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Gertrude Jekyll and the country house garden / Judith B. Tankard

Author:
Tankard, Judith B
Subject:
Jekyll, Gertrude 1843-1932
Physical description:
207 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
England
Date:
2011
Topic:
Gardens--Design
Landscape gardening
Notes:
"From the archives of Country life."
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

Gertrude Jekyll : a vision of garden and wood / Judith B. Tankard and Michael R. Van Valkenburgh ; foreword by Jane Brown

Author:
Tankard, Judith B
Van Valkenburgh, Michael
Subject:
Jekyll, Gertrude 1843-1932
Physical description:
x, 148 p. : ill. ; 27 x 26 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
England
Munstead Wood Gardens (England)
Date:
1989
Topic:
Gardens--Design
Pictorial works
Notes:
Published in conjunction with a major exhibition of Gertrude Jekyll's photographs
"A Ngaere Macray book."
Includes index
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

Gertrude Jekyll at Munstead Wood : writing, horticulture, photography, homebuilding / Judith B. Tankard and Martin A. Wood ; foreword by Graham Stuart Thomas

Author:
Tankard, Judith B
Wood, Martin A. 1959-
Subject:
Jekyll, Gertrude 1843-1932 Homes and haunts
Physical description:
xiii, 201 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 26 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
England
Surrey
Munstead Wood Gardens (England)
Date:
1996
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

Reef Point, ca. 1940

Former owner:
Jones, Mary Cadwalader
Farrand, Max 1869-1945
Landscape architect, former owner:
Farrand, Beatrix 1872-1959
Provenance:
Buckler, James R
Architects:
Rotch and Tilden
Physical description:
1 folder+ 10 35 mm slides; 2 glass lantern slide
Type:
Mixed archival materials
Place:
United States of America, Maine, Hancock County, Bar Harbor
Maine
Bar Harbor
Reef Point (Bar Harbor, Maine)
Date:
1940
ca 1940
Topic:
Gardens
Local number:
ME047000
Notes:
Landscape designer Beatrix Farrand (1872 - 1959) spent her childhood summers at Reef Point on Mount Desert Island in Maine, a six-acre property with distinct garden rooms that featured native plants and panoramas of trees set against the ocean vista. According to landscape historian Judith Tankard the front of the half-timbered house supported flowering vines including clematis, jasmine, wisteria and hydrangea. A stone terrace facing the water had a rose garden complimented by gray foliage plants. In the acid soil banks of azaleas grew on slopes that led to the bay. There was an informal perennial garden sheltered by hemlocks, a vegetable garden, a small rock garden, a bog plantation, a large heather garden, and carpets of ground covers including bunchberry, ferns, trilliums, and ginger. Besides areas for seating and entertaining the grounds resembled an arboretum of spruce and Asian shrubs. Farrand inherited Reef Point after her mother's death and it became her permanent home in 1941
Circa 1939 Farrand incorporated Reef Point Gardens as a botanical garden and reference library to be used by students of outdoor life and gardening. Her own professional papers and those of English garden designer Gertrude Jekyll were made available for study along with illustrations of European gardens that had influenced Farrand, thousands of books including English herbals, a herbarium of 1,800 plant species found at Reef Point, and the garden slides of garden architect Mary Rutherfurd Jay (1872 - 1953). The center was closed and the garden was dismantled by Farrand in 1955 due to lack of funds and a dearth of visitors to the area, which is near Acadia National Park. Farrand's and Jekyll's documents were sent to the University of California at Berkeley
Persons associated with the garden include: Mary Cadwalader Rawle Jones (1850 - 1935) (former owner, 1882 until 1935); Beatrix (1872 - 1959) and Max (1869 - 1945) Farrand (former owners, 1941 - 1955); Arthur Rotch (1850 - 1894) & George Thomas Tilden (1845 - 1919) (architects, 1883); Beatrix Farrand (landscape designer)
Summary:
The folders includes worksheets and photocopies of articles
Publications:
This property is featured in: Golden Age of American Gardens, p. 34; "Such, Such Were the Joys" published in Lost Bar Harbor, by G.W. Helfrich and Gladys O'Neil, Down East Books, 1982, pp. 42 - 43; "The Start and The Goal" by Beatrix Farrand, Bulletin of the Garden Club of America, 1947, pp. 13 - 15; Beatrix Farrand: Private Gardens, Public Landscapes by Judith B. Tankard, The Monacelli Press, 2009, pp. 193 - 203
Data Source:
Archives of American Gardens
Visitor Tag(s):

The Farm House, ca. 1930, ca. 1983, 1988

Former owner:
McCormick, Mildred Day
Landscape architect:
Farrand, Beatrix 1872-1959
Smith, Ann Leighton
Physical description:
2 folders+ 15 35 mm slides
Type:
Mixed archival materials
Place:
United States of America, Maine, Hancock County, Bar Harbor
Maine
Bar Harbor
The Farm House (Bar Harbor, Maine)
Date:
1930
1930-1988
ca 1930, ca 1983, 1988
Topic:
Gardens
Local number:
ME048000
Notes:
One of the earliest Mount Desert Island dwellings, The Farm House was built in 1800 and extensively remodeled circa 1925. The garden designed by Beatrix Farrand (1872 - 1959) for the eight-acre Bar Harbor property was installed in 1923 and amended over the next five years. Farrand moved the main entrance of the shingled cottage to the opposite side of the house and added a small stone terrace. The main garden areas were now behind the house and featured two 80-foot long borders along a gravel path planted with massed drifts of summer annuals in a style developed by the English garden designer Gertrude Jekyll (1843 - 1932) for her own pastel border. That style has been described as impressionistic, with blooms of blended colors cascading over the walk, generously massed with attention paid to texture and foliage. Each of the three garden rooms - the borders, the orchard and the vegetable garden -was enclosed by hedges of arborvitae. Gates designed by Farrand divided the rooms and each area had benches she designed as well
When The Farmhouse changed hands within the McCormick family in the 1980's the carefully designed flower borders were in decline but the structure of the garden remained. The current owners have undertaken the restoration of the long borders more in keeping with Farrand's original plans but with plant substitutions that simplify upkeep and reduce the expense. Changes include planting more perennials, especially astilbe, and replacing hollyhocks with sunflowers. The peak blooming season has been shortened to the two months the family is in residence rather than the six month flowering season envisioned by Farrand
Persons associated with the garden include: Mildred Day McCormick (former owner, circa 1920 to circa 1980); Arthur McFarland (architect); Beatrix Farrand (1872 - 1959) (landscape architect, 1923-1928) and Ann Leighton Smith (restoration landscape architect, ca. 1982)
Summary:
The folders include worksheets, photocopies of articles, and photocopies of Farrand's designs
Publications:
This property is featured in: the Bulletin of the Garden Club of America, 1934, p. 36, and in the winter 1983 edition; the August 1932 issue of House Beautiful; "All in the Family: Restoring a Design Legacy in Maine" by Anne Kozak, published in "Garden Design" January/February 1991, pp. 50 - 56; "In Bloom Again" by Peter Lemos, published in "House Beautiful" April 1992, pp. 34 - 38; Beatrix Farrand: Private Gardens, Public Landscapes by Judith B. Tankard, published by The Monacelli Press, 2009, pp. 111 - 114
Data Source:
Archives of American Gardens
Visitor Tag(s):

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