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Footed Paperweight

view Footed Paperweight digital asset number 1
Maker:
unknown
Physical Description:
glass (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 4 1/16 in x 2 13/16 in; 10.287 cm x 7.112 cm
Object Name:
paperweight
paperweight, footed
Place made:
Česká Republika: Bohemia
Date made:
1800s
Description (Brief):
In the 1700s, paperweights made from textured stone or bronze were part of the writer’s tool kit, which also included a quill pen and stand, inkpot, and blotter. By the mid-1800s, decorative paperweights produced by glassmakers in Europe and the United States became highly desired collectibles.
Decorative glass paperweights reflected the 19th-century taste for intricate, over-the-top designs. Until the spread of textiles colorized with synthetic dyes, ceramics and glass were among the few objects that added brilliant color to a 19th-century Victorian interior. The popularity of these paperweights in the 1800s testifies to the sustained cultural interest in hand craftsmanship during an age of rapid industrialization.
This glass footed paperweight features silhouette canes and stands on a star-cut base with thirty two rays, and was likely made in Bohemia.
There may have been as many as 600 active glassworks in Bohemia, the area now known primarily as the Czech Republic, by 1835. The earliest evidence of paperweights made in the area dates to 1886. Bohemian paperweights are known for their bright colors.
Location:
Currently not on view
Credit Line:
Mrs. Florence E. Bushee
ID Number:
CE*65.462
Catalog number:
65.462
Accession number:
264964
Collector/donor number:
78
See more items in:
Home and Community Life: Ceramics and Glass
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Paperweights
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Clichy Paperweight

view Clichy Paperweight digital asset number 1
Maker:
Clichy
Physical Description:
glass, transparent (overall material)
millifiori (joint piece production method/technique)
Measurements:
overall: 2 1/16 in x 3 1/16 in; 5.23875 cm x 7.77875 cm
Object Name:
paperweight
Date made:
1845-1850
Description (Brief):
In the 1700s, paperweights made from textured stone or bronze were part of the writer’s tool kit, which also included a quill pen and stand, inkpot, and blotter. By the mid-1800s, decorative paperweights produced by glassmakers in Europe and the United States became highly desired collectibles.
Decorative glass paperweights reflected the 19th-century taste for intricate, over-the-top designs. Until the spread of textiles colorized with synthetic dyes, ceramics and glass were among the few objects that added brilliant color to a 19th-century Victorian interior. The popularity of these paperweights in the 1800s testifies to the sustained cultural interest in hand craftsmanship during an age of rapid industrialization.
The French firm, Verrerie de Clichy, began operation after merging with another local glassworks in 1837. The height of paperweight production at the firm was 1846 to 1857.
Pentagon-shaped rows of millefiori, are imbedded in an opaque white ground in this Clichy paperweight. Millefiore paperweights, first manufactured in Venice, consist of sections from rods of colored glass encased in a clear, colorless sphere. By the mid-nineteenth century, glass factories elsewhere in Europe were emulating the millefiore style.
Location:
Currently not on view
Credit Line:
Aaron and Lillie Straus
ID Number:
CE*60.25
Catalog number:
60.25
Accession number:
211475
See more items in:
Home and Community Life: Ceramics and Glass
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Paperweights
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Clichy Paperweight

