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Victory Bicycle

view Victory Bicycle digital asset number 1
Maker:
Overman Wheel Co.
Physical Description:
steel (frame material)
rubber (pedals material)
leather (saddle material)
Measurements:
overall: 60 3/4 in x 72 in x 25 1/2 in; 154.305 cm x 182.88 cm x 64.77 cm
Object Name:
Bicycle
Place made:
United States: Massachusetts, Boston
Associated Place:
United States: Massachusetts
United States: New Jersey
Date made:
ca 1886
Description:
This high-wheeler bicycle was built by the Overman Wheel Company of Boston, Massachusetts around 1886. This bicycle was Overman’s Victor model, which was ridden to many racing victories in the late 1880s by Stacy Cassady, of Millville, New Jersey. It was donated to the Smithsonian in 1921.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Cycling
Credit Line:
Gift of Edward Hosea Sithens
ID Number:
TR.307216
Catalog number:
307216
Accession number:
66457
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Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
America on the Move
Bicycling
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_667755

Gendron Bicycle Pin

view Gendron Bicycle Pin digital asset number 1
Depicted:
Gendron Bicycle
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
celluloid (overall material)
Object Name:
pin, lapel
Description:
The Gendron Wheel Company of Toledo, Ohio produced this souvenir metal pin around 1896. Originally founded as the Gendron Iron Wheel Company in 1872, Gendron began manufacturing bicycles during the early 1890s, changing its name to the Gendron Wheel Company in 1896. In addition, it manufactured a variety of spoked wheels for carriages, wagons, and wheelchairs. The white celluloid button on top of a stickpin is decorated with a Gendron’s star logo in black, with the white text “Gendron Bicycle” inside.
Bicycling boomed in popularity in the United States during the 1890s when the invention of the “safety” bicycle replaced the dangerous high-wheeler. The National Cycle Board of Trade held the largest annual exhibitions in New York and Chicago between 1893 and 1897. At these cycle shows manufacturers attempted to capitalize on the bicycle boom with exhibitions of their products to both the public and bicycle agents from other cities. At shows like these, manufacturers advertised their wares with pins and buttons made of tin and celluloid—cheap materials easily mass manufactured into trinkets and souvenirs. The Chicago Tribune’s account of the 1896 Chicago show speaks to the ubiquity of these kind of souvenirs. “Every visitor seems to have a desire to cherish its memory through some kind of a souvenir . . . anyone who does not look like a walking sign board is a rarity and every exhibiter goes after him and every available buttonhole has some kind of button in it, and stick pins are thrust at him from all sides.”
Location:
Currently not on view
ID Number:
1990.0294.11
Catalog number:
1990.0294.11
Accession number:
1990.0294
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Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Bicycle Pins
Transportation
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1138153

Reinhardt Bicycle, 1935

view Reinhardt Bicycle, 1935 digital asset number 1
Maker:
Fahrradfabrik Otto Reinhardt
Object Name:
Bicycle
Associated Place:
United States: Georgia
Date made:
1935
Description:
The Otto Reinhardt Fahrrad-fabrik, of Bielefeld, Germany built this Reinhardt bicycle in 1935. Donor Fred Birchmore purchased the bicycle for 67 Reichsmarks in Gotha, Germany. Mr. Birchmore nicknamed the bicycle, "Bucephalus" after Alexander the Great's horse and rode it “around the world”—through western Europe, eastern Europe, Crete, Cyprus, Egypt, Iraq, Iran, Afghanistan, India, Siam, Indochina, and the Philippines—over the next two years. Birchmore estimated that his travels covered approximately 40,000 miles, of which about 25,000 were on the bicycle, and the rest by boat. Approximately four saddle covers and seven sets of tires were worn out during the journey.
Location:
Currently not on view
Credit Line:
Gift of Fred A. Birchmore
ID Number:
TR.311533
Catalog number:
311533
Accession number:
148650
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America on the Move
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Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_843028

Smith Pony Star bicycle

view Smith Pony Star bicycle digital asset number 1
Maker:
H. B. Smith Machine Co.
Object Name:
Bicycle
Description:
This American Star bicycle was built by the H. B. Smith Machine Company, of Smithville, New Jersey. It bears the serial number 3025, which dates it to around 1885. The Star bicycle has a large rear wheel and a small front wheel, the opposite set-up of the Ordinary (penny-farthing) bicycle.
Location:
Currently not on view
Credit Line:
Gift of Robert Atwater Smith
ID Number:
TR.279005
Catalog number:
279005
Accession number:
55662
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Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_843024

