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Gendron Bicycle Pin

view Gendron Bicycle Pin digital asset number 1
Depicted:
Gendron Bicycle
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
celluloid (overall material)
Object Name:
pin, lapel
Description:
The Gendron Wheel Company of Toledo, Ohio produced this souvenir metal pin around 1896. Originally founded as the Gendron Iron Wheel Company in 1872, Gendron began manufacturing bicycles during the early 1890s, changing its name to the Gendron Wheel Company in 1896. In addition, it manufactured a variety of spoked wheels for carriages, wagons, and wheelchairs. The white celluloid button on top of a stickpin is decorated with a Gendron’s star logo in black, with the white text “Gendron Bicycle” inside.
Bicycling boomed in popularity in the United States during the 1890s when the invention of the “safety” bicycle replaced the dangerous high-wheeler. The National Cycle Board of Trade held the largest annual exhibitions in New York and Chicago between 1893 and 1897. At these cycle shows manufacturers attempted to capitalize on the bicycle boom with exhibitions of their products to both the public and bicycle agents from other cities. At shows like these, manufacturers advertised their wares with pins and buttons made of tin and celluloid—cheap materials easily mass manufactured into trinkets and souvenirs. The Chicago Tribune’s account of the 1896 Chicago show speaks to the ubiquity of these kind of souvenirs. “Every visitor seems to have a desire to cherish its memory through some kind of a souvenir . . . anyone who does not look like a walking sign board is a rarity and every exhibiter goes after him and every available buttonhole has some kind of button in it, and stick pins are thrust at him from all sides.”
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Bicycle Pins
Transportation
ID Number:
1990.0294.11
Catalog number:
1990.0294.11
Accession number:
1990.0294
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Bicycle Pins
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Trek 5500 bicycle used by Lance Armstrong in the 2000 Tour de France

view Trek 5500 bicycle used by Lance Armstrong in the 2000 Tour de France digital asset number 1
User:
Armstrong, Lance
Maker:
Trek USA
Physical Description:
metal (part material)
rubber (part material)
Measurements:
overall: 40 in x 18 in x 65 in; 101.6 cm x 45.72 cm x 165.1 cm
Object Name:
bicycle
Date made:
2000
Used during certain stages:
2000-07-01 to 2000-07-21
Description:
American professional racing cyclist Lance Armstrong (b. 1971) may have written a book called It’s Not About the Bike, but his seven Tour de France victories, now annulled as a result of a 2012 investigation by the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA), all benefited from increasingly advanced racing bicycles.
For almost a century, race bikes used steel tubing construction. Steel was stiff and durable, but was also relatively heavy. High-quality steel frames without wheels or components weighed around 3.75 to 4.5 lbs. Because a lighter bike has a significant advantage on long climbs in the mountains, bike manufacturers attempted to reduce weight as much as possible. During the 1980s, modern manufacturers began experimenting with lighter and more versatile construction materials such as aluminum alloys, titanium, and most recently, carbon fiber. Armstrong’s, now-voided, first Tour de France victory in 1999 was on a carbon fiber Trek 5500. The 5500 frame was still comparatively heavy by modern standards, weighing around 3.85 lbs. At the time of his second tour attempt in 2000, Armstrong was riding both the 5500 frame, as well as a lighter and more advanced 2.75 lb Trek 5900 frame for the mountain stages. Other weight savings and technological improvements found on both bicycles include a larger 1 1/8” steerer tube, a threadless headset, and 9-speed Shimano Dura Ace components.
Armstrong brought several bikes to the 2000 Tour de France. This particular bicycle was raced on some of the flatter stages, such as Stage 11 from Bagnères-de-Bigorre to Revel in Southwest France, as well as the final stage on the Champs-Élysées in Paris. During the 2000 Olympics in Sydney, Australia, Armstrong used this bike as a spare, but did not ride it in competition.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Sports & Leisure
Lance Armstrong
Bicycling
Bicycling
Racing
Event:
Tour de France
ID Number:
2005.0214.01
Accession number:
2005.0214
Catalog number:
2005.0214.01
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Sport and Leisure
Lance Armstrong
Bicycling
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Additional Online Media:

Breezer 1 Mountain Bike

view Breezer 1 Mountain Bike digital asset number 1
Maker:
Breezer Bicycles
Maker; designer:
Breeze, Joe
Physical Description:
steel (overall material)
rubber (tires material)
blue (overall color)
aluminum (components material)
Measurements:
overall: 37 in x 29 in x 64 in; 93.98 cm x 73.66 cm x 162.56 cm
Object Name:
mountain bike
bicycle
Place made:
United States: California, Mill Valley
Date made:
1977
Description:
First prototype of the JBX1 "Breezer 1” mountain bike. Hand built by Joe Breeze in 1977, the JBX1 was the first bicycle frame designed specifically for mountain biking.
The “Breezer 1” was constructed with components that could withstand the repeated pounding of mountain bike riding, such as Araya brand 26” steel rims, Phil Wood hubs, Sun Tour derailleurs, and Dia-Compe brakes. The steel “riser” handlebars and Magura brand brake levers were repurposed from motorcycles and adapted to work with the “Breezer 1’s” stem and brake calipers. The large size of the Magura motorcycle levers provided increased braking leverage and was advantageous when trying to ride in wet conditions with slippery steel Araya rims. Other parts, such as the Sun Tour thumb shifters were adapted from five-speed touring bikes and only came in right hand models. The left side thumb shifter, which controlled the front derailleur, was a right hand shifter that was mounted backwards.
Prior to the construction of the “Breezer 1”, mountain bike racers would modify vintage cruiser bikes, nicknamed “clunkers”, with coaster or drum brakes, sturdier wheels with knobby “balloon tires”, and “fork braces” to keep the frames from bending under the stresses of off-road riding. Mountain bike riders in Marin County, California would race these “clunkers” down mountain trails in events called “Repack Races”. The term ”Repack” was coined because the hub-based brakes would inevitably overheat, lose their effectiveness, and have to be disassembled and repacked with fresh grease prior to another ride down the mountain.
Joe Breeze’s “Breezer 1” design served as a benchmark for mountain bikes to build and improve upon. In 1979 Tom Ritchey of Redwood City, California, started building fat-tire mountain bikes, which were sold by two veterans of the “Repack Races”, Gary Fisher and Charlie Kelly. In 1982, mountain bicycles were offered by two separate companies -- Specialized Bicycles came out with the Stumpjumper and Univega released the Alpina Pro. The following year, Gary Fisher founded his own mountain bicycle company, which sold bicycles under the brand "Gary Fisher" from 1983 to 2010.
The 1980s and 1990s saw mountain biking evolve from a niche sport to an International Cycling World Championship event in 1990. It became an Olympic event at the 1996 Atlanta games. Additionally, mountain biking became an increasingly popular amateur sport. Once only available from specialty shops, mountain bikes were suddenly being sold as recreation bikes at department stores and big box retailers.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Sports & Leisure
Bicycling
Bicycling
ID Number:
2012.0066.01
Catalog number:
2012.0066.01
Accession number:
2012.0066
Serial number:
JBX1
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Sport and Leisure
Bicycling
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Additional Online Media:

Columbia High-Wheel Bicycle, 1886

view Columbia High-Wheel Bicycle, 1886 digital asset: Columbia high-wheel bicycle
Maker:
Pope Manufacturing Company
Measurements:
overall: 148 cm x 67 cm x 167 cm; 58 1/4 in x 26 3/8 in x 65 3/4 in
front wheel: 52 in; 132.08 cm
Object Name:
bicycle
Date made:
1886
Description:
High-wheel bicycles were the first common type of personal, mechanized transportation. Equipped with pedals but no chain, the diameter of the front wheel and the rider’s strength provided rapid speed for the first time in cycling history. The Pope Manufacturing Company dominated the bicycle market in the 1880s with its Columbia brand of high-wheel bicycles, and later with Columbia safety bicycles in the 1890s. Albert A. Pope, the nation’s leading mass producer of bicycles, introduced thousands of Americans to the benefits and pleasures of personal mobility. His factories in Hartford, Connecticut excelled at producing lightweight tubular steel frames, pneumatic tires, and other bicycle parts in vast quantities. Pope also was adept at influencing the social and political landscape; he was instrumental in promoting bicycle touring, starting the good roads movement, and defining the concept of personal mobility independent of trains.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Road Transportation
Transportation
Credit Line:
Gift of Margaret Alduk in memory of Frank P. Alduk
ID Number:
1994.0279.02
Accession number:
1994.0279
Serial number:
13676
Catalog number:
1994.0279.02
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Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Road Transportation
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

