women have been simultaneously attributed to Antoin Sevruguin and Dimitri Yermakov, the Georgian photographer who is often referred to as Sevruguin's mentor from Tbilisi. Many of Antoin Sevruguin's photographs were published as early as 1885 in travelogues, journals and books indicating that by that time he had a fully established practice in Tehran's Ala al-Dawla street, with ties to the court of Nasir al-Din Shah Qajar. Often unacknowledged as the producer of published images in his own time - the 1902 photographic survey of Persepolis being the most glaring of such authorial misrepresentations - he was nevertheless celebrated and acknowledged for his artistic vision and his keen eye for composition, achieving the Medal of Lion and Sun from Nasir al-Din Shah, the 1897 Medal of Honour in the Brussels International Exposition, and the 1900 Medal of Honour in Paris International Exposition. Reflecting a career that spans nearly half a century, Sevruguin's diverse body of work includes studio portraits of families, women and dervishes, survey photographs of archeological sites, objects, landscapes and architecture, and photographs of royalty, high officials and ceremonies of the Qajar court. The range of his output not only demonstrates his own pictorial concerns and artistic abilities but also the divergent interests of his clients. Despite numerous devastating incidents throughout his career - the loss of more than half of his negatives in a 1908 blast and fire, an unsuccessful attempt at diversifying into cinematography in the 1910s, and the confiscation of the remainder of his negatives in the mid-1920s to name a few - his studio remained operational even after his death in 1933. A number of negatives from the Sevruguin studio can be dated to the years after Antoin's death, indicating that the Sevruguin studio continued to be commercially viable. As one of the most prolific early commercial photographers in Iran, Antoin Sevruguin's artistic legacy has since proved far more enduring.
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Jay A. Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs, 1969-1985

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Nāsir al-Dīn Shāh Shah of Iran 1831-1896
Physical description:
18 albumen prints : b&w
Type:
Albumen prints
Collection descriptions
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1985
1969-1985
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Criminal procedure
Landscapes
Executions and executioners
Headgear
Portrait photography
Religious buildings
Royalty (Nobility)
Local number:
FSA A.15
Notes:
Jay A. Bisno (b. 1939) was Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History curator of archaeology.
Summary:
Antoin Sevruguin managed and operated one of the most successful commercial photography studios in Tehran in the late 19th century. Born in the 1840s in Iran, Sevruguin's mother returned with her children to her hometown of Tbilisi after his father Vassil, a Russian diplomat in Iran, died in a horse riding accident. Trained as a painter, Sevruguin returned to Iran in the early 1870s accompanied by his two brothers, establishing a photography studio first in Tabriz and then Tehran. His studio's ties to Tbilisi, however, persisted through the years; many of the early portraits of Dervishes and women have been simultaneously attributed to Antoin Sevruguin and Dimitri Yermakov, the Georgian photographer who is often referred to as Sevruguin's mentor from Tbilisi. Many of Antoin Sevruguin's photographs were published as early as 1885 in travelogues, journals and books indicating that by that time he had a fully established practice in Tehran's Ala al-Dawla street, with ties to the court of Nasir al-Din Shah Qajar. Often unacknowledged as the producer of published images in his own time - the 1902 photographic survey of Persepolis being the most glaring of such authorial misrepresentations - he was nevertheless celebrated and acknowledged for his artistic vision and his keen eye for composition, achieving the Medal of Lion and Sun from Nasir al-Din Shah, the 1897 Medal of Honour in the Brussels International Exposition, and the 1900 Medal of Honour in Paris International Exposition. Reflecting a career that spans nearly half a century, Sevruguin's diverse body of work includes studio portraits of families, women and dervishes, survey photographs of archeological sites, objects, landscapes and architecture, and photographs of royalty, high officials and ceremonies of the Qajar court. The range of his output not only demonstrates his own pictorial concerns and artistic abilities but also the divergent interests of his clients. Despite numerous devastating incidents throughout his career - the loss of more than half of his negatives in a 1908 blast and fire, an unsuccessful attempt at diversifying into cinematography in the 1910s, and the confiscation of the remainder of his negatives in the mid-1920s to name a few - his studio remained operational even after his death in 1933. A number of negatives from the Sevruguin studio can be dated to the years after Antoin's death, indicating that the Sevruguin studio continued to be commercially viable. As one of the most prolific early commercial photographers in Iran, Antoin Sevruguin's artistic legacy has since proved far more enduring.
Cite as:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Jay Bisno, 1985
See more items in:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs 1969-1985
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Arpee Album: Photograph of a Man Holding a Book [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 20.5 cm. x 12.7 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s - 1930
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Portrait photography
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 A.52a
Notes:
Title and Summary notes are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
- FSg curatorial research specialist remark on Antoin Sevruguin photo condition reads, "Albumen print, faded on the outer boundaries."
- Handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Photograph of a Man Holding a Book [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 13.1 cm. x 20.4 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s - 1930
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Portrait photography
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 B.30
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
- Handwritten Cyrillic signature (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Photograph of a Begger [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 13.1 cm. x 20 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s - 1930
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Hairstyles
Portrait photography
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 B.35
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
- Handwritten Cyrillic signature (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Arpee Album: Photograph of a Dervish [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 20 cm. x 12.4 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s - 1930
Topic:
Portrait photography
Clothing and dress
Dervishes
Headgear
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 A.25a
Notes:
Title and Summary notes are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
"The portrait is one of the prime examples of 'Dervish' genre in Sevruguin's ouevre. The christ like features of this set of portraits is their defining feature." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- FSg curatorial research specialist remark on Antoin Sevruguin photo condition reads, "Albumen print, faded on the outer boundaries."
- On the mount, below the photographic print, handwritten caption (inked) in English reads, "Nomad."
- Handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Arpee Album: Photograph of Group of Men [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 20.6 cm. x 12.7 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s - 1930
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Portrait photography
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 A.29a
Notes:
Title and Summary notes are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
"The standing figure appears in other studio portraits of Sevruguin, signalling that he is most possibly using different models in various scenarios for his studio portraits." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- FSg curatorial research specialist remark on Antoin Sevruguin photo condition reads, "Albumen print, faded on the outer boundaries."
- Handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Arpee Album: Photograph of a Man and Two Women [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 20.3 cm. x 12.6 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s - 1930
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Domestic scenes
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 A.36b
Notes:
Title and Summary notes are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
"The man depicted on the far left side of the image appears in other studio portraits of Sevruguin, signalling that he is most possibly using different models in various scenarios for his studio portraits." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- FSg curatorial research specialist remark on Antoin Sevruguin photo condition reads, "Albumen print, faded on the outer boundaries."
- On the mount, below the photographic print, handwritten caption (inked) in English reads, "Persian mode of keeping warm."
- Handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Arpee Album: Photograph of a Dervish [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 20.7 cm. x 12.7 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s - 1930
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Dervishes
Hairstyles
Portrait photography
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 A.49a
Notes:
Title and Summary notes are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
"The photo depicts a man commonly referred to as a Dervish. The man's appearance fits the stereotype of the Dervish type, which is a common theme of portraiture in Sevruguin's portfoli." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- FSg curatorial research specialist remark on Antoin Sevruguin photo condition reads, "Albumen print, faded on the outer boundaries."
- Handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Publications:
Jean-Baptiste Feuvrier, Troise ans a' la Cour de Perse, Paris, 1899, p:56
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Photograph of a Dervish [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 13.6 cm. x 20.7 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s - 1930
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Dervishes
Hairstyles
Portrait photography
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 B.36
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
"The photo depicts a man commonly referred to as a Dervish. The man's appearance fits the stereotype of the Dervish type, which is a common theme of portraiture in Sevruguin's portfoli." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- Handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Photograph of a Dervish [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 13.2 cm. x 20.3 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s - 1930
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Dervishes
Headgear
Portrait photography
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 B.41
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
"The portrait is one of the prime examples of 'Dervish' genre in Sevruguin's oeuvre. The christ like features of this set of portraits is their defining feature." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- Handwritten Cyrillic signature (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Photograph of a Man and Two Women [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 13.1 cm. x 20.3 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s - 1930
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Domestic scenes
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 B.52
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
"The man depicted on the far left side of the image appears in other studio portraits of Sevruguin, signalling that he is most possibly using different models in various scenarios for his studio portraits." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- Handwritten Cyrillic signature (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Arpee Album: Photograph of City Dwellers with Lantern [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 19.5 cm. x 13 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s - 1930
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 A.28a
Notes:
Title and Summary notes are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
"The photo is supposedly taken after dust. The man depicted in the photo is guiding the way with a portable light, accompanying the women in their urban travel after dark." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- FSg curatorial research specialist remark on Antoin Sevruguin photo condition reads, "Albumen print, faded on the outer boundaries."
- On the mount, below the photographic print, handwritten caption (inked) in English reads, "Family with Lantern."
- Handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Arpee Album: Photograph of a Begger [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 20.5 cm. x 13 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s - 1930
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Hairstyles
Portrait photography
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 A.31b
Notes:
Title and Summary notes are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
- FSg curatorial research specialist remark on Antoin Sevruguin photo condition reads, "Albumen print, faded on the outer boundaries."
- On the mount, below the photographic print, handwritten caption (inked) in English reads, "Dervish."
- Handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
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Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
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Arpee Album: Photograph of a Street Vendor and a Customer [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 20 cm. x 12.5 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s - 1930
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Street vendors
Headgear
Portrait photography
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 A.34a
Notes:
Title and Summary notes are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
"." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- FSg curatorial research specialist remark on Antoin Sevruguin photo condition reads, "Albumen print, faded on the outer boundaries."
