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Sirige, Kanaga and Pulo Yana masqueraders during a Dama ceremony, Sanga, Mali, [slide]

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1959
Topic:
Masquerades
Clothing and dress
Masks
Local number:
E 1 DGN 63 EE 59
EEPA EECL 3560
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes
Summary:
"For the Dogon, the èmma consists of a person dancing in a costume that includes a headpiece but is not limited to it. Masks are not worn; masks are men who dance, perform, and shout. The total outfit consists of a kind of skirt and arm adornments fashioned from red and black fibers, a pair of very wide Dogon trousers, a headpiece with cotton bands for attachment, and various handheld objects relating to a particular mask, such as a dancing stick, a rattle, or a dancing ax. The headpiece defines the type of mask, but the fibers define the outfit as a mask." [Hollyman S. and Van Beek W., 2001: Dogon, Africa's People of the Cliffs. Harry N Abrams, Inc.]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for Life magazine and traveled to Africa from August 18, 1959 to December 20, 1959
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Sirige, Kanaga, Dyomo and Pulo Yana masqueraders during a Dama ceremony, Sanga, Mali, [slide]

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1959
Topic:
Masquerades
Clothing and dress
Masks
Animals in art
Animals in art--Rabbits
Wood-carving
Beadwork
Local number:
E 1 DGN 65 EE 59
EEPA EECL 3570
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes
Summary:
"For the Dogon, the èmma consists of a person dancing in a costume that includes a headpiece but is not limited to it. Masks are not worn; masks are men who dance, perform, and shout. The total outfit consists of a kind of skirt and arm adornments fashioned from red and black fibers, a pair of very wide Dogon trousers, a headpiece with cotton bands for attachment, and various handheld objects relating to a particular mask, such as a dancing stick, a rattle, or a dancing ax. The headpiece defines the type of mask, but the fibers define the outfit as a mask." [Hollyman S. and Van Beek W., 2001: Dogon, Africa's People of the Cliffs. Harry N Abrams, Inc.]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for Life magazine and traveled to Africa from August 18, 1959 to December 20, 1959
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Dyomo, Danana, buffalo and Pulo Yana masqueraders during a Dama ceremony, Sanga, Mali, [slide]

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1972
Topic:
Masquerades
Clothing and dress
Masks
Animals in art
Animals in art--Rabbits
Animals in art--Buffaloes
Wood-carving
Local number:
E 1 DGN 68.5 EE 72
EEPA EECL 3576
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes
Summary:
The photograph depicts procession of masked performers, including Pulo Yana (Fulani woman), Buffalo, Danana (hunter) and Dyomo (rabbit) masks. "For the Dogon, the èmma consists of a person dancing in a costume that includes a headpiece but is not limited to it. Masks are not worn; masks are men who dance, perform, and shout. The total outfit consists of a kind of skirt and arm adornments fashioned from red and black fibers, a pair of very wide Dogon trousers, a headpiece with cotton bands for attachment, and various handheld objects relating to a particular mask, such as a dancing stick, a rattle, or a dancing ax. The headpiece defines the type of mask, but the fibers define the outfit as a mask." [Hollyman S. and Van Beek W., 2001: Dogon, Africa's People of the Cliffs. Harry N Abrams, Inc.]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for National Geographic and traveled to Africa from January 19, 1972 to mid April 1972
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Dyomo, Kanaga, and Danana masqueraders during a Dama ceremony, Sanga, Mali, [slide]

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1972
Topic:
Masquerades
Clothing and dress
Masks
Animals in art
Animals in art--Rabbits
Wood-carving
Local number:
E 1 DGN 68.6 EE 72
EEPA EECL 3577
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes
Summary:
The photograph depicts procession of masked performers, including Danana (hunter), Kanaga and Dyomo (rabbit) masks. "For the Dogon, the èmma consists of a person dancing in a costume that includes a headpiece but is not limited to it. Masks are not worn; masks are men who dance, perform, and shout. The total outfit consists of a kind of skirt and arm adornments fashioned from red and black fibers, a pair of very wide Dogon trousers, a headpiece with cotton bands for attachment, and various handheld objects relating to a particular mask, such as a dancing stick, a rattle, or a dancing ax. The headpiece defines the type of mask, but the fibers define the outfit as a mask." [Hollyman S. and Van Beek W., 2001: Dogon, Africa's People of the Cliffs. Harry N Abrams, Inc.]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for National Geographic and traveled to Africa from January 19, 1972 to mid April 1972
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Dyomo masqueraders during the Dama ceremony, Sanga, Mali. [slide]