1896 Columbia Woman’s Bicycle Embellished by Tiffany

view 1896 Columbia Woman’s Bicycle Embellished by Tiffany digital asset number 1
Maker:
Pope Manufacturing Company
Object Name:
bicycle
Date made:
1896
Description:
This bicycle is a lavishly decorated example of a common safety bicycle. It is covered with foliage, rosettes, and other organic Art Nouveau-inspired figures made of silver covered with a thin layer of gold. An expensive product for a limited market, it was introduced by Tiffany and Co. for the 1895 holiday season and was available at the height of the bicycle craze of the 1890s. Mary Noble “Mittie” Wiley of Montgomery, Alabama owned this bicycle. Her monogram MNW appears on the front tube in gold with diamonds and emeralds. Wiley was married to Ariosto Appling Wiley, a member of the Alabama House of Representatives and later a Representative in the United States Congress. Despite the couple’s prominent standing in Montgomery and Washington over many years, the circumstances surrounding the acquisition and use of this bicycle are unknown. In 1915, Mittie gave it to her son, Noble, intending that he give it to his daughter, Hulit, when she was old enough to appreciate it. But Noble Wiley became fascinated by the bicycle’s unusual materials, techniques, and history, and he donated it to the Smithsonian Institution in 1950.
Subject:
Road Transportation
Transportation
Credit Line:
Gift of Col. N. J. Wiley, U.S.A., Ret.
ID Number:
TR*313486
Catalog number:
313486
Accession number:
188297
Serial number:
12877
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Road Transportation
Exhibition:
Object Project
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Additional Online Media:

1965 Super Deluxe Sting-Ray Schwinn Bicycle

view 1965 Super Deluxe Sting-Ray Schwinn Bicycle digital asset number 1
Maker:
Arnold, Schwinn and Co.
Object Name:
bicycle
Date made:
1965
Description:
In 1963, Schwinn introduced a low-slung child’s bicycle that had begun as a fad in southern California. The California custom bikes had small wheels, “Longhorn” handlebars, and a slim, elongated seat. The mass-produced Schwinn Sting-Ray was an instant success; it was perfect for wheelies, and the “banana” seat accommodated the rider and his “date.” The Sting-Ray came in vibrant colors, including Flamboyant Lime, Radiant Coppertone, Sky Blue, and Violet. As sales boomed, Schwinn added the Fastback and Manta Ray, several models for girls, and the Orange Krate, Apple Krate, Lemon Peeler, and Pea Picker. This bike was donated by the manufacturer.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Transportation
Road Transportation
Credit Line:
Gift of Arnold, Schwinn & Co.
ID Number:
TR*326804
Catalog number:
326804
Accession number:
265701
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Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Road Transportation
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Photographing Our Country Cousins

view Photographing Our Country Cousins digital asset number 1
Artist:
William H. Rau, born Phildelphia, PA 1855-died Phildelphia, PA 1920
Publisher:
William H. Rau, born Phildelphia, PA 1855-died Phildelphia, PA 1920
Medium:
albumen silver prints mounted to stereographic card
Dimensions:
sheet and image (each): 3 1/8 x 3 1/4 in. (7.9 x 8.3 cm.) arched top
Type:
Photography-Photoprint
Date:
1896-1903
Topic:
Figure(s) in exterior\rural
Architecture\vehicle\bicycle
Occupation\art\photographer
Credit Line:
Smithsonian American Art Museum, Museum purchase from the Charles Isaacs Collection made possible in part by the Luisita L. and Franz H. Denghausen Endowment
Object number:
1994.91.243
See more items in:
Smithsonian American Art Museum Collection
Data Source:
Smithsonian American Art Museum

