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Victory Bicycle

view Victory Bicycle digital asset number 1
Maker:
Overman Wheel Co.
Physical Description:
steel (frame material)
rubber (pedals material)
leather (saddle material)
Measurements:
overall: 60 3/4 in x 72 in x 25 1/2 in; 154.305 cm x 182.88 cm x 64.77 cm
Object Name:
Bicycle
Place made:
United States: Massachusetts, Boston
Associated Place:
United States: Massachusetts
United States: New Jersey
Date made:
ca 1886
Description:
This high-wheeler bicycle was built by the Overman Wheel Company of Boston, Massachusetts around 1886. This bicycle was Overman’s Victor model, which was ridden to many racing victories in the late 1880s by Stacy Cassady, of Millville, New Jersey. It was donated to the Smithsonian in 1921.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Cycling
Credit Line:
Gift of Edward Hosea Sithens
ID Number:
TR.307216
Catalog number:
307216
Accession number:
66457
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
America on the Move
Bicycling
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Schwinn Panther Bicycle, 1953

view Schwinn Panther Bicycle, 1953 digital asset number 1
Maker:
Arnold, Schwinn and Co.
Object Name:
Bicycle
Place made:
United States: Illinois, Chicago
Date made:
1953
Description:
This is a Model D-77 balloon-tire Schwinn Panther girl's bicycle made by Arnold, Schwinn and Co., Chicago, Illinois in 1953. Balloon-tire bicycles for girls and boys, introduced by Schwinn in 1933, intrigued millions of young Americans with the promise of personal mobility, and appealed to their imaginations with features that simulated automobiles and motorcycles. A typical model had long fenders, whitewall tires, streamlined styling, and a dummy gasoline tank containing a battery-powered horn. Mechanical features included internal-expanding brakes and shock-absorbing spring forks. Sales of children's balloon tire bicycles increased after World War II and remained strong until the late 1950s. Schwinn was an innovator and one of the largest makers of bicycles at the time.
Credit Line:
Gift of James Lyle Hurd
ID Number:
1986.1021.01
Accession number:
1986.1021
Catalog number:
1986.1021.01
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
America on the Move
Bicycling
Transportation
Exhibition:
Road Transportation
Exhibition Location:
National Museum of American History
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Additional Online Media:

Columbia High-Wheel Bicycle, 1886

view Columbia High-Wheel Bicycle, 1886 digital asset: Columbia high-wheel bicycle
Maker:
Pope Manufacturing Company
Measurements:
overall: 148 cm x 67 cm x 167 cm; 58 1/4 in x 26 3/8 in x 65 3/4 in
front wheel: 52 in; 132.08 cm
Object Name:
bicycle
Date made:
1886
Description:
High-wheel bicycles were the first common type of personal, mechanized transportation. Equipped with pedals but no chain, the diameter of the front wheel and the rider’s strength provided rapid speed for the first time in cycling history. The Pope Manufacturing Company dominated the bicycle market in the 1880s with its Columbia brand of high-wheel bicycles, and later with Columbia safety bicycles in the 1890s. Albert A. Pope, the nation’s leading mass producer of bicycles, introduced thousands of Americans to the benefits and pleasures of personal mobility. His factories in Hartford, Connecticut excelled at producing lightweight tubular steel frames, pneumatic tires, and other bicycle parts in vast quantities. Pope also was adept at influencing the social and political landscape; he was instrumental in promoting bicycle touring, starting the good roads movement, and defining the concept of personal mobility independent of trains.
Credit Line:
Gift of Margaret Alduk in memory of Frank P. Alduk
ID Number:
1994.0279.02
Accession number:
1994.0279
Serial number:
13676
Catalog number:
1994.0279.02
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Bicycling
Road Transportation
Transportation
Exhibition:
Places of Invention
Exhibition Location:
National Museum of American History
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Gendron Bicycle Pin