Starley Bicycle, ca. 1887

view Starley Bicycle, ca. 1887 digital asset number 1
Object Name:
Bicycle, 1887
bicycle
Associated Place:
United Kingdom: England, Coventry, Coventry
Date made:
ca 1887
Description:
The Starley Brothers of St. John's Works, in Coventry, England, built this Psycho brand bicycle around 1887. The bicycle is of the improved cross-frame, safety type with a crank-bracket stay, a stay between the steering head and the top of the saddle post, and a pair of stays from the rear end of the rear fork to the top of the saddle post.
Location:
Currently not on view
Credit Line:
Gift of J. E. Hosford
ID Number:
TR.218218
Catalog number:
218218
Accession number:
40967
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Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_843088

Raleigh Bicycle, ca 1949

view Raleigh Bicycle, ca 1949 digital asset number 1
Object Name:
Bicycle
Place Made:
United Kingdom: England, Nottingham
Date made:
ca 1949
Description:
The Raleigh Bicycle Company of Nottingham, England, produced this Raleigh brand bicycle around 1949.
This bicycle was ridden by Mr. Alvaro Zabala from Bogota, Colombia to New York City form January to June 1950. On January 3, 1950 Alvaro Zabala left Bogota, Colombia, on this bicycle, and headed for New York City. After pedaling through Colombia, Panama, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Honduras, El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico, the Mississippi Valley, and Ontario, Canada, he reached New York City five months later on June 2nd. It is estimated that about 8,000 miles were covered during the trip. Subsequently, Mr. Zabala pedaled the bicycle to Washington, where he presented the bicycle to the museum. Small flags of the 10 countries through which Mr. Zabala travelled are draped from the handlebars to the saddle.
Location:
Currently not on view
Credit Line:
GIft of Alvaro Zabala Amero (Tolima)
ID Number:
TR.313481
Catalog number:
313481
Accession number:
187321
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America on the Move
Bicycling
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Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_843025

Schwinn Panther Bicycle, 1953

view Schwinn Panther Bicycle, 1953 digital asset number 1
Maker:
Arnold, Schwinn and Co.
Object Name:
Bicycle
Place made:
United States: Illinois, Chicago
Date made:
1953
Description:
This is a Model D-77 balloon-tire Schwinn Panther girl's bicycle made by Arnold, Schwinn and Co., Chicago, Illinois in 1953. Balloon-tire bicycles for girls and boys, introduced by Schwinn in 1933, intrigued millions of young Americans with the promise of personal mobility, and appealed to their imaginations with features that simulated automobiles and motorcycles. A typical model had long fenders, whitewall tires, streamlined styling, and a dummy gasoline tank containing a battery-powered horn. Mechanical features included internal-expanding brakes and shock-absorbing spring forks. Sales of children's balloon tire bicycles increased after World War II and remained strong until the late 1950s. Schwinn was an innovator and one of the largest makers of bicycles at the time.
Location:
Currently not on view
Credit Line:
Gift of James Lyle Hurd
ID Number:
1986.1021.01
Accession number:
1986.1021
Catalog number:
1986.1021.01
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Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
America on the Move
Bicycling
Transportation
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_844913
Additional Online Media:

Columbia High-Wheel Bicycle, 1886

view Columbia High-Wheel Bicycle, 1886 digital asset: Columbia high-wheel bicycle
Maker:
Pope Manufacturing Company
Measurements:
overall: 148 cm x 67 cm x 167 cm; 58 1/4 in x 26 3/8 in x 65 3/4 in
front wheel: 52 in; 132.08 cm
Object Name:
bicycle
Date made:
1886
Description:
High-wheel bicycles were the first common type of personal, mechanized transportation. Equipped with pedals but no chain, the diameter of the front wheel and the rider’s strength provided rapid speed for the first time in cycling history. The Pope Manufacturing Company dominated the bicycle market in the 1880s with its Columbia brand of high-wheel bicycles, and later with Columbia safety bicycles in the 1890s. Albert A. Pope, the nation’s leading mass producer of bicycles, introduced thousands of Americans to the benefits and pleasures of personal mobility. His factories in Hartford, Connecticut excelled at producing lightweight tubular steel frames, pneumatic tires, and other bicycle parts in vast quantities. Pope also was adept at influencing the social and political landscape; he was instrumental in promoting bicycle touring, starting the good roads movement, and defining the concept of personal mobility independent of trains.
Credit Line:
Gift of Margaret Alduk in memory of Frank P. Alduk
ID Number:
1994.0279.02
Accession number:
1994.0279
Serial number:
13676
Catalog number:
1994.0279.02
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Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Bicycling
Road Transportation
Transportation
Exhibition:
Places of Invention
Exhibition Location:
National Museum of American History
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1281900