Dayton Bicycle Pin

view Dayton Bicycle Pin digital asset number 1
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
celluloid (overall material)
Object Name:
pin, lapel
Description:
This metal stickpin is topped with a red celluloid button that reads “A Modern Bicycle/Dayton/A Model Bicycle” in white. The Davis Sewing Machine Company produced this souvenir pin to advertise their Dayton Bicycle around 1896. The Davis Sewing Machine Company began production of their sewing machines in 1868 in Watertown, New York. The successful company moved to Dayton, Ohio in 1889 due to overtures by the Dayton Board of Trade offering to build new factories and housing for the company and its employees. Upon arrival in Dayton, Davis added bicycles to their production of sewing machines, which sold better than the sewing machines during the bicycle boom of the 1890s. Unlike many bicycle makers of the era, Davis continued to sell bicycles into the 20th century, and in 1924 the Huffman Manufacturing Company purchased the concerns of Davis. In 1934 Huffman began producing the Huffy bicycle, which it continued to produce into the 21st century.
Bicycling boomed in popularity in the United States during the 1890s when the invention of the “safety” bicycle replaced the dangerous high-wheeler. The National Cycle Board of Trade held the largest annual exhibitions in New York and Chicago between 1893 and 1897. At these cycle shows manufacturers attempted to capitalize on the bicycle boom with exhibitions of their products to both the public and bicycle agents from other cities. At shows like these, manufacturers advertised their wares with pins and buttons made of tin and celluloid—cheap materials easily mass manufactured into trinkets and souvenirs. The Chicago Tribune’s account of the 1896 Chicago show speaks to the ubiquity of these kind of souvenirs. “Every visitor seems to have a desire to cherish its memory through some kind of a souvenir . . . anyone who does not look like a walking sign board is a rarity and every exhibiter goes after him and every available buttonhole has some kind of button in it, and stick pins are thrust at him from all sides.”
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Bicycle Pins
Transportation
ID Number:
1990.0294.14
Catalog number:
1990.0294.14
Accession number:
1990.0294
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Bicycle Pins
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Richmond Bicycle Pin

view Richmond Bicycle Pin digital asset number 1
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
celluloid (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 3/4 in; 1.905 cm
Object Name:
pin, lapel
Description:
The stickpin is topped with a blue celluloid button that features Richmond’s motto “There’s a Richmond in the Field.” The Richmond Bicycle Company of Richmond, Indiana produced this souvenir pin to advertise their Richmond bicycles around 1896. Richmond began producing their cycles in 1895, but their business failed in just a few years as the bicycle boom ended.
Bicycling boomed in popularity in the United States during the 1890s when the invention of the “safety” bicycle replaced the dangerous high-wheeler. The National Cycle Board of Trade held the largest annual exhibitions in New York and Chicago between 1893 and 1897. At these cycle shows manufacturers attempted to capitalize on the bicycle boom with exhibitions of their products to both the public and bicycle agents from other cities. At shows like these, manufacturers advertised their wares with pins and buttons made of tin and celluloid—cheap materials easily mass manufactured into trinkets and souvenirs. The Chicago Tribune’s account of the 1896 Chicago show speaks to the ubiquity of these kind of souvenirs. “Every visitor seems to have a desire to cherish its memory through some kind of a souvenir . . . anyone who does not look like a walking sign board is a rarity and every exhibiter goes after him and every available buttonhole has some kind of button in it, and stick pins are thrust at him from all sides.”
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Bicycle Pins
Transportation
ID Number:
1990.0294.21
Catalog number:
1990.0294.21
Accession number:
1990.0294
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Bicycle Pins
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Viking Bicycle Pin

view Viking Bicycle Pin digital asset number 1
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
celluloid (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 3/4 in; 1.905 cm
Object Name:
pin, lapel
Description:
The Union Manufacturing Company of Toledo, Ohio produced this souvenir pin for Viking Bicycles between 1896 and 1898. In 1898, the Union Manufacturing Company split of its bicycle manufacturing concerns into the Viking Manufacturing Co. The cycles were produced until 1899, when the American Bicycle Company monopolized the market and forced many smaller companies out of business.
Bicycling boomed in popularity in the United States during the 1890s when the invention of the “safety” bicycle replaced the dangerous high-wheeler. The National Cycle Board of Trade held the largest annual exhibitions in New York and Chicago between 1893 and 1897. At these cycle shows manufacturers attempted to capitalize on the bicycle boom with exhibitions of their products to both the public and bicycle agents from other cities. At shows like these, manufacturers advertised their wares with pins and buttons made of tin and celluloid—cheap materials easily mass manufactured into trinkets and souvenirs. The Chicago Tribune’s account of the 1896 Chicago show speaks to the ubiquity of these kind of souvenirs. “Every visitor seems to have a desire to cherish its memory through some kind of a souvenir . . . anyone who does not look like a walking sign board is a rarity and every exhibiter goes after him and every available buttonhole has some kind of button in it, and stick pins are thrust at him from all sides.”
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Bicycle Pins
Transportation
ID Number:
1990.0294.26
Catalog number:
1990.0294.26
Accession number:
1990.0294
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Bicycle Pins
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Dayton Bicycle Pin