view Gendron Bicycle Pin digital asset number 1
Depicted:
Gendron Bicycle
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
celluloid (overall material)
Object Name:
pin, lapel
Description:
The Gendron Wheel Company of Toledo, Ohio produced this souvenir metal pin around 1896. Originally founded as the Gendron Iron Wheel Company in 1872, Gendron began manufacturing bicycles during the early 1890s, changing its name to the Gendron Wheel Company in 1896. In addition, it manufactured a variety of spoked wheels for carriages, wagons, and wheelchairs. The white celluloid button on top of a stickpin is decorated with a Gendron’s star logo in black, with the white text “Gendron Bicycle” inside.
Bicycling boomed in popularity in the United States during the 1890s when the invention of the “safety” bicycle replaced the dangerous high-wheeler. The National Cycle Board of Trade held the largest annual exhibitions in New York and Chicago between 1893 and 1897. At these cycle shows manufacturers attempted to capitalize on the bicycle boom with exhibitions of their products to both the public and bicycle agents from other cities. At shows like these, manufacturers advertised their wares with pins and buttons made of tin and celluloid—cheap materials easily mass manufactured into trinkets and souvenirs. The Chicago Tribune’s account of the 1896 Chicago show speaks to the ubiquity of these kind of souvenirs. “Every visitor seems to have a desire to cherish its memory through some kind of a souvenir . . . anyone who does not look like a walking sign board is a rarity and every exhibiter goes after him and every available buttonhole has some kind of button in it, and stick pins are thrust at him from all sides.”
Location:
Currently not on view
ID Number:
1990.0294.11
Catalog number:
1990.0294.11
Accession number:
1990.0294
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Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Bicycle Pins
Transportation
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

1881 Columbia Bicycle

view 1881 Columbia Bicycle digital asset: Advertisement for Standard Columbia Bicycle
Maker:
Pope Manufacturing Company
Measurements:
front wheel: 54 in; x 137.16 cm
rear wheel: 18 in; x 45.72 cm
Object Name:
Bicycle
ordinary bicycle
Place made:
United States: Massachusetts, Boston
Associated Place:
United States: District of Columbia, Washington
Date made:
1881
Description:
This is a Standard Columbia bicycle made by The Pope Manufacturing Company of Boston, Massachusetts around 1881. The Standard Columbia was available in models with front-wheel diameters ranging from 42 to 58 inches. This particular Standard Columbia has a 54- inch wheel and sold for $95. Mr. Frank E. Waring used this in the Washington, D.C., area.
In the 1870s Albert A. Pope founded the Pope Manufacturing Company, the first company to manufacture bicycles on American soil. Pope had previously sold bicycles exported from England, but began building bicycles under the trade name "Columbia" in the Weed Sewing Machine Company's factory in Hartford Connecticut in 1879. By 1890, the company was so successful it had bought the factory from Weed because it needed all the space.
This Standard Columbia has a 54-inch front wheel with 44 radial spokes, and an 18-inch rear wheel with 18 radial spokes, weighing 49 pounds. The 1881 catalog states that this model came in two colors . On the left side of the backbone, under the seat, is a brass manufacturer's nameplate. At the upper end of the forged-steel front fork is the open steering head containing the long steering spindle, which can be adjusted by means of a bolt passing through the top of the head. Straight handlebars carry pear- shaped grips of Siamese buffalo horn and a brake lever on the right side that operates the spoon brake on the front tire. The front-wheel bearings are adjustable double cones, fitting into hardened boxes in the hubs. They are adjusted for wear by an eccentric in the bottom of the fork. The adjustable pedal cranks allow the throw to vary from 5 to 6 inches.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Bicycling
Credit Line:
Gift of Paul E. Waring
ID Number:
TR.330156
Catalog number:
330156
Accession number:
288679
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Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
America on the Move
Transportation
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Cleveland Model 69 Bicycle, 1899

