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Gas Engine Indicator

Physical Description:
brass (overall material)
bakelite (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 6 in x 12 1/4 in x 9 3/8 in; 15.24 cm x 31.115 cm x 23.8125 cm
Object Name:
indicator, gas engine
Subject:
Engineering, Building, and Architecture
Work
Industry & Manufacturing
Indicators
Credit Line:
Gift from Estate of Kalman J. Dejuhasz, State College, Pennsylvania
ID Number:
1981.0217.01
Accession number:
1981.0217
Catalog number:
1981.0217.01
Description:
This De Juhasz gas engine indicator, serial number 407, consists of a small steel piston with three grooves; a vented brass cylinder with radial fins for cooling; an external, double wound spring, which can be changed; a light Bakelite drum with a spiral spring and a single record; and a metal stylus. This is a new instrument, complete with metal box and accessories.
An engine indicator is an instrument for graphically recording the pressure versus piston displacement through an engine stroke cycle. Engineers use the resulting diagram to check the design and performance of the engine.
A mechanical indicator consists of a piston, spring, stylus, and recording system. The gas pressure of the cylinder deflects the piston and pushes against the spring, creating a linear relationship between the gas pressure and the deflection of the piston against the spring. The deflection is recorded by the stylus on a rotating drum that is connected to the piston. Most indicators incorporate a mechanical linkage to amplify the movement of the piston to increase the scale of the record.
When the ratio of the frequency of the pressure variation to the natural frequency of the system is small, then the dynamic deflection is equal to the static deflection. To design a system with a high natural frequency, the mass of the piston, spring, stylus, and mechanical linkage must be small, but the stiffness of the spring must be high. The indicator is subjected to high temperatures and pressures and rapid oscillations, imposing a limitation on the reduction in mass. Too stiff a spring will result in a small displacement of the indicator piston and a record too small to measure with accuracy. Multiplication of the displacement will introduce mechanical ad dynamic errors.
The parameters of the problem for designing an accurate and trouble free recorder are such that there is no easy or simple solution. Studying the variety of indicators in the collection shows how different inventors made different compromises in their designs.
Location:
Currently not on view
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Mechanical and Civil Engineering
Indicators
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Visitor Tag(s):

De Juhasz Gas Engine Indicator

Measurements:
overall: 6 in x 9 1/8 in x 7 in; 15.24 cm x 23.1775 cm x 17.78 cm
Object Name:
indicator, gas engine
Subject:
Engineering, Building, and Architecture
Work
Industry & Manufacturing
Indicators
Credit Line:
Gift of Estate of Kalman J. Dejuhasz, State College, Pennsylvania
ID Number:
1981.0217.02
Accession number:
1981.0217
Catalog number:
1981.0217.02
Description:
This gas engine indicator, manufactured by Kalman J. De Juhasz, is very similar to another one in the collection (catalog number 311.621). It is a modification of the steam engine indicator to adapt it for use on diesel engines. The improvements consist of cooling fins, reduced masses of piston and pencil movement, light Bakelite drum, ball bearings for drum and roller, and a built-in indicator.
An engine indicator is an instrument for graphically recording the pressure versus piston displacement through an engine stroke cycle. Engineers use the resulting diagram to check the design and performance of the engine.
A mechanical indicator consists of a piston, spring, stylus, and recording system. The gas pressure of the cylinder deflects the piston and pushes against the spring, creating a linear relationship between the gas pressure and the deflection of the piston against the spring. The deflection is recorded by the stylus on a rotating drum that is connected to the piston. Most indicators incorporate a mechanical linkage to amplify the movement of the piston to increase the scale of the record.
When the ratio of the frequency of the pressure variation to the natural frequency of the system is small, then the dynamic deflection is equal to the static deflection. To design a system with a high natural frequency, the mass of the piston, spring, stylus, and mechanical linkage must be small, but the stiffness of the spring must be high. The indicator is subjected to high temperatures and pressures and rapid oscillations, imposing a limitation on the reduction in mass. Too stiff a spring will result in a small displacement of the indicator piston and a record too small to measure with accuracy. Multiplication of the displacement will introduce mechanical ad dynamic errors.
The parameters of the problem for designing an accurate and trouble free recorder are such that there is no easy or simple solution. Studying the variety of indicators in the collection shows how different inventors made different compromises in their designs.
Location:
Currently not on view
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Mechanical and Civil Engineering
Indicators
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Visitor Tag(s):

Schaeffer & Budenberg Steam Engine Indicator

Maker:
Schaeffer and Bundenberg Manufacturing Company
Physical Description:
wood (case material)
brass (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 4 1/2 in x 16 7/8 in x 11 1/4 in; 11.43 cm x 42.8625 cm x 28.575 cm
Object Name:
indicator, steam engine
Subject:
Engineering, Building, and Architecture
Work
Industry & Manufacturing
Indicators
Credit Line:
Gift from Estate of Kalman J. Dejuhasz, State College, Pennsylvania
ID Number:
1981.0217.03
Accession number:
1981.0217
Catalog number:
1981.0217.03
Description:
Shaeffer & Budenberg manufactured this steam engine indicator. It consists of a large brass piston with a single groove; a vented brass cylinder; an internal, single wound spring, which can be changed; a large drum with a spiral spring and single record; and a heavy brass stylus. Accompanying the indicator is a wooden box with three scales and a wooden ram rod.
An engine indicator is an instrument for graphically recording the pressure versus piston displacement through an engine stroke cycle. Engineers use the resulting diagram to check the design and performance of the engine.
A mechanical indicator consists of a piston, spring, stylus, and recording system. The gas pressure of the cylinder deflects the piston and pushes against the spring, creating a linear relationship between the gas pressure and the deflection of the piston against the spring. The deflection is recorded by the stylus on a rotating drum that is connected to the piston. Most indicators incorporate a mechanical linkage to amplify the movement of the piston to increase the scale of the record.
When the ratio of the frequency of the pressure variation to the natural frequency of the system is small, then the dynamic deflection is equal to the static deflection. To design a system with a high natural frequency, the mass of the piston, spring, stylus, and mechanical linkage must be small, but the stiffness of the spring must be high. The indicator is subjected to high temperatures and pressures and rapid oscillations, imposing a limitation on the reduction in mass. Too stiff a spring will result in a small displacement of the indicator piston and a record too small to measure with accuracy. Multiplication of the displacement will introduce mechanical ad dynamic errors.
The parameters of the problem for designing an accurate and trouble free recorder are such that there is no easy or simple solution. Studying the variety of indicators in the collection shows how different inventors made different compromises in their designs.
Location:
Currently not on view
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Mechanical and Civil Engineering
Indicators
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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Schaeffer & Budenberg Steam Engine Indicator