view Dayton Bicycle Pin digital asset number 1
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
celluloid (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 3/4 in; 1.905 cm
Object Name:
pin, lapel
Description:
This gold-colored stickpin is topped with a “D” with a ribbon in the center. The pin is inscribed “The/Dayton/Bicycle.” The Davis Sewing Machine Company produced this souvenir pin to advertise their Dayton Bicycle around 1896. The Davis Sewing Machine Company began production of their sewing machines in 1868 in Watertown, New York. The successful company moved to Dayton, Ohio in 1889 due to overtures by the Dayton Board of Trade offering to build new factories and housing for the company and its employees. Upon arrival in Dayton, Davis added bicycles to their production of sewing machines, which sold better than the sewing machines during the bicycle boom of the 1890s. Unlike many bicycle makers of the era, Davis continued to sell bicycles into the 20th century, and in 1924 the Huffman Manufacturing Company purchased the concerns of Davis. In 1934 Huffman began producing the Huffy bicycle, which it continued to produce into the 21st century.
Bicycling boomed in popularity in the United States during the 1890s when the invention of the “safety” bicycle replaced the dangerous high-wheeler. The National Cycle Board of Trade held the largest annual exhibitions in New York and Chicago between 1893 and 1897. At these cycle shows manufacturers attempted to capitalize on the bicycle boom with exhibitions of their products to both the public and bicycle agents from other cities. At shows like these, manufacturers advertised their wares with pins and buttons made of tin and celluloid—cheap materials easily mass manufactured into trinkets and souvenirs. The Chicago Tribune’s account of the 1896 Chicago show speaks to the ubiquity of these kind of souvenirs. “Every visitor seems to have a desire to cherish its memory through some kind of a souvenir . . . anyone who does not look like a walking sign board is a rarity and every exhibiter goes after him and every available buttonhole has some kind of button in it, and stick pins are thrust at him from all sides.”
Subject:
Bicycle Pins
Transportation
ID Number:
1990.0294.22
Catalog number:
1990.0294.22
Accession number:
1990.0294
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Bicycle Pins
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Columbia Bicycle Pin

view Columbia Bicycle Pin digital asset number 1
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
celluloid (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 3/4 in; 1.905 cm
Object Name:
pin, lapel
Description:
This metal stickpin features Columbia’s circle and slash logo with their motto “You See Them Everywhere/Columbia Bicycles.” The Pope Manufacturing Company of Hartford, Connecticut produced this souvenir stickpin for its Columbia bicycles around 1896. Albert Pope was a pioneer of American cycling, becoming the first bicycle manufacturer in the United States in 1878. His Columbia bicycle began as a high-wheeler, but the popularity of the safety bicycle led Pope to introduce his own safety in 1888. As the bicycle boom began to subside, Pope shifted his focus towards motorized transport, manufacturing an electric automobile in 1897 and a motorcycle in 1902.
Bicycling boomed in popularity in the United States during the 1890s when the invention of the “safety” bicycle replaced the dangerous high-wheeler. The National Cycle Board of Trade held the largest annual exhibitions in New York and Chicago between 1893 and 1897. At these cycle shows manufacturers attempted to capitalize on the bicycle boom with exhibitions of their products to both the public and bicycle agents from other cities. At shows like these, manufacturers advertised their wares with pins and buttons made of tin and celluloid—cheap materials easily mass manufactured into trinkets and souvenirs. The Chicago Tribune’s account of the 1896 Chicago show speaks to the ubiquity of these kind of souvenirs. “Every visitor seems to have a desire to cherish its memory through some kind of a souvenir . . . anyone who does not look like a walking sign board is a rarity and every exhibiter goes after him and every available buttonhole has some kind of button in it, and stick pins are thrust at him from all sides.”
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Bicycle Pins
Transportation
ID Number:
1990.0294.19
Catalog number:
1990.0294.19
Accession number:
1990.0294
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Bicycle Pins
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Perry's Bicycle Pin