view Cleveland Model 69 Bicycle, 1899 digital asset number 1
Maker:
H. A. Lozier and Company
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
leather (saddle material)
Measurements:
overall: 38 in x 14 1/2 in x 72 in; 96.52 cm x 36.83 cm x 182.88 cm
Object Name:
Bicycle
Place Made:
United States: Ohio, Cleveland
Used:
United States: Iowa, Nashua
Date made:
ca 1899
Used date:
1899-1902
Description:
This Cleveland model 69 bicycle was manufactured by H. A. Lozier Company in Cleveland, Ohio around 1899. This bicycle was used by L. J. Powers who road to work in Nashua, Iowa from his home in Powersville on a daily basis between the years of 1899 and 1902. It was donated to the Smithsonian Institution in 1989. This type of bicycle was the most common man's bicycle during a period when cycling was an extremely popular activity among adults, factory output of bicycles was increasing rapidly, and bicycle manufacturing methods were changing.
Credit Line:
Gift of Roderick E. Briggs
ID Number:
1989.0648.01
Accession number:
1989.0648
Catalog number:
1989.0648.01
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
America on the Move
Bicycling
Transportation
Exhibition:
America On The Move
Exhibition Location:
National Museum of American History
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Iver Johnson Arms & Cycle Works Bicycle, 1925

view Iver Johnson Arms & Cycle Works Bicycle, 1925 digital asset number 1
Maker:
Iver Johnson Arms & Cycle Works
Iver Johnson Arms & Cycle Works
Physical Description:
steel (overall material)
rubber (overall material)
leather (overall material)
blue (overall color)
white (overall color)
Measurements:
average spatial: 39 1/4 in x 21 3/4 in x 70 1/2 in; 99.695 cm x 55.245 cm x 179.07 cm
Object Name:
Bicycle
girl's bicycle
Place Made:
United States: Massachusetts, Fitchburg
Date made:
1925
Description:
This ladies’ bicycle was manufactured by Iver Johnson Arms & Cycle Works of Fitchburg, Massachusetts, in 1925. The steel bicycle has a drop frame to accommodate a skirt, a Mesinger No. 1 leather saddle, rubber tires and a steel frame. The chain drive has a 22-tooth front
sprocket and 9-sprocket rear gear. The cycle has front and rear mudguards and a rear luggage rack. The bike is finished in a medium blue with white striping. The bike was donated to the museum in 1961 as a representation of the typical bicycle of the era.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Sports
Credit Line:
Mrs. Powhatan Moncure, Jr.
ID Number:
CL.318471
Accession number:
236166
Catalog number:
318471
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Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
America on the Move
Bicycling
Transportation
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Trek 5500 bicycle used by Lance Armstrong in the 2000 Tour de France

view Trek 5500 bicycle used by Lance Armstrong in the 2000 Tour de France digital asset number 1
User:
Armstrong, Lance
Maker:
Trek USA
Physical Description:
metal (part material)
rubber (part material)
Measurements:
overall: 40 in x 18 in x 65 in; 101.6 cm x 45.72 cm x 165.1 cm
Object Name:
bicycle
Date made:
2000
Used during certain stages:
2000-07-01 to 2000-07-21
Description:
American professional racing cyclist Lance Armstrong (b. 1971) may have written a book called It’s Not About the Bike, but his seven Tour de France victories, now annulled as a result of a 2012 investigation by the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA), all benefited from increasingly advanced racing bicycles.
For almost a century, race bikes used steel tubing construction. Steel was stiff and durable, but was also relatively heavy. High-quality steel frames without wheels or components weighed around 3.75 to 4.5 lbs. Because a lighter bike has a significant advantage on long climbs in the mountains, bike manufacturers attempted to reduce weight as much as possible. During the 1980s, modern manufacturers began experimenting with lighter and more versatile construction materials such as aluminum alloys, titanium, and most recently, carbon fiber. Armstrong’s, now-voided, first Tour de France victory in 1999 was on a carbon fiber Trek 5500. The 5500 frame was still comparatively heavy by modern standards, weighing around 3.85 lbs. At the time of his second tour attempt in 2000, Armstrong was riding both the 5500 frame, as well as a lighter and more advanced 2.75 lb Trek 5900 frame for the mountain stages. Other weight savings and technological improvements found on both bicycles include a larger 1 1/8” steerer tube, a threadless headset, and 9-speed Shimano Dura Ace components.
Armstrong brought several bikes to the 2000 Tour de France. This particular bicycle was raced on some of the flatter stages, such as Stage 11 from Bagnères-de-Bigorre to Revel in Southwest France, as well as the final stage on the Champs-Élysées in Paris. During the 2000 Olympics in Sydney, Australia, Armstrong used this bike as a spare, but did not ride it in competition.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Bicycling
Racing
Related event:
Tour de France
ID Number:
2005.0214.01
Accession number:
2005.0214
Catalog number:
2005.0214.01
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Sport and Leisure
Lance Armstrong
Bicycling
Sports & Leisure
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Additional Online Media:

1889 Overman Bicycle

view 1889 Overman Bicycle digital asset number 1
Manufacturer:
Overman Wheel Company
Measurements:
overall: 47 in x 23 in x 72 in; 119.38 cm x 58.42 cm x 182.88 cm
Object Name:
Bicycle
Victoria Bicycle
Place made:
United States: Massachusetts, Boston
Date made:
1889
Description:
The Overman Wheel Company of Boston, Massachusetts produced this Victoria Model bicycle during the 1890s. The bicycle bears a nameplate carrying patent dates ranging fThe Overman Wheel Company of Boston, Massachusetts produced this Victoria Model bicycle during the 1890s. The bicycle bears a nameplate carrying patent dates ranging from Nov. 20, 1877 to July 9, 1889. The safety bicycle with two wheels of equal size replaced the high wheeler (penny-farthing) when it was introduced to the US from England in 1887. Unlike the earlier high-wheeled bicycles, the drop frame style of the safety bicycle allowed women to ride by accommodating their skirts.
The 1890s saw a great boom in bicycling. As the first personal mechanical mode of transportation, the bicycle gave both men and women a thrilling sense of freedom. Cycling was a popular way to get around the city, and on weekends many bike enthusiasts went for rides in the country. Bicyclists played a major role in lobbying for road improvements.
Subject:
Arts, Leisure and Recreation
Environmental History
Daily Life
Economics
Gender
Industrialization
Regionalism
Credit Line:
Gift of May H. Mead
ID Number:
TR.214971
Catalog number:
214971
Accession number:
40667
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
America on the Move
Exhibition:
America on the Move
Exhibition Location:
National Museum of American History
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Whalen and Janssen Laminated Wood-Frame Bicycle

view Whalen and Janssen Laminated Wood-Frame Bicycle digital asset number 1
Maker:
Janssen Piano Co., Inc.
Object Name:
Bicycle
Date made:
1942
Description:
At the beginning of World War II, John T. Whalen, with Webster E. Janssen of the Janssen Piano Co., Inc., developed this laminated-wood-frame bicycle in order to conserve metal for the war effort. Wood subsequently proved to be more critical than metal, so the bicycle was not marketed. This bicycle weighs approximately 31 pounds. Its fork, saddle, handlebars, and elliptical frame are made of laminated wood, while the wheels are metal.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Bicycling
Credit Line:
Gift of Webster E. Janssen
ID Number:
TR.313040
Catalog number:
313040
Accession number:
173992
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Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
America on the Move
Transportation
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Roper Steam Velocipede, about 1869

view Roper Steam Velocipede, about 1869 digital asset: Roper steam velocipede, ca. 1869
Maker:
Roper, Sylvester H.
Measurements:
overall: 3 15/16 ft x 2 1/8 ft x 6 9/16 ft; 1.1936 m x .64008 m x 2.0065 m
Object Name:
bicycle
Place made:
United States: Massachusetts
Date made:
ca 1869
Description:
Sylvester Roper, a machinist and inventor in Massachusetts, built this steam velocipede and demonstrated it at fairs and circuses. It is believed to be the oldest existing American motorcycle. With its forged iron frame and wooden wheels, it resembles a velocipede, a popular bicycle of the late 1860s. The saddle served as a water tank for the boiler, which was heated by a firebox that burned charcoal. Twisting the handlebar controlled the throttle and brakes. Roper built several other steam vehicles, including another motorcycle in 1895, but he died just before the motor vehicle manufacturing industry got underway.
Location:
Currently not on view
Credit Line:
Gift of John H. Bacon
ID Number:
1956.209499.01
Catalog number:
314809
Accession number:
209499
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Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Bicycling
Road Transportation
Transportation
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Breezer 1 Mountain Bike