Child's High Wheel Bicycle, 1885

view Child's High Wheel Bicycle, 1885 digital asset number 1
Measurements:
overall: 40 in x 15 in x 45 in; 101.6 cm x 38.1 cm x 114.3 cm
front wheel: 33 cm; x 13 in
rear wheel: 12.5 cm; x 4 15/16 in
Object Name:
bicycle
Date made:
1885
Description:
Elbert C. Wood used this ordinary (high-wheeler) bicycle as a child in 1885. The ordinary has a 32-inch front wheel and a 12-inch rear wheel. The bicycle is made of iron with wooden grips and a learther-covered iron saddle.
Location:
Currently not on view
Credit Line:
Gift of Elbert C. Wood
ID Number:
1960.229882.01
Catalog number:
317075
Accession number:
229882
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America on the Move
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Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1342286

Schwinn Varsity Tourist Bicycle, 1965

view Schwinn Varsity Tourist Bicycle, 1965 digital asset number 1
Object Name:
Bicycle
Date made:
1965
Description:
This ten-speed Schiwinn Varsity Tourist Bicycle was donated to the Museum in 1965 as an example of a bicycle typical to the period.
This bicycle's frame is of the usual lightweight diamond pattern. The frame and forks have a coppertone finish, the tourist-style handlebars have white plastic grips, and the spring saddle is in white and coppertone. A built in kick-stand is mounted on the left, just behind the pedals. This cycle is equipped with a 10-speed, French-made Sprint derailleur. This is so named because the chain can be "derailed" from one sprocket to another, offering ten different gear ratios. The rear hub is fitted with five sprockets (14, 16, 20, 24, and 28 teeth), and the 6 1/2-inch pedal cranks have two sprockets (39 and 50 teeth). Two small levers mounted on the lower main tube of the frame move cables that operate the derailing devices, the left one moving the chain sideways behind the pedal sprocket and the right one moving the chain sideways below the wheel sprocket. This lateral movement causes the chain to crawl up or down to the next sprocket as the cycle is pedaled forward. With this type of drive, Weinmann caliper brakes are used, the pairs of brake shoes gripping the rims of the wheels when hand levers are squeezed-the left one operating the front brake, and the right one, the rear. The 36-spoke wheels have tubular chrome rims and carry 27-by-1 1/4-inch nylon sports touring tires.
Location:
Currently not on view
Credit Line:
Gift of Arnold, Schwinn & Co.
ID Number:
TR.326803
Catalog number:
326803
Accession number:
265701
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America on the Move
Bicycling
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Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_843022

Cleveland Model 69 Bicycle, 1899

view Cleveland Model 69 Bicycle, 1899 digital asset number 1
Maker:
H. A. Lozier and Company
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
leather (saddle material)
Measurements:
overall: 38 in x 14 1/2 in x 72 in; 96.52 cm x 36.83 cm x 182.88 cm
Object Name:
Bicycle
Place Made:
United States: Ohio, Cleveland
Used:
United States: Iowa, Nashua
Date made:
ca 1899
Used date:
1899-1902
Description:
This Cleveland model 69 bicycle was manufactured by H. A. Lozier Company in Cleveland, Ohio around 1899. This bicycle was used by L. J. Powers who road to work in Nashua, Iowa from his home in Powersville on a daily basis between the years of 1899 and 1902. It was donated to the Smithsonian Institution in 1989. This type of bicycle was the most common man's bicycle during a period when cycling was an extremely popular activity among adults, factory output of bicycles was increasing rapidly, and bicycle manufacturing methods were changing.
Credit Line:
Gift of Roderick E. Briggs
ID Number:
1989.0648.01
Accession number:
1989.0648
Catalog number:
1989.0648.01
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Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
America on the Move
Bicycling
Transportation
Exhibition:
America On The Move
Exhibition Location:
National Museum of American History
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_742169