view Clichy Paperweight digital asset number 1
Maker:
Clichy
Physical Description:
glass, transparent (overall material)
cut (joint piece production method/technique)
millifiori (joint piece production method/technique)
Measurements:
overall: 1 15/16 in x 2 13/16 in; 4.9276 cm x 7.112 cm
Object Name:
paperweight
Date made:
1845-1870
Description (Brief):
In the 1700s, paperweights made from textured stone or bronze were part of the writer’s tool kit, which also included a quill pen and stand, inkpot, and blotter. By the mid-1800s, decorative paperweights produced by glassmakers in Europe and the United States became highly desired collectibles.
Decorative glass paperweights reflected the 19th-century taste for intricate, over-the-top designs. Until the spread of textiles colorized with synthetic dyes, ceramics and glass were among the few objects that added brilliant color to a 19th-century Victorian interior. The popularity of these paperweights in the 1800s testifies to the sustained cultural interest in hand craftsmanship during an age of rapid industrialization.
The French firm, Verrerie de Clichy, began operation after merging with another local glassworks in 1837. The height of paperweight production at the firm was 1846 to 1857.
This faceted Clichy paperweight features concentric millefiori surrounding a central white and red Rose cane, and turquoise and white staves (flattened rods). Millefiore paperweights, first manufactured in Venice, consist of sections from rods of colored glass encased in a clear, colorless sphere. By the mid-nineteenth century, glass factories elsewhere in Europe were emulating the millefiore style.
Location:
Currently not on view
Credit Line:
Mrs. Florence E. Bushee
ID Number:
CE*66.33
Catalog number:
66.33
Accession number:
268356
Collector/donor number:
70
See more items in:
Home and Community Life: Ceramics and Glass
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Paperweights
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Baccarat Paperweight

view Baccarat Paperweight digital asset number 1
Maker:
Baccarat
Physical Description:
glass, transparent (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 1 7/8 in x 2 13/16 in; 4.7625 cm x 7.112 cm
Object Name:
paperweight, footed
paperweight
Place made:
France: Lorraine, Baccarat
Date made:
1845-1850
Description (Brief):
In the 1700s, paperweights made from textured stone or bronze were part of the writer’s tool kit, which also included a quill pen and stand, inkpot, and blotter. By the mid-1800s, decorative paperweights produced by glassmakers in Europe and the United States became highly desired collectibles.
Decorative glass paperweights reflected the 19th-century taste for intricate, over-the-top designs. Until the spread of textiles colorized with synthetic dyes, ceramics and glass were among the few objects that added brilliant color to a 19th-century Victorian interior. The popularity of these paperweights in the 1800s testifies to the sustained cultural interest in hand craftsmanship during an age of rapid industrialization.
The French firm, Baccarat, was originally founded as the Verrerie Renaut in 1764, by request of the Bishop of Metz to the King of France, Louis XV. After the French Revolution, the company was re-named Verrerie de Baccarat. Peak production of Baccarat paperweights was between 1846 and1855.
This Baccarat glass paperweight features a Clematis with three red flowers and a star-cut base.
Location:
Currently not on view
Credit Line:
Mrs. Florence E. Bushee
ID Number:
CE*66.43
Catalog number:
66.43
Collector/donor number:
167
Accession number:
268356
See more items in:
Home and Community Life: Ceramics and Glass
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Paperweights
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Clichy Paperweight

view Clichy Paperweight digital asset number 1
Maker:
Clichy
Physical Description:
glass, transparent (overall material)
millifiori (joint piece production method/technique)
Measurements:
overall: 3 3/32 in; 7.874 cm
Object Name:
paperweight
Place made:
France: Île-de-France, Clichy-la-Garenne
Date made:
1845-1850
Description (Brief):
In the 1700s, paperweights made from textured stone or bronze were part of the writer’s tool kit, which also included a quill pen and stand, inkpot, and blotter. By the mid-1800s, decorative paperweights produced by glassmakers in Europe and the United States became highly desired collectibles.
Decorative glass paperweights reflected the 19th-century taste for intricate, over-the-top designs. Until the spread of textiles colorized with synthetic dyes, ceramics and glass were among the few objects that added brilliant color to a 19th-century Victorian interior. The popularity of these paperweights in the 1800s testifies to the sustained cultural interest in hand craftsmanship during an age of rapid industrialization.
The French firm, Verrerie de Clichy, began operation after merging with another local glassworks in 1837. The height of paperweight production at the firm was 1846 to 1857.
This Clichy paperweight features concentric rings of millefiori and a “C” signature cane. Millefiore paperweights, first manufactured in Venice, consist of sections from rods of colored glass encased in a clear, colorless sphere. By the mid-nineteenth century, glass factories elsewhere in Europe were emulating the millefiore style.
Location:
Currently not on view
Credit Line:
Mrs. Florence E. Bushee
ID Number:
CE*66.74
Catalog number:
66.74
Collector/donor number:
174
Accession number:
268356
See more items in:
Home and Community Life: Ceramics and Glass
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Paperweights
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Baccarat Paperweight