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1970
Topic:
Masquerades
Clothing and dress
Masks
Animals in art
Animals in art--Rabbits
Wood-carving
Local number:
E 1 DGN 75 EE 70
EEPA EECL 3578
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes
Summary:
"For the Dogon, the èmma consists of a person dancing in a costume that includes a headpiece but is not limited to it. Masks are not worn; masks are men who dance, perform, and shout. The total outfit consists of a kind of skirt and arm adornments fashioned from red and black fibers, a pair of very wide Dogon trousers, a headpiece with cotton bands for attachment, and various handheld objects relating to a particular mask, such as a dancing stick, a rattle, or a dancing ax. The headpiece defines the type of mask, but the fibers define the outfit as a mask." [Hollyman S. and Van Beek W., 2001: Dogon, Africa's People of the Cliffs. Harry N Abrams, Inc.]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Dyomo masqueraders during the Dama ceremony, Sanga, Mali. [slide]

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1970
Topic:
Masquerades
Clothing and dress
Masks
Animals in art
Animals in art--Rabbits
Wood-carving
Local number:
E 1 DGN 75.1.1 EE 70
EEPA EECL 3580
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes
Summary:
"For the Dogon, the èmma consists of a person dancing in a costume that includes a headpiece but is not limited to it. Masks are not worn; masks are men who dance, perform, and shout. The total outfit consists of a kind of skirt and arm adornments fashioned from red and black fibers, a pair of very wide Dogon trousers, a headpiece with cotton bands for attachment, and various handheld objects relating to a particular mask, such as a dancing stick, a rattle, or a dancing ax. The headpiece defines the type of mask, but the fibers define the outfit as a mask." [Hollyman S. and Van Beek W., 2001: Dogon, Africa's People of the Cliffs. Harry N Abrams, Inc.]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Dyomo masqueraders during the Dama ceremony, Sanga, Mali. [slide]

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1970
Topic:
Masquerades
Clothing and dress
Masks
Animals in art
Animals in art--Rabbits
Wood-carving
Local number:
E 1 DGN 76.0.1 EE 70
EEPA EECL 3582
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes
Summary:
"For the Dogon, the èmma consists of a person dancing in a costume that includes a headpiece but is not limited to it. Masks are not worn; masks are men who dance, perform, and shout. The total outfit consists of a kind of skirt and arm adornments fashioned from red and black fibers, a pair of very wide Dogon trousers, a headpiece with cotton bands for attachment, and various handheld objects relating to a particular mask, such as a dancing stick, a rattle, or a dancing ax. The headpiece defines the type of mask, but the fibers define the outfit as a mask." [Hollyman S. and Van Beek W., 2001: Dogon, Africa's People of the Cliffs. Harry N Abrams, Inc.]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Dyomo, Danana, buffalo and Pulo Yana masqueraders during a Dama ceremony, Sanga, Mali, [slide]

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1972
Topic:
Masquerades
Clothing and dress
Masks
Animals in art
Animals in art--Rabbits
Animals in art--Buffaloes
Wood-carving
Local number:
E 1 DGN 94 EE 72
EEPA EECL 3630
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes
Summary:
The photograph depicts procession of masked performers, including Pulo Yana (Fulani woman), Buffalo, Danana (hunter) and Dyomo (rabbit) masks. "For the Dogon, the èmma consists of a person dancing in a costume that includes a headpiece but is not limited to it. Masks are not worn; masks are men who dance, perform, and shout. The total outfit consists of a kind of skirt and arm adornments fashioned from red and black fibers, a pair of very wide Dogon trousers, a headpiece with cotton bands for attachment, and various handheld objects relating to a particular mask, such as a dancing stick, a rattle, or a dancing ax. The headpiece defines the type of mask, but the fibers define the outfit as a mask." [Hollyman S. and Van Beek W., 2001: Dogon, Africa's People of the Cliffs. Harry N Abrams, Inc.]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for National Geographic and traveled to Africa from January 19, 1972 to mid April 1972
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Danana, buffalo and Pulo Yana masqueraders during a Dama ceremony, Sanga, Mali, [slide]