Physical Description:
brass (overall material)
steel (overall material)
wood (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 4 3/8 in x 11 in x 9 1/2 in; 11.1125 cm x 27.94 cm x 24.13 cm
Object Name:
indicator, steam engine
Subject:
Engineering, Building, and Architecture
Work
Industry & Manufacturing
Indicators
Credit Line:
Gift of Estate of Kalman J. Dejuhasz, State College, Pennsylvania
ID Number:
1981.0217.04
Accession number:
1981.0217
Catalog number:
1981.0217.04
Description:
Schaeffer and Budenberg manufactured this steam engine indicator. It consists of a large brass piston with a single groove; a vented brass; an internal, single wound spring, which can be changed; a large drum with a coil spring and continuous record; and a small, steel stylus. The record paper is inside the drum with a ratchet and pawl that turns the paper.
An engine indicator is an instrument for graphically recording the pressure versus piston displacement through an engine stroke cycle. Engineers use the resulting diagram to check the design and performance of the engine.
A mechanical indicator consists of a piston, spring, stylus, and recording system. The gas pressure of the cylinder deflects the piston and pushes against the spring, creating a linear relationship between the gas pressure and the deflection of the piston against the spring. The deflection is recorded by the stylus on a rotating drum that is connected to the piston. Most indicators incorporate a mechanical linkage to amplify the movement of the piston to increase the scale of the record.
When the ratio of the frequency of the pressure variation to the natural frequency of the system is small, then the dynamic deflection is equal to the static deflection. To design a system with a high natural frequency, the mass of the piston, spring, stylus, and mechanical linkage must be small, but the stiffness of the spring must be high. The indicator is subjected to high temperatures and pressures and rapid oscillations, imposing a limitation on the reduction in mass. Too stiff a spring will result in a small displacement of the indicator piston and a record too small to measure with accuracy. Multiplication of the displacement will introduce mechanical ad dynamic errors.
The parameters of the problem for designing an accurate and trouble free recorder are such that there is no easy or simple solution. Studying the variety of indicators in the collection shows how different inventors made different compromises in their designs.
Location:
Currently not on view
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Mechanical and Civil Engineering
Indicators
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Visitor Tag(s):

Elliot Bros. Steam Engine Indicator

Physical Description:
brass (overall material)
paper (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 6 in x 3 3/4 in x 2 in; 15.24 cm x 9.525 cm x 5.08 cm
Object Name:
indicator, steam engine
Place made:
United Kingdom: England, London
Subject:
Engineering, Building, and Architecture
Work
Industry & Manufacturing
Indicators
Credit Line:
Gift of Estate of Kalman J. Dejuhasz via Lehman Michel Co.,
ID Number:
1981.0217.05
Accession number:
1981.0217
Catalog number:
1981.0217.05
Description:
The Elliot Bros. of London manufactured this steam engine indicator. It consists of a small diameter brass piston; a vented brass cylinder; an internal, single wound spring, which can be changed; a small drum with a coil spring; a roll of paper inside the drum, which is hand fed; and a heavy brass slide and stylus.
An engine indicator is an instrument for graphically recording the pressure versus piston displacement through an engine stroke cycle. Engineers use the resulting diagram to check the design and performance of the engine.
A mechanical indicator consists of a piston, spring, stylus, and recording system. The gas pressure of the cylinder deflects the piston and pushes against the spring, creating a linear relationship between the gas pressure and the deflection of the piston against the spring. The deflection is recorded by the stylus on a rotating drum that is connected to the piston. Most indicators incorporate a mechanical linkage to amplify the movement of the piston to increase the scale of the record.
When the ratio of the frequency of the pressure variation to the natural frequency of the system is small, then the dynamic deflection is equal to the static deflection. To design a system with a high natural frequency, the mass of the piston, spring, stylus, and mechanical linkage must be small, but the stiffness of the spring must be high. The indicator is subjected to high temperatures and pressures and rapid oscillations, imposing a limitation on the reduction in mass. Too stiff a spring will result in a small displacement of the indicator piston and a record too small to measure with accuracy. Multiplication of the displacement will introduce mechanical ad dynamic errors.
The parameters of the problem for designing an accurate and trouble free recorder are such that there is no easy or simple solution. Studying the variety of indicators in the collection shows how different inventors made different compromises in their designs.
Location:
Currently not on view
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Mechanical and Civil Engineering
Indicators
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Visitor Tag(s):