view Baccarat Paperweight digital asset number 1
Maker:
Baccarat
Physical Description:
glass, transparent (overall material)
millifiori (joint piece production method/technique)
Measurements:
overall: 2 in x 3 1/8 in; 5.08 cm x 7.9375 cm
Object Name:
paperweight
Place made:
France: Lorraine, Baccarat
Date made:
1845-1850
Description (Brief):
In the 1700s, paperweights made from textured stone or bronze were part of the writer’s tool kit, which also included a quill pen and stand, inkpot, and blotter. By the mid-1800s, decorative paperweights produced by glassmakers in Europe and the United States became highly desired collectibles.
Decorative glass paperweights reflected the 19th-century taste for intricate, over-the-top designs. Until the spread of textiles colorized with synthetic dyes, ceramics and glass were among the few objects that added brilliant color to a 19th-century Victorian interior. The popularity of these paperweights in the 1800s testifies to the sustained cultural interest in hand craftsmanship during an age of rapid industrialization.
The French firm, Baccarat, was originally founded as the Verrerie Renaut in 1764, by request of the Bishop of Metz to the King of France, Louis XV. After the French Revolution, the company was re-named Verrerie de Baccarat. Peak production of Baccarat paperweights was between 1846 and1855.
This Baccarat glass paperweight features patterned millefiori (colored glass canes) and an arrow head cane, and has a star-cut base.
Location:
Currently not on view
Credit Line:
Aaron and Lillie Straus
ID Number:
CE*60.17
Catalog number:
60.17
Accession number:
211475
See more items in:
Home and Community Life: Ceramics and Glass
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Paperweights
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Clichy Paperweight

view Clichy Paperweight digital asset number 1
Maker:
Clichy
Physical Description:
glass, transparent (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 2 1/16 in x 3 in; 5.23875 cm x 7.62 cm
Object Name:
paperweight
Place made:
France: Île-de-France, Clichy-la-Garenne
Date made:
1845-1850
Description (Brief):
In the 1700s, paperweights made from textured stone or bronze were part of the writer’s tool kit, which also included a quill pen and stand, inkpot, and blotter. By the mid-1800s, decorative paperweights produced by glassmakers in Europe and the United States became highly desired collectibles.
Decorative glass paperweights reflected the 19th-century taste for intricate, over-the-top designs. Until the spread of textiles colorized with synthetic dyes, ceramics and glass were among the few objects that added brilliant color to a 19th-century Victorian interior. The popularity of these paperweights in the 1800s testifies to the sustained cultural interest in hand craftsmanship during an age of rapid industrialization.
The French firm, Verrerie de Clichy, began operation after merging with another local glassworks in 1837. The height of paperweight production at the firm was 1846 to 1857.
This rare, unrecorded Clichy glass paperweight has a five-petal white flower with a yellow center suspended in a clear ball.
Location:
Currently not on view
Credit Line:
Mrs. Florence E. Bushee
ID Number:
CE*65.463
Catalog number:
65.463
Accession number:
264964
Collector/donor number:
80
See more items in:
Home and Community Life: Ceramics and Glass
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Paperweights
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Clichy Paperweight