view Perry's Bicycle Pin digital asset number 1
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
celluloid (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 3/4 in; 1.905 cm
Object Name:
pin, lapel
Description:
Perry & Company was a manufacturer of metal goods in Manchester, England from 1824. While the company was well known for their dip pens, they also produced bicycle chains during the 1890s. This pin is shaped like a bicycle chain, advertising Perry’s patented chain.
Bicycling boomed in popularity in the United States during the 1890s when the invention of the “safety” bicycle replaced the dangerous high-wheeler. The National Cycle Board of Trade held the largest annual exhibitions in New York and Chicago between 1893 and 1897. At these cycle shows manufacturers attempted to capitalize on the bicycle boom with exhibitions of their products to both the public and bicycle agents from other cities. At shows like these, manufacturers advertised their wares with pins and buttons made of tin and celluloid—cheap materials easily mass manufactured into trinkets and souvenirs. The Chicago Tribune’s account of the 1896 Chicago show speaks to the ubiquity of these kind of souvenirs. “Every visitor seems to have a desire to cherish its memory through some kind of a souvenir . . . anyone who does not look like a walking sign board is a rarity and every exhibiter goes after him and every available buttonhole has some kind of button in it, and stick pins are thrust at him from all sides.”
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Bicycle Pins
Transportation
ID Number:
1990.0294.24
Catalog number:
1990.0294.24
Accession number:
1990.0294
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Bicycle Pins
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Fenton Bicycle Pin

view Fenton Bicycle Pin digital asset number 1
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
celluloid (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 3/4 in; 1.905 cm
Object Name:
pin, lapel
Description:
The stickpin is topped with an aqua colored celluloid button and is decorated with a red wheel in the center. The button reads “I admire/Fenton/Bicycles.” The Fenton Metallic Company of Jamestown, New York produced this souvenir pin advertising for Fenton bicycles around 1896. Fenton was one of many companies who parlayed their existing business (in this case metal office goods) into bicycles when the bicycle boom began. Similarly to those companies, the Fenton ceased manufacturing cycling parts when the bicycle boom ended in 1898.
Bicycling boomed in popularity in the United States during the 1890s when the invention of the “safety” bicycle replaced the dangerous high-wheeler. The National Cycle Board of Trade held the largest annual exhibitions in New York and Chicago between 1893 and 1897. At these cycle shows manufacturers attempted to capitalize on the bicycle boom with exhibitions of their products to both the public and bicycle agents from other cities. At shows like these, manufacturers advertised their wares with pins and buttons made of tin and celluloid—cheap materials easily mass manufactured into trinkets and souvenirs. The Chicago Tribune’s account of the 1896 Chicago show speaks to the ubiquity of these kind of souvenirs. “Every visitor seems to have a desire to cherish its memory through some kind of a souvenir . . . anyone who does not look like a walking sign board is a rarity and every exhibiter goes after him and every available buttonhole has some kind of button in it, and stick pins are thrust at him from all sides.”
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Bicycle Pins
Transportation
ID Number:
1990.0294.20
Catalog number:
1990.0294.20
Accession number:
1990.0294
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Bicycle Pins
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Syracuse Bicycles Pin

view Syracuse Bicycles Pin digital asset number 1
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
celluloid (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 3/4 in; 1.905 cm
Object Name:
pin, lapel
Description:
A metal token is attached to this stickpin that bears the image of a bicycle surrounded by the text “Syracuse Bicycles/Crimson Rims.” The reverse side of the token reads “Chas. J. Stebbins/Syracuse Bicycles/103 Reade St. New York.” This stickpin was used by the Syracuse Cycle Company and agent Charles J. Stebbins to advertise the Syracuse bicycle with the Crimson Rim. Syracuse became a hub of bicycle production in the 1890s, and the Syracuse Cycle Company was a popular producer of wheels and cycles during the time. Charles Stebbins acted as a resale agent in Brooklyn for the company, likely handing out this pin at one of the National Cycle Shows in 1896 or 1897.
Bicycling boomed in popularity in the United States during the 1890s when the invention of the “safety” bicycle replaced the dangerous high-wheeler. The National Cycle Board of Trade held the largest annual exhibitions in New York and Chicago between 1893 and 1897. At these cycle shows manufacturers attempted to capitalize on the bicycle boom with exhibitions of their products to both the public and bicycle agents from other cities. At shows like these, manufacturers advertised their wares with pins and buttons made of tin and celluloid—cheap materials easily mass manufactured into trinkets and souvenirs. The Chicago Tribune’s account of the 1896 Chicago show speaks to the ubiquity of these kind of souvenirs. “Every visitor seems to have a desire to cherish its memory through some kind of a souvenir . . . anyone who does not look like a walking sign board is a rarity and every exhibiter goes after him and every available buttonhole has some kind of button in it, and stick pins are thrust at him from all sides.”
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Bicycle Pins
Transportation
ID Number:
1990.0294.23
Catalog number:
1990.0294.23
Accession number:
1990.0294
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Bicycle Pins
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Additional Online Media:

Syracuse Bicycles Pin

view Syracuse Bicycles Pin digital asset number 1
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
celluloid (overall material)
Object Name:
pin, lapel
Description:
A metal token is attached to this stickpin that bears the image of a bicycle surrounded by the text “Syracuse Bicycles/Crimson Rims.” The reverse side of the token reads “Chas. J. Stebbins/Syracuse Bicycles/103 Reade St. New York.” This stickpin was used by the Syracuse Cycle Company and agent Charles J. Stebbins to advertise the Syracuse bicycle with the Crimson Rim. Syracuse became a hub of bicycle production in the 1890s, and the Syracuse Cycle Company was a popular producer of wheels and cycles during the time. Charles Stebbins acted as a resale agent in Brooklyn for the company, likely handing out this pin at one of the National Cycle Shows in 1896 or 1897.
Bicycling boomed in popularity in the United States during the 1890s when the invention of the “safety” bicycle replaced the dangerous high-wheeler. The National Cycle Board of Trade held the largest annual exhibitions in New York and Chicago between 1893 and 1897. At these cycle shows manufacturers attempted to capitalize on the bicycle boom with exhibitions of their products to both the public and bicycle agents from other cities. At shows like these, manufacturers advertised their wares with pins and buttons made of tin and celluloid—cheap materials easily mass manufactured into trinkets and souvenirs. The Chicago Tribune’s account of the 1896 Chicago show speaks to the ubiquity of these kind of souvenirs. “Every visitor seems to have a desire to cherish its memory through some kind of a souvenir . . . anyone who does not look like a walking sign board is a rarity and every exhibiter goes after him and every available buttonhole has some kind of button in it, and stick pins are thrust at him from all sides.”
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Bicycle Pins
Transportation
ID Number:
1990.0294.32
Catalog number:
1990.0294.32
Accession number:
1990.0294
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Bicycle Pins
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Additional Online Media:

Crescent Bicycles Pin

view Crescent Bicycles Pin digital asset number 1
Depicted:
Crescent Bicycles
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
celluloid (overall material)
Object Name:
pin, lapel
Description:
The Western Wheel Works of Chicago, Illinois produced this souvenir pin for its Crescent brand bicycle around 1896. First producing wheels for carriages, prams, and wheelchairs, Western Wheel Works turned its production towards bicycle manufacturing around 1890. In 1891 it introduced its Crescent model cycle, which was produced in a variety of models for men, women, boys, girls, and tandem riders until around 1897. A white celluloid button tops the stickpin that reads “Crescent Bicycles.” To the right is Crescent’s logo of, a waxing red crescent moon.
Bicycling boomed in popularity in the United States during the 1890s when the invention of the “safety” bicycle replaced the dangerous high-wheeler. The National Cycle Board of Trade held the largest annual exhibitions in New York and Chicago between 1893 and 1897. At these cycle shows manufacturers attempted to capitalize on the bicycle boom with exhibitions of their products to both the public and bicycle agents from other cities. At shows like these, manufacturers advertised their wares with pins and buttons made of tin and celluloid—cheap materials easily mass manufactured into trinkets and souvenirs. The Chicago Tribune’s account of the 1896 Chicago show speaks to the ubiquity of these kind of souvenirs. “Every visitor seems to have a desire to cherish its memory through some kind of a souvenir . . . anyone who does not look like a walking sign board is a rarity and every exhibiter goes after him and every available buttonhole has some kind of button in it, and stick pins are thrust at him from all sides.”
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Bicycle Pins
Transportation
ID Number:
1990.0294.10
Catalog number:
1990.0294.10
Accession number:
1990.0294
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Bicycle Pins
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Spalding Bicycle Pin