Ashcroft Tabor Steam Engine Indicator

Physical Description:
brass (overall material)
wood (container material)
Measurements:
overall: 5 in x 9 1/2 in x 7 3/4 in; 12.7 cm x 24.13 cm x 19.685 cm
Object Name:
indicator, steam engine
Subject:
Engineering, Building, and Architecture
Work
Industry & Manufacturing
Indicators
Credit Line:
Gift of Estate of Kalman J. Dejuhasz, State College, Pennsylvania
ID Number:
1981.0217.06
Accession number:
1981.0217
Catalog number:
1981.0217.06
Description:
Ashcroft Mfg. Co. of Bridgeport, Connecticut, manufactured this Tabor steam engine indicator, serial number 2604. It consists of a brass piston with three grooves; a vented brass cylinder; an internal, single wound spring, which can be changed; a large drum with a coil spring and a single record; and a short pencil lead for the stylus. Accompanying the indicator is a box with eight springs, two turn cocks, a coil spring for the drum, and a small wooden knob. The internal spring is missing.
An engine indicator is an instrument for graphically recording the pressure versus piston displacement through an engine stroke cycle. Engineers use the resulting diagram to check the design and performance of the engine.
A mechanical indicator consists of a piston, spring, stylus, and recording system. The gas pressure of the cylinder deflects the piston and pushes against the spring, creating a linear relationship between the gas pressure and the deflection of the piston against the spring. The deflection is recorded by the stylus on a rotating drum that is connected to the piston. Most indicators incorporate a mechanical linkage to amplify the movement of the piston to increase the scale of the record.
When the ratio of the frequency of the pressure variation to the natural frequency of the system is small, then the dynamic deflection is equal to the static deflection. To design a system with a high natural frequency, the mass of the piston, spring, stylus, and mechanical linkage must be small, but the stiffness of the spring must be high. The indicator is subjected to high temperatures and pressures and rapid oscillations, imposing a limitation on the reduction in mass. Too stiff a spring will result in a small displacement of the indicator piston and a record too small to measure with accuracy. Multiplication of the displacement will introduce mechanical ad dynamic errors.
The parameters of the problem for designing an accurate and trouble free recorder are such that there is no easy or simple solution. Studying the variety of indicators in the collection shows how different inventors made different compromises in their designs.
Location:
Currently not on view
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Mechanical and Civil Engineering
Indicators
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Visitor Tag(s):

Ashcroft-Tabor Steam Engine Indicator

Physical Description:
brass (overall material)
wood (container material)
Measurements:
overall: 4 5/8 in x 9 1/4 in x 7 7/8 in; 11.7475 cm x 23.495 cm x 20.0025 cm
Object Name:
indicator, steam engine
Subject:
Engineering, Building, and Architecture
Work
Industry & Manufacturing
Indicators
Credit Line:
Gift from estate of Kalman J. Dejuhasz, State College, Pennsylvania
ID Number:
1981.0217.07
Accession number:
1981.0217
Catalog number:
1981.0217.07
Description:
Ashcroft Mfg. Co. of Bridgeport, Connecticut, manufactured this Tabor steam engine indicator, serial number 920. It consists of a brass piston; a vented brass cylinder; an internal, single wound spring, which can be changed; a large drum with a coil spring and a single record; and a short pencil lead for the stylus. Accompanying the indicator is a box with one spring, a wrench, and a coil spring for the drum.
An engine indicator is an instrument for graphically recording the pressure versus piston displacement through an engine stroke cycle. Engineers use the resulting diagram to check the design and performance of the engine.
A mechanical indicator consists of a piston, spring, stylus, and recording system. The gas pressure of the cylinder deflects the piston and pushes against the spring, creating a linear relationship between the gas pressure and the deflection of the piston against the spring. The deflection is recorded by the stylus on a rotating drum that is connected to the piston. Most indicators incorporate a mechanical linkage to amplify the movement of the piston to increase the scale of the record.
When the ratio of the frequency of the pressure variation to the natural frequency of the system is small, then the dynamic deflection is equal to the static deflection. To design a system with a high natural frequency, the mass of the piston, spring, stylus, and mechanical linkage must be small, but the stiffness of the spring must be high. The indicator is subjected to high temperatures and pressures and rapid oscillations, imposing a limitation on the reduction in mass. Too stiff a spring will result in a small displacement of the indicator piston and a record too small to measure with accuracy. Multiplication of the displacement will introduce mechanical ad dynamic errors.
The parameters of the problem for designing an accurate and trouble free recorder are such that there is no easy or simple solution. Studying the variety of indicators in the collection shows how different inventors made different compromises in their designs.
Location:
Currently not on view
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Mechanical and Civil Engineering
Indicators
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Visitor Tag(s):

Additional Online Media:

American Steam Gauge Steam Engine Indicator

Physical Description:
wood (case material)
brass (overall material)
paper (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 4 1/2 in x 11 1/8 in x 8 3/4 in; 11.43 cm x 28.2575 cm x 22.225 cm
Object Name:
indicator, steam engine
Subject:
Engineering, Building, and Architecture
Work
Industry & Manufacturing
Indicators
Credit Line:
Gift from Estate of Kalman J. Dejuhasz, State College, Pennsylvania
ID Number:
1981.0217.08
Accession number:
1981.0217
Catalog number:
1981.0217.08
Description:
The American Steam Gauge Co. of Boston, Massachusetts, manufactured this steam engine indicator, serial number 572. It consists of a brass piston with one groove; a brass cylinder; an internal, single wound spring, which can be changed; a large drum with a coil spring and single record. The stylus is missing. Accompanying the indicator is a box with two small wrenches; a packet of record paper with the title on top of the Taylor Engine Company Time Card; and actual engine records on five sheets.
An engine indicator is an instrument for graphically recording the pressure versus piston displacement through an engine stroke cycle. Engineers use the resulting diagram to check the design and performance of the engine.
A mechanical indicator consists of a piston, spring, stylus, and recording system. The gas pressure of the cylinder deflects the piston and pushes against the spring, creating a linear relationship between the gas pressure and the deflection of the piston against the spring. The deflection is recorded by the stylus on a rotating drum that is connected to the piston. Most indicators incorporate a mechanical linkage to amplify the movement of the piston to increase the scale of the record.
When the ratio of the frequency of the pressure variation to the natural frequency of the system is small, then the dynamic deflection is equal to the static deflection. To design a system with a high natural frequency, the mass of the piston, spring, stylus, and mechanical linkage must be small, but the stiffness of the spring must be high. The indicator is subjected to high temperatures and pressures and rapid oscillations, imposing a limitation on the reduction in mass. Too stiff a spring will result in a small displacement of the indicator piston and a record too small to measure with accuracy. Multiplication of the displacement will introduce mechanical ad dynamic errors.
The parameters of the problem for designing an accurate and trouble free recorder are such that there is no easy or simple solution. Studying the variety of indicators in the collection shows how different inventors made different compromises in their designs.
Location:
Currently not on view
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Mechanical and Civil Engineering
Indicators
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Visitor Tag(s):

Additional Online Media:

Trill Steam Engine Indicator

Physical Description:
brass (overall material)
wood (container material)
Measurements:
overall: 6 1/2 in x 11 1/2 in x 10 3/4 in; 16.51 cm x 29.21 cm x 27.305 cm
Object Name:
indicator, steam engine
Subject:
Engineering, Building, and Architecture
Industry & Manufacturing
Work
Indicators
Credit Line:
Gift from Estate of Kalman J. Dejuhasz, State College, Pennsylvania
ID Number:
1981.0217.09
Accession number:
1981.0217
Catalog number:
1981.0217.09
Description:
The Trill Indicator Co. manufactured this steam engine indicator, serial number 27. It consists of a brass piston; a brass cylinder, which is open at top; an external, double wound spring, which can be changed; a large drum with a spiral spring and a single record; and a short lead pencil as stylus. Accompanying the indicator is a box with six springs, two drum springs, two wrenches, and three turn cocks.
An engine indicator is an instrument for graphically recording the pressure versus piston displacement through an engine stroke cycle. Engineers use the resulting diagram to check the design and performance of the engine.
A mechanical indicator consists of a piston, spring, stylus, and recording system. The gas pressure of the cylinder deflects the piston and pushes against the spring, creating a linear relationship between the gas pressure and the deflection of the piston against the spring. The deflection is recorded by the stylus on a rotating drum that is connected to the piston. Most indicators incorporate a mechanical linkage to amplify the movement of the piston to increase the scale of the record.
When the ratio of the frequency of the pressure variation to the natural frequency of the system is small, then the dynamic deflection is equal to the static deflection. To design a system with a high natural frequency, the mass of the piston, spring, stylus, and mechanical linkage must be small, but the stiffness of the spring must be high. The indicator is subjected to high temperatures and pressures and rapid oscillations, imposing a limitation on the reduction in mass. Too stiff a spring will result in a small displacement of the indicator piston and a record too small to measure with accuracy. Multiplication of the displacement will introduce mechanical ad dynamic errors.
The parameters of the problem for designing an accurate and trouble free recorder are such that there is no easy or simple solution. Studying the variety of indicators in the collection shows how different inventors made different compromises in their designs.
Location:
Currently not on view
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Mechanical and Civil Engineering
Indicators
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Visitor Tag(s):

Additional Online Media:

Maihak Gas Engine Indicator

Physical Description:
wood (case material)
brass (overall material)
steel (overall material)
paper (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 4 5/8 in x 10 in x 9 3/8 in; 11.7475 cm x 25.4 cm x 23.8125 cm
Object Name:
indicator, gas engine
Subject:
Engineering, Building, and Architecture
Indicators
Credit Line:
Gift of Estate of Kalman J. Dejuhasz, State College, Pennsylvania
ID Number:
1981.0217.10
Accession number:
1981.0217
Catalog number:
1981.0217.10
Description:
This steel indicator, serial number S-37393, has a steel piston with a tapered cantilever socket. A small brass stylus can record a single cycle on paper wrapped around a small brass drum which is driven by string over a pulley. Accompanying the indicator is a box with three additional tapered cantilevers, two pads of paper, four scales, three wrenches, and a box of tiny parts.
An engine indicator is an instrument for graphically recording the pressure versus piston displacement through an engine stroke cycle. Engineers use the resulting diagram to check the design and performance of the engine.
A mechanical indicator consists of a piston, spring, stylus, and recording system. The gas pressure of the cylinder deflects the piston and pushes against the spring, creating a linear relationship between the gas pressure and the deflection of the piston against the spring. The deflection is recorded by the stylus on a rotating drum that is connected to the piston. Most indicators incorporate a mechanical linkage to amplify the movement of the piston to increase the scale of the record.
When the ratio of the frequency of the pressure variation to the natural frequency of the system is small, then the dynamic deflection is equal to the static deflection. To design a system with a high natural frequency, the mass of the piston, spring, stylus, and mechanical linkage must be small, but the stiffness of the spring must be high. The indicator is subjected to high temperatures and pressures and rapid oscillations, imposing a limitation on the reduction in mass. Too stiff a spring will result in a small displacement of the indicator piston and a record too small to measure with accuracy. Multiplication of the displacement will introduce mechanical ad dynamic errors.
The parameters of the problem for designing an accurate and trouble free recorder are such that there is no easy or simple solution. Studying the variety of indicators in the collection shows how different inventors made different compromises in their designs.
Location:
Currently not on view
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Mechanical and Civil Engineering
Indicators
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Visitor Tag(s):