Iver Johnson Arms & Cycle Works Bicycle, 1925

view Iver Johnson Arms & Cycle Works Bicycle, 1925 digital asset number 1
Maker:
Iver Johnson Arms & Cycle Works
Iver Johnson Arms & Cycle Works
Physical Description:
steel (overall material)
rubber (overall material)
leather (overall material)
blue (overall color)
white (overall color)
Measurements:
average spatial: 39 1/4 in x 21 3/4 in x 70 1/2 in; 99.695 cm x 55.245 cm x 179.07 cm
Object Name:
Bicycle
girl's bicycle
Place Made:
United States: Massachusetts, Fitchburg
Date made:
1925
Description:
This ladies’ bicycle was manufactured by Iver Johnson Arms & Cycle Works of Fitchburg, Massachusetts, in 1925. The steel bicycle has a drop frame to accommodate a skirt, a Mesinger No. 1 leather saddle, rubber tires and a steel frame. The chain drive has a 22-tooth front
sprocket and 9-sprocket rear gear. The cycle has front and rear mudguards and a rear luggage rack. The bike is finished in a medium blue with white striping. The bike was donated to the museum in 1961 as a representation of the typical bicycle of the era.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Sports
Credit Line:
Mrs. Powhatan Moncure, Jr.
ID Number:
CL.318471
Accession number:
236166
Catalog number:
318471
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Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
America on the Move
Bicycling
Transportation
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1091343

1881 Columbia Bicycle

view 1881 Columbia Bicycle digital asset: Advertisement for Standard Columbia Bicycle
Maker:
Pope Manufacturing Company
Measurements:
front wheel: 54 in; x 137.16 cm
rear wheel: 18 in; x 45.72 cm
Object Name:
Bicycle
ordinary bicycle
Place made:
United States: Massachusetts, Boston
Associated Place:
United States: District of Columbia, Washington
Date made:
1881
Description:
This is a Standard Columbia bicycle made by The Pope Manufacturing Company of Boston, Massachusetts around 1881. The Standard Columbia was available in models with front-wheel diameters ranging from 42 to 58 inches. This particular Standard Columbia has a 54- inch wheel and sold for $95. Mr. Frank E. Waring used this in the Washington, D.C., area.
In the 1870s Albert A. Pope founded the Pope Manufacturing Company, the first company to manufacture bicycles on American soil. Pope had previously sold bicycles exported from England, but began building bicycles under the trade name "Columbia" in the Weed Sewing Machine Company's factory in Hartford Connecticut in 1879. By 1890, the company was so successful it had bought the factory from Weed because it needed all the space.
This Standard Columbia has a 54-inch front wheel with 44 radial spokes, and an 18-inch rear wheel with 18 radial spokes, weighing 49 pounds. The 1881 catalog states that this model came in two colors . On the left side of the backbone, under the seat, is a brass manufacturer's nameplate. At the upper end of the forged-steel front fork is the open steering head containing the long steering spindle, which can be adjusted by means of a bolt passing through the top of the head. Straight handlebars carry pear- shaped grips of Siamese buffalo horn and a brake lever on the right side that operates the spoon brake on the front tire. The front-wheel bearings are adjustable double cones, fitting into hardened boxes in the hubs. They are adjusted for wear by an eccentric in the bottom of the fork. The adjustable pedal cranks allow the throw to vary from 5 to 6 inches.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Bicycling
Credit Line:
Gift of Paul E. Waring
ID Number:
TR.330156
Catalog number:
330156
Accession number:
288679
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Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
America on the Move
Transportation
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_843021