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1972
Topic:
Masquerades
Clothing and dress
Masks
Animals in art
Animals in art--Buffaloes
Wood-carving
Local number:
E 1 DGN 94.1 EE 72
EEPA EECL 3631
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes
Summary:
The photograph depicts procession of masked performers, including Pulo Yana (Fulani woman), Buffalo, Danana (hunter) masks. "For the Dogon, the èmma consists of a person dancing in a costume that includes a headpiece but is not limited to it. Masks are not worn; masks are men who dance, perform, and shout. The total outfit consists of a kind of skirt and arm adornments fashioned from red and black fibers, a pair of very wide Dogon trousers, a headpiece with cotton bands for attachment, and various handheld objects relating to a particular mask, such as a dancing stick, a rattle, or a dancing ax. The headpiece defines the type of mask, but the fibers define the outfit as a mask." [Hollyman S. and Van Beek W., 2001: Dogon, Africa's People of the Cliffs. Harry N Abrams, Inc.]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for National Geographic and traveled to Africa from January 19, 1972 to mid April 1972
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Sirige, Kanaga and buffalo masqueraders during the Dama ceremony, Sanga, Mali, [slide]

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1972
Topic:
Masquerades
Clothing and dress
Masks
Animals in art
Animals in art--Buffaloes
Wood-carving
Local number:
E 1 DGN 94.2 EE 72
EEPA EECL 3632
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes
Summary:
"For the Dogon, the èmma consists of a person dancing in a costume that includes a headpiece but is not limited to it. Masks are not worn; masks are men who dance, perform, and shout. The total outfit consists of a kind of skirt and arm adornments fashioned from red and black fibers, a pair of very wide Dogon trousers, a headpiece with cotton bands for attachment, and various handheld objects relating to a particular mask, such as a dancing stick, a rattle, or a dancing ax. The headpiece defines the type of mask, but the fibers define the outfit as a mask." [Hollyman S. and Van Beek W., 2001: Dogon, Africa's People of the Cliffs. Harry N Abrams, Inc.]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for National Geographic and traveled to Africa from January 19, 1972 to mid April 1972
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Kanaga, Dyomo, buffalo and Pulo Yana masqueraders during a Dama ceremony, Sanga, Mali, [slide]

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1972
Topic:
Masquerades
Clothing and dress
Masks
Animals in art
Animals in art--Rabbits
Animals in art--Buffaloes
Wood-carving
Local number:
E 1 DGN 94.3 EE 72
EEPA EECL 3633
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes
Summary:
The photograph depicts procession of masked performers, including Pulo Yana (Fulani woman), Buffalo, and kanaga masks. "For the Dogon, the èmma consists of a person dancing in a costume that includes a headpiece but is not limited to it. Masks are not worn; masks are men who dance, perform, and shout. The total outfit consists of a kind of skirt and arm adornments fashioned from red and black fibers, a pair of very wide Dogon trousers, a headpiece with cotton bands for attachment, and various handheld objects relating to a particular mask, such as a dancing stick, a rattle, or a dancing ax. The headpiece defines the type of mask, but the fibers define the outfit as a mask." [Hollyman S. and Van Beek W., 2001: Dogon, Africa's People of the Cliffs. Harry N Abrams, Inc.]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for National Geographic and traveled to Africa from January 19, 1972 to mid April 1972
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Dyomo, Danana, buffalo and Kanaga masqueraders during a Dama ceremony, Sanga, Mali, [slide]

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1972
Topic:
Masquerades
Clothing and dress
Masks
Animals in art
Animals in art--Buffaloes
Wood-carving
Local number:
E 1 DGN 94.4 EE 72
EEPA EECL 3634
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes
Summary:
The photograph depicts procession of masked performers, including Danana (hunter) and Dyomo (rabbit), Kanaga and buffalo masks. "For the Dogon, the èmma consists of a person dancing in a costume that includes a headpiece but is not limited to it. Masks are not worn; masks are men who dance, perform, and shout. The total outfit consists of a kind of skirt and arm adornments fashioned from red and black fibers, a pair of very wide Dogon trousers, a headpiece with cotton bands for attachment, and various handheld objects relating to a particular mask, such as a dancing stick, a rattle, or a dancing ax. The headpiece defines the type of mask, but the fibers define the outfit as a mask." [Hollyman S. and Van Beek W., 2001: Dogon, Africa's People of the Cliffs. Harry N Abrams, Inc.]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for National Geographic and traveled to Africa from January 19, 1972 to mid April 1972
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