view Clichy Paperweight digital asset number 1
Maker:
Clichy
Physical Description:
glass (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 2 1/16 in x 2 13/16 in; 5.23875 cm x 7.112 cm
Object Name:
paperweight
Date made:
1845-1850
Description (Brief):
In the 1700s, paperweights made from textured stone or bronze were part of the writer’s tool kit, which also included a quill pen and stand, inkpot, and blotter. By the mid-1800s, decorative paperweights produced by glassmakers in Europe and the United States became highly desired collectibles.
Decorative glass paperweights reflected the 19th-century taste for intricate, over-the-top designs. Until the spread of textiles colorized with synthetic dyes, ceramics and glass were among the few objects that added brilliant color to a 19th-century Victorian interior. The popularity of these paperweights in the 1800s testifies to the sustained cultural interest in hand craftsmanship during an age of rapid industrialization.
The French firm, Verrerie de Clichy, began operation after merging with another local glassworks in 1837. The height of paperweight production at the firm was 1846 to 1857.
A deep moss-green background sets off the large center pink and green Rose cane and the multi-colored pastry mold canes (millefiori canes that flare at the base) on this Clichy paperweight.
Location:
Currently not on view
Credit Line:
Mrs. Florence E. Bushee
ID Number:
CE*65.468
Catalog number:
65.468
Collector/donor number:
98
Accession number:
264964
See more items in:
Home and Community Life: Ceramics and Glass
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Paperweights
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Clichy Paperweight

view Clichy Paperweight digital asset number 1
Maker:
Clichy
Physical Description:
glass (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 1 3/4 in x 2 21/32 in; 4.445 cm x 6.731 cm
Object Name:
paperweight
Date made:
1845-1850
Description (Brief):
In the 1700s, paperweights made from textured stone or bronze were part of the writer’s tool kit, which also included a quill pen and stand, inkpot, and blotter. By the mid-1800s, decorative paperweights produced by glassmakers in Europe and the United States became highly desired collectibles.
Decorative glass paperweights reflected the 19th-century taste for intricate, over-the-top designs. Until the spread of textiles colorized with synthetic dyes, ceramics and glass were among the few objects that added brilliant color to a 19th-century Victorian interior. The popularity of these paperweights in the 1800s testifies to the sustained cultural interest in hand craftsmanship during an age of rapid industrialization.
The French firm, Verrerie de Clichy, began operation after merging with another local glassworks in 1837. The height of paperweight production at the firm was 1846 to 1857.
A large white and green Rose is surrounded by interlacing swags of canes on a bright red ground on this large Clichy paperweight.
Location:
Currently not on view
Credit Line:
Mrs. Florence E. Bushee
ID Number:
CE*65.472
Catalog number:
65.472
Accession number:
264964
Collector/donor number:
110
See more items in:
Home and Community Life: Ceramics and Glass
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Paperweights
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Clichy Paperweight

view Clichy Paperweight digital asset number 1
Maker:
Clichy
Physical Description:
glass, transparent (overall material)
millifiori (joint piece production method/technique)
Measurements:
overall: 2 7/16 in x 3 3/32 in; 6.19125 cm x 7.874 cm
Object Name:
paperweight
Place made:
France: Île-de-France, Clichy-la-Garenne
Date made:
1845-1850
Description (Brief):
In the 1700s, paperweights made from textured stone or bronze were part of the writer’s tool kit, which also included a quill pen and stand, inkpot, and blotter. By the mid-1800s, decorative paperweights produced by glassmakers in Europe and the United States became highly desired collectibles.
Decorative glass paperweights reflected the 19th-century taste for intricate, over-the-top designs. Until the spread of textiles colorized with synthetic dyes, ceramics and glass were among the few objects that added brilliant color to a 19th-century Victorian interior. The popularity of these paperweights in the 1800s testifies to the sustained cultural interest in hand craftsmanship during an age of rapid industrialization.
The French firm, Verrerie de Clichy, began operation after merging with another local glassworks in 1837. The height of paperweight production at the firm was 1846 to 1857.
This Clichy glass paperweight contains closely packed multi-color canes with two pink-and-white, and four green-and-white Rose canes.
Location:
Currently not on view
Credit Line:
Mrs. Florence E. Bushee
ID Number:
CE*65.483
Catalog number:
65.483
Accession number:
264964
Collector/donor number:
128
See more items in:
Home and Community Life: Ceramics and Glass
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Paperweights
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Clichy Paperweight