Dayton Bicycle Pin

view Dayton Bicycle Pin digital asset number 1
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
celluloid (overall material)
Object Name:
pin, lapel
Description:
This metal stickpin is topped with a red celluloid button that reads “A Modern Bicycle/Dayton/A Model Bicycle” in white. The Davis Sewing Machine Company produced this souvenir pin to advertise their Dayton Bicycle around 1896. The Davis Sewing Machine Company began production of their sewing machines in 1868 in Watertown, New York. The successful company moved to Dayton, Ohio in 1889 due to overtures by the Dayton Board of Trade offering to build new factories and housing for the company and its employees. Upon arrival in Dayton, Davis added bicycles to their production of sewing machines, which sold better than the sewing machines during the bicycle boom of the 1890s. Unlike many bicycle makers of the era, Davis continued to sell bicycles into the 20th century, and in 1924 the Huffman Manufacturing Company purchased the concerns of Davis. In 1934 Huffman began producing the Huffy bicycle, which it continued to produce into the 21st century.
Bicycling boomed in popularity in the United States during the 1890s when the invention of the “safety” bicycle replaced the dangerous high-wheeler. The National Cycle Board of Trade held the largest annual exhibitions in New York and Chicago between 1893 and 1897. At these cycle shows manufacturers attempted to capitalize on the bicycle boom with exhibitions of their products to both the public and bicycle agents from other cities. At shows like these, manufacturers advertised their wares with pins and buttons made of tin and celluloid—cheap materials easily mass manufactured into trinkets and souvenirs. The Chicago Tribune’s account of the 1896 Chicago show speaks to the ubiquity of these kind of souvenirs. “Every visitor seems to have a desire to cherish its memory through some kind of a souvenir . . . anyone who does not look like a walking sign board is a rarity and every exhibiter goes after him and every available buttonhole has some kind of button in it, and stick pins are thrust at him from all sides.”
Location:
Currently not on view
ID Number:
1990.0294.14
Catalog number:
1990.0294.14
Accession number:
1990.0294
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Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Bicycle Pins
Transportation
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1138156

Dayton Bicycle Pin

view Dayton Bicycle Pin digital asset number 1
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
celluloid (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 3/4 in; 1.905 cm
Object Name:
pin, lapel
Description:
This gold-colored stickpin is topped with a “D” with a ribbon in the center. The pin is inscribed “The/Dayton/Bicycle.” The Davis Sewing Machine Company produced this souvenir pin to advertise their Dayton Bicycle around 1896. The Davis Sewing Machine Company began production of their sewing machines in 1868 in Watertown, New York. The successful company moved to Dayton, Ohio in 1889 due to overtures by the Dayton Board of Trade offering to build new factories and housing for the company and its employees. Upon arrival in Dayton, Davis added bicycles to their production of sewing machines, which sold better than the sewing machines during the bicycle boom of the 1890s. Unlike many bicycle makers of the era, Davis continued to sell bicycles into the 20th century, and in 1924 the Huffman Manufacturing Company purchased the concerns of Davis. In 1934 Huffman began producing the Huffy bicycle, which it continued to produce into the 21st century.
Bicycling boomed in popularity in the United States during the 1890s when the invention of the “safety” bicycle replaced the dangerous high-wheeler. The National Cycle Board of Trade held the largest annual exhibitions in New York and Chicago between 1893 and 1897. At these cycle shows manufacturers attempted to capitalize on the bicycle boom with exhibitions of their products to both the public and bicycle agents from other cities. At shows like these, manufacturers advertised their wares with pins and buttons made of tin and celluloid—cheap materials easily mass manufactured into trinkets and souvenirs. The Chicago Tribune’s account of the 1896 Chicago show speaks to the ubiquity of these kind of souvenirs. “Every visitor seems to have a desire to cherish its memory through some kind of a souvenir . . . anyone who does not look like a walking sign board is a rarity and every exhibiter goes after him and every available buttonhole has some kind of button in it, and stick pins are thrust at him from all sides.”
ID Number:
1990.0294.22
Catalog number:
1990.0294.22
Accession number:
1990.0294
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Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Bicycle Pins
Transportation
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1140631