Additional Online Media:

Lehmann & Michels Gas Engine Indicator

Physical Description:
wood (case material)
brass (overall material)
steel (overall material)
paper (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 5 1/4 in x 11 5/8 in x 10 7/8 in; 13.335 cm x 29.5275 cm x 27.6225 cm
Object Name:
indicator, gas engine
Subject:
Engineering, Building, and Architecture
Work
Industry & Manufacturing
Indicators
Credit Line:
Gift of estate of Kalman j. Dejuhasz, State College, Pennsylvania
ID Number:
1981.0217.11
Accession number:
1981.0217
Catalog number:
1981.0217.11
Description:
Lehmann & Michels manufactured this gas engine indicator in Germany. According to a card inside the box, this style of indicator was invented by Voelcker about 1928. It consists of a steel piston with one groove, a vented brass cylinder; an external, double wound spring, which can be changed; a small aluminum drum and single record. There is an additional device to turn the drum by a steel handle that is driven from the crank or cam shaft. Accompanying the indicator is a box with tools, one spring, extra parts, a pad of paper, and product literature.
An engine indicator is an instrument for graphically recording the pressure versus piston displacement through an engine stroke cycle. Engineers use the resulting diagram to check the design and performance of the engine.
A mechanical indicator consists of a piston, spring, stylus, and recording system. The gas pressure of the cylinder deflects the piston and pushes against the spring, creating a linear relationship between the gas pressure and the deflection of the piston against the spring. The deflection is recorded by the stylus on a rotating drum that is connected to the piston. Most indicators incorporate a mechanical linkage to amplify the movement of the piston to increase the scale of the record.
When the ratio of the frequency of the pressure variation to the natural frequency of the system is small, then the dynamic deflection is equal to the static deflection. To design a system with a high natural frequency, the mass of the piston, spring, stylus, and mechanical linkage must be small, but the stiffness of the spring must be high. The indicator is subjected to high temperatures and pressures and rapid oscillations, imposing a limitation on the reduction in mass. Too stiff a spring will result in a small displacement of the indicator piston and a record too small to measure with accuracy. Multiplication of the displacement will introduce mechanical ad dynamic errors.
The parameters of the problem for designing an accurate and trouble free recorder are such that there is no easy or simple solution. Studying the variety of indicators in the collection shows how different inventors made different compromises in their designs.
Location:
Currently not on view
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Mechanical and Civil Engineering
Indicators
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Visitor Tag(s):

Additional Online Media:

Steam Engine Indicator

Physical Description:
brass (overall material)
steel (overall material)
wood (container material)
Measurements:
overall: 5 in x 12 in x 9 in; 12.7 cm x 30.48 cm x 22.86 cm
Object Name:
indicator, steam engine
Subject:
Engineering, Building, and Architecture
Work
Industry & Manufacturing
Indicators
Credit Line:
Gift from Estate of Kalman J. Dejuhasz, State College, Pennsylvania
ID Number:
1981.0217.12
Accession number:
1981.0217
Catalog number:
1981.0217.12
Description:
This steam engine indicator consists of a steel piston with three grooves, which can be changed; a vented steel cylinder; an external, double wound spring, which can be changed; and a brass stylus. The drum assembly is missing. Accompanying the indicator is a box with two extra pistons and liners, seven extra springs, and one turn cock.
An engine indicator is an instrument for graphically recording the pressure versus piston displacement through an engine stroke cycle. Engineers use the resulting diagram to check the design and performance of the engine.
A mechanical indicator consists of a piston, spring, stylus, and recording system. The gas pressure of the cylinder deflects the piston and pushes against the spring, creating a linear relationship between the gas pressure and the deflection of the piston against the spring. The deflection is recorded by the stylus on a rotating drum that is connected to the piston. Most indicators incorporate a mechanical linkage to amplify the movement of the piston to increase the scale of the record.
When the ratio of the frequency of the pressure variation to the natural frequency of the system is small, then the dynamic deflection is equal to the static deflection. To design a system with a high natural frequency, the mass of the piston, spring, stylus, and mechanical linkage must be small, but the stiffness of the spring must be high. The indicator is subjected to high temperatures and pressures and rapid oscillations, imposing a limitation on the reduction in mass. Too stiff a spring will result in a small displacement of the indicator piston and a record too small to measure with accuracy. Multiplication of the displacement will introduce mechanical ad dynamic errors.
The parameters of the problem for designing an accurate and trouble free recorder are such that there is no easy or simple solution. Studying the variety of indicators in the collection shows how different inventors made different compromises in their designs.
Location:
Currently not on view
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Mechanical and Civil Engineering
Indicators
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Visitor Tag(s):

Additional Online Media:

Steam Engine Indicator

Physical Description:
wood (case material)
steel (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 4 3/4 in x 12 1/4 in x 8 1/2 in; 12.065 cm x 31.115 cm x 21.59 cm
Object Name:
indicator, steam engine
Subject:
Engineering, Building, and Architecture
Work
Industry & Manufacturing
Indicators
Credit Line:
Gift from Estate of Kalman J. Dejuhasz, State College, Pennsylvania
ID Number:
1981.0217.13
Accession number:
1981.0217
Catalog number:
1981.0217.13
Description:
This steam engine indicator consists of a steel piston with three grooves; a vented steel cylinder; an external, double wound spring, which can be changed; a small drum with a spiral spring and a single record; and a brass stylus. Accompanying the indicator is a box with an extra piston and line, fourteen extra springs, a wrench, and two small parts.
An engine indicator is an instrument for graphically recording the pressure versus piston displacement through an engine stroke cycle. Engineers use the resulting diagram to check the design and performance of the engine.
A mechanical indicator consists of a piston, spring, stylus, and recording system. The gas pressure of the cylinder deflects the piston and pushes against the spring, creating a linear relationship between the gas pressure and the deflection of the piston against the spring. The deflection is recorded by the stylus on a rotating drum that is connected to the piston. Most indicators incorporate a mechanical linkage to amplify the movement of the piston to increase the scale of the record.
When the ratio of the frequency of the pressure variation to the natural frequency of the system is small, then the dynamic deflection is equal to the static deflection. To design a system with a high natural frequency, the mass of the piston, spring, stylus, and mechanical linkage must be small, but the stiffness of the spring must be high. The indicator is subjected to high temperatures and pressures and rapid oscillations, imposing a limitation on the reduction in mass. Too stiff a spring will result in a small displacement of the indicator piston and a record too small to measure with accuracy. Multiplication of the displacement will introduce mechanical ad dynamic errors.
The parameters of the problem for designing an accurate and trouble free recorder are such that there is no easy or simple solution. Studying the variety of indicators in the collection shows how different inventors made different compromises in their designs.
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Work and Industry: Mechanical and Civil Engineering
Indicators
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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Gas Engine Indicator

Physical Description:
brass (overall material)
steel (overall material)
wood (container material)
Measurements:
overall: 5 1/8 in x 9 1/2 in x 8 in; 13.0175 cm x 24.13 cm x 20.32 cm
Object Name:
indicator, gas
indicator, gas engine
Subject:
Engineering, Building, and Architecture
Work
Industry & Manufacturing
Indicators
Credit Line:
Gift from Estate of Kalman J. Dejuhasz, State College, Pennsylvania
ID Number:
1981.0217.14
Accession number:
1981.0217
Catalog number:
1981.0217.14
Description:
This gas engine indicator consists of a small steel rod with no piston on the end; a steel cylinder with a loose fit with the piston; an external spring, which is missing; a large drum with a spiral spring and a single record; and a small brass stylus. Accompanying the indicator is a box with five springs.
An engine indicator is an instrument for graphically recording the pressure versus piston displacement through an engine stroke cycle. Engineers use the resulting diagram to check the design and performance of the engine.
A mechanical indicator consists of a piston, spring, stylus, and recording system. The gas pressure of the cylinder deflects the piston and pushes against the spring, creating a linear relationship between the gas pressure and the deflection of the piston against the spring. The deflection is recorded by the stylus on a rotating drum that is connected to the piston. Most indicators incorporate a mechanical linkage to amplify the movement of the piston to increase the scale of the record.
When the ratio of the frequency of the pressure variation to the natural frequency of the system is small, then the dynamic deflection is equal to the static deflection. To design a system with a high natural frequency, the mass of the piston, spring, stylus, and mechanical linkage must be small, but the stiffness of the spring must be high. The indicator is subjected to high temperatures and pressures and rapid oscillations, imposing a limitation on the reduction in mass. Too stiff a spring will result in a small displacement of the indicator piston and a record too small to measure with accuracy. Multiplication of the displacement will introduce mechanical ad dynamic errors.
The parameters of the problem for designing an accurate and trouble free recorder are such that there is no easy or simple solution. Studying the variety of indicators in the collection shows how different inventors made different compromises in their designs.
Location:
Currently not on view
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Work and Industry: Mechanical and Civil Engineering
Indicators
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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Dreyer, Rosenkranz & Droop Steam Engine Indicator

Measurements:
overall: 8 3/8 in x 6 1/4 in x 3 in; 21.2725 cm x 15.875 cm x 7.62 cm
Object Name:
indicator, steam engine
Subject:
Engineering, Building, and Architecture
Work
Industry & Manufacturing
Indicators
Credit Line:
Gift from Estate of Kalman J. Dejuhasz, state College, Pennsylvania
ID Number:
1981.0217.15
Accession number:
1981.0217
Catalog number:
1981.0217.15
Description:
Dreyer, Rosenkranz, & Droop manufactured this steam engine indicator, serial number 10633. It cannot be disassembled for inspection. The stylus is missing.
An engine indicator is an instrument for graphically recording the pressure versus piston displacement through an engine stroke cycle. Engineers use the resulting diagram to check the design and performance of the engine.
A mechanical indicator consists of a piston, spring, stylus, and recording system. The gas pressure of the cylinder deflects the piston and pushes against the spring, creating a linear relationship between the gas pressure and the deflection of the piston against the spring. The deflection is recorded by the stylus on a rotating drum that is connected to the piston. Most indicators incorporate a mechanical linkage to amplify the movement of the piston to increase the scale of the record.
When the ratio of the frequency of the pressure variation to the natural frequency of the system is small, then the dynamic deflection is equal to the static deflection. To design a system with a high natural frequency, the mass of the piston, spring, stylus, and mechanical linkage must be small, but the stiffness of the spring must be high. The indicator is subjected to high temperatures and pressures and rapid oscillations, imposing a limitation on the reduction in mass. Too stiff a spring will result in a small displacement of the indicator piston and a record too small to measure with accuracy. Multiplication of the displacement will introduce mechanical ad dynamic errors.
The parameters of the problem for designing an accurate and trouble free recorder are such that there is no easy or simple solution. Studying the variety of indicators in the collection shows how different inventors made different compromises in their designs.
Location:
Currently not on view
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Mechanical and Civil Engineering
Indicators
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Visitor Tag(s):