view Clichy Paperweight digital asset number 1
Maker:
Clichy
Physical Description:
glass, transparent (overall material)
air-trapped (joint piece production method/technique)
Measurements:
overall: 2 in x 3 3/16 in; 5.08 cm x 8.128 cm
Object Name:
paperweight
Date made:
1845-1850
Description (Brief):
In the 1700s, paperweights made from textured stone or bronze were part of the writer’s tool kit, which also included a quill pen and stand, inkpot, and blotter. By the mid-1800s, decorative paperweights produced by glassmakers in Europe and the United States became highly desired collectibles.
Decorative glass paperweights reflected the 19th-century taste for intricate, over-the-top designs. Until the spread of textiles colorized with synthetic dyes, ceramics and glass were among the few objects that added brilliant color to a 19th-century Victorian interior. The popularity of these paperweights in the 1800s testifies to the sustained cultural interest in hand craftsmanship during an age of rapid industrialization.
The French firm, Verrerie de Clichy, began operation after merging with another local glassworks in 1837. The height of paperweight production at the firm was 1846 to 1857.
Red and white swirls emanate from a central pink Rose cane in this Clichy glass paperweight.
Location:
Currently not on view
Credit Line:
Mrs. Florence E. Bushee
ID Number:
CE*65.487
Catalog number:
65.487
Accession number:
264964
Collector/donor number:
45
See more items in:
Home and Community Life: Ceramics and Glass
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Paperweights
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Clichy Paperweight

view Clichy Paperweight digital asset number 1
Maker:
Clichy
Physical Description:
glass (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 2 3/16 in; 5.588 cm
Object Name:
paperweight
Date made:
1845-1850
Description (Brief):
In the 1700s, paperweights made from textured stone or bronze were part of the writer’s tool kit, which also included a quill pen and stand, inkpot, and blotter. By the mid-1800s, decorative paperweights produced by glassmakers in Europe and the United States became highly desired collectibles.
Decorative glass paperweights reflected the 19th-century taste for intricate, over-the-top designs. Until the spread of textiles colorized with synthetic dyes, ceramics and glass were among the few objects that added brilliant color to a 19th-century Victorian interior. The popularity of these paperweights in the 1800s testifies to the sustained cultural interest in hand craftsmanship during an age of rapid industrialization.
The French firm, Verrerie de Clichy, began operation after merging with another local glassworks in 1837. The height of paperweight production at the firm was 1846 to 1857.
A purple and yellow Pansy decorates this clear glass Clichy paperweight.
Location:
Currently not on view
Credit Line:
Mrs. Florence E. Bushee
ID Number:
CE*65.496
Catalog number:
65.496
Accession number:
264964
See more items in:
Home and Community Life: Ceramics and Glass
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Paperweights
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Clichy Paperweight

view Clichy Paperweight digital asset number 1
Maker:
Clichy
Physical Description:
glass, transparent (overall material)
millifiori (joint piece production method/technique)
Measurements:
overall: 1 3/4 in x 2 21/32 in; 4.445 cm x 6.731 cm
Object Name:
paperweight
Place made:
France: Île-de-France, Clichy-la-Garenne
Date made:
1845-1850
Description (Brief):
In the 1700s, paperweights made from textured stone or bronze were part of the writer’s tool kit, which also included a quill pen and stand, inkpot, and blotter. By the mid-1800s, decorative paperweights produced by glassmakers in Europe and the United States became highly desired collectibles.
Decorative glass paperweights reflected the 19th-century taste for intricate, over-the-top designs. Until the spread of textiles colorized with synthetic dyes, ceramics and glass were among the few objects that added brilliant color to a 19th-century Victorian interior. The popularity of these paperweights in the 1800s testifies to the sustained cultural interest in hand craftsmanship during an age of rapid industrialization.
The French firm, Verrerie de Clichy, began operation after merging with another local glassworks in 1837. The height of paperweight production at the firm was 1846 to 1857.
Pink and green, green and white, and yellow rose canes, and a “C” signature cane over a latticinio (latticework) ground decorate this Clichy glass paperweight.
Location:
Currently not on view
Credit Line:
Mrs. Florence E. Bushee
ID Number:
CE*66.11
Catalog number:
66.11
Collector/donor number:
176
Accession number:
268356
See more items in:
Home and Community Life: Ceramics and Glass
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Paperweights
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Baccarat Paperweight