From the plain, trees at the edge of the village, Ogol du Haut village, Mali, [slide]

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1970
Topic:
Vernacular architecture
Cultural landscapes
Local number:
H 1 DGN 4.1 EE 70
EEPA EECL 6764
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes
Summary:
"The Dogon value trees for several reasons. Some trees add important ingredients for seasoning and shortening the sauce added to the daily meals of millet mush. the Oro tree, a baobab, bears leaves that when cooked with sesame yield a dark green sauce greatly relished by the Dogon. Used more intensively than other trees, the baobab yields poor firewood and consequently is never cut down. Other trees that are important for their fruit are the Ponu; Omunu; Sa; and Yuro." [Hollyman S. and Van Beek W., 2001: Dogon, Africa's People of the Cliffs. Harry N Abrams, Inc.]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. The most important villages are Ogol-du-Haut and Ogol-du-Bas. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17,1970
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

From the plain, trees at the edge of the village, Ogol du Haut village, Mali, [slide]

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1970
Topic:
Vernacular architecture
Cultural landscapes
Local number:
H 1 DGN 4.2 EE 70
EEPA EECL 6765
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes
Summary:
"The Dogon value trees for several reasons. Some trees add important ingredients for seasoning and shortening the sauce added to the daily meals of millet mush. the Oro tree, a baobab, bears leaves that when cooked with sesame yield a dark green sauce greatly relished by the Dogon. Used more intensively than other trees, the baobab yields poor firewood and consequently is never cut down. Other trees that are important for their fruit are the Ponu; Omunu; Sa; and Yuro." [Hollyman S. and Van Beek W., 2001: Dogon, Africa's People of the Cliffs. Harry N Abrams, Inc.]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. The most important villages are Ogol-du-Haut and Ogol-du-Bas. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17,1970
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Dolo, a blacksmith and woodcarver, with his son Samuel, Ogol du Haut village, Mali, [slide]

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1970
Topic:
Artists
Wood-carving
Local number:
H 1 DGN 5.3 EE 70
EEPA EECL 6768
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes
Summary:
The photograph depicts Dolo, the blacksmith and wood carver of Ogol du Haut village, and his son Samuel using traditional adze to make a Kanaga mask. "Dogon masks are carved from the wood of male trees, a practice consistent with the association of the Awa society, masks, and Dama performances, with men. Wood from the togolo tree (Bumbax buonopozente) is most often used for the masks, and it is characterized by a red sap that oozes from its cut surfaces. When the carving is complete, the masks are prevented from drying by applications of sesame oil, and are painted with pigments from natural sources." [Harris M., 1989: Visual Tropes: The Kanaga Mask of the Dogon People of West Africa, Yale University]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. The most important villages are Ogol-du-Haut and Ogol-du-Bas. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970
Cite as:
Dogon carver and son cut down a tree to make a Kanaga mask, Mali. Photograph by Eliot Elisofon, 1970. EEPA 6768. Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Dolo, a blacksmith and woodcarver, with his son Samuel, Ogol du Haut village, Mali, [slide]

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1970
Topic:
Artists
Wood-carving
Local number:
H 1 DGN 6.1 EE 70
EEPA EECL 6770
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes
Summary:
The photograph depicts Dolo, the blacksmith and wood carver of Ogol du Haut village, and his son Samuel using traditional adze to make a Kanaga mask. "Dogon masks are carved from the wood of male trees, a practice consistent with the association of the Awa society, masks, and Dama performances, with men. Wood from the togolo tree (Bumbax buonopozente) is most often used for the masks, and it is characterized by a red sap that oozes from its cut surfaces. When the carving is complete, the masks are prevented from drying by applications of sesame oil, and are painted with pigments from natural sources." [Harris M., 1989: Visual Tropes: The Kanaga Mask of the Dogon People of West Africa, Yale University]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. The most important villages are Ogol-du-Haut and Ogol-du-Bas. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970
Cite as:
Dogon carver and son cut down a tree to make a Kanaga mask, Mali. Photograph by Eliot Elisofon, 1970. EEPA 6770. Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Dolo, a blacksmith and woodcarver, with his son Samuel, carving a Kanaga mask, Ogol du Haut village, Mali, [slide]