Columbia Bicycle Pin

view Columbia Bicycle Pin digital asset number 1
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
celluloid (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 3/4 in; 1.905 cm
Object Name:
pin, lapel
Description:
This metal stickpin features Columbia’s circle and slash logo with their motto “You See Them Everywhere/Columbia Bicycles.” The Pope Manufacturing Company of Hartford, Connecticut produced this souvenir stickpin for its Columbia bicycles around 1896. Albert Pope was a pioneer of American cycling, becoming the first bicycle manufacturer in the United States in 1878. His Columbia bicycle began as a high-wheeler, but the popularity of the safety bicycle led Pope to introduce his own safety in 1888. As the bicycle boom began to subside, Pope shifted his focus towards motorized transport, manufacturing an electric automobile in 1897 and a motorcycle in 1902.
Bicycling boomed in popularity in the United States during the 1890s when the invention of the “safety” bicycle replaced the dangerous high-wheeler. The National Cycle Board of Trade held the largest annual exhibitions in New York and Chicago between 1893 and 1897. At these cycle shows manufacturers attempted to capitalize on the bicycle boom with exhibitions of their products to both the public and bicycle agents from other cities. At shows like these, manufacturers advertised their wares with pins and buttons made of tin and celluloid—cheap materials easily mass manufactured into trinkets and souvenirs. The Chicago Tribune’s account of the 1896 Chicago show speaks to the ubiquity of these kind of souvenirs. “Every visitor seems to have a desire to cherish its memory through some kind of a souvenir . . . anyone who does not look like a walking sign board is a rarity and every exhibiter goes after him and every available buttonhole has some kind of button in it, and stick pins are thrust at him from all sides.”
Location:
Currently not on view
ID Number:
1990.0294.19
Catalog number:
1990.0294.19
Accession number:
1990.0294
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Bicycle Pins
Transportation
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1140628

Fenton Bicycle Pin

view Fenton Bicycle Pin digital asset number 1
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
celluloid (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 3/4 in; 1.905 cm
Object Name:
pin, lapel
Description:
The stickpin is topped with an aqua colored celluloid button and is decorated with a red wheel in the center. The button reads “I admire/Fenton/Bicycles.” The Fenton Metallic Company of Jamestown, New York produced this souvenir pin advertising for Fenton bicycles around 1896. Fenton was one of many companies who parlayed their existing business (in this case metal office goods) into bicycles when the bicycle boom began. Similarly to those companies, the Fenton ceased manufacturing cycling parts when the bicycle boom ended in 1898.
Bicycling boomed in popularity in the United States during the 1890s when the invention of the “safety” bicycle replaced the dangerous high-wheeler. The National Cycle Board of Trade held the largest annual exhibitions in New York and Chicago between 1893 and 1897. At these cycle shows manufacturers attempted to capitalize on the bicycle boom with exhibitions of their products to both the public and bicycle agents from other cities. At shows like these, manufacturers advertised their wares with pins and buttons made of tin and celluloid—cheap materials easily mass manufactured into trinkets and souvenirs. The Chicago Tribune’s account of the 1896 Chicago show speaks to the ubiquity of these kind of souvenirs. “Every visitor seems to have a desire to cherish its memory through some kind of a souvenir . . . anyone who does not look like a walking sign board is a rarity and every exhibiter goes after him and every available buttonhole has some kind of button in it, and stick pins are thrust at him from all sides.”
Location:
Currently not on view
ID Number:
1990.0294.20
Catalog number:
1990.0294.20
Accession number:
1990.0294
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Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Bicycle Pins
Transportation
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1140629

Sagamore Bicycle Pin

view Sagamore Bicycle Pin digital asset number 1
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
celluloid (overall material)
Object Name:
pin, lapel
Description:
This stickpin is topped by the Porter & Gilmour’s horseshoe logo that is engraved “Porter & Gilmour Incpd. New York/ Sagamore.” Porter & Gilmour of New York City produced this souvenir pin to advertise their Sagamore bicycles and bicycle wheels around 1896. The company began in 1892 as a retailer for other cycles and wheels before beginning production on their own wheels and bicycles around 1896. Luther H. Porter was heavily involved in the bicycle boom, writing “Cycling for health and pleasure: an indispensable guide to the successful use of the wheel” and “Wheels and Wheeling” in 1892.
Bicycling boomed in popularity in the United States during the 1890s when the invention of the “safety” bicycle replaced the dangerous high-wheeler. The National Cycle Board of Trade held the largest annual exhibitions in New York and Chicago between 1893 and 1897. At these cycle shows manufacturers attempted to capitalize on the bicycle boom with exhibitions of their products to both the public and bicycle agents from other cities. At shows like these, manufacturers advertised their wares with pins and buttons made of tin and celluloid—cheap materials easily mass manufactured into trinkets and souvenirs. The Chicago Tribune’s account of the 1896 Chicago show speaks to the ubiquity of these kind of souvenirs. “Every visitor seems to have a desire to cherish its memory through some kind of a souvenir . . . anyone who does not look like a walking sign board is a rarity and every exhibiter goes after him and every available buttonhole has some kind of button in it, and stick pins are thrust at him from all sides.”
Location:
Currently not on view
ID Number:
1990.0294.31
Catalog number:
1990.0294.31
Accession number:
1990.0294
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Bicycle Pins
Transportation
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1145102