view Baccarat Paperweight digital asset number 1
Maker:
Baccarat
Physical Description:
glass, transparent (overall material)
cut (joint piece production method/technique)
Measurements:
overall: 1 3/4 in x 2 3/4 in; 4.445 cm x 6.985 cm
Object Name:
paperweight
Place made:
France: Lorraine, Baccarat
Date made:
1845-1850
Description (Brief):
In the 1700s, paperweights made from textured stone or bronze were part of the writer’s tool kit, which also included a quill pen and stand, inkpot, and blotter. By the mid-1800s, decorative paperweights produced by glassmakers in Europe and the United States became highly desired collectibles.
Decorative glass paperweights reflected the 19th-century taste for intricate, over-the-top designs. Until the spread of textiles colorized with synthetic dyes, ceramics and glass were among the few objects that added brilliant color to a 19th-century Victorian interior. The popularity of these paperweights in the 1800s testifies to the sustained cultural interest in hand craftsmanship during an age of rapid industrialization.
The French firm, Baccarat, was originally founded as the Verrerie Renaut in 1764, by request of the Bishop of Metz to the King of France, Louis XV. After the French Revolution, the company was re-named Verrerie de Baccarat. Peak production of Baccarat paperweights was between 1846 and1855.
This faceted Baccarat glass paperweight features a yellow, white, and red Buttercup or Columbine and has a deep star-cut base.
Location:
Currently not on view
Credit Line:
Mrs. Florence E. Bushee
ID Number:
CE*66.12
Catalog number:
66.12
Accession number:
268356
Collector/donor number:
184
See more items in:
Home and Community Life: Ceramics and Glass
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Paperweights
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Clichy Paperweight

view Clichy Paperweight digital asset number 1
Maker:
Clichy
Physical Description:
glass (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 1 5/8 in x 2 19/32 in; 4.1275 cm x 6.604 cm
Object Name:
paperweight
Date made:
1845-1850
Description (Brief):
In the 1700s, paperweights made from textured stone or bronze were part of the writer’s tool kit, which also included a quill pen and stand, inkpot, and blotter. By the mid-1800s, decorative paperweights produced by glassmakers in Europe and the United States became highly desired collectibles.
Decorative glass paperweights reflected the 19th-century taste for intricate, over-the-top designs. Until the spread of textiles colorized with synthetic dyes, ceramics and glass were among the few objects that added brilliant color to a 19th-century Victorian interior. The popularity of these paperweights in the 1800s testifies to the sustained cultural interest in hand craftsmanship during an age of rapid industrialization.
The French firm, Verrerie de Clichy, began operation after merging with another local glassworks in 1837. The height of paperweight production at the firm was 1846 to 1857.
Turquoise and white glass ribbons thread around the Rose and “C” signature cane on this Clichy paperweight.
Location:
Currently not on view
Credit Line:
Mrs. Florence E. Bushee
ID Number:
CE*66.14
Catalog number:
66.14
Collector/donor number:
164
Accession number:
268356
See more items in:
Home and Community Life: Ceramics and Glass
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Paperweights
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Baccarat Paperweight