- On the mount, below the photographic print, handwritten caption (inked) in English reads, "Water Vendor."
- Handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Arpee Album: Photograph of Soldiers from Fawj-I Jalali, Isfahan Army Battalion [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 24.3 cm. x 17.8 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s - 1930
Topic:
Military
Portrait photography
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 A.37a
Notes:
Title and Summary notes are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
"The image depicts a group of soldiers, part of Isfahan's army. These soldiers were recruited and trained in Isfahan, to be a part of an army known as Fawj-I Jalali. The army was placed under Zil al-Sultan's supervision (Nasir al-Din Shah's oldest son)." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- FSg curatorial research specialist remark on Antoin Sevruguin photo condition reads, "Albumen print, faded on the outer boundaries."
- On the mount, below the photographic print, handwritten caption (inked) in English reads, "Cavalry Officers."
- Handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Photograph of a Dallak (Bathhouse Worker) at Work [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 13.1 cm. x 20.8 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
Ca.1900
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Domestic scenes
Hairstyles
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 B.29
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
"The photo depicts a bathhouse worker (Dallak), engaging the gaze of the camera, and a customer sitting with his profile to the viewer. The setting is posed in the artist's studio." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- Handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Muzaffar Al-Din Shah Qajar, Shah of Iran [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Muzaffar al-Dīn Shāh 1853-1907 Shah of Iran
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 15.6 cm. x 20.7 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
Before 1896
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Portrait photography
Regalia (Insignia)
Royalty (Nobility)
Local number:
FSA A.15 03
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
"Muzaffar Al-Din Shah Qajar (b.1853-d.1906) succeeded Nasir Al-Din Shah as the fifth king of Qajar dynasty after his assassination in 1896. The new king, who originally resided in Tabriz, moved to Tehran in May of 1896 to take over his father's throne. However, the inscription on the crown's emblem in this image makes it a Nasiri crown. The photo is therefore taken while he was still the crown prince and during Nasir al-Din Shah's reign. The small bit of railing visible in the image - where the figure rests his arm - closely resembles the studio props of the photographer's studio. If the image is not taken in the studio and in the palace, the choice of the setting complicates the distinction, possibly contributing to the photographic studio's profile of clienteles and thus its fame." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- On recto of the print, handwritten number in white (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "600."
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "1."
Cite as:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Jay Bisno, 1985
See more items in:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs 1969-1985
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Muzaffar Al-Din Shah-i Qajar, Shah of Iran, Accompanied by Amin al-Sultan and Mushir al-Dawla [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Muzaffar al-Dīn Shāh 1853-1907 Shah of Iran
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 10.8 cm. x 14.4 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1898
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Portrait photography
Regalia (Insignia)
Royalty (Nobility)
Local number:
FSA A.15 04
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
"The studio portrait shows Muzaffar Al-Din Shah (seated) with Amin al-sultan(b.1843-d.1907) on his left and Shaykh Muhsin Khan-i Mushir al-Dawla(b.1820-d.1899) on his right. Compared to another portrait of Muzaffar al-Din in the Bisno collection (Bisno 3), the crown in this image is the crown of the king and not the heir to the throne. Therefore the photo must have been taken after the coronation of Muzaffar al-Din Shah and during the short period of Mushir al-Dawla's appointment as the chief minister in June of 1898." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "2."
- On verso of the print, unidentified inked seal marked.
Publications:
Mahdi Bamdad: Sharh-i Hal-i Rijal-i Iran dar Qarn-i 12, 13, 14 Hijri, Tehran: Intisharat-i Zavvar (Zavvar Publishing): 1992, Vol. 3, p:204-212
Ghasem Safi, Aksha-I Ghadimi-I Iran, Rijal, Manazir, Bana-ha, va Muhit-i Ijtima'i, Tehran: Intisharat va Chap-i Danishgah-i Tehran, 1989, p:480
Michael Myers Shoemaker, The Heart of the Orient, New York: The Knickerbockers Press, 1904, p:129
Cite as:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Jay Bisno, 1985
See more items in:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs 1969-1985
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Dervish Smoking Pipe [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 photographic print : b&w ; 17.3 cm. x 22.2 cm
Type:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s-1928
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Hairstyles
Portrait photography
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.Up.18
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
Joseph Upton purchased 66 black-and-white gelatin silver photoprints in 1928 from Antoin Sevruguin in Tehran (Iran), and subsequently donated them to the Committee for Islamic Culture, as reported in their official minutes of October 24, 1953.
- On recto of the print, handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "37."
- On recto of the print, faded handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "1353."
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "208."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) in French reads, "Derviche nègre."
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
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