McNaught Steam Engine Indicator

Physical Description:
wood (case material)
brass (overall material)
steel (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 4 1/2 in x 16 3/4 in x 9 5/8 in; 11.43 cm x 42.545 cm x 24.4475 cm
Object Name:
indicator, steam engine
Subject:
Engineering, Building, and Architecture
Work
Industry & Manufacturing
Indicators
Credit Line:
Gift of Estate of Kalman J. Dejuhasz, State College, Pennsylvania
ID Number:
1981.0217.16
Accession number:
1981.0217
Catalog number:
1981.0217.16
Description:
Novelty Iron Works manufactured this McNaught steam engine indicator. It consists of a brass piston and cylinder with a long steel spring above a pencil holder in the tube. It takes a direct reading with no linkage on a large drum. Accompanying the indicator is a box with four turn cocks and a brass wrench. The brass tube contains a spring, which may not be part of this indicator. The connector on the bottom has the wrong thread to fit the indicator. The pulley is missing.
An engine indicator is an instrument for graphically recording the pressure versus piston displacement through an engine stroke cycle. Engineers use the resulting diagram to check the design and performance of the engine.
A mechanical indicator consists of a piston, spring, stylus, and recording system. The gas pressure of the cylinder deflects the piston and pushes against the spring, creating a linear relationship between the gas pressure and the deflection of the piston against the spring. The deflection is recorded by the stylus on a rotating drum that is connected to the piston. Most indicators incorporate a mechanical linkage to amplify the movement of the piston to increase the scale of the record.
When the ratio of the frequency of the pressure variation to the natural frequency of the system is small, then the dynamic deflection is equal to the static deflection. To design a system with a high natural frequency, the mass of the piston, spring, stylus, and mechanical linkage must be small, but the stiffness of the spring must be high. The indicator is subjected to high temperatures and pressures and rapid oscillations, imposing a limitation on the reduction in mass. Too stiff a spring will result in a small displacement of the indicator piston and a record too small to measure with accuracy. Multiplication of the displacement will introduce mechanical ad dynamic errors.
The parameters of the problem for designing an accurate and trouble free recorder are such that there is no easy or simple solution. Studying the variety of indicators in the collection shows how different inventors made different compromises in their designs.
Location:
Currently not on view
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Mechanical and Civil Engineering
Indicators
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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Crosby Steam Engine Indicator

Physical Description:
steel (overall material)
brass (overall material)
wood (container material)
Measurements:
overall: 4 3/4 in x 12 in x 9 3/4 in; 12.065 cm x 30.48 cm x 24.765 cm
Object Name:
indicator, steam engine
Subject:
Engineering, Building, and Architecture
Work
Industry & Manufacturing
Indicators
Credit Line:
Gift of Estate of Kalman J. Dejuhasz, State College, Pennsylvania
ID Number:
1981.0217.17
Accession number:
1981.0217
Catalog number:
1981.0217.17
Description:
Crosby Steam Gauge & Valve Co. of Boston, Massachusetts, manufactured this steam engine indicator, serial number 6163D. It consists of a steel piston with one groove; a vented brass cylinder; an external, double wound spring; a large drum with a spiral spring and a single record; and a pencil lead stylus. Accompanying the indicator is a box with a wrench, a number of pulleys for reduction gear, and a bracket with pivot on end.
An engine indicator is an instrument for graphically recording the pressure versus piston displacement through an engine stroke cycle. Engineers use the resulting diagram to check the design and performance of the engine.
A mechanical indicator consists of a piston, spring, stylus, and recording system. The gas pressure of the cylinder deflects the piston and pushes against the spring, creating a linear relationship between the gas pressure and the deflection of the piston against the spring. The deflection is recorded by the stylus on a rotating drum that is connected to the piston. Most indicators incorporate a mechanical linkage to amplify the movement of the piston to increase the scale of the record.
When the ratio of the frequency of the pressure variation to the natural frequency of the system is small, then the dynamic deflection is equal to the static deflection. To design a system with a high natural frequency, the mass of the piston, spring, stylus, and mechanical linkage must be small, but the stiffness of the spring must be high. The indicator is subjected to high temperatures and pressures and rapid oscillations, imposing a limitation on the reduction in mass. Too stiff a spring will result in a small displacement of the indicator piston and a record too small to measure with accuracy. Multiplication of the displacement will introduce mechanical ad dynamic errors.
The parameters of the problem for designing an accurate and trouble free recorder are such that there is no easy or simple solution. Studying the variety of indicators in the collection shows how different inventors made different compromises in their designs.
Location:
Currently not on view
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Mechanical and Civil Engineering
Indicators
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Visitor Tag(s):

Shimadzu Photo Recorder

Physical Description:
glass (overall material)
steel (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 5 5/8 in x 13 in x 8 3/8 in; 14.2875 cm x 33.02 cm x 21.2725 cm
Object Name:
indicator, steam engine
Subject:
Engineering, Building, and Architecture
Work
Industry & Manufacturing
Indicators
Credit Line:
Gift From Estate of Kalman J. Dejuhasz, State College, Pennsylvania
ID Number:
1981.0217.18
Accession number:
1981.0217
Catalog number:
1981.0217.18
Description:
Shimadzu manufactured this gas engine indicator. It is a photographic recorder with a four sided mirror for shutter and a drive with pulley and belt to an external motor. A sensing element is enclosed, but no description is available. Accompanying the indicator is a box with a wrench, two film holders and two cans of Kodak exposed film, extra film holder and mirror assembly. Additionally, there are two tool steel parts with short, knife edges, which are probably parts of the sensing element.
An engine indicator is an instrument for graphically recording the pressure versus piston displacement through an engine stroke cycle. Engineers use the resulting diagram to check the design and performance of the engine.
A mechanical indicator consists of a piston, spring, stylus, and recording system. The gas pressure of the cylinder deflects the piston and pushes against the spring, creating a linear relationship between the gas pressure and the deflection of the piston against the spring. The deflection is recorded by the stylus on a rotating drum that is connected to the piston. Most indicators incorporate a mechanical linkage to amplify the movement of the piston to increase the scale of the record.
When the ratio of the frequency of the pressure variation to the natural frequency of the system is small, then the dynamic deflection is equal to the static deflection. To design a system with a high natural frequency, the mass of the piston, spring, stylus, and mechanical linkage must be small, but the stiffness of the spring must be high. The indicator is subjected to high temperatures and pressures and rapid oscillations, imposing a limitation on the reduction in mass. Too stiff a spring will result in a small displacement of the indicator piston and a record too small to measure with accuracy. Multiplication of the displacement will introduce mechanical ad dynamic errors.
The parameters of the problem for designing an accurate and trouble free recorder are such that there is no easy or simple solution. Studying the variety of indicators in the collection shows how different inventors made different compromises in their designs.
Location:
Currently not on view
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Mechanical and Civil Engineering
Indicators
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Visitor Tag(s):