Spalding Bicycle Pin

view Spalding Bicycle Pin digital asset number 1
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
celluloid (overall material)
Object Name:
pin, lapel
Description:
This metal stickpin is topped with a metal cursive “S” that is engraved “The Spalding.” Albert Goodwill Spalding began his sporting career as a pitcher for the Boston Red Stockings of the National Association in 1871, before ending his career with the Chicago White Stockings in the newly formed National League. In 1876, Spalding founded A. G. Spalding & Brothers a sporting goods company. In the late 1870s, Spalding wore a glove on his non-throwing hand to help sell the new baseball mitts his company sold. Spalding while also supplied the National League with baseballs, expanding his company’s popularity. Combining his baseball skill with business acumen made Spalding a leader in sporting goods retail. During the late 1880s and early 1890s, Spalding produced several different bicycle models and sponsored a racing team to help advertise its cycles. In 1899 Spalding purchased the concerns of over 48 bicycle manufacturers, then sold them to the American Bicycle Company, forming a trust in an effort to reduce overhead and improve sales. For his work in baseball, Spalding was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1939, and his company continued to manufacture sporting goods.
During the late 1880s and early 1890s, Spalding produced several different bicycle models and sponsored a racing team to help advertise its cycles. In 1899 Spalding headed the incorporation of the American Bicycle Company, a trust formed in an effort to reduce overhead and improve flagging bicycle sales. 
Bicycling boomed in popularity in the United States during the 1890s when the invention of the “safety” bicycle replaced the dangerous high-wheeler. The National Cycle Board of Trade held the largest annual exhibitions in New York and Chicago between 1893 and 1897. At these cycle shows manufacturers attempted to capitalize on the bicycle boom with exhibitions of their products to both the public and bicycle agents from other cities. At shows like these, manufacturers advertised their wares with pins and buttons made of tin and celluloid—cheap materials easily mass manufactured into trinkets and souvenirs. The Chicago Tribune’s account of the 1896 Chicago show speaks to the ubiquity of these kind of souvenirs. “Every visitor seems to have a desire to cherish its memory through some kind of a souvenir . . . anyone who does not look like a walking sign board is a rarity and every exhibiter goes after him and every available buttonhole has some kind of button in it, and stick pins are thrust at him from all sides.”
Location:
Currently not on view
ID Number:
1990.0294.13
Catalog number:
1990.0294.13
Accession number:
1990.0294
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Bicycle Pins
Transportation
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1138155

Viking Bicycle Pin

view Viking Bicycle Pin digital asset number 1
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
celluloid (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 3/4 in; 1.905 cm
Object Name:
pin, lapel
Description:
The Union Manufacturing Company of Toledo, Ohio produced this souvenir pin for Viking Bicycles between 1896 and 1898. In 1898, the Union Manufacturing Company split of its bicycle manufacturing concerns into the Viking Manufacturing Co. The cycles were produced until 1899, when the American Bicycle Company monopolized the market and forced many smaller companies out of business.
Bicycling boomed in popularity in the United States during the 1890s when the invention of the “safety” bicycle replaced the dangerous high-wheeler. The National Cycle Board of Trade held the largest annual exhibitions in New York and Chicago between 1893 and 1897. At these cycle shows manufacturers attempted to capitalize on the bicycle boom with exhibitions of their products to both the public and bicycle agents from other cities. At shows like these, manufacturers advertised their wares with pins and buttons made of tin and celluloid—cheap materials easily mass manufactured into trinkets and souvenirs. The Chicago Tribune’s account of the 1896 Chicago show speaks to the ubiquity of these kind of souvenirs. “Every visitor seems to have a desire to cherish its memory through some kind of a souvenir . . . anyone who does not look like a walking sign board is a rarity and every exhibiter goes after him and every available buttonhole has some kind of button in it, and stick pins are thrust at him from all sides.”
Location:
Currently not on view
ID Number:
1990.0294.26
Catalog number:
1990.0294.26
Accession number:
1990.0294
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Bicycle Pins
Transportation
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1140635

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