view Breezer 1 Mountain Bike digital asset number 1
Maker:
Breezer Bicycles
Maker; designer:
Breeze, Joe
Physical Description:
steel (overall material)
rubber (tires material)
blue (overall color)
aluminum (components material)
Measurements:
overall: 37 in x 29 in x 64 in; 93.98 cm x 73.66 cm x 162.56 cm
Object Name:
mountain bike
bicycle
Place made:
United States: California, Mill Valley
Date made:
1977
Description:
First prototype of the JBX1 "Breezer 1” mountain bike. Hand built by Joe Breeze in 1977, the JBX1 was the first bicycle frame designed specifically for mountain biking.
The “Breezer 1” was constructed with components that could withstand the repeated pounding of mountain bike riding, such as Araya brand 26” steel rims, Phil Wood hubs, Sun Tour derailleurs, and Dia-Compe brakes. The steel “riser” handlebars and Magura brand brake levers were repurposed from motorcycles and adapted to work with the “Breezer 1’s” stem and brake calipers. The large size of the Magura motorcycle levers provided increased braking leverage and was advantageous when trying to ride in wet conditions with slippery steel Araya rims. Other parts, such as the Sun Tour thumb shifters were adapted from five-speed touring bikes and only came in right hand models. The left side thumb shifter, which controlled the front derailleur, was a right hand shifter that was mounted backwards.
Prior to the construction of the “Breezer 1”, mountain bike racers would modify vintage cruiser bikes, nicknamed “clunkers”, with coaster or drum brakes, sturdier wheels with knobby “balloon tires”, and “fork braces” to keep the frames from bending under the stresses of off-road riding. Mountain bike riders in Marin County, California would race these “clunkers” down mountain trails in events called “Repack Races”. The term ”Repack” was coined because the hub-based brakes would inevitably overheat, lose their effectiveness, and have to be disassembled and repacked with fresh grease prior to another ride down the mountain.
Joe Breeze’s “Breezer 1” design served as a benchmark for mountain bikes to build and improve upon. In 1979 Tom Ritchey of Redwood City, California, started building fat-tire mountain bikes, which were sold by two veterans of the “Repack Races”, Gary Fisher and Charlie Kelly. In 1982, mountain bicycles were offered by two separate companies -- Specialized Bicycles came out with the Stumpjumper and Univega released the Alpina Pro. The following year, Gary Fisher founded his own mountain bicycle company, which sold bicycles under the brand "Gary Fisher" from 1983 to 2010.
The 1980s and 1990s saw mountain biking evolve from a niche sport to an International Cycling World Championship event in 1990. It became an Olympic event at the 1996 Atlanta games. Additionally, mountain biking became an increasingly popular amateur sport. Once only available from specialty shops, mountain bikes were suddenly being sold as recreation bikes at department stores and big box retailers.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Bicycling
ID Number:
2012.0066.01
Catalog number:
2012.0066.01
Accession number:
2012.0066
Serial number:
JBX1
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Sport and Leisure
Bicycling
Sports & Leisure
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Additional Online Media:

1927 Snyder Boy’s Bicycle

view 1927 Snyder Boy’s Bicycle digital asset number 1
Maker:
Homer P. Snyder Mfg. Co., Inc.
Object Name:
bicycle
Place made:
United States: New York
Date made:
1927
Description:
The Homer P. Snyder Manufacturing Company of Little Falls, New York expanded its product line from knitting mill machinery to bicycles in 1898 during the safety bicycle craze. The company remained a leading manufacturer of bicycles in the early twentieth century. Motorcycles offered an appealing transition from bicycles to motorized personal mobility; Schwinn, one of the largest bicycle manufacturers, acquired Excelsior motorcycles in 1911 and Henderson motorcycles in 1917 to exploit the demand. In the late teens and twenties, some manufacturers even designed bicycles that resembled motorcycles to appeal to boys. This 1927 Snyder bike resembles a contemporary motorcycle; it has a tool box shaped like a gasoline tank, an electric headlight with battery compartment, and a luggage rack. Making bicycles look like motor vehicles became a long-lasting trend. From the 1930s to the 1960s, headlights and imitation gasoline tanks on some bicycles had shapes that suggested streamlined automobiles or airplanes, exciting the imagination of children.
Credit Line:
Gift of Homer P. Snyder Mfg. Co., Inc.
ID Number:
TR.309382
Catalog number:
309382
Accession number:
99530
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Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Road Transportation
Transportation
Exhibition:
Object Project
Exhibition Location:
National Museum of American History
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Photographing Our Country Cousins

view Photographing Our Country Cousins digital asset number 1
Artist:
William H. Rau, born Phildelphia, PA 1855-died Phildelphia, PA 1920
Publisher:
William H. Rau, born Phildelphia, PA 1855-died Phildelphia, PA 1920
Medium:
albumen silver prints mounted to stereographic card
Dimensions:
sheet and image (each): 3 1/8 x 3 1/4 in. (7.9 x 8.3 cm.) arched top
Type:
Photography-Photoprint
Date:
1896-1903
Topic:
Figure group
Architecture\vehicle\bicycle
Occupation\art\photographer
Credit Line:
Smithsonian American Art Museum, Museum purchase from the Charles Isaacs Collection made possible in part by the Luisita L. and Franz H. Denghausen Endowment
Object number:
1994.91.243
See more items in:
Smithsonian American Art Museum Collection
Data Source:
Smithsonian American Art Museum

1896 Columbia Woman’s Bicycle Embellished by Tiffany

view 1896 Columbia Woman’s Bicycle Embellished by Tiffany digital asset number 1
Maker:
Pope Manufacturing Company
Object Name:
bicycle
Date made:
1896
Description:
This bicycle is a lavishly decorated example of a common safety bicycle. It is covered with foliage, rosettes, and other organic Art Nouveau-inspired figures made of silver covered with a thin layer of gold. An expensive product for a limited market, it was introduced by Tiffany and Co. for the 1895 holiday season and was available at the height of the bicycle craze of the 1890s. Mary Noble “Mittie” Wiley of Montgomery, Alabama owned this bicycle. Her monogram MNW appears on the front tube in gold with diamonds and emeralds. Wiley was married to Ariosto Appling Wiley, a member of the Alabama House of Representatives and later a Representative in the United States Congress. Despite the couple’s prominent standing in Montgomery and Washington over many years, the circumstances surrounding the acquisition and use of this bicycle are unknown. In 1915, Mittie gave it to her son, Noble, intending that he give it to his daughter, Hulit, when she was old enough to appreciate it. But Noble Wiley became fascinated by the bicycle’s unusual materials, techniques, and history, and he donated it to the Smithsonian Institution in 1950.
Credit Line:
Gift of Col. N. J. Wiley, U.S.A., Ret.
ID Number:
TR.313486
Catalog number:
313486
Accession number:
188297
Serial number:
12877
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Road Transportation
Transportation
Exhibition:
Object Project
Exhibition Location:
National Museum of American History
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Additional Online Media:

1965 Super Deluxe Sting-Ray Schwinn Bicycle

view 1965 Super Deluxe Sting-Ray Schwinn Bicycle digital asset number 1
Maker:
Arnold, Schwinn and Co.
Object Name:
bicycle
Date made:
1965
Description:
In 1963, Schwinn introduced a low-slung child’s bicycle that had begun as a fad in southern California. The California custom bikes had small wheels, “Longhorn” handlebars, and a slim, elongated seat. The mass-produced Schwinn Sting-Ray was an instant success; it was perfect for wheelies, and the “banana” seat accommodated the rider and his “date.” The Sting-Ray came in vibrant colors, including Flamboyant Lime, Radiant Coppertone, Sky Blue, and Violet. As sales boomed, Schwinn added the Fastback and Manta Ray, several models for girls, and the Orange Krate, Apple Krate, Lemon Peeler, and Pea Picker. This bike was donated by the manufacturer.
Location:
Currently not on view
Credit Line:
Gift of Arnold, Schwinn & Co.
ID Number:
TR.326804
Catalog number:
326804
Accession number:
265701
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Transportation
Road Transportation
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Dayton Bicycle Pin

view Dayton Bicycle Pin digital asset number 1
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
celluloid (overall material)
Object Name:
pin, lapel
Description:
This metal stickpin is topped with a red celluloid button that reads “A Modern Bicycle/Dayton/A Model Bicycle” in white. The Davis Sewing Machine Company produced this souvenir pin to advertise their Dayton Bicycle around 1896. The Davis Sewing Machine Company began production of their sewing machines in 1868 in Watertown, New York. The successful company moved to Dayton, Ohio in 1889 due to overtures by the Dayton Board of Trade offering to build new factories and housing for the company and its employees. Upon arrival in Dayton, Davis added bicycles to their production of sewing machines, which sold better than the sewing machines during the bicycle boom of the 1890s. Unlike many bicycle makers of the era, Davis continued to sell bicycles into the 20th century, and in 1924 the Huffman Manufacturing Company purchased the concerns of Davis. In 1934 Huffman began producing the Huffy bicycle, which it continued to produce into the 21st century.
Bicycling boomed in popularity in the United States during the 1890s when the invention of the “safety” bicycle replaced the dangerous high-wheeler. The National Cycle Board of Trade held the largest annual exhibitions in New York and Chicago between 1893 and 1897. At these cycle shows manufacturers attempted to capitalize on the bicycle boom with exhibitions of their products to both the public and bicycle agents from other cities. At shows like these, manufacturers advertised their wares with pins and buttons made of tin and celluloid—cheap materials easily mass manufactured into trinkets and souvenirs. The Chicago Tribune’s account of the 1896 Chicago show speaks to the ubiquity of these kind of souvenirs. “Every visitor seems to have a desire to cherish its memory through some kind of a souvenir . . . anyone who does not look like a walking sign board is a rarity and every exhibiter goes after him and every available buttonhole has some kind of button in it, and stick pins are thrust at him from all sides.”
Location:
Currently not on view
ID Number:
1990.0294.14
Catalog number:
1990.0294.14
Accession number:
1990.0294
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Bicycle Pins
Transportation
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Dayton Bicycle Pin

view Dayton Bicycle Pin digital asset number 1
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
celluloid (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 3/4 in; 1.905 cm
Object Name:
pin, lapel
Description:
This gold-colored stickpin is topped with a “D” with a ribbon in the center. The pin is inscribed “The/Dayton/Bicycle.” The Davis Sewing Machine Company produced this souvenir pin to advertise their Dayton Bicycle around 1896. The Davis Sewing Machine Company began production of their sewing machines in 1868 in Watertown, New York. The successful company moved to Dayton, Ohio in 1889 due to overtures by the Dayton Board of Trade offering to build new factories and housing for the company and its employees. Upon arrival in Dayton, Davis added bicycles to their production of sewing machines, which sold better than the sewing machines during the bicycle boom of the 1890s. Unlike many bicycle makers of the era, Davis continued to sell bicycles into the 20th century, and in 1924 the Huffman Manufacturing Company purchased the concerns of Davis. In 1934 Huffman began producing the Huffy bicycle, which it continued to produce into the 21st century.
Bicycling boomed in popularity in the United States during the 1890s when the invention of the “safety” bicycle replaced the dangerous high-wheeler. The National Cycle Board of Trade held the largest annual exhibitions in New York and Chicago between 1893 and 1897. At these cycle shows manufacturers attempted to capitalize on the bicycle boom with exhibitions of their products to both the public and bicycle agents from other cities. At shows like these, manufacturers advertised their wares with pins and buttons made of tin and celluloid—cheap materials easily mass manufactured into trinkets and souvenirs. The Chicago Tribune’s account of the 1896 Chicago show speaks to the ubiquity of these kind of souvenirs. “Every visitor seems to have a desire to cherish its memory through some kind of a souvenir . . . anyone who does not look like a walking sign board is a rarity and every exhibiter goes after him and every available buttonhole has some kind of button in it, and stick pins are thrust at him from all sides.”
ID Number:
1990.0294.22
Catalog number:
1990.0294.22
Accession number:
1990.0294
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Bicycle Pins
Transportation
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Richmond Bicycle Pin