view Baccarat Paperweight digital asset number 1
Maker:
Baccarat
Physical Description:
glass, transparent (overall material)
cut (joint piece production method/technique)
Measurements:
overall: 1 3/4 in x 2 7/8 in; 4.445 cm x 7.3025 cm
Object Name:
paperweight
Place made:
France: Lorraine, Baccarat
Date made:
1845-1850
Description (Brief):
In the 1700s, paperweights made from textured stone or bronze were part of the writer’s tool kit, which also included a quill pen and stand, inkpot, and blotter. By the mid-1800s, decorative paperweights produced by glassmakers in Europe and the United States became highly desired collectibles.
Decorative glass paperweights reflected the 19th-century taste for intricate, over-the-top designs. Until the spread of textiles colorized with synthetic dyes, ceramics and glass were among the few objects that added brilliant color to a 19th-century Victorian interior. The popularity of these paperweights in the 1800s testifies to the sustained cultural interest in hand craftsmanship during an age of rapid industrialization.
The French firm, Baccarat, was originally founded as the Verrerie Renaut in 1764, by request of the Bishop of Metz to the King of France, Louis XV. After the French Revolution, the company was re-named Verrerie de Baccarat. Peak production of Baccarat paperweights was between 1846 and1855.
Bright red Gentians highlight this star-cut base Baccarat paperweight.
Location:
Currently not on view
Credit Line:
Mrs. Florence E. Bushee
ID Number:
CE*66.16
Catalog number:
66.16
Accession number:
268356
Collector/donor number:
166
See more items in:
Home and Community Life: Ceramics and Glass
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Paperweights
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Clichy Paperweight

view Clichy Paperweight digital asset number 1
Maker:
Clichy
Physical Description:
cut (joint piece production method/technique)
millifiori (joint piece production method/technique)
glass, transparent (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 2 1/4 in x 3 in; 5.715 cm x 7.62 cm
Object Name:
paperweight
Place made:
France: Île-de-France, Clichy-la-Garenne
Date made:
1845-1850
Description (Brief):
In the 1700s, paperweights made from textured stone or bronze were part of the writer’s tool kit, which also included a quill pen and stand, inkpot, and blotter. By the mid-1800s, decorative paperweights produced by glassmakers in Europe and the United States became highly desired collectibles.
Decorative glass paperweights reflected the 19th-century taste for intricate, over-the-top designs. Until the spread of textiles colorized with synthetic dyes, ceramics and glass were among the few objects that added brilliant color to a 19th-century Victorian interior. The popularity of these paperweights in the 1800s testifies to the sustained cultural interest in hand craftsmanship during an age of rapid industrialization.
The French firm, Verrerie de Clichy, began operation after merging with another local glassworks in 1837. The height of paperweight production at the firm was 1846 to 1857.
Interlacing multi-colored garlands on a deep cobalt blue background decorate this faceted Clichy glass paperweight.
Location:
Currently not on view
Credit Line:
Mrs. Florence E. Bushee
ID Number:
CE*66.20
Catalog number:
66.20
Collector/donor number:
126
Accession number:
268356
See more items in:
Home and Community Life: Ceramics and Glass
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Paperweights
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Baccarat Paperweight

view Baccarat Paperweight digital asset number 1
Maker:
Baccarat
Physical Description:
glass, transparent (overall material)
cut (joint piece production method/technique)
Measurements:
overall: 2 1/16 in x 2 29/32 in; 5.23875 cm x 7.366 cm
Object Name:
paperweight
Place made:
France: Lorraine, Baccarat
Date made:
1845-1850
Description (Brief):
In the 1700s, paperweights made from textured stone or bronze were part of the writer’s tool kit, which also included a quill pen and stand, inkpot, and blotter. By the mid-1800s, decorative paperweights produced by glassmakers in Europe and the United States became highly desired collectibles.
Decorative glass paperweights reflected the 19th-century taste for intricate, over-the-top designs. Until the spread of textiles colorized with synthetic dyes, ceramics and glass were among the few objects that added brilliant color to a 19th-century Victorian interior. The popularity of these paperweights in the 1800s testifies to the sustained cultural interest in hand craftsmanship during an age of rapid industrialization.
The French firm, Baccarat, was originally founded as the Verrerie Renaut in 1764, by request of the Bishop of Metz to the King of France, Louis XV. After the French Revolution, the company was re-named Verrerie de Baccarat. Peak production of Baccarat paperweights was between 1846 and1855.
This Baccarat glass paperweight features a red and white Primrose with deep green leaves and a star-cut base.
Location:
Currently not on view
Credit Line:
Mrs. Florence E. Bushee
ID Number:
CE*66.21
Catalog number:
66.21
Collector/donor number:
15
Accession number:
268356
See more items in:
Home and Community Life: Ceramics and Glass
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Paperweights
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Clichy Paperweight

