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From the plain, trees at the edge of the village, Sanga region, Mali, [negative]

view From the plain, trees at the edge of the village, Sanga region, Mali, [negative] digital asset number 1
Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
photographic negative b&w; 35mm
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Black-and-white negatives
Negatives
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1970
Notes:
Title source: Index card based on photographer's notes.
Summary:
"The Dogon value trees for several reasons. Some trees add important ingredients for seasoning and shortening the sauce added to the daily meals of millet mush. the Oro tree, a baobab, bears leaves that when cooked with sesame yield a dark green sauce greatly relished by the Dogon. Used more intensively than other trees, the baobab yields poor firewood and consequently is never cut down. Other trees that are important for their fruit are the Ponu; Omunu; Sa; and Yuro." [Hollyman S. and Van Beek W., 2001: Dogon, Africa's People of the Cliffs. Harry N Abrams, Inc.]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. The most important villages are Ogol-du-Haut and Ogol-du-Bas. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17,1970.
Topic:
Vernacular architecture
Cultural landscapes
Local number:
EENG-IV-23, 25
EEPA EENG 10522
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives

Built environment into sandstone cliffs, near Sanga, Mali, [negative]

view Built environment into sandstone cliffs, near Sanga, Mali, [negative] digital asset number 1
Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
photographic negative b&w; 35mm
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Black-and-white negatives
Negatives
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1970
Notes:
Title source: Index card based on photographer's notes.
Summary:
"For safety's sake, the Dogon built their houses only on defendable spots. On top of the plateau the villages were built beside steep-walled gorges accessible only by foot. At the base of the cliff face, the fallen boulders and loose rock offered some protection against a mounted attack as well as an opportunity to spot raider parties from afar. If the pressure became too great, the Dogon could flee into the caverns inside the sandstone cliffs." [Hollyman S. and Van Beek W., 2001: Dogon, Africa's People of the Cliffs. Harry N Abrams, Inc.]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. The most important villages are Ogol-du-Haut and Ogol-du-Bas. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.
Topic:
Cultural landscapes
Vernacular architecture
Local number:
EENG-IV-26, 3A
EEPA EENG 10530
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives

From the plain, trees at the edge of the village, near Sanga, Mali, [negative]

view From the plain, trees at the edge of the village, near Sanga, Mali, [negative] digital asset number 1
Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
photographic negative b&w; 35mm
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Black-and-white negatives
Negatives
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1970
Notes:
Title source: Index card based on photographer's notes.
Summary:
"The Dogon value trees for several reasons. Some trees add important ingredients for seasoning and shortening the sauce added to the daily meals of millet mush. the Oro tree, a baobab, bears leaves that when cooked with sesame yield a dark green sauce greatly relished by the Dogon. Used more intensively than other trees, the baobab yields poor firewood and consequently is never cut down. Other trees that are important for their fruit are the Ponu; Omunu; Sa; and Yuro." [Hollyman S. and Van Beek W., 2001: Dogon, Africa's People of the Cliffs. Harry N Abrams, Inc.]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. The most important villages are Ogol-du-Haut and Ogol-du-Bas. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.
Topic:
Vernacular architecture
Cultural landscapes
Local number:
EENG-IV-26, 32A
EEPA EENG 10533
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives

Traditional mud brick village at the top of the Bandiagara escarpment, Sanga, Mali, [slide]

view Traditional mud brick village at the top of the Bandiagara escarpment, Sanga, Mali, [slide] digital asset number 1
Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1972
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Summary:
"Villages in Dogon country along the escarpment are composed in clear-cut social units. A village generally consists of several wards. Each ward includes a few clans, called gina [ginna (gin'na)], meaning literally "big house." Some special buildings mark the wards and clans. Each ward has its dancing square, tei; overlooking the tei is the major togu na, the men's house; a special building, yapunu ginu, is reserved for menstruating women; each clan has an ancestral adobe, called gina. In addition, most wards have one major shrine, standing apart." [Hollyman S. and Van Beek W., 2001: Dogon, Africa's People of the Cliffs. Harry N Abrams, Inc.]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for National Geographic and traveled to Africa from January 19, 1972 to mid April 1972.
Cite as:
Dogon village in Mali. Photograph by Eliot Elisofon, 1972. Image no. EEPA EECL 16135. Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Topic:
Vernacular architecture
Cultural landscapes
Local number:
T 1 DGN 16.1 EE 72
EEPA EECL 16135
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives

From the plain, trees at the edge of the village, Sanga region, Mali, [slide]

view From the plain, trees at the edge of the village, Sanga region, Mali, [slide] digital asset number 1
Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1970
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Summary:
"The Dogon value trees for several reasons. Some trees add important ingredients for seasoning and shortening the sauce added to the daily meals of millet mush. the Oro tree, a baobab, bears leaves that when cooked with sesame yield a dark green sauce greatly relished by the Dogon. Used more intensively than other trees, the baobab yields poor firewood and consequently is never cut down. Other trees that are important for their fruit are the Ponu; Omunu; Sa; and Yuro." [Hollyman S. and Van Beek W., 2001: Dogon, Africa's People of the Cliffs. Harry N Abrams, Inc.]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. The most important villages are Ogol-du-Haut and Ogol-du-Bas. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17,1970.
Topic:
Vernacular architecture
Cultural landscapes
Local number:
T 1 DGN 16.5 EE 70
EEPA EECL 16139
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives

From the plain, trees at the edge of the village, Sanga region, Mali, [slide]

view From the plain, trees at the edge of the village, Sanga region, Mali, [slide] digital asset number 1
Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1970
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Summary:
"The Dogon value trees for several reasons. Some trees add important ingredients for seasoning and shortening the sauce added to the daily meals of millet mush. the Oro tree, a baobab, bears leaves that when cooked with sesame yield a dark green sauce greatly relished by the Dogon. Used more intensively than other trees, the baobab yields poor firewood and consequently is never cut down. Other trees that are important for their fruit are the Ponu; Omunu; Sa; and Yuro." [Hollyman S. and Van Beek W., 2001: Dogon, Africa's People of the Cliffs. Harry N Abrams, Inc.]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. The most important villages are Ogol-du-Haut and Ogol-du-Bas. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17,1970.
Topic:
Vernacular architecture
Cultural landscapes
Local number:
T 1 DGN 16.6 EE 70
EEPA EECL 16140
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives

From the plain, trees at the edge of the village, Sanga region, Mali, [slide]

view From the plain, trees at the edge of the village, Sanga region, Mali, [slide] digital asset number 1
Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1970
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Summary:
"The Dogon value trees for several reasons. Some trees add important ingredients for seasoning and shortening the sauce added to the daily meals of millet mush. the Oro tree, a baobab, bears leaves that when cooked with sesame yield a dark green sauce greatly relished by the Dogon. Used more intensively than other trees, the baobab yields poor firewood and consequently is never cut down. Other trees that are important for their fruit are the Ponu; Omunu; Sa; and Yuro." [Hollyman S. and Van Beek W., 2001: Dogon, Africa's People of the Cliffs. Harry N Abrams, Inc.]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. The most important villages are Ogol-du-Haut and Ogol-du-Bas. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17,1970.
Topic:
Vernacular architecture
Cultural landscapes
Local number:
T 1 DGN 16.6.1 EE 70
EEPA EECL 16141
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives

Tellem architecture into the sandstone cliffs, Sanga region, Mali, [slide]

view Tellem architecture into the sandstone cliffs, Sanga region, Mali, [slide] digital asset number 1
Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1972
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Summary:
"The Tellem, thought to be the ancestors of the people of Yatenga known today as the Kurumba, have left many magnificent artistic and architectural vestiges: dwellings, granaries, cemeteries, shrines, statuettes, and wooden headdrests... Some of these artifacts are so inaccessible, even for the Dogon, who are reputed to be skilled climbers, that tradition has it that the Tellem must have been able to fly like birds." [Pataux A., 2004: Dogon, People of the Cliffs. 5 Continents Editions]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for National Geographic and traveled to Africa from January 19, 1972 to mid April 1972.
Cite as:
A Dogon village in the Bandiagara cliffs, Mali. Photograph by Eliot Elisofon, 1972. Image no. EEPA EECL 16154. Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Topic:
Cultural landscapes
Vernacular architecture
Local number:
T 1 DGN 23.2 EE 72
EEPA EECL 16154
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives

Trees along the Bandiagara Cliffs, Sanga region, Mali, [slide]

view Trees along the Bandiagara Cliffs, Sanga region, Mali, [slide] digital asset number 1
Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1972
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Summary:
"The Dogon value trees for several reasons. Some trees add important ingredients for seasoning and shortening the sauce added to the daily meals of millet mush. the Oro tree, a baobab, bears leaves that when cooked with sesame yield a dark green sauce greatly relished by the Dogon. Used more intensively than other trees, the baobab yields poor firewood and consequently is never cut down. Other trees that are important for their fruit are the Ponu; Omunu; Sa; and Yuro." [Hollyman S. and Van Beek W., 2001: Dogon, Africa's People of the Cliffs. Harry N Abrams, Inc.]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. The most important villages are Ogol-du-Haut and Ogol-du-Bas. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for National Geographic and traveled to Africa from January 19, 1972 to mid April 1972.
Topic:
Vernacular architecture
Cultural landscapes
Local number:
T 1 DGN 80 EE 72
EEPA EECL 16269
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives

Trees along the Bandiagara cliffs, Sanga region, Mali, [slide]

view Trees along the Bandiagara cliffs, Sanga region, Mali, [slide] digital asset number 1
Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1972
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Summary:
"The Dogon value trees for several reasons. Some trees add important ingredients for seasoning and shortening the sauce added to the daily meals of millet mush. the Oro tree, a baobab, bears leaves that when cooked with sesame yield a dark green sauce greatly relished by the Dogon. Used more intensively than other trees, the baobab yields poor firewood and consequently is never cut down. Other trees that are important for their fruit are the Ponu; Omunu; Sa; and Yuro." [Hollyman S. and Van Beek W., 2001: Dogon, Africa's People of the Cliffs. Harry N Abrams, Inc.]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for National Geographic and traveled to Africa from January 19, 1972 to mid April 1972.
Topic:
Vernacular architecture
Cultural landscapes
Local number:
T 1 DGN 80.1 EE 72
EEPA EECL 16270
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives

Sirige, Kanaga and Pulo Yana masqueraders during a Dama ceremony, Sanga, Mali, [slide]

view Sirige, Kanaga and Pulo Yana masqueraders during a Dama ceremony, Sanga, Mali, [slide] digital asset number 1
Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1959
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Summary:
"For the Dogon, the èmma consists of a person dancing in a costume that includes a headpiece but is not limited to it. Masks are not worn; masks are men who dance, perform, and shout. The total outfit consists of a kind of skirt and arm adornments fashioned from red and black fibers, a pair of very wide Dogon trousers, a headpiece with cotton bands for attachment, and various handheld objects relating to a particular mask, such as a dancing stick, a rattle, or a dancing ax. The headpiece defines the type of mask, but the fibers define the outfit as a mask." [Hollyman S. and Van Beek W., 2001: Dogon, Africa's People of the Cliffs. Harry N Abrams, Inc.]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for Life magazine and traveled to Africa from August 18, 1959 to December 20, 1959.
Topic:
Masquerades
Clothing and dress
Masks
Local number:
E 1 DGN 62 EE 59
EEPA EECL 3558
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives

Sirige, Kanaga and Pulo Yana masqueraders during a Dama ceremony, Sanga, Mali, [slide]

view Sirige, Kanaga and Pulo Yana masqueraders during a Dama ceremony, Sanga, Mali, [slide] digital asset number 1
Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1959
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Summary:
"For the Dogon, the èmma consists of a person dancing in a costume that includes a headpiece but is not limited to it. Masks are not worn; masks are men who dance, perform, and shout. The total outfit consists of a kind of skirt and arm adornments fashioned from red and black fibers, a pair of very wide Dogon trousers, a headpiece with cotton bands for attachment, and various handheld objects relating to a particular mask, such as a dancing stick, a rattle, or a dancing ax. The headpiece defines the type of mask, but the fibers define the outfit as a mask." [Hollyman S. and Van Beek W., 2001: Dogon, Africa's People of the Cliffs. Harry N Abrams, Inc.]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for Life magazine and traveled to Africa from August 18, 1959 to December 20, 1959.
Topic:
Masquerades
Clothing and dress
Masks
Local number:
E 1 DGN 62.1 EE 59
EEPA EECL 3559
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives

Sirige, Kanaga and Pulo Yana masqueraders during a Dama ceremony, Sanga, Mali, [slide]

view Sirige, Kanaga and Pulo Yana masqueraders during a Dama ceremony, Sanga, Mali, [slide] digital asset number 1
Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1959
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Summary:
"For the Dogon, the èmma consists of a person dancing in a costume that includes a headpiece but is not limited to it. Masks are not worn; masks are men who dance, perform, and shout. The total outfit consists of a kind of skirt and arm adornments fashioned from red and black fibers, a pair of very wide Dogon trousers, a headpiece with cotton bands for attachment, and various handheld objects relating to a particular mask, such as a dancing stick, a rattle, or a dancing ax. The headpiece defines the type of mask, but the fibers define the outfit as a mask." [Hollyman S. and Van Beek W., 2001: Dogon, Africa's People of the Cliffs. Harry N Abrams, Inc.]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for Life magazine and traveled to Africa from August 18, 1959 to December 20, 1959.
Topic:
Masquerades
Clothing and dress
Masks
Local number:
E 1 DGN 63 EE 59
EEPA EECL 3560
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives

Sirige, Kanaga, Dyomo and Pulo Yana masqueraders during a Dama ceremony, Sanga, Mali, [slide]

view Sirige, Kanaga, Dyomo and Pulo Yana masqueraders during a Dama ceremony, Sanga, Mali, [slide] digital asset number 1
Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1959
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Summary:
"For the Dogon, the èmma consists of a person dancing in a costume that includes a headpiece but is not limited to it. Masks are not worn; masks are men who dance, perform, and shout. The total outfit consists of a kind of skirt and arm adornments fashioned from red and black fibers, a pair of very wide Dogon trousers, a headpiece with cotton bands for attachment, and various handheld objects relating to a particular mask, such as a dancing stick, a rattle, or a dancing ax. The headpiece defines the type of mask, but the fibers define the outfit as a mask." [Hollyman S. and Van Beek W., 2001: Dogon, Africa's People of the Cliffs. Harry N Abrams, Inc.]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for Life magazine and traveled to Africa from August 18, 1959 to December 20, 1959.
Topic:
Masquerades
Clothing and dress
Masks
Animals in art
Animals in art--Rabbits
Wood-carving
Beadwork
Local number:
E 1 DGN 65 EE 59
EEPA EECL 3570
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives

Dyomo, Danana, buffalo and Pulo Yana masqueraders during a Dama ceremony, Sanga, Mali, [slide]

view Dyomo, Danana, buffalo and Pulo Yana masqueraders during a Dama ceremony, Sanga, Mali, [slide] digital asset number 1
Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1972
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Summary:
The photograph depicts procession of masked performers, including Pulo Yana (Fulani woman), Buffalo, Danana (hunter) and Dyomo (rabbit) masks. "For the Dogon, the èmma consists of a person dancing in a costume that includes a headpiece but is not limited to it. Masks are not worn; masks are men who dance, perform, and shout. The total outfit consists of a kind of skirt and arm adornments fashioned from red and black fibers, a pair of very wide Dogon trousers, a headpiece with cotton bands for attachment, and various handheld objects relating to a particular mask, such as a dancing stick, a rattle, or a dancing ax. The headpiece defines the type of mask, but the fibers define the outfit as a mask." [Hollyman S. and Van Beek W., 2001: Dogon, Africa's People of the Cliffs. Harry N Abrams, Inc.]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for National Geographic and traveled to Africa from January 19, 1972 to mid April 1972.
Topic:
Masquerades
Clothing and dress
Masks
Animals in art
Animals in art--Rabbits
Animals in art--Buffaloes
Wood-carving
Local number:
E 1 DGN 68.5 EE 72
EEPA EECL 3576
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives

Dyomo, Kanaga, and Danana masqueraders during a Dama ceremony, Sanga, Mali, [slide]

view Dyomo, Kanaga, and Danana masqueraders during a Dama ceremony, Sanga, Mali, [slide] digital asset number 1
Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1972
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Summary:
The photograph depicts procession of masked performers, including Danana (hunter), Kanaga and Dyomo (rabbit) masks. "For the Dogon, the èmma consists of a person dancing in a costume that includes a headpiece but is not limited to it. Masks are not worn; masks are men who dance, perform, and shout. The total outfit consists of a kind of skirt and arm adornments fashioned from red and black fibers, a pair of very wide Dogon trousers, a headpiece with cotton bands for attachment, and various handheld objects relating to a particular mask, such as a dancing stick, a rattle, or a dancing ax. The headpiece defines the type of mask, but the fibers define the outfit as a mask." [Hollyman S. and Van Beek W., 2001: Dogon, Africa's People of the Cliffs. Harry N Abrams, Inc.]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for National Geographic and traveled to Africa from January 19, 1972 to mid April 1972.
Topic:
Masquerades
Clothing and dress
Masks
Animals in art
Animals in art--Rabbits
Wood-carving
Local number:
E 1 DGN 68.6 EE 72
EEPA EECL 3577
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives

Dyomo masqueraders during the Dama ceremony, Sanga, Mali. [slide]

view Dyomo masqueraders during the Dama ceremony, Sanga, Mali. [slide] digital asset number 1
Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1970
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Summary:
"For the Dogon, the èmma consists of a person dancing in a costume that includes a headpiece but is not limited to it. Masks are not worn; masks are men who dance, perform, and shout. The total outfit consists of a kind of skirt and arm adornments fashioned from red and black fibers, a pair of very wide Dogon trousers, a headpiece with cotton bands for attachment, and various handheld objects relating to a particular mask, such as a dancing stick, a rattle, or a dancing ax. The headpiece defines the type of mask, but the fibers define the outfit as a mask." [Hollyman S. and Van Beek W., 2001: Dogon, Africa's People of the Cliffs. Harry N Abrams, Inc.]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.
Topic:
Masquerades
Clothing and dress
Masks
Animals in art
Animals in art--Rabbits
Wood-carving
Local number:
E 1 DGN 75 EE 70
EEPA EECL 3578
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives

Dyomo masqueraders during the Dama ceremony, Sanga, Mali. [slide]

view Dyomo masqueraders during the Dama ceremony, Sanga, Mali. [slide] digital asset number 1
Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1970
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Summary:
"For the Dogon, the èmma consists of a person dancing in a costume that includes a headpiece but is not limited to it. Masks are not worn; masks are men who dance, perform, and shout. The total outfit consists of a kind of skirt and arm adornments fashioned from red and black fibers, a pair of very wide Dogon trousers, a headpiece with cotton bands for attachment, and various handheld objects relating to a particular mask, such as a dancing stick, a rattle, or a dancing ax. The headpiece defines the type of mask, but the fibers define the outfit as a mask." [Hollyman S. and Van Beek W., 2001: Dogon, Africa's People of the Cliffs. Harry N Abrams, Inc.]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.
Topic:
Masquerades
Clothing and dress
Masks
Animals in art
Animals in art--Rabbits
Wood-carving
Local number:
E 1 DGN 75.1.1 EE 70
EEPA EECL 3580
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives

Dyomo masqueraders during the Dama ceremony, Sanga, Mali. [slide]

view Dyomo masqueraders during the Dama ceremony, Sanga, Mali. [slide] digital asset number 1
Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1970
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Summary:
"For the Dogon, the èmma consists of a person dancing in a costume that includes a headpiece but is not limited to it. Masks are not worn; masks are men who dance, perform, and shout. The total outfit consists of a kind of skirt and arm adornments fashioned from red and black fibers, a pair of very wide Dogon trousers, a headpiece with cotton bands for attachment, and various handheld objects relating to a particular mask, such as a dancing stick, a rattle, or a dancing ax. The headpiece defines the type of mask, but the fibers define the outfit as a mask." [Hollyman S. and Van Beek W., 2001: Dogon, Africa's People of the Cliffs. Harry N Abrams, Inc.]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.
Topic:
Masquerades
Clothing and dress
Masks
Animals in art
Animals in art--Rabbits
Wood-carving
Local number:
E 1 DGN 76.0.1 EE 70
EEPA EECL 3582
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives

Dyomo, Danana, buffalo and Pulo Yana masqueraders during a Dama ceremony, Sanga, Mali, [slide]

view Dyomo, Danana, buffalo and Pulo Yana masqueraders during a Dama ceremony, Sanga, Mali, [slide] digital asset number 1
Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Dogon (African people)
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1972
Notes:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Summary:
The photograph depicts procession of masked performers, including Pulo Yana (Fulani woman), Buffalo, Danana (hunter) and Dyomo (rabbit) masks. "For the Dogon, the èmma consists of a person dancing in a costume that includes a headpiece but is not limited to it. Masks are not worn; masks are men who dance, perform, and shout. The total outfit consists of a kind of skirt and arm adornments fashioned from red and black fibers, a pair of very wide Dogon trousers, a headpiece with cotton bands for attachment, and various handheld objects relating to a particular mask, such as a dancing stick, a rattle, or a dancing ax. The headpiece defines the type of mask, but the fibers define the outfit as a mask." [Hollyman S. and Van Beek W., 2001: Dogon, Africa's People of the Cliffs. Harry N Abrams, Inc.]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for National Geographic and traveled to Africa from January 19, 1972 to mid April 1972.
Topic:
Masquerades
Clothing and dress
Masks
Animals in art
Animals in art--Rabbits
Animals in art--Buffaloes
Wood-carving
Local number:
E 1 DGN 94 EE 72
EEPA EECL 3630
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives

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