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1970
Topic:
Artists
Wood-carving
Local number:
H 1 DGN 9.4 EE 70
EEPA EECL 6781
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes
Summary:
The photograph depicts Dolo, the blacksmith and wood carver of Ogol du Haut village, and his son Samuel using traditional adze to make a Kanaga mask. "Dogon masks are carved from the wood of male trees, a practice consistent with the association of the Awa society, masks, and Dama performances, with men. Wood from the togolo tree (Bumbax buonopozente) is most often used for the masks, and it is characterized by a red sap that oozes from its cut surfaces. When the carving is complete, the masks are prevented from drying by applications of sesame oil, and are painted with pigments from natural sources." [Harris M., 1989: Visual Tropes: The Kanaga Mask of the Dogon People of West Africa, Yale University]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. The most important villages are Ogol-du-Haut and Ogol-du-Bas. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970
Cite as:
Dogon carver makes a Kanaga mask, Mali. Photograph by Eliot Elisofon, 1970. EEPA 6781. Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Dolo, a blacksmith and woodcarver, making a Kanaga mask, Ogol du Haut village, Mali, [slide]

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1970
Topic:
Artists
Wood-carving
Local number:
H 1 DGN 11.1 EE 70
EEPA EECL 6793
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes
Summary:
The photograph depicts Dolo, the blacksmith and wood carver of Ogol du Haut village, using a traditional adze to make a Kanaga mask. "Dogon masks are carved from the wood of male trees, a practice consistent with the association of the Awa society, masks, and Dama performances, with men. Wood from the togolo tree (Bumbax buonopozente) is most often used for the masks, and it is characterized by a red sap that oozes from its cut surfaces. When the carving is complete, the masks are prevented from drying by applications of sesame oil, and are painted with pigments from natural sources." [Harris M., 1989: Visual Tropes: The Kanaga Mask of the Dogon People of West Africa, Yale University]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. The most important villages are Ogol-du-Haut and Ogol-du-Bas. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970
Cite as:
Dogon carver making a kanaga mask in a cave outside Ogol du Haut village, Sangha region, Mali. Photograph by Eliot Elisofon, 1970. Image no. EEPA 6793. Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Dolo, a blacksmith and woodcarver, and his son Samuel, making a Kanaga mask, Ogol du Haut village, Mali, [slide]

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1970
Topic:
Artists
Wood-carving
Local number:
H 1 DGN 23.2 EE 70
EEPA EECL 6840
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes
Summary:
The photograph depicts Dolo, the blacksmith and wood carver of Ogol du Haut village, and his son painting a Kanaga mask with paint made from kam fruit, almie tree bark and bala seeds. "Dogon masks are carved from the wood of male trees, a practice consistent with the association of the Awa society, masks, and Dama performances, with men. Wood from the togolo tree (Bumbax buonopozente) is most often used for the masks, and it is characterized by a red sap that oozes from its cut surfaces. When the carving is complete, the masks are prevented from drying by applications of sesame oil, and are painted with pigments from natural sources." [Harris M., 1989: Visual Tropes: The Kanaga Mask of the Dogon People of West Africa, Yale University]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in the Sanga region. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970
Cite as:
Dogon carver and son paint Kanaga mask, Mali. Photograph by Eliot Elisofon, 1970. EEPA 6840. Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Dolo, a blacksmith and woodcarver, and his son Samuel, making a Kanaga mask, Ogol du Haut village, Mali, [slide]

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1970
Topic:
Artists
Wood-carving
Masks
Local number:
H 1 DGN 25 EE 70
EEPA EECL 6842
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes
Summary:
The photograph depicts Dolo, the blacksmith and wood carver of Ogol du Haut village, and his son painting a Kanaga mask with paint made from kam fruit, almie tree bark and bala seeds. "Dogon masks are carved from the wood of male trees, a practice consistent with the association of the Awa society, masks, and Dama performances, with men. Wood from the togolo tree (Bumbax buonopozente) is most often used for the masks, and it is characterized by a red sap that oozes from its cut surfaces. When the carving is complete, the masks are prevented from drying by applications of sesame oil, and are painted with pigments from natural sources." [Harris M., 1989: Visual Tropes: The Kanaga Mask of the Dogon People of West Africa, Yale University]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in the Sanga region. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970
Cite as:
Dogon carver and son paint Kanaga mask, Mali. Photograph by Eliot Elisoson, 1970. EEPA 6842. Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

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