view Spalding Bicycle Pin digital asset number 1
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
celluloid (overall material)
Object Name:
pin, lapel
Description:
This metal stickpin is topped with a white celluloid button that reads “The Spalding Bicycle” in red script. Albert Goodwill Spalding began his sporting career as a pitcher for the Boston Red Stockings of the National Association in 1871, and ended his career with the Chicago White Stockings in the newly formed National League. In 1876, Spalding founded A. G. Spalding & Brothers a sporting goods company. In the late 1870s, Albert Spalding wore a glove on his non-throwing hand to help sell the new baseball mitts his company sold. The Spalding Company also supplied the National League with baseballs, expanding its popularity. Combining his baseball skill with business acumen made Spalding a leader in sporting goods retail. For his work in baseball, Spalding was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1939, and his company continued to manufacture sporting goods.
During the late 1880s and early 1890s, Spalding produced several different bicycle models and sponsored a racing team to help advertise its cycles. In 1899 Spalding headed the incorporation of the American Bicycle Company, a trust formed in an effort to reduce overhead and improve flagging bicycle sales.
Bicycling boomed in popularity in the United States during the 1890s when the invention of the “safety” bicycle replaced the dangerous high-wheeler. The National Cycle Board of Trade held the largest annual exhibitions in New York and Chicago between 1893 and 1897. At these cycle shows manufacturers attempted to capitalize on the bicycle boom with exhibitions of their products to both the public and bicycle agents from other cities. At shows like these, manufacturers advertised their wares with pins and buttons made of tin and celluloid—cheap materials easily mass manufactured into trinkets and souvenirs. The Chicago Tribune’s account of the 1896 Chicago show speaks to the ubiquity of these kind of souvenirs. “Every visitor seems to have a desire to cherish its memory through some kind of a souvenir . . . anyone who does not look like a walking sign board is a rarity and every exhibiter goes after him and every available buttonhole has some kind of button in it, and stick pins are thrust at him from all sides.”
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Bicycle Pins
Transportation
ID Number:
1990.0294.12
Catalog number:
1990.0294.12
Accession number:
1990.0294
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Bicycle Pins
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Sagamore Bicycle Pin

view Sagamore Bicycle Pin digital asset number 1
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
celluloid (overall material)
Object Name:
pin, lapel
Description:
This stickpin is topped by the Porter & Gilmour’s horseshoe logo that is engraved “Porter & Gilmour Incpd. New York/ Sagamore.” Porter & Gilmour of New York City produced this souvenir pin to advertise their Sagamore bicycles and bicycle wheels around 1896. The company began in 1892 as a retailer for other cycles and wheels before beginning production on their own wheels and bicycles around 1896. Luther H. Porter was heavily involved in the bicycle boom, writing “Cycling for health and pleasure: an indispensable guide to the successful use of the wheel” and “Wheels and Wheeling” in 1892.
Bicycling boomed in popularity in the United States during the 1890s when the invention of the “safety” bicycle replaced the dangerous high-wheeler. The National Cycle Board of Trade held the largest annual exhibitions in New York and Chicago between 1893 and 1897. At these cycle shows manufacturers attempted to capitalize on the bicycle boom with exhibitions of their products to both the public and bicycle agents from other cities. At shows like these, manufacturers advertised their wares with pins and buttons made of tin and celluloid—cheap materials easily mass manufactured into trinkets and souvenirs. The Chicago Tribune’s account of the 1896 Chicago show speaks to the ubiquity of these kind of souvenirs. “Every visitor seems to have a desire to cherish its memory through some kind of a souvenir . . . anyone who does not look like a walking sign board is a rarity and every exhibiter goes after him and every available buttonhole has some kind of button in it, and stick pins are thrust at him from all sides.”
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Bicycle Pins
Transportation
ID Number:
1990.0294.31
Catalog number:
1990.0294.31
Accession number:
1990.0294
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Bicycle Pins
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Unknown Bicycle Pin

view Unknown Bicycle Pin digital asset number 1
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
celluloid (overall material)
Object Name:
pin, lapel
Description:
This stickpin is topped by a white celluloid pin decorated with a figure in cycling gear. The button was made for an unknown company.
Bicycling boomed in popularity in the United States during the 1890s when the invention of the “safety” bicycle replaced the dangerous high-wheeler. The National Cycle Board of Trade held the largest annual exhibitions in New York and Chicago between 1893 and 1897. At these cycle shows manufacturers attempted to capitalize on the bicycle boom with exhibitions of their products to both the public and bicycle agents from other cities. At shows like these, manufacturers advertised their wares with pins and buttons made of tin and celluloid—cheap materials easily mass manufactured into trinkets and souvenirs. The Chicago Tribune’s account of the 1896 Chicago show speaks to the ubiquity of these kind of souvenirs. “Every visitor seems to have a desire to cherish its memory through some kind of a souvenir . . . anyone who does not look like a walking sign board is a rarity and every exhibiter goes after him and every available buttonhole has some kind of button in it, and stick pins are thrust at him from all sides.”
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Bicycle Pins
Transportation
ID Number:
1990.0294.35
Accession number:
1990.0294
Catalog number:
1990.0294.35
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Bicycle Pins
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

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