Lehmann & Michels Gas Engine Indicator

Measurements:
overall - case: 3 1/2 in x 8 5/8 in x 9 3/4 in; 8.89 cm x 21.9075 cm x 24.765 cm
Object Name:
indicator, gas engine
Subject:
Engineering, Building, and Architecture
Work
Industry & Manufacturing
Indicators
Credit Line:
Gift of the Estate of Kalman J. Dejuhasz, State College, Pennsylvania
ID Number:
1981.0217.19
Accession number:
1981.0217
Catalog number:
1981.0217.19
Description:
Lehmann & Michels manufactured this gas engine indicator, serial number D. R. P. 416623. It is based on patent number 1532692, which was granted to Josef Geiger of Augsburg, Germany, on April 7, 1925.
The L & M catalog describes this instrument as a Pi-Meter and instrument to measure the mean pressure. There is no record, pointer, or dial. Most likely, it contains a heavy fly wheel that is damped, an impulse of gas pressure each cycle does work on fly wheel, and the work determines the velocity which is transcribed into a mean pressure for each stroke of the piston.
An engine indicator is an instrument for graphically recording the pressure versus piston displacement through an engine stroke cycle. Engineers use the resulting diagram to check the design and performance of the engine.
A mechanical indicator consists of a piston, spring, stylus, and recording system. The gas pressure of the cylinder deflects the piston and pushes against the spring, creating a linear relationship between the gas pressure and the deflection of the piston against the spring. The deflection is recorded by the stylus on a rotating drum that is connected to the piston. Most indicators incorporate a mechanical linkage to amplify the movement of the piston to increase the scale of the record.
When the ratio of the frequency of the pressure variation to the natural frequency of the system is small, then the dynamic deflection is equal to the static deflection. To design a system with a high natural frequency, the mass of the piston, spring, stylus, and mechanical linkage must be small, but the stiffness of the spring must be high. The indicator is subjected to high temperatures and pressures and rapid oscillations, imposing a limitation on the reduction in mass. Too stiff a spring will result in a small displacement of the indicator piston and a record too small to measure with accuracy. Multiplication of the displacement will introduce mechanical ad dynamic errors.
The parameters of the problem for designing an accurate and trouble free recorder are such that there is no easy or simple solution. Studying the variety of indicators in the collection shows how different inventors made different compromises in their designs.
Location:
Currently not on view
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Mechanical and Civil Engineering
Indicators
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Visitor Tag(s):

Askania Battery Operated Indicator

Physical Description:
wood (case material)
Measurements:
overall: 4 3/8 in x 10 1/2 in x 6 5/8 in; 11.1125 cm x 26.67 cm x 16.8275 cm
Object Name:
indicator, continuous recorder
Subject:
Engineering, Building, and Architecture
Work
Industry & Manufacturing
Indicators
Credit Line:
Gift from Estate of Kalman J. Dejuhasz, State College, Pennsylvania
ID Number:
1981.0217.20
Accession number:
1981.0217
Catalog number:
1981.0217.20
Description:
Askania Werk A. G. manufactured this low pressure air indicator. It has a battery operated continuous recorder. The record is made with a metal stylus on a red waxed paper one inch in width. A small device separate from the recorder is evidently the sensing element. There is a simple mechanical multiplication of the movement. The accompanying box contains several rolls of the red wax record paper.
An engine indicator is an instrument for graphically recording the pressure versus piston displacement through an engine stroke cycle. Engineers use the resulting diagram to check the design and performance of the engine.
A mechanical indicator consists of a piston, spring, stylus, and recording system. The gas pressure of the cylinder deflects the piston and pushes against the spring, creating a linear relationship between the gas pressure and the deflection of the piston against the spring. The deflection is recorded by the stylus on a rotating drum that is connected to the piston. Most indicators incorporate a mechanical linkage to amplify the movement of the piston to increase the scale of the record.
When the ratio of the frequency of the pressure variation to the natural frequency of the system is small, then the dynamic deflection is equal to the static deflection. To design a system with a high natural frequency, the mass of the piston, spring, stylus, and mechanical linkage must be small, but the stiffness of the spring must be high. The indicator is subjected to high temperatures and pressures and rapid oscillations, imposing a limitation on the reduction in mass. Too stiff a spring will result in a small displacement of the indicator piston and a record too small to measure with accuracy. Multiplication of the displacement will introduce mechanical ad dynamic errors.
The parameters of the problem for designing an accurate and trouble free recorder are such that there is no easy or simple solution. Studying the variety of indicators in the collection shows how different inventors made different compromises in their designs.
Location:
Currently not on view
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Mechanical and Civil Engineering
Indicators
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Visitor Tag(s):

Additional Online Media:

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