view Richmond Bicycle Pin digital asset number 1
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
celluloid (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 3/4 in; 1.905 cm
Object Name:
pin, lapel
Description:
The stickpin is topped with a blue celluloid button that features Richmond’s motto “There’s a Richmond in the Field.” The Richmond Bicycle Company of Richmond, Indiana produced this souvenir pin to advertise their Richmond bicycles around 1896. Richmond began producing their cycles in 1895, but their business failed in just a few years as the bicycle boom ended.
Bicycling boomed in popularity in the United States during the 1890s when the invention of the “safety” bicycle replaced the dangerous high-wheeler. The National Cycle Board of Trade held the largest annual exhibitions in New York and Chicago between 1893 and 1897. At these cycle shows manufacturers attempted to capitalize on the bicycle boom with exhibitions of their products to both the public and bicycle agents from other cities. At shows like these, manufacturers advertised their wares with pins and buttons made of tin and celluloid—cheap materials easily mass manufactured into trinkets and souvenirs. The Chicago Tribune’s account of the 1896 Chicago show speaks to the ubiquity of these kind of souvenirs. “Every visitor seems to have a desire to cherish its memory through some kind of a souvenir . . . anyone who does not look like a walking sign board is a rarity and every exhibiter goes after him and every available buttonhole has some kind of button in it, and stick pins are thrust at him from all sides.”
Location:
Currently not on view
ID Number:
1990.0294.21
Catalog number:
1990.0294.21
Accession number:
1990.0294
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Bicycle Pins
Transportation
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Viking Bicycle Pin

view Viking Bicycle Pin digital asset number 1
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
celluloid (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 3/4 in; 1.905 cm
Object Name:
pin, lapel
Description:
The Union Manufacturing Company of Toledo, Ohio produced this souvenir pin for Viking Bicycles between 1896 and 1898. In 1898, the Union Manufacturing Company split of its bicycle manufacturing concerns into the Viking Manufacturing Co. The cycles were produced until 1899, when the American Bicycle Company monopolized the market and forced many smaller companies out of business.
Bicycling boomed in popularity in the United States during the 1890s when the invention of the “safety” bicycle replaced the dangerous high-wheeler. The National Cycle Board of Trade held the largest annual exhibitions in New York and Chicago between 1893 and 1897. At these cycle shows manufacturers attempted to capitalize on the bicycle boom with exhibitions of their products to both the public and bicycle agents from other cities. At shows like these, manufacturers advertised their wares with pins and buttons made of tin and celluloid—cheap materials easily mass manufactured into trinkets and souvenirs. The Chicago Tribune’s account of the 1896 Chicago show speaks to the ubiquity of these kind of souvenirs. “Every visitor seems to have a desire to cherish its memory through some kind of a souvenir . . . anyone who does not look like a walking sign board is a rarity and every exhibiter goes after him and every available buttonhole has some kind of button in it, and stick pins are thrust at him from all sides.”
Location:
Currently not on view
ID Number:
1990.0294.26
Catalog number:
1990.0294.26
Accession number:
1990.0294
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Bicycle Pins
Transportation
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

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