view Clichy Paperweight digital asset number 1
Maker:
Clichy
Physical Description:
glass, transparent (overall material)
millifiori (joint piece production method/technique)
Measurements:
overall: 1 9/16 in x 2 21/32 in; 3.96875 cm x 6.731 cm
Object Name:
paperweight
Place made:
France: Île-de-France, Clichy-la-Garenne
Date made:
1845-1850
Description (Brief):
In the 1700s, paperweights made from textured stone or bronze were part of the writer’s tool kit, which also included a quill pen and stand, inkpot, and blotter. By the mid-1800s, decorative paperweights produced by glassmakers in Europe and the United States became highly desired collectibles.
Decorative glass paperweights reflected the 19th-century taste for intricate, over-the-top designs. Until the spread of textiles colorized with synthetic dyes, ceramics and glass were among the few objects that added brilliant color to a 19th-century Victorian interior. The popularity of these paperweights in the 1800s testifies to the sustained cultural interest in hand craftsmanship during an age of rapid industrialization.
The French firm, Verrerie de Clichy, began operation after merging with another local glassworks in 1837. The height of paperweight production at the firm was 1846 to 1857.
Interlacing garlands surround a central pink and green Rose cane in this Clichy paperweight.
Location:
Currently not on view
Credit Line:
Mrs. Florence E. Bushee
ID Number:
CE*66.29
Catalog number:
66.29
Collector/donor number:
141
Accession number:
268356
See more items in:
Home and Community Life: Ceramics and Glass
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Paperweights
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Baccarat Paperweight

view Baccarat Paperweight digital asset number 1
Maker:
Baccarat
Physical Description:
glass, transparent (overall material)
millifiori (joint piece production method/technique)
Measurements:
overall: 1 7/8 in x 2 21/32 in; 4.7625 cm x 6.731 cm
Object Name:
paperweight
Place made:
France: Lorraine, Baccarat
Date made:
1847-1848
Description (Brief):
In the 1700s, paperweights made from textured stone or bronze were part of the writer’s tool kit, which also included a quill pen and stand, inkpot, and blotter. By the mid-1800s, decorative paperweights produced by glassmakers in Europe and the United States became highly desired collectibles.
Decorative glass paperweights reflected the 19th-century taste for intricate, over-the-top designs. Until the spread of textiles colorized with synthetic dyes, ceramics and glass were among the few objects that added brilliant color to a 19th-century Victorian interior. The popularity of these paperweights in the 1800s testifies to the sustained cultural interest in hand craftsmanship during an age of rapid industrialization.
The French firm, Baccarat, was originally founded as the Verrerie Renaut in 1764, by request of the Bishop of Metz to the King of France, Louis XV. After the French Revolution, the company was re-named Verrerie de Baccarat. Peak production of Baccarat paperweights was between 1846 and1855.
This Baccarat glass paperweight features a “Gridel” silhouette cane (said to be named after a young boy whose cut paper silhouettes inspired Baccarat’s glass workers), and “1847” and “1848” date canes.
Location:
Currently not on view
Credit Line:
Mrs. Florence E. Bushee
ID Number:
CE*67.224
Catalog number:
67.224
Accession number:
213138
See more items in:
Home and Community Life: Ceramics and Glass
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Paperweights
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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